book review on looking for alaska

Common Sense Media

Movie & TV reviews for parents

  • For Parents
  • For Educators
  • Our Work and Impact

Or browse by category:

  • Get the app
  • Movie Reviews
  • Best Movie Lists
  • Best Movies on Netflix, Disney+, and More

Common Sense Selections for Movies

book review on looking for alaska

50 Modern Movies All Kids Should Watch Before They're 12

book review on looking for alaska

  • Best TV Lists
  • Best TV Shows on Netflix, Disney+, and More
  • Common Sense Selections for TV
  • Video Reviews of TV Shows

book review on looking for alaska

Best Kids' Shows on Disney+

book review on looking for alaska

Best Kids' TV Shows on Netflix

  • Book Reviews
  • Best Book Lists
  • Common Sense Selections for Books

book review on looking for alaska

8 Tips for Getting Kids Hooked on Books

book review on looking for alaska

50 Books All Kids Should Read Before They're 12

  • Game Reviews
  • Best Game Lists

Common Sense Selections for Games

  • Video Reviews of Games

book review on looking for alaska

Nintendo Switch Games for Family Fun

book review on looking for alaska

  • Podcast Reviews
  • Best Podcast Lists

Common Sense Selections for Podcasts

book review on looking for alaska

Parents' Guide to Podcasts

book review on looking for alaska

  • App Reviews
  • Best App Lists

book review on looking for alaska

Social Networking for Teens

book review on looking for alaska

Gun-Free Action Game Apps

book review on looking for alaska

Reviews for AI Apps and Tools

  • YouTube Channel Reviews
  • YouTube Kids Channels by Topic

book review on looking for alaska

Parents' Ultimate Guide to YouTube Kids

book review on looking for alaska

YouTube Kids Channels for Gamers

  • Preschoolers (2-4)
  • Little Kids (5-7)
  • Big Kids (8-9)
  • Pre-Teens (10-12)
  • Teens (13+)
  • Screen Time
  • Social Media
  • Online Safety
  • Identity and Community

book review on looking for alaska

Real-Life Heroes on YouTube for Tweens and Teens

  • Family Tech Planners
  • Digital Skills
  • All Articles
  • Latino Culture
  • Black Voices
  • Asian Stories
  • Native Narratives
  • LGBTQ+ Pride
  • Best of Diverse Representation List

book review on looking for alaska

Celebrating Black History Month

book review on looking for alaska

Movies and TV Shows with Arab Leads

book review on looking for alaska

Celebrate Hip-Hop's 50th Anniversary

Looking for alaska, common sense media reviewers.

book review on looking for alaska

Teens process tragic loss in thought-provoking novel.

Looking for Alaska Poster Image

A Lot or a Little?

What you will—and won't—find in this book.

This book is on many school reading lists; teacher

Looking for Alaska will give older teens a lot to

Even though the main characters often behave badly

A fatal car wreck, a possible suicide, and a chara

Most of the teen characters have lost their virgin

Occasional strong language, including "ass," "s--t

Fast food restaurants, soda brands mentioned.

Lots of underage drinking, fake IDs, drunkenness a

Parents need to know that John Green's Looking for Alaska won the Michael J. Printz Award and many other literary awards. It's the story of a group of fun-loving, rule-breaking teens who are rocked by a tragedy and must process the grief and loss. There's lots of sex (descriptions of heavy kissing,…

Educational Value

This book is on many school reading lists; teachers interested in adding it to their curriculum can find a thorough discussion guide on the publisher's website. Teachers and parents can use Green's novel as a way to talk about big issues, such as loss and growing up, or explore the book's literary language or unusual structure to talk about the art of writing.

Positive Messages

Looking for Alaska will give older teens a lot to think about, most obviously about loss and what it means to journey into a "Great Perhaps." When it comes to guilt and grief, it's important to forgive not only others but also ourselves. People deal with loss and responsibility in different ways.

Positive Role Models

Even though the main characters often behave badly, readers will respond to the realistic teens here who come together to face a devastating loss. Also, every adult is warm, caring, and intelligent: The parents, the teachers, the local cop -- even the requisite rigid disciplinarian who enforces the rules at school is not clueless, has a sense of humor, and cares deeply about the students.

Violence & Scariness

A fatal car wreck, a possible suicide, and a character has gruesome dreams about the wreck and its aftermath. Cruel pranks are played on Miles and the other characters as well that often result in plans for revenge.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Violence & Scariness in your kid's entertainment guide.

Sex, Romance & Nudity

Most of the teen characters have lost their virginity, and there are some descriptions of heavy kissing, oral sex, groping, references to masturbation, erections, making out, watching pornography, etc. Author John Green has described the frank sex scene as "wholly unerotic," especially in contrast to the book's next more intimate (but less graphic) encounter.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Sex, Romance & Nudity in your kid's entertainment guide.

Occasional strong language, including "ass," "s--t," and f--k," in realistic teen dialogue.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Language in your kid's entertainment guide.

Products & Purchases

Drinking, drugs & smoking.

Lots of underage drinking, fake IDs, drunkenness and hangovers, drunk driving, etc., but it's alcohol is not glamorized. Nor is the constant smoking or references to marijuana.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Drinking, Drugs & Smoking in your kid's entertainment guide.

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that John Green's Looking for Alaska won the Michael J. Printz Award and many other literary awards. It's the story of a group of fun-loving, rule-breaking teens who are rocked by a tragedy and must process the grief and loss. There's lots of sex (descriptions of heavy kissing, oral sex, groping, references to masturbation, erections, making out, watching pornography), drinking, strong language (including "s--t" and f--k"), and smoking, including of marijuana, but nothing is gratuitous or glamorized. It all illuminates character and theme. This award-winning book is considered a modern classic and is on many high school reading lists. It can help both teachers and parents talk about loss, friendship, and the importance of self-discovery.

Where to Read

Community reviews.

  • Parents say (46)
  • Kids say (207)

Based on 46 parent reviews

Everyone should read this!

It's really not as shocking as people think it is, what's the story.

In LOOKING FOR ALASKA, Miles, tired of his friendless, dull life in Florida, convinces his parents to send him away to boarding school in Alabama so that he can seek "the Great Perhaps." There he meets his roommate and soon-to-be best friend, Chip, called the Colonel, and Alaska Young, the moody, gorgeous, wild girl who instantly becomes the object of his lust. Miles is quickly enlisted in their war against the Weekday Warriors, the rich kids who go home every weekend, and they bond over elaborate pranks, studying, and assorted rule-breaking. About halfway through the book a tragedy occurs, and those left spend the rest of the book trying to make sense of it, to solve the mystery it leaves behind, and to pull off one last, greatest-ever prank.

Is It Any Good?

This coming-of-age novel is gorgeously written, passionate, hilarious, moving, thought-provoking, character-driven, and literary. It deserves all the awards it's won. The characters may often behave badly, but they are vividly real, complex, and beautifully drawn -- and their stories can help readers start dealing with some big topics, like self-discovery and loss. Looking for Alaska is a hard one to put down. Since new chapters don't start on new pages, there's always a temptation to read just a little bit further. For the first half at least, readers will be grinning all the way -- and in the end, they will be moved, maybe even to tears.

Talk to Your Kids About ...

Families can talk about the mature content iin Looking for Alaska, including a frank sex scene. Do you think including it was essential to the story? What does it tell readers about the characters?

What does Miles mean when he goes off to boarding school in search of what 16th-century French author Francois Rabelais called "the Great Perhaps"? Do we all need to go on a similar search to discover ourselves?

Why do you think Looking for Alaska has often turned up on the American Library Association's Most Frequently Challenged book list? Why do you think it remains so popular with teens years after it was originally published?

Book Details

  • Author : John Green
  • Genre : Coming of Age
  • Topics : Friendship , High School
  • Book type : Fiction
  • Publisher : Dutton Children's Books
  • Publication date : February 5, 2006
  • Number of pages : 221
  • Last updated : March 3, 2020

Did we miss something on diversity?

Research shows a connection between kids' healthy self-esteem and positive portrayals in media. That's why we've added a new "Diverse Representations" section to our reviews that will be rolling out on an ongoing basis. You can help us help kids by suggesting a diversity update.

Suggest an Update

Our editors recommend.

Tales of the Madman Underground: An Historical Romance 1973 Poster Image

Tales of the Madman Underground: An Historical Romance 1973

Want personalized picks for your kids' age and interests?

Monstrumologist

Going Bovine Poster Image

Going Bovine

Teen romance novels, movies based on books, related topics.

  • High School

Want suggestions based on your streaming services? Get personalized recommendations

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

  • International edition
  • Australia edition
  • Europe edition

Looking for Alaska by John Green - review

John Green's The Fault in Our Stars was what won me over. He was different, fresh and knew how to put a new spin on books based on teenage life without landing them straight in the cliché category. His debut novel, Looking For Alaska, is a showcase to the raw talent John Green has, the kind of talent that can make you close the crisp last page of a novel and come out as a different person.

Looking For Alaska cannot be merely written off as a typical boy-meets-girl love story, because it isn't. It's more of a tale of how love isn't as translucent as it seems.

Miles Halter or "Pudge" as he is referred to throughout the book, is the protagonist, and the book starts with Miles leaving Florida to attend a school in Alabama. He's introduced by his roommates to beautiful, mysterious and emotionally confused Alaska Young, and the story progresses, mostly centered around Miles' life at Culver Creek and his growing attachment to Alaska. There are also essential parts of teenage life thrown in casually and skillfully to the story, such as pranks, bets and disastrous parties.

The beauty of the book is that it doesn't hide anything. It showcases what young love and growing up really are in a brutal and honest light. How the characters communicate, their relationships with each other, their pasts and the pleasure that comes with being a bad kid shine through the pages. Why I prefer John Green's debut novel to his other ones is because he's made no effort to make it an appropriate and proper book. You might not weep buckets like most people did at the end of The Fault in Our Stars, but you'll get attached to Miles and Alaska, just as they do to each other.

Want to tell the world about a book you've read? Join the site and send us your review!

  • Children and teenagers
  • Friendship books for children and teens
  • Teen romance books for childrens and teens
  • children's user reviews

Most viewed

  • On Eating Alone: Hello, Table For One, Please?
  • On Self-Care Driven By Products: Buy Them Bathsalts, Candles, And Yoga Mats
  • On Social Media (also OTT and Headspace): What’s At The Bottom Of The 2-Hour Scroll?
  • On Quiet: Shhh
  • On Writing: Come, Let’s Make Sense Of The World
  • On Serendipity: The Magic Of Bougainvilleas
  • On Ignorance Of Conventional Emotional Achievements: Cheers To Emotional Normality
  • On Attention: How Many Social Approvals Are There In My Post?
  • On Honeymoon Periods: Ugh, How Could I Have Ignored This Earlier?
  • On Life’s Big Questions: Why Can’t I Eat Maggie For Dinner Every Day?
  • On Loneliness & Solitude: Shut The Door As You Leave, Please
  • On Resting: Chill, babe
  • On Uncertainty: Um, What If?
  • Sorrow And Bliss by Meg Mason Book Review: Suffering A Miscellaneous Disease
  • Big Magic By Elizabeth Gilbert Book Review: How To Conquer Creativity
  • The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini Book Review: A Tale Of Twisted Friendship
  • Essentialism by Greg McKeown Book Review: How Much Is Too Much On Your To-Do List?
  • Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert Book Review: Is Worth All The Hate?
  • From Rags To Riches: How To Get Filthy Rich In Rising Asia by Mohsin Hamid Book Review
  • Book Review: A Room Of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf
  • March Sisters: Little Women by Louisa May Alcott Book Review
  • Confessions from Kitty: The Diary Of A Young Girl by Anne Frank
  • Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte Book Review: It’s Not A Love Story You Want To Live
  • Book Review: The Psychology Of Money by Morgan Housel
  • Wild By Cheryl Strayed Book Review: Where Can You Find Yourself?
  • Slouching Towards Bethlehem By Joan Didion: Book Review
  • Book Review: Maybe You Should Talk To Someone By Lori Gottlieb
  • The Bell Jar By Sylvia Plath Book Summary: An Autobiographical Insight Into Depression And Emptiness
  • Down And Out In Paris And London By George Orwell: Book Review & Summary
  • 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami: Book Review
  • A Thousand Splendid Suns By Khaled Hosseini – Book Summary: A Story Of Female Friendship And Sacrifice
  • The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri – Book Review: The Intimacy of the Political and Personal
  • Book Review – Tiny Beautiful Things by Cheryl Strayed: What is this ‘life’ thing, sis?
  • Cancer Perks And Genie Wishes: The Fault In Our Stars By John Green – Book Review
  • Emma by Jane Austen Book Review: The Power Of Unlikable Characters

Looking for Alaska By John Green Book Review: What Is The Way Out Of The Labyrinth?

  • My Year of Rest and Relaxation Review: Sleeping Your Way To Enlightenment
  • The Bluest Eye Review: The Paws Of Conventional Beauty And Internalized Racism
  • Tuesdays with Morrie Review: Lessons When Death Awaits
  • December 4, 2020 March 16, 2021

book review on looking for alaska

The story in Looking for Alaska is set in a time when everyone is building their self-image, identity, dreams, and love lives – high school. John Green introduces us to Miles Halter, who is the unreliable narrator of this story (But, as you know, the story revolves around our heroine, Alaska) He remembers the last words of famous people – that is his ‘thing’. And unlike Francois Rabelais, whose last words are ‘ I go to seek a Great Perhaps ‘, he does not want to wait till the end of his life to see his Great Perhaps. 

So he goes to Culver Creek – a boarding school like every other boarding school. There is cigarettes, truth & dare, pranks, parents who are cool, parents who don’t get it, the warden (The Eagle, as we know him), and the students in two rival groups (Weekday Warriors and those who stay 24*7 in the school).  

One particular line that I loved about the Weekday Warriors: “ They love their hair because they’re not smart enough to love something more interesting .” The pleasures of hating in teenage envy are apparent.  

The relatability is why the story works. 

At Culver Creek, our narrator, Miles, turns into Pudge, a nickname his roommate, Chip (or as he is called, The Colonel) gives him. Pudge quickly becomes a part of Colonel’s group consisting of Takumi, a Japanese kid with a Southern accent, and Alaska, who is the “ hottest girl in all of human history ”. Miles is new to the Alabama sun, the hostel, and the women. 

The reader is introduced to the heroine of our story, Alaska Young. As a character, she is predictable. I would go as far as to say that she is typical. She is moody, spontaneous, secretive, bookish, feminist, has a tough past. She is flirty, dreamy, and unavailable. The only detail that I absolutely adored about her was the fact that she had named herself when she was young. 

As it is clear, I wasn’t particularly fond of Alaska. Like Miles himself, I only saw parts of her, liked only certain aspects of her personality, and did not seem to “get” the whole package. But I like unlikeable characters in a book. I like being made uncomfortable about still empathizing with them, still understanding them. That is exactly what Looking for Alaska does. In her own words, “ You never get me, that’s the whole point. ”

‘Looking for Alaska’ becomes more than just a teen drama when Alaska dies. I was a fan of the narrative when the big story-turn happens in the middle (The separation of Before and After ) because, usually, these big turns are safely taken either at the end of the novel or right upfront at the beginning. 

Everyone ponders Alaska’s death, including the readers. Everyone ponders about her assignment topic question about what truly is the labyrinth and what is the way out: “ That’s the mystery, isn’t it? Is the labyrinth living or dying? Which is he trying to escape- the world or the end of it?” These words of Simon Bolivar are Alaska’s final questions to Pudge and to us. 

And Pudge answers it. All the readers get a Crash Course (see what I did there?) on Eastern Religion and the answers it provides. He gets an epiphany at Takumi’s confession, which is as truthful as it is heartbreaking, “ If only we could see the endless string of consequences that result from our smallest actions. But we can’t know better until knowing better is useless “. They could not know better. They wish they did. The irony is consistent and sits well. Pudge will never know Alaska’s last words. He will never know if she chose to end her life or if it was an accident that they could’ve avoided. He will have to sit with these questions and the uncertainty of everything all his life. 

But the only way out of the labyrinth is to forgive. And Alaska would’ve forgiven them. 

But the Easter Religion epiphany, although impactful, was quick, shallow, and exotic. Another thing that never added up was why Jake, Alaska’s boyfriend, wasn’t at her funeral. It doesn’t make sense. 

Looking for Alaska has also been criticized for only being made for a teen mind – when everything is big, everyone wants to seem smart & worldly, all decisions are impulsive & irrational. It can come off as many years far behind to someone older. But that is what literature is supposed to do: make you feel like a teenager again, make you nostalgic for all of your dumb decisions, make you remember all of the things that seemed big then (and maybe they were big, you know?). 

For me, John Green entices that feeling perfectly. His literature (and videos) stay with me for days on end. I forget the plot, the characters, the narrative, but the emotions stay with me. The meaning stays with me. The questions stay with me. On sudden random cloudy Wednesday afternoons, I dwell on the sentences of John Green. Take one, for instance, “ Imagining the future is kind of like living in a nostalgia ” – actually spoken by Green’s wife . 

In Looking For Alaska, I felt the angst, the frustration, the joys, the worries, the amusements, and the being of being a teenager. By the end, I felt as if someone (someone being John Green’s writing) had poked a hole in my heart. 

I usually hate books and movies that end with questions. I detest unreliable narrators like Miles Halter. But this book has made me sit with the big questions , taught me to be comfortable with having them with me all along. 

Because I still don’t know my way out of the labyrinth. 

Find this book on Amazon here .

PS: Big thanks to Prakhar for gifting me this book. 

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

  • Old School Wednesdays
  • SFF in Conversation
  • Women To Read
  • X Marks The Story
  • Trash and Treasure
  • Decoding the Newbery
  • COOKING FOR WIZARDS, WARRIORS AND DRAGONS

Book Review: Looking for Alaska by John Green

Title: Looking for Alaska

Author: John Green

Genre: Contemporary YA

Publisher: Speak/ HarperCollins Children’sBooks (UK) Publication date: March 2005/ July 2006 (UK) Paperback: 272 pages

Stand alone or series: Stand alone

book review on looking for alaska

First drink, first prank, first friend, first girl, last words! A poignant and moving crossover novel about making friends and growing up from American author, John Green. Miles Halter is fascinated by famous last words — and tired of his safe, boring and rather lonely life at home. He leaves for boarding school filled with cautious optimism, to seek what the dying poet Francois Rabelais called the “Great Perhaps.” Much awaits Miles at Culver Creek, including Alaska Young. Clever, funny, screwed-up, and dead sexy, Alaska will pull Miles into her labyrinth and catapult him into the Great Perhaps. Looking for Alaska brilliantly chronicles the indelible impact one life can have on another.

Why did I read the book: John Green is right now, one of my favorite writers.

How did I get the book: Bought.

I don’t know how to write this review. I don’t think I was really prepared for this book even though I read all of John Green’s books; ironically, I read this one last, but this is actually his first and all I have to say about this is: REALLY? This is John Green’s first book? Holy $£%^! Expletives aside, I was expecting something I didn’t get, but what I got was so much better. This is probably his most serious and thoughtful book which is to say a lot, because all of his books are to some extent, serious and thoughtful. It is also a painful book to read but I didn’t know how much until the halfway mark when BAM, surprise, surprise and this is partly what makes this review a difficult one to write because Looking for Alaska is a book that can’t be spoiled and I therefore, can’t discuss some parts of the story the way I would have wanted – but I believe this is for the Ultimate Good because this is a Wonderful Book!

Are these Grandiose Exclamations with Capital Letters really a necessity, you might be asking yourself, to wit, I say, yes, yes they are and they are actually quite fitting as well, given as how this book deals with the meaning of life, with guilt and grief, with last words and first loves; all from the point of view of Miles Halter, 16 year old, a skinny, nerdy guy. He is friendless, lonely, and his greatest quirk is to read biographies in search of last words. François Rabelais’s is:

“I go to seek a Great Perhaps.” and is in search of his Great Perhaps that Miles decides to attend the Culver Creek Boarding School where he hopes to start anew. There he makes friends with his roommate Chip, aka “the Colonel” (who immediately starts calling Miles, Pudge) , a guy named Takumi and their best friend, a girl called Alaska Young. Alaska is the wild, beautiful, intelligent, moody, mysterious, unattainable girl whom Miles falls irrevocably in love with.

The book is divided between Before and After and I did not know (for a change I went in completely unspoiled) what is going to be the pivotal point of divide until it hits but there is an inescapable sense of dread as the days pass, building the After. The event is indeed calamitous and it’s only when it happens that the different between the Before and After becomes oh, so clear. The Before is made up of routine, of monotony, of mundane happenings: kids going to classes, coming up with pranks, drinking, smoking, doing stupid things, hooking up and talking to each other about Stuff like Simón Bolívar’s last words:

‘How will I ever get out of this labyrinth!” So what’s the labyrinth?’ I asked her… That’s the mystery, isn’t it? Is the labyrinth living or dying? Which is he trying to escape- the world or the end of it?”

This “labyrinth” becomes a central discussion encompassing all characters at one point, when the After comes. That’s when the book loses the mundane and reaches the momentous. And it is a grave, serious, painful and genuine journey until we are able to close the book.

I loved Miles because I recognised quite a bit of my teenage self in him. This sense of knowing exactly how certain things are and feel is definitely a plus when trying to understand a character. Even though Alaska is not a favourite (Too moody? Too mysterious? Too fantastic? ) , I can certainly get why Miles would fall in love with her so easily and so abruptly because I know how some people have a certain gravitational field that entrance others. But in any case, I don’t think that the book is about Alaska any more than Paper Towns was about Margo Roth Spiegelman. The girls are mirrors or windows from which to observe the boy-narrator’s lives and this is perhaps my greatest criticisms: that the girls are more out of this world, impossible realities that serve more as plot-propeller than concrete characters in themselves. I am sure some will disagree with me, but this is how I felt about both Margo Roth Spiegelman and Alaska Young and to some extent I feel these girls deserved more. BUT and this is a great but, as I said before the books ARE more about how these two influence and touch the guys’ lives so my point might as well be moot.

John Green’s prose is insanely good writing because it is the kind of writing that creeps in little by little and it’s like I start reading a paragraph and it seems like any regular paragraph in the world of books, until I reach its end and then it hits me and I realise that there is more beauty in one single paragraph of a John Green book than in entire book collections out there.

But what makes John Green’s books wonderful books to me is the fact that I think about them, about the decisions and revelations and lines for hours and days in a row. Sometimes, I forget the name of the characters, sometimes, I forget the details of the stories, but I have yet to forget the ideas and the meaning and the feelings that I felt when I read his books. I remember laughing until my belly ached with An Abundance of Katherines or daydreaming about connectivity after reading Paper Towns and I am sure I will keep on thinking about the last words of this book for a long, long time.

At one point, Miles thinks (with regards to Alaska):

So I walked back to my room and collapsed on the bottom bunk, thinking that if people were rain, I was drizzle and she was a hurricane.

And I think this is an apt way of describing John Green’s books as well. Most books are drizzle but John Green’s are totally hurricanes.

Notable Quotes/Parts: Some wonderful quotes from the book:

What the hell is instant? Nothing is instant. Instant rice takes five minutes, instant pudding an hour. I doubt that an instant of blinding pain feels particularly instantaneous.
We were kissing. I thought: This is good. I thought: I am not bad at this kissing. Not bad at all. I thought: I am clearly the greatest kisser in the history of the universe. Suddenly she laughed and pulled away from me. She wiggled a hand out of her sleeping bag and wiped her face. “You slobbered on my nose,” she said, and laughed.

Additional Thoughts:I have the honour and the pleasure to say that tomorrow we will post an article written by John Green for our blog on the inspirations and ideas behind writing Paper Towns and, courtesy of Bloosmbury PLC, we will have 15 copies of that book to giveaway. Make sure to come back tomorrow!

Verdict: Looking for Alaska is another fantastic John Green book and that means that there is a lot of food for thought, a great narrator, and the usual, great writing that I have come to expect from this author.

Rating: 8 – Excellent

Reading Next: Seth Baumgartner’s Love Manifesto by Eric Luper

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

' src=

Ana Grilo is a Brazilian who moved to the UK because of the weather. No, seriously. She works with translations in RL and hopes one day The Book Smugglers will be her day job. When she’s not here at The Book Smugglers, she is hogging our Twitter feed.

20 Comments

' src=

I have always wanted one John Green’s books and it will be awesome if I get one.

' src=

This was also my last (as in ‘latest’) John Green, and the one that I loved most unreservedly. I hadn’t realized that it was his first, in which case, *agog* Also, it shattered my grumpy little heart.

' src=

i’m so unbelievably happy that you loved this book as much as i did.

' src=

You already know how I feel about the guy and his books.

But I read this one after I read (and loved) AN ABUNDANCE OF KATHERINES and it still blew me away. I mean, wow. I loved it so much. Can’t read the end without tearing up. In a very good way.

' src=

I have to agree with you on this one. John Green has a way of building a story that seems so ordinary but the end result is infuriatingly brilliant.

Looking for Alaska is a wonderful novel. I’m happy to see a positive review.

' src=

One of my all time favorite books. ^.^ Brilliant

' src=

lisa (the little reader)

i just finished reading this, my first John Greene, novel last month and still haven’t managed to write a review for it. i don’t even know where to begin. i did enjoy it, but not in a pleasant way, and i think that’s where i’ve had a hard time with it. i’ll get there, but your review really did hit a lot of it square on the head.

' src=

I have had this book on my radar for a long time. I believe my library has it and will be in my next library loot! Thanks for reminding me to read it!!!! 😀

' src=

Tyler_Hendu

I really loved this book until alaska had to die!!! 😡 😡

' src=

this book no has review of chapters 🙁

' src=

Chastine Denise Perkins

I read Looking for alaska my sophmore year in high school and now i have a copy that is falling apart on me. I absoulutly love to read it. john green uses so much imagery and symbolism. there are things hidden between the pages that i find more wonderful each time i read it. there is a lesson to be learned from alaska and pudge, life is a mystery and can end at any second so live you life to the fullest cause it can change in a blink. 😯

Looking for Alaska: Therein Lies the Paradox | Hardcovers and Heroines

[…] Book Smuggler Review […]

' src=

http://lorxiebookreviews.blogspot.com/2012/05/looking-for-alaska-by-john-green.html i love JOHN GREEN

Looking for Alaska by John Green « The Lemon-Squash Book Club

[…] To read The Examiner’s review of Looking for Alaska, click here.  And read The Book Smugglers review here. […]

Looking for Alaska by John Green | wrapped up in books

[…] The Book Smugglers: ”The girls are mirrors or windows from which to observe the boy-narrator’s lives and this is perhaps my greatest criticisms: that the girls are more out of this world, impossible realities that serve more as plot-propeller than concrete characters in themselves…John Green’s prose is insanely good writing because it is the kind of writing that creeps in little by little.” […]

Looking for Alaska (2005)? by John Green « The Lemon-Squash Book Club

[…] Examiner’s review of Looking for Alaska, click here. And read The Book Smugglers ?review here. ? Extras Check out below to see John Green’s video regarding the controversy over Looking […]

' src=

I liked the book too – I remember reading the quote ‘I go to seek a great perhaps’ somewhere on the internet and never knew that I would end up buying this book. My thoughts on the book: http://www.booksandalotmore.com/2017/06/26/death-looking-alaska-john-green/

' src=

yurbookstore

Wowww…I finally read the book after reading your Review.Thank you so much.. 🙂 Here have a look at the other Book’s of John Green Here: https://goo.gl/NqLuqw

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed .

Follow @booksmugglers on Instagram

Ftc disclaimer.

The Book Smugglers purchase books for review on this site, but also receive free review copies from authors, publishers, and other third parties.

Notice: All forms on this website are temporarily down for maintenance. You will not be able to complete a form to request information or a resource. We apologize for any inconvenience and will reactivate the forms as soon as possible.

book review on looking for alaska

Book Review

Looking for alaska.

  • Coming-of-Age

book review on looking for alaska

Readability Age Range

  • Dutton Children's Books, an imprint of Penguin Young Reader's Group
  • 2006 Michael L. Printz Award and an ALA Best Books for Young Adults

Year Published

Looking for Alaska by John Green has been reviewed by Focus on the Family’s marriage and parenting magazine .

Plot Summary

Miles (Pudge) Halter goes to boarding school in search of the “great perhaps,” — a phrase attributed to French humanist Francois Rabelais about discovering the possibilities of life beyond the present — along with his new classmates Chip (the Colonel) Martin, Takumi and beautiful but troubled Alaska. Alaska spends most of her free time drinking, smoking and musing. She is legendary for instigating pranks against the school’s rich kids and leadership. But one night after a prank and a drinking binge with Pudge and the gang, Alaska crashes her car and dies. Alaska’s friends spend the rest of the book trying to piece together the events of that night, to forgive themselves for not stopping her and to understand what really happens to someone after death.

Christian Beliefs

While Dr. Hyde, the aging world religions teacher, doesn’t provide false information about Christ and Christianity, he gives a textbook presentation, empty of any discussion about Christ’s power to restore broken lives. He also places Christianity on a level playing field with Islam and Buddhism. When Pudge’s school competes against a Christian school’s basketball team, the Christians do a “hellfire” cheer, and Pudge and friends yell out faith-mocking comments from the bleachers.

Other Belief Systems

Pudge and friends study Buddhism and Islam alongside Christianity in their world religions class.

Authority Roles

Pudge’s parents support his desire to attend boarding school. His father (an alumnus of the school) even helps him pull a prank on the faculty. Mr. Starnes (the dean of students, known to Pudge’s crew as The Eagle) allows a student jury to mete out punishment. Mr. Starnes is the subject of many pranks but remains fairly good-natured about them. He displays deep, genuine sorrow when Alaska dies, even though she was one of his worst troublemakers. Dr. Hyde gains the respect of Pudge and others with his philosophical explanations of religious leaders and the afterlife. For his class final, he asks each student to use his newly enlightened mind to determine how he, personally, will escape what Alaska had always called the “labyrinth of suffering.”

Profanity & Violence

The teenagers’ dialogue is littered with the f-word and s—, as well as other, milder profanities. The bulk of their discussions rapidly turn crass and/or sexual.

Sexual Content

When everyone else is gone for Thanksgiving, Alaska and Pudge ransack people’s rooms in search of porn. Alaska, a self-proclaimed sex addict, tells the guys a story about getting her breast “honked” and provides Pudge’s girlfriend with graphic instructions on how to give him oral sex (which the girl promptly does). While dating another guy, Alaska makes out with Pudge. Pudge obsesses over Alaska’s body. Prior to meeting her, however, he confesses that he wouldn’t care who his girlfriend was as long as he had someone to make out with.

Discussion Topics

Get free discussion questions for this book and others, at FocusOnTheFamily.com/discuss-books .

Additional Comments

You can request a review of a title you can’t find at [email protected] .

Book reviews cover the content, themes and worldviews of fiction books, not their literary merit, and equip parents to decide whether a book is appropriate for their children. The inclusion of a book’s review does not constitute an endorsement by Focus on the Family.

Latest Book Reviews

book review on looking for alaska

Island of Whispers

book review on looking for alaska

Bookshops & Bonedust

book review on looking for alaska

Elf Dog and Owl Head

book review on looking for alaska

A Court of Frost and Starlight (A Court of Thorns and Roses Series)

book review on looking for alaska

Fog & Fireflies

Solitaire pic

Weekly Reviews Straight to your Inbox!

Logo for Plugged In by Focus on the Family

You have exceeded your limit for simultaneous device logins.

Your current subscription allows you to be actively logged in on up to three (3) devices simultaneously. click on continue below to log out of other sessions and log in on this device..

book review on looking for alaska

Looking for Alaska

Get print. get digital. get both.

book review on looking for alaska

Be the first reader to comment.

Comment Policy:

  • Be respectful, and do not attack the author, people mentioned in the article, or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  • Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  • Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.
  • Comments may be republished in print, online, or other forms of media.
  • If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.

First Name should not be empty !!!

Last Name should not be empty !!!

email should not be empty !!!

Comment should not be empty !!!

You should check the checkbox.

Please check the reCaptcha

book review on looking for alaska

Betty Hartman

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.

Posted 3 hours ago REPLY

Ethan Smith

Posted 6 hours ago REPLY

Jane Fitgzgerald

Posted 6 hours ago

Michael Woodward

Continue reading, get digital and print.

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's.

book review on looking for alaska

Added To Cart

Related , the great influenza: the true story of the deadliest pandemic in history (young readers edition), heroes of world war ii: 25 stories of unsung heroes who fought for freedom, let’s get creative: art for a healthy planet, night stories: folktales from latin america: a toon graphic, peach heaven, advertisement, subscribe today, get print, digital editions, and online all in one..

SLJ, where and when you need it.

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER? LOG IN

We are currently offering this content for free. Sign up now to activate your personal profile, where you can save articles for future viewing

Thank you for visiting.

We’ve noticed you are using a private browser. To continue, please log in or create an account.

Hard paywall image

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

SUBSCRIPTION OPTIONS

Already a subscriber log in.

Most SLJ reviews are exclusive to subscribers.

As a subscriber, you'll receive unlimited access to all reviews dating back to 2010.

To access other site content, visit our homepage .

Logo

  • Middle School
  • High School
  • College & Admissions
  • Social Life
  • Health & Sexuality
  • Stuff We Love

YourTeenMag Logo

  • Meet the Team
  • Our Advisory Board
  • In the News
  • Write for Your Teen
  • Campus Visits
  • Teen College Life
  • Paying for College
  • Teen Dating
  • Teens and Friends
  • Mental Health
  • Drugs & Alcohol
  • Physical Health
  • Teen Sexuality
  • Communication
  • Celebrity Interviews

Book Review For Teens: John Green Looking for Alaska

Book on table Looking For Alaska by John Green

New York Times best selling author John Green was awarded the 2006 Michael L. Printz Award for Looking for Alaska . Our reviewer, New York Times best selling author, Jamie Ford ( Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet ) and his daughter, Madi, tell you why it’s a must read.

Winter's Bone by Daniel Woodrell

TEEN REVIEW |  By Madi Ford

Earlier this year, I read John Green’s, The Fault in Our Stars, and I loved it (though I was somewhat mad because I didn’t think anyone could be as wonderful and perfect as Augustus Waters in real life, though a part of me is still hoping…)

So, when my dad asked me to choose a book for this review, I sought Green’s first book, Looking for Alaska , which turned out to be a good choice for any teenager (or even adult) as it deals with universal questions of love,  friendship, truth and the unknown areas in between.

The story follows Miles (Pudge) as he attempts to reinvent himself at a new school, with new friends and new experiences (smoking, drinking, dating). But he gets more than he bargained for when he meets Alaska Young, with her witty charm and too-good-to-be-true carefree attitude.

I loved how the book continued after Alaska’s mysterious death. There was so much more to feel at that point. It left Miles and all of Alaska’s friends lost and confused, struggling without closure, questioning who she really was.

Also, the “not so” PG rating gives a believable feel to the book. Unexpected plot twists pull you in. As do the numbering of the chapters, which are a countdown that hint to some big event toward the end.

As a teen, I could relate to Looking for Alaska because the characters felt real. And while the book drew me in emotionally, the story still had a sense of humor that speaks to readers my age.

Although the book reaches from suspense to sadness, I enjoyed every moment.

How Hulu’s Looking for Alaska Updates John Green’s Book for a New Generation

B oarding schools are strange places, little fiefdoms of byzantine social politics and spiking teen hormones. Culver Creek Academy — the setting for John Green ’s 2005 best-selling young adult novel Looking for Alaska and, now, Hulu’ s eight-episode adaptation of the story — is particularly surreal. The high-pressure academic institution in a sleepy Southern hamlet is populated by characters that read like fairy-tale archetypes: the charming but clueless young hero, Miles “Pudge” Halter; the rebellious ingenue Alaska Young; their sidekicks, smart-talking Chip “Colonel” Martin and brainy Takumi Hikohito; a group of carelessly cruel, privileged enemies; and the wise yet stern authority figures. In the new show all of this, plus much of the plot and dialogue, remains unchanged from Green’s book.

But beneath the surface, Green’s story has gotten a facelift for our present moment. In 2005, the book was a revelation for its clear-eyed depiction of teen angst and love, and a generation of readers grew up smitten with the inscrutable Alaska, infatuated Miles and feisty Chip. But everything looks different in the light of 2019’s political landscape and evolving social norms, and so the novel Looking for Alaska — originally told entirely through Miles’ eyes — can feel dated, at the very least for its fixation with what some have deemed an early version of the Manic Pixie Dream Girl . ( Many , including Green himself , have wrestled with the way in which he deals with this trope in his books.)

Today’s TV landscape features shows like HBO’s Gen Z hit Euphoria , Netflix’s controversial 13 Reasons Why and candid Sex Education , and major-network sitcoms and dramas that present diverse depictions of family and teen life. The only way Looking for Alaska could work in this moment is with a broadening of voices and more explicit exploration of themes like sexuality, consent, mental health, race and privilege — and fortunately, that’s what the eight-episode series delivers. Some of these themes, particularly sexuality and privilege, are certainly present in the book, but not with the kind of intention brought to them by executive producers Josh Schwartz and Stephanie Savage, who were also behind The O.C. and Gossip Girl. (Green also serves as an executive producer on the series.) The story is the same, but the emotional beats it hits — self-discovery, betrayal, grief — are thrown into sharper relief by the more nuanced telling.

Green, author of The Fault in Our Stars and Paper Towns , knows how to tap into teenage emotion. But where he fixates on feelings, Schwartz and Savage — also experts in teen drama — like to see the big, dramatic picture. Though they’ve softened their usually snappy tone to match the meditative pace of this story, their instincts for drawing out insider-outsider tensions remain sharp.

The series is shot with a dreamy reverence for the sepia-toned magic of boarding school in a humid early autumn, when Miles arrives as a new student to find adventure after a lackluster high school experience in his native Florida. It’s set in 2005, but it could be any year in the past few decades: Alaska wears bell-bottoms and chokers, student pranks run rampant and school dances involve the “Macarena.” The kids drink contraband wine, talk in over-wrought witticisms and smoke illicit cigarettes in the woods. (Today, that might be vaping — but the show is committed to its old-school cigarettes.) And the rich kids get away with everything. It’s all timeless teen stuff. Even the music — songs popular in 2005, from a particularly poignant cover of Death Cab for Cutie’s “I Will Follow You Into the Dark” to Kelly Clarkson’s “Since U Been Gone” — helps situate us in a familiar past.

Into that haze of nostalgia marches Alaska, a long-legged and bookish young woman with an eye for trouble and a scholarship. She was always a feminist in Green’s writing, bold about her sexuality and quick to excoriate her classmates for casual sexism. Now — with scenes flashing back to her childhood and showing her dealing with teachers and responsibilities of her own — her motivations, and frustrations, come into sharper focus. At one point, she dreams of a future in which she is “inspiring girls to be their unapologetically badass selves” by running a feminist bookstore. At another, she frankly instructs Miles and his new girlfriend in the finer arts of some sex acts — for both of them. (In the book, the only focus is on male pleasure.) Even Miles seems to have internalized today’s rules of consent, nervously checking in with his girlfriend as they reach new bases: “Is this OK?” The show hits these notes with a light touch, but the updates are noticeable, exhibiting evolved norms of communication and turning Alaska into more than a cipher for Miles’ dreams.

looking-for-alaska

In one scene, Alaska and Miles have the following exchange: “Alaska,” he asks delicately, “are you suffering?” “Aren’t we all?” she responds. “It’s kind of the human condition.” “I mean you. Specifically,” he says. Her answer: “I mean sure, I guess.” It’s just a few lines of dialogue, but it’s an addition that resonates. In the book, mental health and depression are never directly addressed; Alaska is referred to, repeatedly, as “moody.” But in 2019 teen mental health awareness — and concerns about anxiety, depression and suicide rates — have become regular topics of conversation. The simple act of Miles verbalizing his concern, and Alaska’s admission that she struggles, are tweaks that matter. No, a school therapist doesn’t materialize to address the many problems these kids are facing. But at least we get an example of how to ask, and a reminder that it’s OK to answer honestly.

The show works hard to give supporting characters backstories that matter, too. The new adaptation’s biggest and worthiest addition is the casting of Denny Love as Chip, a scholarship student with lofty ambitions. Chip is a troublemaker with, yes, a chip on his shoulder. In the book, his anger can seem misplaced. With his race explicitly stated in the show (it went unmentioned in the novel), his struggles to fit in at Culver Creek, accept the status quo and get ahead academically make even more sense. This isn’t just about socioeconomic privilege; Chip’s fight is also about finding a place for himself as a young black man in a southern boys’ club. (Example: a moment in the show when his girlfriend’s dad refuses to let him be her escort at her debutante ball.) Another new revelation: the backstory of the wise old religion professor, Dr. Hyde (This Is Us’ Ron Cephas Jones). In a tender new scene, he opens up to Alaska and Miles about the love of his life and the AIDS epidemic that claimed his life. And Lara (Sofia Vassilieva), a Romanian immigrant, has more of a voice here than on the page, given space to reflect on the changes that moving across the world has wrought on her family’s fortunes.

Green has said this book was based on his own adolescent experience; it’s a personal story. Meanwhile the show, by the nature of its medium and its carefully calibrated updates, has a more universal and relevant message. I was in boarding school in 2005, too. But the book failed to strike me as relatable; Alaska remained too much of a mystery. The show, however, hit home — and not just for its throwback music and early-2000s fashion. It’s poised to do the same for today’s teens, for reasons that go far beyond appearances.

More Must-Reads from TIME

  • How Selena Gomez Is Revolutionizing the Celebrity Beauty Business
  • TIME100 Most Influential Companies 2024
  • Javier Milei’s Radical Plan to Transform Argentina
  • How Private Donors Shape Birth-Control Choices
  • The Deadly Digital Frontiers at the Border
  • What's the Best Measure of Fitness? 
  • The 31 Most Anticipated Movies of Summer 2024
  • Want Weekly Recs on What to Watch, Read, and More? Sign Up for Worth Your Time

Write to Raisa Bruner at [email protected]

Profile Picture

  • ADMIN AREA MY BOOKSHELF MY DASHBOARD MY PROFILE SIGN OUT SIGN IN

avatar

LOOKING FOR ALASKA

by Peter Jenkins ‧ RELEASE DATE: Nov. 16, 2001

A bracing, happy view of Alaska and Alaskans prior to a couple little changes like new oil drilling and Star Wars outposts....

Veteran travel-writer Jenkins ( Along the Edge of America , 1995, etc.) looks for Alaska and finds an idealized America: sparsely populated with hardy individualists in majestic scenery.

For more than a year, the author and family members lived in the northernmost state during all seasons, balmy or frigid, through sunshine or blizzard. Based in Seward, eager as an Iditarod dog, he journeyed through tundra, bush, and mountain, north and south of the Arctic Circle from Cordova to Tok, Kotzebue to Unalakleet. The vistas he saw are picturesque and, reminiscent of TV’s Northern Exposure , the people distinctive. If Jenkins ever met any men or women he didn’t like, they weren’t in Alaska (except, perhaps, for a passing census worker). He found flannel-shirted Alaskans, whether immigrant or native—wanderers, teachers, hunters, fishermen, pilots, civil servants, Haida or Tlinglit—to be stalwart, generous, and noble. A typical nice guy, for example, was “sort of godlike.” And that’s just the people. Domestic animals and the author took a liking to each other, too. The whales, moose, and brown bears offered no opinion, though from his side Jenkins expresses a healthy respect for the magnificence of wildlife. On an Alaskan high, he is unmatched by Jack London or Robert W. Service, and the result is as persuasive as an avalanche. The writing, including some nice contributions by a 20-year-old daughter, is effective in spite of some incorrect personal pronouns and a disconcerting habit of omitting the requisite preposition after “couple”—it’s “a couple snow machines” or “a couple dogs” throughout). The tome, big like the state, will be a revelation to many, including the author’s neighbors back in Tennessee.

Pub Date: Nov. 16, 2001

ISBN: 0-312-26178-0

Page Count: 448

Publisher: St. Martin's

Review Posted Online: May 19, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2001

GENERAL NONFICTION

Share your opinion of this book

More by Peter Jenkins

ALONG THE EDGE OF AMERICA

BOOK REVIEW

by Peter Jenkins

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50th anniversary edition.

by William Strunk & E.B. White ‧ RELEASE DATE: May 15, 1972

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

NUTCRACKER

by E.T.A. Hoffmann ‧ RELEASE DATE: Oct. 28, 1996

This is not the Nutcracker sweet, as passed on by Tchaikovsky and Marius Petipa. No, this is the original Hoffmann tale of 1816, in which the froth of Christmas revelry occasionally parts to let the dark underside of childhood fantasies and fears peek through. The boundaries between dream and reality fade, just as Godfather Drosselmeier, the Nutcracker's creator, is seen as alternately sinister and jolly. And Italian artist Roberto Innocenti gives an errily realistic air to Marie's dreams, in richly detailed illustrations touched by a mysterious light. A beautiful version of this classic tale, which will captivate adults and children alike. (Nutcracker; $35.00; Oct. 28, 1996; 136 pp.; 0-15-100227-4)

Pub Date: Oct. 28, 1996

ISBN: 0-15-100227-4

Page Count: 136

Publisher: Harcourt

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 1996

More by E.T.A. Hoffmann

THE NUTCRACKER AND THE MOUSE KING

by E.T.A. Hoffmann ; adapted by Natalie Andrewson ; illustrated by Natalie Andrewson

THE NUTCRACKER

by E.T.A. Hoffmann & illustrated by Julie Paschkis

  • Discover Books Fiction Thriller & Suspense Mystery & Detective Romance Science Fiction & Fantasy Nonfiction Biography & Memoir Teens & Young Adult Children's
  • News & Features Bestsellers Book Lists Profiles Perspectives Awards Seen & Heard Book to Screen Kirkus TV videos In the News
  • Kirkus Prize Winners & Finalists About the Kirkus Prize Kirkus Prize Judges
  • Magazine Current Issue All Issues Manage My Subscription Subscribe
  • Writers’ Center Hire a Professional Book Editor Get Your Book Reviewed Advertise Your Book Launch a Pro Connect Author Page Learn About The Book Industry
  • More Kirkus Diversity Collections Kirkus Pro Connect My Account/Login
  • About Kirkus History Our Team Contest FAQ Press Center Info For Publishers
  • Privacy Policy
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Reprints, Permission & Excerpting Policy

© Copyright 2024 Kirkus Media LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Go To Top

Popular in this Genre

Close Quickview

Hey there, book lover.

We’re glad you found a book that interests you!

Please select an existing bookshelf

Create a new bookshelf.

We can’t wait for you to join Kirkus!

Please sign up to continue.

It’s free and takes less than 10 seconds!

Already have an account? Log in.

Sign in with Google

Trouble signing in? Retrieve credentials.

Almost there!

  • Industry Professional

Welcome Back!

Sign in using your Kirkus account

Contact us: 1-800-316-9361 or email [email protected].

Don’t fret. We’ll find you.

Magazine Subscribers ( How to Find Your Reader Number )

If You’ve Purchased Author Services

Don’t have an account yet? Sign Up.

book review on looking for alaska

AMEYA'S NEW LOGO

BOOKS AMEYA

For the voracious indian reader.

Book Reviews

[Book Review] ‘Looking for Alaska’ by John Green

Book Review of 'Looking for Alaska' by John Green

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

John Green is New York Times bestselling author of Looking for Alaska , An Abundance of Katherines , Paper Towns , The Fault in Our Stars , and Turtles All the Way Down . Along with David Levithan , he has also co-authored the critically acclaimed novel Will Grayson, Will Grayson . He was the 2006 recipient of the Michael L. Printz Award, a 2009 Edgar Award winner, and has twice been a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Green’s books have been published in more than 55 languages and over 24 million copies are in print. John is also an active Twitter user with more than 5.06 million followers.

Thomas Edison’s last words were “ It’s very beautiful over there “. I don’t know where there is, but I believe it’s somewhere, and I hope it’s beautiful.

Looking for Alaska deals with the universal questions of love, friendship, truth, and the gray areas in between. This story is about Miles, who attempts to reinvent himself in a new school, with new friends and activities, and how his meeting with Alaska Young, a witty and carefree girl, changed his life.

The story is very realistic, especially since John has portrayed the characters exactly as one would expect them to behave without parental supervision .  It seems at first that the book is about a high school romance, but it turns out to be much more than that. It’s more of a tale of how love isn’t as translucent as it seems.

There are no chapters, in a traditional sense. Instead, the novel begins with an unconventional ‘One Hundred and Thirty-six Days Before’ and gradually counts down to the second part, ‘One Hundred and Thirty-six Days After’, leaving in the reader’s mind, an inescapable sense of dread as to what is going to be the pivotal point of division. The before is made up of routine, of monotony, of mundane happenings: kids going to classes, coming up with pranks, drinking, smoking, doing stupid things, hooking up. The after is gloomier, and shows how high school students often deal with troubles in life . That’s when the plot waves goodbye to the mundane and sets off for the momentous. And it is a serious, painful and genuine journey.

“So I walked back to my room and collapsed on the bottom bunk, thinking that if people were rain, I was drizzle and she was a hurricane.” quote from 'Looking for Alaska' by John Green

Miles likes to memorize last words . He talks about the words of Francois Rabelais before he leaves for boarding school, hoping to find a ‘Great Perhaps’ before he dies. And he finds Alaska – the gorgeous, clever, funny, sexy, self-destructive, screwed-up, and utterly fascinating Alaska. She is an event in herself. She pulls him into her world, launches him into the Great Perhaps, and steals his heart. Alaska’s character is difficult to comprehend. She is impulsive, temperamental and passionate. It seems that every one of Alaska’s friends knows a different part of her and, throughout the book, different pieces of the jigsaw are revealed and brought together. It is through Alaska’s character that John introduces all thought-provoking topics.

At some point, you just pull off the Band-Aid, and it hurts, but then it’s over and you’re relieved.

The beauty of the book is that it doesn’t hide anything. Brutally and honestly, it showcases what young love and growing up really are. The characters’ communication, their relationships with each other, the highs and lows of their pasts and the pleasure that comes with being a bad kid shine through the pages. The suspense of the pivotal point, the mystery of the event, the fun of adolescence and the sadness in the story make this book a cocktail of emotions . This novel gives the readers an unfiltered peek into adolescence.

With a commendable score of 3.9 out of 5, Looking for Alaska is a journey of self-discovery that explores true understanding, forgiveness, and eventually, the idea of love itself, asking innocent questions like, “Can we love someone without truly knowing them?” Readers might not weep buckets, but they will get attached to Miles and Alaska, just as they do to each other.

…now that you’re here

As you might know, Ameya runs on a purely non-profit basis. With no tangible products on offer, advertisements and donations are our only two sources of keeping this blog up and running. You could convey your support to us with something as little as $5 - that's less than what an average Starbucks would cost!

Share this:

  • Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)
  • Click to print (Opens in new window)

5 thoughts on “ [Book Review] ‘Looking for Alaska’ by John Green ”

Add Comment

  • Pingback: The Boy from Pataliputra
  • Pingback: Kavita and her theory of everything
  • Pingback: How Surbhi, the new girl in town, turned to books for solace
  • Pingback: The Fault in Our Stars | Book Review | 2012 | John Green

Looking for alaska is a book for teenager where u find yourself in it and how you find it and relate to it is something very pleasurable.

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Discover more from books ameya.

Subscribe now to keep reading and get access to the full archive.

Type your email…

Continue reading

Looking For Alaska Book Review (Spoiler Free) | Favbookshelf

lloking for alaska book review

Looking For Alaska is a beautiful tale of young love and loss. In this article, we have given a spoiler-free book review of Looking For Alaska.

About Looking For Alaska

looking for alaska book review

Title: Looking For Alaska

Author: John Green

Genre: Young adult fiction, Romance

Publisher: Dutton Juvenile

Type: Standalone

Goodreads rating: 4 / 5

Miles Halter is a nerdy Florida teen who has an unusual obsession with learning famous dead people’s last words. When he starts at Culver Creek Preparatory High School in Alabama, he meets the beautiful and enchanting Alaska Young. Miles’ life which was previously one big non-event becomes thrilling as Alaska draws him into her reckless and unstable world. Along the way, Miles loses his heart irrevocably to Alaska and life can never be the same for either of them.

Book Review of Looking For Alaska

Wondering what to do on a four-hour train ride, I bought this book from the station bookstore. Believe me, when I say, I finished the book on the four-hour train journey. That’s how captivating I found it.

You don’t expect young adult fiction to be philosophical but that is the unique quality of John Green’s writing. With Miles’ obsession with the last words of dead famous people, John Green begins the conversation on mortality. Miles is on his way to seek a ‘Great Perhaps’ as François Rabelais’ last words, and by the end of the book, the reader would want to follow in Miles’ footsteps to seek it too.

I liked John Green’s characters. They are vividly described and therefore, their choices make sense. The protagonist, Miles, is a character that the readers might find relatable, at least I did. His uneventful life is mundane and boring, therefore, when he meets the chaotic, unstable, but gorgeous Alaska, it is natural that he is drawn to her.

“If people were rain, I was drizzle and she was a hurricane.”  Looking For Alaska

The book is divided into two parts- Before and After. The readers know from the beginning that a major incident is coming that would change the lives of all the characters, but it’s still heartbreaking when it finally happens. Green’s writing successfully creates the intrigue that makes it difficult for the reader to put down the book.

This book, Looking For Alaska was John Green’s first novel and it is a great one for a debut. It has all the elements of a young adult novel, young love, and teenage friendships. It reminded me of my own teenage years. John Green follows a trope where everything seems fine until it’s not. The incident that Green prepares you for since the beginning would still come as a shock to you.

“Thomas Edison’s last words were, ‘It’s very beautiful over there.’ I don’t know where there is, but I know it’s somewhere, and I hope it’s beautiful.” Looking For Alaska

Overall, Looking For Alaska is a short book and you can finish it in one go if you want. The Before part of the book is breezy and light but the After part gets dramatic and dark. It’s still a very captivating read, sprinkled with a heavy dose of philosophy, something that is so unique to John Green’s writing.

Rating: 4 / 5 ; Our Rating Guide

Recommendation: Absolutely try it!

If you are a fan of  The Fault In Our Stars and Nicholas Sparks books, you would definitely love Looking For Alaska. Pick it up if you are looking for a light read.

If you want to read the book, click on the link below:

About the Author

book review on looking for alaska

John Michael Green is an American award-winning author. He has been the Number One New York Times bestselling author and has won many accolades including the Printz Medal, a Printz Honour, and the Edgar Award. His most popular book is The Fault In Our Stars. His other books include Paper Towns, Let It Snow, An Abundance Of Katherines, Will Grayson, and Turtles All The Way Down. John Green is also a YouTube content creator.

Below is the link to buy Looking For Alaska:

Articles you might like:

  • Book Review of Girl Online Series (Spoiler Free)
  • 10 Best Feel-Good Books to read (Awesome Reads)
  • 19 Best Kindle Unlimited Supernatural Romance Books
  • The Best Romantic Love Quotes from Books

Videos you might like:

  • 1 0 Best Roma nce Novels to read (All-time Favorite)
  • A Thousand Splendid Suns | Honest and Spoiler-Free

Are you an author or a publisher? If yes, then you must check our servic es for promotions and marketing. They will undoubtedly benefit you.

Disclosure :  All our reviews are honest. Also, some links in this post may be affiliate links, which means we receive a commission if you click a link and purchase something that we recommend.

Did you read this book? What do you like about it? Do comments below. We would love to know

Subscribe to our newsletter to never miss our updates and book recommendations.

Do follow us on   Instagram ,  Twitter ,  Pinterest, Youtube , Tumblr, Facebook , and  Goodreads .

P.S.   If you share it, it will make our day.

Have a great day ahead! 🙂

Happy Reading and Keep Smiling!!!

Related Posts

The Forgotten by David Baldacci is kept with a coffee

Review of The Forgotten by David Baldacci (Spoiler Free)

The Lean Startup by Eric Ries

Book Review of The Lean Startup by Eric Ries

Leave a comment cancel reply.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Founded 1901

Royal Purple

Advertisement

Book Review: ‘Looking for Alaska’ by John Green

“Looking for Alaska,” by popular American novelist John Green, follows Miles Halter as he journeys through his first year at Culver Creek Preparatory High School in Alabama.

Based on the description of the book, I was under the impression that “Looking for Alaska” would revolve around a high school romance, but the book turned out to be so much more than that.

From the beginning, it is clear that Miles isn’t your average junior in high school. He

Review by Hilary Igl Staff Writer

has a fascination with peoples’ final words before death and is obsessed with studying. He begs his parents to send him to Culver Creek because he knows that he does not fit in at the high school in his hometown.

It doesn’t take long for Miles to be welcomed into the spontaneous, adventure-filled lives of his roommate Chip Martin (also known as “the Colonel”) and the Colonel’s best friend Alaska Young.

His first night at the boarding school, Miles finds himself abducted by the rich kids of campus, the “Weekday Warriors,” and thrown into the nearby lake as part of a prank war that started long before Miles attended Culver Creek.

The Colonel, Alaska and Miles seek revenge on the Weekday Warriors.

While planning pranks and attending classes with Alaska, Miles falls in love with her. However, Alaska has a boyfriend and a painful secret about her past.

Alaska’s character was who kept me reading. She is impulsive, temperamental and passionate. It seemed that every one of Alaska’s friends knows a different part of her, and throughout the book different pieces of the puzzle are revealed.

Tragedy strikes near the end of the book, and Miles loses touch with his friends of Culver Creek. None of them know how to handle the situation and the ending leaves many questions.

Most of the time, I dislike books that leave me wondering. I like everything to be wrapped up, unless there is a sequel.

“Looking for Alaska” was different. Green made a statement by leaving some questions up to the interpretation of the reader, and I enjoyed coming up with my own answers.

The characters in the book were relatable to those in Green’s book “Paper Towns,” but the plot line is different enough that it kept me reading. Once I was a quarter of the way through the book, I couldn’t put it down.

The best part of “Looking for Alaska” was how real the characters seemed. Green’s consistency with characterization helped bring me into Culver Creek.

While college isn’t exactly like boarding school, the similarities help make “Looking for Alaska” a good read not only for teenage readers, but for anyone who craves a story about adventure and a bit of heartache.

4 stars out of 5.

  • "Looking for Alaska"
  • book review
  • UW-Whitewater

Founded 1901

  • Animal House
  • Front Row Review
  • MVP Q&A
  • Winning Women
  • In My Opinion
  • Advertising

Comments (0)

Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Founded 1901

Logo

Looking for Alaska Book Summary

“ looking for alaska ” by john green.

Support Local Bookstores.  Buy this book on bookshop.org

Introduction:

“Looking for Alaska” is a deeply moving and thought-provoking young adult novel by bestselling author John Green. The novel tells the story of a young man’s journey of self-discovery as he navigates the complexities of friendship, love, and loss. This review will discuss the book’s themes, literary devices, and strengths, as well as its impact on readers and its place in contemporary young adult literature.

Book Summary:

“Looking for Alaska” follows the story of Miles “Pudge” Halter, a teenager who leaves his mundane life in Florida to attend Culver Creek Preparatory School in Alabama. At Culver Creek, Pudge makes new friends and becomes infatuated with the enigmatic Alaska Young. Through a series of events, Pudge and his friends experience the ups and downs of adolescence, ultimately facing a tragic loss that forces them to confront the meaning of life and their own identities. The themes explored in the novel include the search for meaning and purpose, the complexities of human relationships, and the process of coming of age.

“Looking for Alaska” is a powerful and introspective novel that successfully captures the essence of adolescence, with its strengths lying in the development of its characters, the exploration of its themes, and the use of literary devices. The novel is unique and worth reading for its honest portrayal of the teenage experience, its engaging plot, and its ability to evoke strong emotions in readers.

  • Characters: The characters in “Looking for Alaska” are well-developed and relatable, with each one having their own distinct voice and personality.
  • Themes: The book’s main strengths include its exploration of themes such as the search for meaning and purpose, the complexities of human relationships, and coming of age.
  • Literary Devices: John Green’s use of literary devices such as symbolism, foreshadowing, and allusion enhances the novel’s thematic depth.

“Looking for Alaska” can be linked to broader social issues and the author’s life, as it touches on topics such as mental health, substance abuse, and the challenges faced by young people in today’s society. Additionally, John Green has spoken openly about his own experiences with anxiety and depression, which may have influenced the novel’s portrayal of these issues.

Evaluation:

“Looking for Alaska” is a novel that will appeal to young adults and older readers alike, particularly those who enjoy coming-of-age stories and introspective narratives. It is a powerful and engaging read that delves into the complexities of adolescence and leaves a lasting impact on its readers.

In comparison to other works by John Green, “Looking for Alaska” shares similarities in themes and character development, but stands out for its raw and unflinching portrayal of the teenage experience. The novel has garnered numerous accolades, including the Michael L. Printz Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature, and has been a bestseller on various lists, further solidifying its place in contemporary young adult literature.

Final thoughts and recommendation:

“Looking for Alaska” is a poignant and thought-provoking novel that will captivate readers with its engaging plot, well-developed characters, and exploration of universal themes. It is highly recommended for those who appreciate coming-of-age stories that delve into the complexities of adolescence and the human experience.

Possible questions for a high school test:

  • What is the significance of the labyrinth in “Looking for Alaska”?
  • How does the novel explore the theme of coming of age?
  • What role do friendships play in the story and the characters’ personal development?
  • How does John Green use foreshadowing to enhance the narrative?
  • How do the characters in “Looking for Alaska” search for meaning in their lives?
  • The labyrinth represents the characters’ struggles to navigate the complexities of life and find meaning in their experiences.
  • The novel explores coming of age through the characters’ personal growth, self-discovery, and evolving relationships.
  • Friendships play a crucial role in the story, providing support, camaraderie, and personal growth opportunities for the characters.
  • John Green uses foreshadowing to hint at future events and build suspense, such as Alaska’s tragic fate and the characters’ subsequent emotional journey.
  • The characters search for meaning through their relationships, personal growth, and attempts to understand the world around them.
  • Green, John. Looking for Alaska. Dutton Books for Young Readers, 2005.
  • “John Green Biography.” Biography.com, A&E Networks Television, 9 Aug. 2018, www.biography.com/writer/john-green .

Awards and accolades:

  • Michael L. Printz Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature (2006)
  • A bestseller on various lists, including The New York Times Best Seller list

Other Reviews:

  • The Guardian review by a reader, 5 stars: “[…] a beautiful, moving piece of literature, dealing with friendship, love, and the pain of loss.” (Source: www.theguardian.com/childrens-books-site/2013/oct/25/review-john-green-looking-for-alaska )
  • Goodreads, average rating of 4.03 out of 5 stars based on over 1,300,000 ratings. (Source: www.goodreads.com/book/show/99561.Looking_for_Alaska )

Where to buy the book:

Purchase the book on Bookshop.org: https://bookshop.org/a/1289/9780142402511

Note functional details about the book:

  • ISBN: 9780525475064
  • Number of pages: 221
  • Publisher name: Dutton Books for Young Readers
  • First publish date: March 3, 2005
  • Genre: Young Adult Fiction
  • BISAC Categories: Young Adult Fiction / Social Themes / Adolescence & Coming of Age, Young Adult Fiction / Romance / General

About the author:

John Green is an American author, best known for his young adult novels. He was born on August 24, 1977, in Indianapolis, Indiana. Green is a graduate of Kenyon College, where he studied English and religious studies. In addition to “Looking for Alaska,” Green has written several other bestselling novels, including “The Fault in Our Stars” and “Paper Towns.” He is also known for his YouTube channel, Vlogbrothers, which he shares with his brother, Hank Green. John Green has won numerous awards for his literary works, including the Michael L. Printz Award and the Edgar Award for Best Young Adult Novel.

Review from Common Sense Media :

This book richly deserves the awards it has won. It’s gorgeously written — passionate, hilarious, moving, thought-provoking, character-driven, and literary. The characters may often behave badly, but they are vividly real, complex, and beautifully drawn — and their stories can help readers start dealing with some big topics, like self discovery and loss. This is a hard one to put down. Since new chapters don’t start on new pages, there’s always a temptation to read just a little bit further. For the first half at least, readers will be grinning all the way — and in the end, they will be moved, maybe even to tears.

Scattered Summary by Penny

Bunny icon

  • Skip to main content
  • Keyboard shortcuts for audio player

Illustration of a woman holding a stack of colorful books.

Books We Love

20 new books hitting shelves this summer that our critics can't wait to read.

Meghan Collins Sullivan

Illustration of a person lying down and reading in the grass.

June is around the corner, meaning summer is almost here! As we look forward to travel and staycations, plane rides and trips to the beach, we've asked our book critics for some advice: What upcoming fiction and nonfiction are they most looking forward to reading?

Their picks range from memoirs to sci-fi and fantasy to translations, love stories and everything in between. Here's a look:

Daughter of the Merciful Deep

Daughter of the Merciful Deep by Leslye Penelope

I was hooked when I first saw the gorgeous cover for Daughter of the Merciful Deep by Leslye Penelope. But the novel's premise put it at the top of my summer reading list. Penelope is known for unforgettable characters, world-building, beautiful writing and robust storytelling. Her latest work, inspired by actual events — the drowned Black towns of the American South — promises a magical, mythical and powerful tale of a young woman's quest to save her town. A historical fantasy must-read. (June 4) — Denny Bryce

Buy Featured Book

Your purchase helps support NPR programming. How?

  • Independent Bookstores

The Future Was Color

The Future Was Color by Patrick Nathan

The Future Was Color by Patrick Nathan has everything I look for in a book: a unique and startling voice, a queer protagonist and a deep understanding of a particular time and place. George — once György — is a gay Hungarian immigrant working as a screenwriter in McCarthy-era Hollywood, occasionally fantasizing about his officemate, Jack. When a once-famous actress named Madeline invites George to stay and write at her spacious Malibu house, she won't take no for an answer — and so George finds himself in a hedonistic milieu where pleasure, politics and strong personalities intermingle. (June 4) — Ilana Masad

Mirrored Heavens

Mirrored Heavens: Between Earth & Sky, Book 3 by Rebecca Roanhorse

Rebecca Roanhorse is one of my auto-read authors — and one major reason is because of her fire Between Earth and Sky series. That trilogy comes to a stunning, fevered conclusion with Mirrored Heavens . All of the characters you love, hate and love to hate will converge on the city of Tova. Get ready for an epic battle between ancient gods, their human avatars and the mortals caught in between. (June 4) — Alex Brown

Sing Like Fish

Sing Like Fish: How Sound Rules Life Under Water by Amorina Kingdon

You may know about 52 Blue , whose vocalizations likely go unheard by some other whales; it captured worldwide sympathy and became a pop-culture metaphor. But did you know all whale song is critically disrupted by ships? If that gets you wondering, keep an eye out for Sing Like Fish , which promises to illuminate the fragile symphony of the deep. (June 4) — Genevieve Valentine

Consent: A Memoir

Consent: A Memoir by Jill Ciment

I look forward to reading Jill Ciment's Consent and to the discussions it's sure to provoke. In this follow-up memoir to Half a Life, Ciment reconsiders what she wrote 25 years ago about her teenage affair and marriage to her art teacher, 30 years her senior. Half a Life was written before the #MeToo movement, and before her husband died at the age of 93 after 45 years of marriage. Consent promises a fuller picture. (June 11) — Heller McAlpin

Do What Godmother Says

Do What Godmother Says by L.S. Stratton

As we continue to experience the frenzy of Harlem Renaissance celebrations, commemorations and historical resonance, Do What Godmother Says by L.S. Stratton is the perfect addition to the litany of works set in this artistic period this year. It examines the intense and frequently degenerating relationship between patrons and artists during this intellectual and cultural movement. In this dual-timeline gothic thriller, a modern writer discovers a family heirloom painting by a Harlem Renaissance artist, which connects her family to a mysterious past. This historical novel is one I'm eager to read because it deftly exposes the layers of creative ownership, especially when race and wealth are involved. (June 11) — Keishel Williams

Horror Movie

Horror Movie: A Novel by Paul Tremblay

Paul Tremblay is one of the most entertaining and innovative voices in contemporary fiction regardless of genre. Horror Movie , a story about a cursed movie that never came out and is about to get a remake, is a love letter to horror novels and horror movies, as well as a tense narrative that will redefine the cursed film subgenre. Tremblay is one of the modern masters of horror, and this new novel promises to be packed with the author's distinctive voice, knack for ambiguity and intrigue, and superb atmosphere. (June 11) — Gabino Iglesias

Cue the Sun!

Cue The Sun! The Invention of Reality TV by Emily Nussbaum

Every so often there's a nonfiction title I covet like it's the next installment in my favorite mystery series. This summer it's Cue the Sun! Based on in-depth interviews with more than 300 sources from every aspect of the production process, this book is a cultural history of the genre that ate American entertainment, from New Yorker critic Emily Nussbaum. It combines the appeal of a page-turning thriller and the heft of serious scholarship. Juicy and thoughtful, it's a must-read for anyone interested in television or popular culture. (June 25) — Carole V. Bell

The Undermining of Twyla and Frank

The Undermining of Twyla and Frank by Megan Bannen

In this return to the delightfully wacky world established in one of my personal top-five romance novels of all time, The Undertaking of Hart and Mercy , Megan Bannen takes on the friends to lovers trope with a combination of madcap joie de vivre and the exhausted practicality of a mom who's had enough. Also, there are dragons! (July 2) — Caitlyn Paxson

The Anthropologists

The Anthropologists by Ayşegül Savaş

I am eagerly awaiting Ayşegül Savaş' The Anthropologists . Born in Istanbul, Savaş has lived in England, Denmark and the U.S. also and now resides in France; in this novel she takes up themes of cultural migration through focus on a young couple seeking an apartment in a foreign city. I'm intrigued to discover how Savaş gifts her characters with an anthropological lens of exploration. (July 9) — Barbara J. King

Elevator in Saigon

Elevator in Saigon by Thuân, translated by Nguyen An Lý

Elevator in Saigon is a literal and structural exquisite corpse , capturing Vietnam's eventful period from 1954 to 2004. Mimicking an elevator's movement, the novel heightens our yearning for romance and mystery, while unflinchingly exposing such narrative shaft. Channeling Marguerite Duras and Patrick Modiano, the book also offers a dead-on tour of a society cunningly leaping from one ideological mode to the next. As if challenging Rick's parting words to Ilsa in Casablanca , Thuận's sophomore novel in English implies that geopolitical debacles might have been mitigated if personal relations were held in more elevated regard than "a hill of beans." (July 9) — Thúy Đinh

Goodnight Tokyo

Goodnight Tokyo by Atsuhiro Yoshida, translated by Haydn Trowell

Atsuhiro Yoshida's Goodnight Tokyo begins with a film company procurer who's tasked with finding fresh kumquats for a production. From there, interlinked tales of Tokyo residents unspool in unpredictable directions. Characters range from a cabdriver to a star of a detective TV series who might be an actual detective. Readers will be reminded of Jim Jarmusch's 1991 movie Night on Earth , which also takes place in the wee hours of the morning and threads together the stories of strangers. (July 9) — Leland Cheuk

Navola

Navola: A novel by Paolo Bacigalupi

I love when a beloved author — especially one known mostly for a certain type of book — throws us a daring curveball. Navola is exactly such a pitch. Paolo Bacigalupi, who has won pretty much every major award in the science-fiction field with his climate-conscious dystopianism, is veering hard left with his new novel. It doesn't take place in the future, and it isn't a cautionary tale. Instead, it's a hefty tome of high fantasy set in a dreamed-up world akin to Renaissance Florence. Only with, you guessed it, dragons. But also high finance, political intrigue, and de' Medici-esque opulence. Bacigalupi is one of today's most gripping spinners of speculative fiction, and I can't wait to dive into this surprising magical foray. (July 9) — Jason Heller

The Lucky Ones: A Memoir

The Lucky Ones: A Memoir by Zara Chowdhary

In 2002, two train carriages were set on fire in Gujarat, India. Within three weeks, more than 2,000 Muslims were murdered in response by Hindu mobs. By the end of the year, more than 50,000 Muslims became refugees in their own country. The Lucky Ones is a unique memoir in English of this largest-ever massacre in independent India . It is also about a communal crisis bringing a fractured family together. A must-read in our warring world today. (July 16) — Jenny Bhatt

Sharks Don't Sink: Adventures of a Rogue Shark Scientist

Sharks Don't Sink: Adventures of a Rogue Shark Scientist by Jasmin Graham

Author Jasmin Graham is a marine biologist specializing in smalltooth sawfish and hammerhead sharks. Who are the real sharks in this story? Graham had to face the sharp-teethed truths of academia, while creating a world of curiosity and discovery around the complex lives of sharks. To combat the racism she encountered in academia, Graham created an "ocean of her own" to become an independent scientist and a champion of social justice, a journey she unspools in this new memoir. (July 16) — Martha Ann Toll

Liars

Liars by Sarah Manguso

I have long been a fan of Sarah Manguso's crystalline prose, from her fragmented illness memoir The Two Kinds of Decay to her tightly constrained 2022 novel Very Cold People . Her second novel , Liars , marries restraint with rage — in it, Manguso traces the full arc of a 15-year relationship between Jane, a successful writer, and John, a dilettante artist-cum-techie, in aphoristic vignettes. The result is a furious, propulsive meditation on wifehood, motherhood and artistic ambition. (July 23) — Kristen Martin

The Horse: A Novel

The Horse: A Novel by Willy Vlautin

Musician and Lean on Pete author Willy Vlautin captures the American West like few other writers. His prose is always excellent, his characters always beautifully drawn, and that promises to be the case with his next novel, about an isolated Nevada man in his 60s who is visited by a blind horse that refuses to leave. (July 30) — Michael Schaub

Einstein in Kafkaland

Einstein in Kafkaland: How Albert Fell Down the Rabbit Hole and Came Up With the Universe by Ken Krimstein

Art and science collide in Ken Krimstein's new graphic biography . In this book, the author of the brilliant and whimsical The Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt similarly translates careful research into scenic, emotive comics — in this case tracking the potential effects of an adventitious meeting in Prague between two geniuses on the cusp of world-changing discoveries. (Aug. 20) — Tahneer Oksman

Survival Is a Promise: The Eternal Life of Audre Lorde

Survival Is a Promise: The Eternal Life of Audre Lorde by Alexis Pauline Gumbs

I'd probably be interested in a new biography of Audre Lorde if it focused on the eating habits of the brilliant thinker, poet, feminist and activist. But biographer Alexis Pauline Gumbs promises to more than exceed that bar. An award-winning poet, writer, feminist and activist in her own right, Gumbs is among the first researchers to delve into Lorde's manuscript archives. The resulting book highlights the late author's commitment to interrogating what it means to survive on this planet — and how Lorde's radical understanding of ecology can guide us today. (Aug. 20) — Ericka Taylor

Et Cetera: An Illustrated Guide to Latin Phrases

Et Cetera: An Illustrated Guide to Latin Phrases by Maia Lee-Chin, illustrated by Marta Bertello

To those claiming Latin is dead, I say res ipsa loquitur — the thing speaks for itself — in children's cartoons , Hollywood cartoons and enduring epics . As a fan of both Mr. Peabody and the Muses, the idea of combining Maia Lee-Chin's thoughtful scholarship and Marta Bertello's dynamic artistry is captivating. Their new book reimagines the world of Latin's invention and tops my summer reading list. (Aug. 27) — Marcela Davison Avilés

  • summer books

Sun Sentinel

Books | Mystery fiction reviews: Violence simmers in…

Share this:.

  • Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on X (Opens in new window)

Daily e-Edition

Evening e-Edition

  • Restaurants

Things To Do

Books | mystery fiction reviews: violence simmers in two gripping debuts.

Alejandro Nodarse's debut novel is "Blood in the Cut." (Khristopher Currea and Sandra Polanco/Courtesy)

Alejandro Nodarse delivers a confident, hard-boiled debut about gentrification, family ties, Cuban-American culture, and the changing landscape of Miami with a deep tour of the Everglades in the gripping neo-noir “Blood in the Cut.”

“Blood in the Cut” also looks at a young man seeking redemption for his criminal past while grappling with who he is and how prison has changed him.

Ignacio “Iggy” Guerra has just been released from prison after serving three years of a drug sentence. The 23-year-old’s parole was “compassionate release” because his mother was killed in a hit-and-run accident about two weeks earlier. But his father, Armando, refused to tell his oldest son until a couple of days ago so that Iggy would miss his mother’s funeral.

Iggy’s home in Miami’s Little Havana neighborhood has never been happy, ruled by “sharp tongues and sharp knives.” But now chaos dominates his family, exacerbated by Armando’s erratic behavior, for whom “grief and sorrow had bled into panic and rage, pushed . . . to the brink of violence.”

Armando is drowning in debt, and blames Iggy for the family’s money woes because of his legal bills and, in a way, for his mother’s death. But the precarious finances go deeper, with the family butcher shop barely staying open and Armando taking sketchy, illegal jobs for a local criminal who has a ranch in the Everglades. Iggy’s younger brother Carlos may have to drop out of college to help pay the bills. And his mother’s pharmacy, a landmark of the neighborhood, has been razed to make way for a pompous, entitled rival who is building an upscale butcher shop and restaurant.

book review on looking for alaska

Iggy desperately wants to prove that he has changed and save the family business, but his father won’t speak to him or even look at him. The debt is so massive Iggy may have to work for the local criminal, who is specializing in illegal game hunting in the Everglades.

Nodarse delivers an in-depth look at how development transforms neighborhoods at the sacrifice of family-owned businesses. The butcher shop is more than a store, it is central to Iggy’s family — his father and brother, of course — but also to the extended Guerra family united in trying making the store survive. This is a butcher shop, so Nodarse unflinchingly includes several graphic scenes of the staff processing the meat, including illegally killed game. The Guerra family history parallels that of the Miami neighborhood where they settled.

Grief permeates “Blood in the Cut” in different ways. Armando channels his into emotional abuse directed at his sons, “lost in his loss.” Iggy, who was close to his mother, and Carlos mourn their mother, making their actions a tribute to her memory.

Nodarse vividly uses the South Florida setting with such an authentic look at Miami that readers will want to visit these neighborhoods. The Everglades especially emerges as a character, as beautiful as it is dangerous, where “even the grass can hurt you.” The Everglades terrain is constantly changing — “continuous contraction and expansion of the landscape felt like breathing.”

“Blood in the Cut” is an intriguing hard-boiled novel introducing a new talent in Nodarse.

Meet the author

Alejandro Nodarse will discuss “Blood in the Cut” with Miami author Raquel V. Reyes, author of “Barbacoa, Bomba, and Betrayal” at 8 p.m. June 5 at Books & Books, 265 Aragon Ave., Coral Gables, 305-442-4408, booksandbooks.com . The discussion is free but reservations are requested.

Out for revenge

Jahmal Mayfield's debut novel is "Smoke Kings." (Melville House/Courtesy)

‘Smoke Kings’ by Jahmal Mayfield. Melville House, 400 pages, $20 

Jahmal Mayfield delivers a bold, provocative and at times uncomfortable debut that sharply looks at race, loyalty and the consequences of revenge in the action-packed “Smoke Kings.”

Set during 2017 and 2019, “Smoke Kings” revolves around political activist Nate Evers and his three friends who decide to avenge the racially motivated murder of his teenage cousin. They plan to kidnap the descendants of those who committed hate crimes, then force them to make reparations to the victims’ family.

book review on looking for alaska

The foursome calls themselves Smoke Kings, a term used in a W.E.B. DuBois poem. The plan seems to work until Mason Farmer is hired to find them and extract another form of justice.

Mason is a white, former Birmingham police detective. The group seems to be getting away with their plan until they accidently kill the brother of a white supremist leader.

Mayfield infuses “Smoke Kings” with moral questions about bigotry, violence and revenge, thoughtfully not supplying any easy answers. “Smoke Kings” introduces a new talent in Mayfield.

More in Books

Also in the Book Pages, Jenny Erpenbeck, the International Booker Prize winner, appears in Southern California.

Books | New information about the mystery of Janet Halverson, book design icon, surfaces

The author of seven novels, three "not-novels," and 26 books under his nom de plume Lemony Snicket, Daniel Handler has added a memoir to his oeuvre. Sort of.

Books | Review: ‘A Series of Unfortunate Events’ writer Lemony Snicket/Daniel Handler pulls back the curtain

Among Chicago's demolished architectural treasures are the Stock Exchange Building, Dearborn Station Trainshed and Granada Theater, "one of the largest and most ornate movie palaces ever built."

Entertainment | Column: New book ‘Lost in America’ offers ghost stories of buildings in Chicago and across the country

Gary Phillips is back with Los Angeles photographer and private investigator Harry Ingram in "Ash Dark as Night," set in the 1960s race riots. Iris Yamashita explores grief and survival in her second Alaska novel, "Village in the Dark."

Books | Book reviews: In LA and Alaska mysteries, darkness descends in different ways

book review on looking for alaska

  • Teen & Young Adult
  • Literature & Fiction

Audible Logo

Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA) is a service we offer sellers that lets them store their products in Amazon's fulfillment centers, and we directly pack, ship, and provide customer service for these products. Something we hope you'll especially enjoy: FBA items qualify for FREE Shipping and Amazon Prime.

If you're a seller, Fulfillment by Amazon can help you grow your business. Learn more about the program.

Kindle app logo image

Download the free Kindle app and start reading Kindle books instantly on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required .

Read instantly on your browser with Kindle for Web.

Using your mobile phone camera - scan the code below and download the Kindle app.

QR code to download the Kindle App

Image Unavailable

Looking for Alaska

  • To view this video download Flash Player

book review on looking for alaska

Follow the author

John Green

Looking for Alaska Paperback – April 4, 2023

  • Print length 272 pages
  • Language English
  • Grade level 9 - 12
  • Lexile measure 850L
  • Dimensions 6 x 0.5 x 8 inches
  • Publisher Dutton Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date April 4, 2023
  • ISBN-10 0525556540
  • ISBN-13 978-0525556541
  • See all details

The Amazon Book Review

Similar items that may deliver to you quickly

Looking for Alaska Deluxe Edition

Get to know this book

What's it about.

book review on looking for alaska

Popular highlight

Editorial reviews, about the author, excerpt. © reprinted by permission. all rights reserved., product details.

  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Dutton Books for Young Readers (April 4, 2023)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Paperback ‏ : ‎ 272 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 0525556540
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0525556541
  • Reading age ‏ : ‎ 16+ years, from customers
  • Lexile measure ‏ : ‎ 850L
  • Grade level ‏ : ‎ 9 - 12
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 6.4 ounces
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 6 x 0.5 x 8 inches
  • #449 in Teen & Young Adult Fiction about Self Esteem & Reliance
  • #639 in Teen & Young Adult Fiction about Death & Dying
  • #1,602 in Teen & Young Adult Friendship Fiction

Videos for this product

Video Widget Card

Click to play video

Video Widget Video Title Section

Looking For Alaska

Amazon Videos

About the author

John Green is the award-winning, #1 bestselling author of Looking for Alaska, An Abundance of Katherines, Paper Towns, Will Grayson, Will Grayson (with David Levithan), and The Fault in Our Stars. His many accolades include the Printz Medal, a Printz Honor, and the Edgar Award. John has twice been a finalist for the LA Times Book Prize and was selected by TIME magazine as one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World. With his brother, Hank, John is one half of the Vlogbrothers (youtube.com/vlogbrothers) and co-created the online educational series CrashCourse (youtube.com/crashcourse). You can join the millions who follow him on Twitter @johngreen and Instagram @johngreenwritesbooks or visit him online at johngreenbooks.com.

John lives with his family in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Customer reviews

Customer Reviews, including Product Star Ratings help customers to learn more about the product and decide whether it is the right product for them.

To calculate the overall star rating and percentage breakdown by star, we don’t use a simple average. Instead, our system considers things like how recent a review is and if the reviewer bought the item on Amazon. It also analyzed reviews to verify trustworthiness.

Reviews with images

Customer Image

  • Sort reviews by Top reviews Most recent Top reviews

Top reviews from the United States

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. please try again later..

book review on looking for alaska

Top reviews from other countries

book review on looking for alaska

  • Amazon Newsletter
  • About Amazon
  • Accessibility
  • Sustainability
  • Press Center
  • Investor Relations
  • Amazon Devices
  • Amazon Science
  • Sell on Amazon
  • Sell apps on Amazon
  • Supply to Amazon
  • Protect & Build Your Brand
  • Become an Affiliate
  • Become a Delivery Driver
  • Start a Package Delivery Business
  • Advertise Your Products
  • Self-Publish with Us
  • Become an Amazon Hub Partner
  • › See More Ways to Make Money
  • Amazon Visa
  • Amazon Store Card
  • Amazon Secured Card
  • Amazon Business Card
  • Shop with Points
  • Credit Card Marketplace
  • Reload Your Balance
  • Amazon Currency Converter
  • Your Account
  • Your Orders
  • Shipping Rates & Policies
  • Amazon Prime
  • Returns & Replacements
  • Manage Your Content and Devices
  • Recalls and Product Safety Alerts
  • Conditions of Use
  • Privacy Notice
  • Consumer Health Data Privacy Disclosure
  • Your Ads Privacy Choices

Advertisement

Supported by

Crime & Mystery

The Best Crime Novels of the Year (So Far)

Looking for some murder and mayhem (fictional, of course)? Here are the best crime novels of 2024 so far.

  • Share full article

book review on looking for alaska

By Sarah Weinman

We chose the 10 best crime novels of 2023. See the complete list .

I like Scandinavian crime fiction — the darker, the better

Under the storm , by christoffer carlsson.

When the body of a young woman is discovered in an incinerated farmhouse, resolution was swift: It was murder, her boyfriend did it, case closed. But for the boyfriend’s nephew, Isak; the arresting officer, Vidar Jörgensson; and the entire community of Marbäck, closure is a myth about to be shattered — spectacularly.

Amazon | Local bookstores | Barnes & Noble | Apple

Give me a tense, high-stakes novel that will keep me up all night

Smoke kings , by jahmal mayfield.

Can there ever be restitution for the harm done to generations of Black people in America? Mayfield takes this question to a provocative extreme in this thriller, which follows four friends as they kidnap descendants of people who long ago committed racially motivated hate crimes.

I want a historical mystery drenched in atmosphere

Rough trade , by katrina carrasco.

This is Carrasco’s second historical thriller to feature Alma Rosales, the gutsy, Pinkerton-trained opium smuggler who loves nothing more than a good brawl. The novel brims with the sights, smells and sounds of Tacoma, Wash., in 1888, full of docks, taverns and illicit back rooms where all manner of appetites are explored discreetly, where secrets swirl and betrayals come quickly.

Sure, plot’s great — but I’m more interested in character-driven stories

The hunter , by tana french.

In her follow-up to her 2020 book “ The Searcher ,” French continues to explore the dynamics of the Irish village where a retired Chicago detective, Cal Hooper, has moved. He is mentoring a local teen, Trey Reddy, when Trey’s long-disappeared father reappears, trailing a get-rich-quick scheme involving hidden gold and, inevitably, murder. French unspools her tale with patience, compassion and utter command.

I’d like a speculative Jazz Age noir

Cahokia jazz , by francis spufford.

Speculative histories have long been the terrain of Spufford’s fiction (and occasionally nonfiction). Here, he sets out to chronicle a vanished world that never had the chance to blossom, and marries it to the rhythms of hard-boiled detective fiction. Cahokia, in Spufford’s brilliant telling, is a thriving, Indigenous-led state roiling with racial tension. Then arrives the outsider detective Joe Barrow, investigating a murder that threatens to split Cahokia for good.

Explore More in Books

Want to know about the best books to read and the latest news start here..

John S. Jacobs was a fugitive, an abolitionist — and the brother of the canonical author Harriet Jacobs. Now, his own fierce autobiography has re-emerged .

Don DeLillo’s fascination with terrorism, cults and mass culture’s weirder turns has given his work a prophetic air. Here are his essential books .

Jenny Erpenbeck’s “ Kairos ,” a novel about a torrid love affair in the final years of East Germany, won the International Booker Prize , the renowned award for fiction translated into English.

Kevin Kwan, the author of “Crazy Rich Asians,” left Singapore’s opulent, status-obsessed, upper crust when he was 11. He’s still writing about it .

Each week, top authors and critics join the Book Review’s podcast to talk about the latest news in the literary world. Listen here .

Cut Lab Barber Studio

Photo of Cut Lab Barber Studio - Moorpark, CA, US.

Services Offered

Verified by Business

Location & Hours

Suggest an edit

Map

530 New Los Angeles Ave

Moorpark, CA 93021

You Might Also Consider

The Hair Extension Master

The Hair Extension Master

Welcome to The hair extension Master we are the experts in the art of hair extensions application and design visit our website or call us today read more

in Hair Extensions

Benz Nails Spa

Benz Nails Spa

7.0 miles away from Cut Lab Barber Studio

PD L. said "Excellent quality place! I use to come when it was TLC day spa. This owner has improved the quality. Wonderful technicians too. I recommend to everyone now. Much better than modern nail nearby." read more

in Skin Care, Waxing, Nail Salons

European Wax Center

European Wax Center

Julia A. said "After I left a previous review, the manager called me and apologized very sincerely and offered me a free wax, and also left a list of recommended waxers next to my name on my account so whoever booked my appointment would know who…" read more

in Skin Care, Waxing

Amenities and More

1 More Attribute

Ask the Community

Ask a question

Yelp users haven’t asked any questions yet about Cut Lab Barber Studio .

People also searched for

hot lather shave

kids' haircuts

line up haircut

beauty & spas

Recommended Reviews

Photo of Username

  • 1 star rating Not good
  • 2 star rating Could’ve been better
  • 3 star rating OK
  • 4 star rating Good
  • 5 star rating Great

Select your rating

Overall rating

Photo of Javier A.

I've been a client of Laylo for some time now, and I can confidently say he's a master of his craft. Every visit is a testament to his meticulous attention to detail and commitment to excellence. Laylo always keeps it clean and crisp, ensuring that each haircut is not only precise but also tailored perfectly to my style. From the moment you sit in his chair, you know you're in good hands. Laylo's professional demeanor, combined with his genuine passion for what he does, creates an experience that is both comfortable and enjoyable. He takes the time to understand exactly what you want and consistently delivers results that exceed expectations. If you're looking for a barber who provides top-tier service and a haircut that stands out, Laylo is the one to see. Highly recommended!

book review on looking for alaska

Professional and friendly, for adults and kids too! I've been a loyal customer for the founding barbers here for many years now. They finally opened this sleek looking and Uber friendly vibe barber shop. It's super easy to book an appointment, and they always do a great job. Can't see myself going anywhere else!!! Highly recommended!!!! A++++++++

Photo of Erick G.

Nick is the MAN! Honestly the best barber I have ever had. I followed him from his previous place and soo happy I did. He is such a personable and fun loving dude. Its always a great experience getting a haircut with him and he delivers a fantastic cut every time. I can tell he really gives the best treatment to all of his clients. Cut Lab has great staff that greats you when you arrive and makes you feel welcome. This place has a great vibe and ambience. I couldn't recommend this barbershop enough!

Photo of Conner G.

Nick has been cutting my hair for years and always does an incredible job. The team at Cut Lab is always welcoming and comes highly recommended. A great addition to Moorpark!

6 other reviews that are not currently recommended

Nora Face Art Beauty

Nora Face Art Beauty

Microblading , 3D creating an illusion of a more defined and fuller brow , and we have our own products which helping in the healing phase. microblading is very attractive to most people because it's not permanent , we not pushing… read more

in Threading Services, Tattoo, Eyelash Service

Polka Dot Nails Spa and Waxing

Polka Dot Nails Spa and Waxing

6.9 miles away from Cut Lab Barber Studio

Tiffany J. said "I went here pretty excited because it looked like they could do nail art and they had such good reviews. The man on the phone was very nice too. However once I got there, and waited for my turn, I showed them what I wanted and they…" read more

in Nail Salons, Waxing

People Also Viewed

The Surgeons on Yelp

The Surgeons

Oasis Barbershop on Yelp

Oasis Barbershop

Oaks Barbershop on Yelp

Oaks Barbershop

Gil’s Barbershop on Yelp

Gil’s Barbershop

Jersey’s Barbershop on Yelp

Jersey’s Barbershop

Shag Shop on Yelp

Joshua’s Barber Shop

Level Up Shop on Yelp

Level Up Shop

Double Edge Barber Shop on Yelp

Double Edge Barber Shop

Razor’s Edge on Yelp

Razor’s Edge

Browse Nearby

Restaurants

Things to Do

Other Barbers Nearby

Find more Barbers near Cut Lab Barber Studio

Service Offerings in Moorpark

Hot Lather Shave

Traditional Straight Razor Shave

IMAGES

  1. Looking For Alaska by John Green Review

    book review on looking for alaska

  2. Looking For Alaska Book Review

    book review on looking for alaska

  3. Looking for Alaska by John Green (book cover recreation)

    book review on looking for alaska

  4. Looking For Alaska & Character Expansion

    book review on looking for alaska

  5. Looking For Alaska by John Green

    book review on looking for alaska

  6. Looking for Alaska by John Green

    book review on looking for alaska

VIDEO

  1. How to book a trip to alaska

  2. “Looking for Alaska” Book Review

  3. Looking For Alaska (S1 E-8) Series Review w/ clips & scenes

COMMENTS

  1. Looking for Alaska Book Review

    Educational Value. This book is on many school reading lists; teacher. Positive Messages. Looking for Alaska will give older teens a lot to. Positive Role Models. Even though the main characters often behave badly. Violence & Scariness. A fatal car wreck, a possible suicide, and a chara. Sex, Romance & Nudity.

  2. Looking for Alaska by John Green

    January 19, 2022. Looking for Alaska, John Green. Looking for Alaska is John Green's first novel, published in March 2005 by Dutton Juvenile. Before. Miles "Pudge" Halter is done with his safe life at home. His whole life has been one big non-event, and his obsession with famous last words has only made him crave "the Great Perhaps ...

  3. News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's US edition

    We would like to show you a description here but the site won't allow us.

  4. Book Review: Looking for Alaska by John Green

    John Green's first novel, Looking for Alaska, won the 2006 Michael L. Printz Award presented by the American Library Association. His second novel, An Abundance of Katherines, was a 2007 Michael L. Printz Award Honor Book and a finalist for the Los

  5. Looking for Alaska By John Green Book Review: What Is The Way Out Of

    December 4, 2020. The story in Looking for Alaska is set in a time when everyone is building their self-image, identity, dreams, and love lives - high school. John Green introduces us to Miles Halter, who is the unreliable narrator of this story (But, as you know, the story revolves around our heroine, Alaska) He remembers the last words of ...

  6. Book Review: Looking for Alaska by John Green

    Title: Looking for Alaska Author: John Green Genre: Contemporary YA Publisher: Speak/ HarperCollins Children'sBooks (UK) Publication date: March 2005/ July 2006 (UK) Paperback: 272 pages Stand alone or series: Stand alone First drink, first prank, first friend, first girl, last words! A poignant and moving crossover novel about making friends and growing up from American author, John Green ...

  7. LOOKING FOR ALASKA

    LOOKING FOR ALASKA. Girls will cry and boys will find love, lust, loss and longing in Alaska's vanilla-and-cigarettes scent. The Alaska of the title is a maddening, fascinating, vivid girl seen through the eyes of Pudge (Miles only to his parents), who meets Alaska at boarding school in Alabama. Pudge is a skinny ("irony" says his ...

  8. Looking for Alaska

    Alaska spends most of her free time drinking, smoking and musing. She is legendary for instigating pranks against the school's rich kids and leadership. But one night after a prank and a drinking binge with Pudge and the gang, Alaska crashes her car and dies. Alaska's friends spend the rest of the book trying to piece together the events of ...

  9. Looking for Alaska

    Looking for Alaska. 368p. Dutton. Jan. 2015. Tr. $19.99. ISBN 9780525428022. Gr 10 Up— The Printz Award-winning novel that kickstarted John Green's career and introduced a whole generation of teens to a new era of YA literature is turning 10 this year. Though the text itself remains the same, there are many extras included in this edition.

  10. Book Review For Teens: John Green Looking for Alaska

    But then, I was asked to review Green's first novel, Looking for Alaska, with my daughter, Madi. She picked it up, devoured it and placed it in my care. Alaska reads as satisfying as The Fault because it delivers in the same way. It has likeable (okay, adorable) characters. It has dialogue that's honest, funny and charmingly vulnerable, and ...

  11. Review: 'Looking For Alaska' but Finding Talky Teens

    The novel "Looking For Alaska," by John Green, was published in 2005, and that same year Josh Schwartz, the creator of "The O.C.," signed on to write and direct a feature adaptation. Then ...

  12. Looking for Alaska

    PZ7.G8233 Lo 2005. Looking for Alaska is a 2005 young adult novel by American author John Green. Based on his time at Indian Springs School, Green wrote the novel as a result of his desire to create meaningful young adult fiction. [1] The characters and events of the plot are grounded in Green's life, while the story itself is fictional.

  13. Looking For Alaska

    Looking For Alaska. John Green. HarperCollins UK, May 31, 2012 - Young Adult Fiction - 272 pages. The unmissable first novel from bestselling and award-winning author of THE FAULT IN OUR STARS and TURTLES ALL THE WAY DOWN. "In the dark beside me, she smelled of sweat and sunshine and vanilla and on that thin-mooned night I could see little ...

  14. Differences Between the Looking for Alaska Show and Book

    The new eight-episode Hulu adaptation of John Green's 2005 book 'Looking for Alaska" updates the novel for a new generation of viewers. Here's how the show differs from the book.

  15. Looking for Alaska: Green, John: 9780142402511: Amazon.com: Books

    John Green is the award-winning, #1 bestselling author of Looking for Alaska, An Abundance of Katherines, Paper Towns, Will Grayson, Will Grayson (with David Levithan), and The Fault in Our Stars. His many accolades include the Printz Medal, a Printz Honor, and the Edgar Award. John has twice been a finalist for the LA Times Book Prize and was ...

  16. Looking for Alaska

    About Looking for Alaska. The award-winning, genre-defining debut from John Green, the #1 bestselling author of The Anthropocene Reviewed and The Fault in Our Stars Winner of the Michael L. Printz Award • A Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist • A New York Times Bestseller • A USA Today Bestseller • NPR's Top Ten Best-Ever Teen Novels • TIME magazine's 100 Best Young Adult ...

  17. LOOKING FOR ALASKA

    One meets in passing a vast roster of famous figures of the international and artistic set. And always one feels Bemelmans, slightly offstage, observing, recording, commenting, illustrated. Share your opinion of this book. Veteran travel-writer Jenkins (Along the Edge of America, 1995, etc.) looks for Alaska and finds an idealized America ...

  18. [Book Review] 'Looking for Alaska' by John Green

    The suspense of the pivotal point, the mystery of the event, the fun of adolescence and the sadness in the story make this book a cocktail of emotions. This novel gives the readers an unfiltered peek into adolescence. With a commendable score of 3.9 out of 5, Looking for Alaska is a journey of self-discovery that explores true understanding ...

  19. Looking For Alaska Book Review (Spoiler Free)

    Looking For Alaska Book Review. Title: Looking For Alaska. Author: John Green. Genre: Young adult fiction, Romance. Publisher: Dutton Juvenile. Type: Standalone. Pages: 297. Goodreads rating: 4 / 5. Miles Halter is a nerdy Florida teen who has an unusual obsession with learning famous dead people's last words. When he starts at Culver Creek ...

  20. Book Review: 'Looking for Alaska' by John Green

    I like everything to be wrapped up, unless there is a sequel. "Looking for Alaska" was different. Green made a statement by leaving some questions up to the interpretation of the reader, and I enjoyed coming up with my own answers. The characters in the book were relatable to those in Green's book "Paper Towns," but the plot line is ...

  21. Looking for Alaska Book Summary

    Introduction: "Looking for Alaska" is a deeply moving and thought-provoking young adult novel by bestselling author John Green. The novel tells the story of a young man's journey of self-discovery as he navigates the complexities of friendship, love, and loss. This review will discuss the book's themes, literary devices, and strengths ...

  22. What to read: Summer books to look forward to in 2024 : NPR

    Goodnight Tokyo by Atsuhiro Yoshida, translated by Haydn Trowell. Atsuhiro Yoshida's Goodnight Tokyo begins with a film company procurer who's tasked with finding fresh kumquats for a production ...

  23. Mystery fiction reviews: Violence simmers in two gripping debuts

    Alejandro Nodarse will discuss "Blood in the Cut" with Miami author Raquel V. Reyes, author of "Barbacoa, Bomba, and Betrayal" at 8 p.m. June 5 at Books & Books, 265 Aragon Ave., Coral ...

  24. Amazon.com: Looking for Alaska: 9780525556541: Green, John: Books

    John Green is the award-winning, #1 bestselling author of Looking for Alaska, An Abundance of Katherines, Paper Towns, Will Grayson, Will Grayson (with David Levithan), The Fault in Our Stars, and Turtles All the Way Down.His many accolades include the Printz Medal, a Printz Honor, and the Edgar Award. John has twice been a finalist for the LA Times Book Prize and was selected by TIME magazine ...

  25. 2024 Sauces of Honor Awards

    Join us LIVE on Thursday May 30th at 8pm for the 2024 Sauces of Honor Awards hosted by Barbecue News Magazine

  26. The Best Crime Novels of 2024 (So Far)

    Under the Storm, by Christoffer Carlsson. When the body of a young woman is discovered in an incinerated farmhouse, resolution was swift: It was murder, her boyfriend did it, case closed. But for ...

  27. CUT LAB BARBER STUDIO

    They finally opened this sleek looking and Uber friendly vibe barber shop. It's super easy to book an appointment, and they always do a great job. Can't see myself going anywhere else!!! Highly recommended!!!! A+++++" ... If you're looking for a barber who provides top-tier service and a haircut that stands out, Laylo is the one to see. Highly ...