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Physician Assistant (MS)

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Training physician assistants since 1971 makes ours one of the most experienced programs in the nation.

Physician Assistants (PAs) are medical practitioners who practice collaboratively with a supervising physician. The PA scope of practice is authorized by state law and determined by the supervising physician.

PAs take medical histories, perform physical examinations, order diagnostic tests/studies, diagnose, develop and implement a treatment plan in consultation with the supervising physician, prescribe medication in all states, advise and educate patients on health promotion and disease management, provide inpatient hospital care for patients, and assist in surgery.

pa program coursework

Physician Assistants provide care both in teaching institutions and in hospitals where there are no physician residents and are employed in health centers, multi-specialty medical group practices, emergency rooms, physician’s offices, and nursing homes.

As the role of the PA has expanded over the years, Northeastern has adapted its curriculum. While PA education concentrates largely on generalist medicine, more than a quarter of PAs now go into subspecialties.

Northeastern has been in the forefront of creative utilization of PAs. You will be trained as a generalist provider in the traditional primary care environment and will also be prepared to work in new and emerging aspects of health care.

Northeastern University’s PA Program prepares students for national certification and meets the education requirements for professional licensure as a Physician Assistant in all 50 states and Washington, DC, enabling graduates to apply for a PA license anywhere in the country upon graduation from the program.

Degree type: – Physician Assistant MS Study options: – On ground (Boston Campus) – Full-time only

Application deadline: Aug 1

GRE: Not required

F1: Not eligible

The 2023 US News and World Report Graduate Rankings list Northeastern University’s Physician Assistant Program as #20 in the nation.

Accreditation and Program Outcomes

The Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA) has granted Accreditation-Continued status to the Northeastern University Physician Assistant Program sponsored by Northeastern University. Accreditation-Continued is an accreditation status granted when a currently accredited program is in compliance with the ARC-PA Standards. Accreditation remains in effect until the program closes or withdraws from the accreditation process or until accreditation is withdrawn for failure to comply with the Standards. The approximate date for the next validation review of the program by the ARC-PA will be March 2025. The review date is contingent upon continued compliance with the Accreditation Standards and ARC-PA policy.

The program’s  accreditation history can be viewed on the ARC-PA website  at: https://www.arc-pa.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Accreditation-History-Northeastern-U-11.pdf

ARCPA logo

1. Patient-Centered Practice Knowledge

  • Gather essential and accurate information about patients through history-taking, physical examination, and diagnostic studies to provide patient-centered care.
  • Synthesize and critically evaluate the most current scientific evidence and the stories of individual patients to formulate a diagnosis and develop and implement patient management plans, provide preventative care, and promote individual wellbeing.
  • Perform or assist in the performance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures associated with the management of medical and surgical conditions.
  • Identify and correct gaps in knowledge, skill, or attitude by engaging in self-motivated learning and self-reflection.

2. Society and Population Health

Integrate individual, societal, community, and global determinants of health into a shared medical decision-making approach to patient care and wellness.

3. Health Literacy and Communication

Exhibit interpersonal and communication skills that encourage effective exchange of information, awareness of unconscious bias, incorporation of health literacy, and cultural humility in order to promote improved medical outcomes and health equity.

4. Interprofessional Collaborative Practice and Leadership

Establish one’s own role and integrate knowledge of other professions in an interprofessional healthcare team that partners with the patient to advocate for and establish a patient-centered clinical approach to healthcare.

5. Professional and Legal Aspects of Healthcare

Promote the continued advancement of the Physician Assistant profession through emphasis on professional maturity and accountability, understanding of standards of care and professional integrity, and knowledge of laws and regulations that govern the delivery of healthcare.

6. Healthcare Finance and Systems

Contribute to the greater health care system though encouragement of system-based practice, cost-effective health care and resource allocation, high quality patient care, and attention to public and population health concerns.

Students are expected to maintain a minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0 (“B”) in all course work.  If the cumulative GPA falls below 3.0, students are placed on academic probation.  Only two courses may be repeated in meeting the GPA of at least 3.0 (“B”) required for the degree.  “Satisfactory” and “Unsatisfactory” grades are not included in the GPA.

Students must receive a grade of “C” or better in each individual course.  If a course grade is below “C,” students are placed on academic probation even if the GPA is above 3.0.

Students must obtain a GPA of at least 3.0 (“B”) in each semester.  If the GPA for any semester is below 3.0, students are placed on academic probation.

Students who receive a grade of “F” or “U” in a course may make up the course based on their advisor’s recommendation and permission of the Program Director. Students are not permitted to repeat a course more than once.  As didactic courses are offered only once each year, students may have to wait at least one year to repeat a failed course or one in which they received a grade of “U.”  In some cases, this could mean that students may not continue in the Program because they have not completed a prerequisite.  Course credits earned in the Program are valid for a maximum of four years unless an extension is granted by the PA Program Director.

To be removed from probation, students must clear any deficient grades; maintain a 3.0 GPA in all future semesters without receiving an “I,” “F,” “U,” or “W” grade; meet the requirements listed above; and petition for removal from probationary status.  Students who do not meet these requirements are subject to dismissal.  Readmission to the program is at the discretion of the Program Admissions Committee.

An “I” (Incomplete) grade will be changed to a letter grade when the deficiency that led to the “I” is corrected to the satisfaction of and in the manner prescribed by the course instructor.  A grade of “I” must be cleared within 30 calendar days from the date of its initial recording on a student’s permanent record.  Students must sign an Incomplete Contract with the Program as required by the Registrar’s office and complete the terms specified prior to clearing the “I”.

Students are permitted to decelerate in the event of a formal leave of absence. A leave of absence is granted at the discretion of the Bouvé College Dean of Graduate Studies and is limited to one year in duration. The student must petition the Bouvé College Dean of Graduate Studies to return to the Program. The Program itself does not participate in the granting of a leave or in reinstatement. After a return from the leave of absence, the student must repeat in its entirety any course for which a final grade was not entered.

A letter grade is given for each clinical rotation (applied study).  The clinical grade includes a review of the student’s clinical performance and professional conduct as determined by the preceptor at each site.  A grade of at least “C” in each clinical rotation is required.  If a student fails a rotation, repeating it is at the discretion of the preceptor and Program Director.  A student may repeat only one rotation during the entire PA Program.

Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA to enter their second year (Semester 4).   Students must maintain at least a 3.0 GPA during the clinical year or be placed on academic probation.  In order to graduate, students must pass all end-of-rotation exams as well as a comprehensive exam at the completion of their second year.

Students are required to pass a Summative Evaluation within the last four months of the program prior to graduation. For more information you can review the Summative Evaluation description .

Students are also required to successfully complete a Scholarly Paper/Capstone Project of publishable quality prior to graduation. A passing grade for the Scholarly Project is 70% or higher.

Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA upon completion of the Program to receive the Master’s degree.

*Attrition rate calculation: Number of students who attrited from cohort divided by the entering class size.

**Graduation rate: Number of cohort graduates divided by the entering class size.

Northeastern University Physician Assistance PANCE Performance Summary Report

Northeastern’s PA Program is highly integrated within each semester as well as vertically between semesters. Methods of instruction include general lectures limited to the maximum 52 students in the class, small group discussion sections of 5 to 8 students, and simulation lab exercises including interdisciplinary cases with students from other health science programs in our college.

We are committed to developing future physician assistants who can advance diversity by providing culturally informed care to people across race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, class, age, ability, and nationality. We support the acquisition of competencies that prepare our students to recognize, confront, and end discrimination in its many forms.

Instructors are able to respond to questions and go into topics in considerable depth, preparing you for the clinical placements where you will put your knowledge to work.

Successful completion of the entire two-year program is required to take the PA National Certification Exam (PANCE).

What does a typical student schedule look like?

The program is a full-time day program . There is NO part-time option.

During the first year, students will have classes Monday through Friday, generally from 8:00 a.m. to at least 5:00 p.m.

Occasionally, there may be a special evening lab or demonstration which students are made aware of well in advance.

While on rotation during the second year, students will go to various rotation sites and are expected to fulfill the hours required at different sites, including evenings, weekends, and on-call coverage.

Sample Curriculum

Sample curriculum, subject to change.

The chart below describes a sequence of courses as taught in the recent past. This chart is not a planning document for what course will be taught in which semester (spring or fall) in the future. For that information, students should consult with their academic advisor or see the  university course catalog .

Fall Semester

Anatomy and Physiology 1

Clinical Lab and Diagnostic Methods 1

Physical Diagnosis and Patient Evaluation 1

Pharmacology 1

Principles of Medicine 1

Principles of Psychiatry

Professional Issues for Physician Assistants

Spring Semester

Anatomy and Physiology 2

Clinical Lab and Diagnostic Methods 2

Physical Diagnosis and Patient Evaluation 2

Pharmacology 2

Principles of Medicine 2

Clinical Neurology

Principles of Pediatrics

Research Design

Health Care Delivery

Principles of Medicine 3

Principles of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Principles of Orthopedics

Principles of Surgery

Aspects of Primary Care

Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

Aging and Rehabilitation Medicine

Clinical rotations are a critical part of PA training. After successfully completing the didactic portion of the program in the first year, the subsequent 12 months are spent in clinical rotations. Rotations are assigned at a variety of medical settings. Because of Northeastern’s recognized focus on practice-oriented education and the PA Program’s longevity and reputation in the field, we can offer students a wide variety of clinical opportunities at hospitals, clinics, private practitioner’s offices, and multispecialty clinics. All students experience a broad diversity of patient populations and practice sites.

Students do not need to find their own clinical placements. We have long-standing relationships with many sites and supervisors and are able to place students in rotations. Every student receives an individualized rotation schedule and completes clinical rotations in each of the following areas of medicine. The sequence varies for each student.

  • Ambulatory Medicine
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Family Practice Medicine
  • Inpatient Medicine
  • Mental Health
  • Women’s Health

While most clinical rotations are located in the Greater Boston area and New England, students will be expected to travel to distant sites to complete their rotations .

Only the elective rotation is chosen by the student and may be done in any medical specialty either in this country or abroad. The Clinical Faculty must approve all elective rotations to ensure they fulfill learning objectives and provide adequate supervision.

Completion of a scholarly project by the end of the second year is required for graduation.

Admissions Requirements

Both academic work and patient care experience must be completed prior to applying to the program with the following exception. Applicants with outstanding degree completion and/or a single  outstanding prerequisite course will be considered if successfully completed by June 15th prior to matriculation.

Admissions requirements and procedures are reviewed and revised annually. Please refer to our  Selection Process and Criteria . Updates are generally made on our web page at the end of March.

We are unable to pre-review transcripts before an individual applies to the program. It is the applicant’s responsibility to review the most current information prior to applying. All applications will be considered as long as they are complete and are submitted prior to the August 1 deadline and verified by CASPA by August 31.

Read carefully prior to applying

Prerequisites.

Both academic work and patient care experience must be completed prior to applying to the program with the following exception. Applicants with outstanding degree completion and/or a single outstanding prerequisite course will be considered if successfully completed by June 15th prior to matriculation.

Admissions requirements and procedures are reviewed and revised annually. Please refer to our  Selection Process and Criteria . Updates are generally made on our web page at the end of March.

We can answer general questions about the program that are not addressed on our website.  You can call us at 617.373.3195 or email at  [email protected] .

Bachelor’s degree  in any major from a regionally accredited institution.

A minimum overall GPA  of 3.00 on a 4.00 scale  as calculated on the CASPA application.  We will accept any of the following overall GPAs to satisfy this requirement:

  • Bachelor’s degree-associated overall GPA
  • Master’s or doctoral degree-associated overall GPA
  • Post-baccalaureate-associated (minimum 30 credit hours) overall GPA

A minimum science GPA  of 3.00 on a 4.00 scale  as calculated on the CASPA application.  This GPA includes all college science courses taken at regionally accredited institutions. We will accept any of the following science GPAs to satisfy this requirement:

  • Bachelor’s degree-associated science GPA
  • Master’s or doctoral degree-associated science GPA
  • Post-baccalaureate-associated (at least 30 credit hours) science GPA. The thirty credits need to be included in the verified GPA
  • Stronger preference will be given to applicants with higher overall and science GPAs

Stronger preference will be given to applicants who demonstrate strong academic rigor including the type of coursework completed and whether difficult courses were completed one at a time versus several difficult courses taken concomitantly.

The GRE is NOT required  and will not be considered in your application review.

Academic Course Requirements

The following academic work must be completed  prior to applying by the August 1 deadline. It is essential that applicants review the detailed Physician Assistant Program Prerequisites information below.  Please be sure to review the FAQ section (below) for additional guidelines and explanations on course prerequisites. Students must earn a  grade of solid B or better  from a regionally accredited institution for a course to fulfill a prerequisite. Pass/Fail grades do not fulfill any of the prerequisites unless otherwise indicated (see COVID-19 prerequisite modifications).

1 Any combination  (basic or upper level) of 2 semesters of biology lectures plus 1 biology lab. Courses may include general biology, microbiology, genetics, immunology, infectious disease, pathophysiology, cell biology. Courses labeled “for non-science majors” are not appropriate.

2 Any combination  (basic or upper level) of 2 semesters of chemistry lectures plus 1 chemistry lab. Courses may include general chemistry, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry. Courses labeled “for non-science majors” are not appropriate.

3 Anatomy and Physiology  is commonly offered as A&P 1 plus A&P 2 or 1 semester of anatomy plus 1 semester of physiology. Course content must be in sufficient depth to provide a comprehensive understanding of the body and must cover the entire body from head to toe including all body systems. Either a one semester or a two-semester course is appropriate as long as all systems are included. Human, vertebrate, and animal A&P are all acceptable. A&P lab is not required. All components of the Anatomy and Physiology sequence must have grades of solid B or better.

4 Statistics  may be offered by any department (biostatistics; statistics for psych, math, or business majors among others). The course content needs to include probability theory, multiple regression, hypothesis testing, T tests, chi square, ANOVAS, Z tests, correlations, means, medians, modes, and logistical regression as well as how to select and apply the appropriate statistical test, how to analyze the data, and how to interpret the results.  Calculus does not satisfy the statistics prerequisite

5 Grades of B- or below do  not  fulfill the minimum grade requirement.

  • Advanced placement (AP) or international baccalaureate (IB) credits from high school do not fulfill any of our course prerequisites. Non-credit courses are not accepted to fulfill any prerequisites. Advanced placement will not be awarded to any applicant, regardless of prior education or experience.
  • Individuals who hold a doctoral degree from an accredited US institution in a health or science field (MD, PhD, DrPH, DVM, ScD) may have individual prerequisite course requirements waived at the discretion of the Admissions Committee. For example, an individual with a PhD in Chemistry who has been working in a related field may have their chemistry lecture/lab requirement waived if taken more than 10-years prior to applying.
  • Successful completion of the ECFMG or USMLE cannot be substituted in lieu of taking all the prerequisite courses. Advanced standing credit will not be given for courses taken elsewhere. All students accepted into the program must successfully complete the entire 2-year curriculum regardless of previous education and degrees.
  • COVID-19 PREREQUISITE MODIFICATIONS: the Northeastern University Physician Assistant Program Admissions Committee made the decision to accept Pass/Fail grades in any 2 of our required prerequisite courses (see chart). These 2 courses must have been taken during the spring 2020 or summer 2020 terms only. All other prerequisite courses taken at any other time must still have grades of solid B or better to satisfy our requirements. All other prerequisites remain the same.

Patient Care Experience

The Admissions Committee defines patient care experience as working directly with patients . Examples of patient care experience include, but are not limited to:

  • Taking vital signs
  • Performing ECGs
  • Drawing blood
  • Changing bandages and dressings
  • Splinting, casting, removing sutures
  • Bathing and toileting
  • Mental health counseling

The job title of the position is not as important as the specific duties performed. Administrative work in a healthcare setting or caring for family members will not be considered.

Patient care experience should be completed prior to applying by the August 1 deadline. Strong preference will be given to applicants who have approximately 1000 hours of patient care experience prior to applying to the program. A stronger preference will be given to those with over 1800 hours of patient care experience prior to applying. Applicants with fewer than 1000 hours may also be given consideration depending upon the strength of their entire application.

PA shadowing is not a prerequisite and does not count toward patient care hours. However, we highly recommend shadowing to acquire a solid understanding of the PA role.

Please be sure to review the  FAQ section  for additional guidelines and explanations.

Additional Prerequisites

  • Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare Providers Certification: Students are required to have valid BLS certification no later than the start of the summer semester of the didactic year and prior to taking the ACLS course during that semester. Initial BLS certification must have an in-person component, and recertification may be done online. Students are required to ascertain on their own if they have taken an American Heart Association (AHA)-approved BLS certification course. Please do not contact the program about AHA approval as the program is unable to research the many local agencies that provide BLS training to ensure that they have AHA approval. BLS certification is not an application requirement.
  • A laptop computer (PC or MAC) with a webcam is required in order to take online exams in class.
  • Criminal background checks are required for all students. This will be conducted upon matriculation.
  • Access to a vehicle is required in order to travel to clinical sites.
  • Travel may be required to distant rotations under special circumstances.

Please note: These requirements are for applicants who are applying to the class that will matriculate in August of each year. Prerequisites are subject to change for future admissions cycles.

International Applicant Information

For applicants who have earned degrees outside of the United States, the following prerequisites must be completed prior to applying:

  • Completion of all the required science courses (see list of specific courses under “Academics” above).
  • TOEFL score within the previous 2 years of at least 100 (internet-based) to demonstrate proficiency in English.
  • A certified degree and course-by-course evaluation of foreign transcripts to ascertain equivalencies to United States educational standards. The GPA obtained at a foreign university must be equivalent to at least a 3.0 GPA in the United States. We will only accept evaluations done by World Education Services (WES). Evaluations performed by other companies will NOT be accepted. The report should be submitted to CASPA.

World Education Services Bowling Green Station PO Box 5087 New York, NY 10274 Phone: 212.966.6311 Website:  www.wes.org

Current and ongoing patient care experience is needed in order to be a competitive applicant.

Required Technical Standards

A candidate for the Physician Assistant Program must have abilities and skills in:

  • observation
  • communication
  • sensory and motor coordination and function
  • intellectual-conceptual, integrative, and quantitative abilities
  • behavioral and social attributes

Observation  Candidates and students must be able to observe demonstrations and participate in experiments in the basic sciences, and must observe a patient accurately at a distance and close at hand, noting both nonverbal and verbal signals. Observation necessitates the functional use of the sense of vision and other sensory modalities.

Communication  Candidates and students must be able to: speak intelligibly, hear sufficiently, and observe patients closely in order to elicit and transmit information; describe changes in mood, activity, and posture; and perceive nonverbal communications; and communicate effectively and sensitively with patients. Communication includes not only speech, but also reading and writing skills. Candidates and students must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently in oral and written English with all members of the health care team.  Students must demonstrate reading skills at a level sufficient to accomplish curricular requirements, provide clinical care for patients, and complete appropriate medical records, documents, and plans according to protocol in a thorough and timely manner.

Sensory and Motor Coordination and Function  Candidates and students are required to possess motor skills sufficient to directly perform palpation, percussion, auscultation, and other basic diagnostic procedures; and execute motor movements reasonably required to provide basic medical care, such as airway management, placement of catheters, application of sufficient pressure to control bleeding, and simple obstetrical maneuvers. These actions require coordination of gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium, and functional use of the senses of touch and vision.

Intellectual-Conceptual, Integrative and Quantitative Abilities  These abilities include measurement, calculation, reasoning, analysis, and synthesis. Problem solving, the critical skill demanded of physician assistants, requires all these intellectual abilities. Candidates and students must be able to: independently access and interpret medical histories or files; identify significant findings from history, physical examination, and laboratory data; provide a reasoned explanation for likely diagnoses and prescribed medications and therapy; recall and retain information in an efficient and timely manner. The ability to incorporate new information from peers, teachers, and medical literature in formulating diagnoses and plans is essential. Good judgment in patient assessment and diagnostic and therapeutic planning is essential. Students must be able to communicate their knowledge to others when appropriate.

Behavioral and Social Attributes  Candidates and students must possess the ability to: use their intellectual capacity, exercise good judgment, and promptly complete all responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients under potentially stressful and/or emergency circumstances; develop empathic, sensitive, and effective relationships with patients; adapt to changing environments and learn in the face of uncertainties that are inherent in the practice of medicine; use supervision appropriately and act independently when indicated. Compassion, integrity, ethical standards, concern for others, interpersonal skills, interest, and motivation are all personal qualities that will be assessed during the admissions and educational process.

Immunization Policy

The University requires that every student submit proof of a health and immunization evaluation prior to matriculation. In addition, most institutions and clinical sites require that students provide documentation of immunization status. University Health and Counseling Services provide Immunization Clearance Forms. Students are responsible for having the Student Health Form completed and returned to Health Services prior to matriculation so that the Clinical Clearance Form can be processed and available for clinical sites. In order to complete rotations, students are required to sign a release form that allows the Program to share immunization records with clinical sites. The Bouvé College of Health Sciences immunization requirements are consistent with current Centers for Disease Control recommendations for the immunization of Health Care Providers and can be found on the Northeastern website. Students planning to matriculate are encouraged to review the information included on the  New to NU  web page.

Admissions and Selection Process

The mission of the Northeastern University Physician Assistant Program is to educate and inspire compassionate clinicians from diverse backgrounds to become accomplished leaders and innovators in all aspects of healthcare. As global citizens, we are dedicated to access, equity, and inclusion. We are committed to developing future physician assistants who can advance diversity by providing culturally informed care to people across race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, class, age, ability, and nationality.

A class of 52 students matriculates once each year in August. The CASPA application cycle opens in late April, and our application deadline is August 1 of the year prior to planned matriculation. We do not have early decision or rolling admissions. Early application submission does not guarantee early review of your application. All applications will be fully reviewed and equally considered if they are submitted to CASPA by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on August 1 and verified by CASPA by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on August 31. Applicants with outstanding degree completion and/or a single outstanding prerequisite course will be considered if successfully completed by June 15th prior to matriculation. If you are completing one final course, be sure it is listed under “Courses in Progress/Planned” on the CASPA application. It is your responsibility to send an official transcript directly to the PA Program as soon as the final grade/degree conferral is available. Electronic transcripts are preferred. The admissions process has 3 phases:

  • Review of the CASPA applications
  • Personal interviews
  • Final selection of class

Northeastern University’s Physician Assistant Program does not award or grant advanced placement or course credit to any admitted students regardless of previous education or work experience. All applicants must meet the Program’s rigorous criteria for admissions. Admissions decisions are made without regard to race, color, religion, creed, sex, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, genetics, nationality, veteran’s status, disability, or age. The admissions process is competitive. During the 2023-2024 application cycle, we had approximately 2,200 verified CASPA applications.

Review of CASPA Applications

The Northeastern University Physician Assistant Program reviews applications holistically. All components of the CASPA application are considered in selecting candidates for a personal interview. No one specific application component will ensure admission to the program. The holistic review considers the following:

  • Admissions prerequisites
  • Academic achievement including overall GPA, science GPA, and academic rigor
  • Patient care hours and reflections of clinical experience in relation to future goals in healthcare in the CASPA and Northeastern essays
  • Evidence of alignment with the program’s mission, vision, program goals, and core values in the CASPA and Northeastern essays
  • Letters of recommendation (at least two clinically-related)
  • Overall impression of the application

Personal Interviews

Approximately 200 candidates are interviewed. Interviews will be conducted virtually and are usually scheduled in mid-October. Applicants selected for personal interviews will be notified via email a few weeks prior to the date of the interview. The interview process provides applicants the opportunity to:

  • meet with program leadership for an overview of the program
  • meet with PA students and/or recent graduates
  • meet with a program graduate to discuss what the professional life of a PA is like and how well the program prepared them for the work
  • virtual tour of campus
  • interview one-on-one with members of the Admissions Committee including program faculty and alumni

During the personal interview the admissions committee not only considers all components of the CASPA application but also evaluates applicants regarding:

  • Patient care reflections of clinical experience in relation to future goals in healthcare in the CASPA essay, Northeastern essay, and personal interview
  • Evidence of alignment with the  program’s mission, vision, program goals, and core values  in the CASPA essay, Northeastern essay, and personal interview
  • Overall impression of the candidate

Final Selection of Class

Final selection of the class will be conducted by holistic review of the candidates who were interviewed. This selection will be based upon all components of the CASPA application review, and the personal interview.

Applicants will receive email notification regarding their status by late December. All admissions decisions are final. Those offered a seat in the program will have two weeks to respond. A deposit of $1000 is required to secure your place in the class and will be applied to your first term’s tuition.

Tuition, fees, and required equipment for PA students

Tuition for students beginning the program in the fall of 2023 is $18,850 per term, for a total of $56,550/year.  The Double Husky Scholarship is available to students starting with the class matriculating in August 2021 in the Physician Assistant Program. Additional fees are also listed below and are subject to change annually.

*These fees represent current expenses. Fees are expected to increase annually. Updated amounts for the upcoming academic year will be made available as soon as they are determined. More detailed information is available at  University Fees  and  Graduate Student Fees  websites.

By law, all students in Massachusetts are required to have health insurance. If a student does not elect to take the Northeastern University student health insurance plan ($2499 for the 2023-2024 academic year), evidence of other comparable health insurance coverage must be provided. More information about the Northeastern University student health insurance plan can be found  here .

Information about financial aid is available through  The Office of Graduate Student Financial Services  ( 617-373-5899 ). There are several types of need-based financial aid in the form of government loans as well as a Northeastern loan available only for physician assistant students.

Working while attending the program is not feasible. There are no graduate assistantships or Lifetime Learning Memberships available for PA students. Information about procedures regarding refunds of tuition and fees is available through  The Office of Student Financial Services  website.

Northeastern University participates in the federal government’s Yellow Ribbon Program for veterans. Information about the program (including eligibility, benefits, and how to apply) can be accessed on university’s  Yellow Ribbon  website.

The  John D. O’Bryant African-American Institute  offers a graduate fellowship to students of African origin who demonstrate high standards of leadership and have a record of community service.

Course Prerequisites FAQs

Can i apply if i still need to complete a course prerequisite.

Applicants with outstanding degree completion and/or a single outstanding prerequisite course will be considered if successfully completed by June 15th prior to matriculation. If you are completing one final course, be sure it is listed under “ Courses in Progress/Planned” on the CASPA application . It is your responsibility to send an official transcript directly to the PA Program as soon as the final grade/degree conferral is available. Electronic transcripts are preferred.

What should I do if I submit my CASPA application in the spring and still plan to take courses during the summer?

List all “in progress” and “planned” courses on the CASPA application. As soon as final grades are available, it is your responsibility to notify the program and promptly send an official transcript directly to the program so we can update your file. Electronic transcripts are preferred. We do not have early decision or rolling admissions, so there is no advantage to submitting your application early.

If you are still taking courses in the spring and summer semesters, you might consider waiting to submit your CASPA application so that the final grades appear on your application. All applications will be considered as long as they are complete and are submitted by the August 1 deadline at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time, verified by CASPA by August 31 at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time, and we receive the $75 Northeastern application fee by August 1 at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time.

Does Northeastern require any material in addition to the CASPA application?

We do not have a supplemental application. However, Northeastern does require a $75 Northeastern application fee in addition to the CASPA application fee. For instructions on how to submit the fee, please refer to the section entitled “Northeastern $75 Application Fee” on our web page under the “How to Apply” section.

What if my anatomy and physiology courses did not include a lab and are only 2-credit courses?

An Anatomy and Physiology lab is not required. The Admissions Committee does not evaluate the Anatomy and Physiology prerequisite based upon course credits. Rather it is the course content that is important. Both the anatomy and physiology of the  entire body  from head to toe, including  all body systems  must be covered.

Any combination of courses that covers full-body anatomy plus full-body physiology is appropriate if as long as all systems have been included. The most common combinations are A&P 1 plus A&P 2 or an anatomy course plus a physiology course. Either a one semester or a two semester course courses is appropriate if as long as all systems have been included. All components of the Anatomy and Physiology sequence must have grades of solid B or better.

Will courses taken during the summer term fulfill prerequisites?

Courses taken in the summer will be accepted if they are considered equivalent courses by the school offering them and they adhere to our guidelines regarding the type and content of the course.

Will I satisfy the biology or chemistry prerequisite if I earned a grade below a solid B in one biology or chemistry lecture course but earned grades of a solid B or better in at least 2 other biology or chemistry lecture courses?

You need to have a minimum of 2 biology lectures plus 1 biology lab and a minimum of 2 chemistry lectures plus 1 chemistry lab all with grades of solid B or better to satisfy the biology and chemistry prerequisite. Any combination of basic and upper-level biology or chemistry courses is acceptable. For example, if you took 5 biology lecture courses and earned grades below solid B in only 2 of them, you would still have 3 biology lectures with grades of solid B or better. Any combination of biology and chemistry courses (basic and upper level) taken at a regionally accredited 2-year or 4-year institution is fine.

Patient Care Experience FAQs

What does patient care experience mean.

The Admissions Committee defines patient care experience as working directly with patients. Examples of patient care experience include, but are not limited to, taking vital signs, performing ECGs, drawing blood, changing bandages and dressings, splinting, casting, removing sutures, bathing and toileting, scribing, and mental health counseling. The job title of the position is not as important as the specific duties performed. Administrative work in a healthcare setting or caring for family members will not be considered.

Does volunteer work count as patient care experience?

Patient care experience can be obtained through paid and/or volunteer experience.

What if I have not completed the necessary hours of patient care experience by the application deadline?

Patient care experience should be completed prior to applying by the August 1 deadline. Strong preference will be given to applicants who have approximately 1000 hours of patient care experience prior to applying to the program. Stronger preference will be given to those with over 1800 hours of patient care experience prior to applying. Applicants with fewer than 1000 hours may also be given consideration depending upon the strength of their entire application.

Application Deadline FAQs

Do you have early decision or rolling admissions.

No. All applications will be given full consideration if they are complete and are submitted to the program by 11:59 p.m. Eastern time on August 1, verified by CASPA by 11:59 p.m. Eastern time on August 31, and we receive Northeastern’s $75 application fee by 11:59 p.m. Eastern time on August 1. Applying early does not necessarily mean that your application will be reviewed earlier. Notification about interviews is generally sent via email starting in October. Final decisions regarding interviews and acceptance are usually finalized by the end of the year.

Can I apply while I’m still a senior in college?

The Admissions Committee will consider an application from a college senior if all the course prerequisites (except for a single outstanding course prerequisite which must be completed by June 15 prior to matriculation) and significant patient care experience have been successfully completed prior to the August 1 application submission deadline.

Will I still be considered if I submit my CASPA application by the August 1 deadline but the program does not receive it for another 2 to 4 weeks?

If your application is submitted to CASPA by 11:59 p.m. Eastern time on August 1, it will be reviewed if it has been verified by CASPA by 11:59 p.m. Eastern time on August 31. However, even if your CASPA application is verified by August 31, it will not be reviewed unless your $75 Northeastern application fee (if applicable) is also received by the program by 11:59 p.m. Eastern time on August 1. Complete applications are necessary for further consideration. Remember that around the August 1 CASPA submission deadline, it may take several weeks for CASPA to verify your application.

Application Evaluation FAQs

What criteria are used to evaluate applications.

Applications are initially screened to ensure that an applicant has satisfied the basic prerequisites (bachelor’s degree, minimum 3.0 overall and science GPAs, specific prerequisite coursework with minimum grades of solid B or better, academic rigor, and approximately 1000 hours of patient care experience). All components of the application are important. Please refer to our web page section on the  Admissions Process and Selection Criteria  for detailed information.

What is the profile of the ideal candidate?

There is none. The Admissions Committee reviews applications holistically. All application components are considered. Students accepted into the program have a wide array of personal backgrounds. The diversity of our classes creates an enriched learning environment for both students and instructors. The application pool varies from year to year making it difficult to predict what types of things an applicant can do to stand out.

All basic prerequisites need to be at least minimally met in order to be considered. The program is committed to developing future physician assistants who can advance diversity by providing culturally informed care to people across race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, class, age, ability, and nationality.

How many applications are typically received?

Last year, the program received close to 2200 verified CASPA applications.

What is the average GPA of the most recently admitted class?

Applications are reviewed holistically, and all criteria together are important. Focusing on an average GPA can be misleading. Students who are accepted into the program need to have both overall and science GPAs of at least 3.0 . Applicants with the highest GPAs are not necessarily always more competitive.

Many factors besides overall and science GPAs are taken into consideration. The Admissions Committee also considers:

  • Specific grades in prerequisite courses
  • Type and amount of patient care experience
  • Academic rigor
  • Clinically-related letters of recommendation
  • The application essays
  • And the personal interview.

What if my overall or science GPA is slightly below 3.0?

Application to the program is extremely competitive. Eligible applicants must have minimum overall and science GPAs of 3.0 in order to be considered for admission.

The Admissions Committee will consider one of the following GPAs when determining whether both the overall and science GPAs have been met: baccalaureate GPA, graduate GPA, or post-baccalaureate GPA (30 credits). Please refer to the  Prerequisites section for details.

How are GPAs calculated?

We use the GPAs as calculated by CASPA. Please refer to the  Prerequisites section on our website for more information.

If accepted, can I defer enrollment for a year?

No, we do not offer deferments. If an applicant is accepted but does not matriculate, they would have to reapply with no guarantee of future acceptance.

Student Schedule FAQs

What is the typical student schedule like.

The program is a full-time day program. There is no part-time option. During the first year, students will have classes Monday through Friday, generally from 8:00 a.m. to at least 5:00 p.m. Occasionally, there may be a special evening lab or demonstration which students are made aware of well in advance. While on rotation during the second year, students will go to various rotation sites and are expected to fulfill the hours required at different sites, including evenings, weekends, and on-call coverage.

Is it possible to work while enrolled in the program?

Working while enrolled in the program is not feasible. The full-time didactic year curriculum is rigorous including mandatory class attendance as well as required reading and other course preparation outside of classroom time.  During the second year while doing clinical rotations, in addition to the hours you need to spend at the rotation site, you will be expected to do outside reading and may be given written assignments by some clinical preceptors. Some rotations require weekend, evening, or on-call coverage, thereby making it unfeasible to plan on having a regular schedule throughout the clinical year.

International Applicant FAQs

Do applicants who have a medical degree from another country have to take an additional courses before applying to the program.

No additional courses are required if you have completed all prerequisite courses with a U.S. equivalent grade of solid B or better. These courses must still have been taken within 10 years of applying. No exceptions are made.

Can I transfer credits or coursework into the program if I took the equivalent courses at another school?

No. All students accepted into the program must go through the entire 2-year curriculum regardless of previous coursework or training. Advanced placement will not be awarded to any applicant to the Physician Assistant Program, regardless of prior education or experience.

Do I need to have patient care experience in the United States?

While the Admissions Committee may consider experience gained in another country, patient care experience in the United States is also recommended.

It is VERY important to review the FAQ section  of our website before completing your application.

Caspa application.

Northeastern University’s PA Program is a participant in CASPA (Centralized Application Service for PAs). CASPA allows you to:

  • Apply to multiple participating programs
  • Verifies your application for accuracy
  • Processes the application
  • And forwards it to your designated PA programs

Deadline for submission to CASPA for the Northeastern University PA Program: August 1   (of the year prior to planned matriculation )

Please note that it is the applicant’s responsibility to ensure that all materials have been submitted to CASPA and that the application is complete.  Northeastern University will not provide interim updates regarding application status.  Applicants will receive email notification regarding their status by late December.

Information on the CASPA application process can be found on the  CASPA web site .

Additional Northeastern Application Material

Be sure to carefully read the information below before completing your CASPA application.

In order for your application to be considered complete and be reviewed for any of the three options, the program must receive the following material:

  • Northeastern $75 Application Fee Northeastern University requires a $75 application fee for all students applying to the University. This fee is in addition to the CASPA application fee and is nonrefundable.
  • Please use the link provided in the email you receive after you submit your CASPA application, to claim your account and pay the application fee by credit card.
  • The $75 Northeastern application fee is waived if you are a current Northeastern senior in a bachelor’s degree program or an alumnus/a who earned a bachelor’s degree from Northeastern. However, you still need to complete the form in the payment portal. Click on whichever fee button reflects your status.
  • If you received a fee waiver from CASPA, we will accept it in lieu of Northeastern’s $75 application fee. At the same time you submit you CASPA application, please send an email to the program at  [email protected]  with a copy of your CASPA waiver.

3 References (submitted online)

  • NUPA requires that at least two of the three required references submitted to CASPA be from individuals with whom you have worked in a clinical environment. The two clinically related references can be from any combination of health care professionals with whom you work including, but not limited to, PAs, MDs, NPs, RNs, PTs, OTs, EMTs, RTs, ATs, etc. Practice managers, EMT supervisors, and others in similar supervisory roles are also acceptable. The evaluators should comment on your clinical background including an assessment of your clinical performance, the type of duties you perform, and your ability to relate to patients and others on the health care team.
  • References from shadowing experiences will not be accepted as a clinical reference as you are observing rather than actually performing patient care duties yourself.
  • We will only accept references included with the CASPA application.  References sent directly to the PA Program will not be considered.
  • CASPA allows a maximum of 5 references

We will notify you via email when your CASPA application has been verified.

Your CASPA application will not be reviewed until has been verified and we have received your $75 Northeastern Application fee.  Receipt of your $75 Northeastern application fee cannot be acknowledged via email until you submit your CASPA application.

Application Checklist

To apply, applicants must submit the following in CASPA :

Minimum overall GPA of 3.0 and science GPA of 3.0 . Stronger preference will be given to applicants with higher overall and science GPAs and who demonstrate strong academic rigor including the type of coursework completed and whether difficult courses were completed one at a time versus several difficult courses taken concomitantly.

Applications fee — both CASPA and Northeastern

3 letters of recommendation submitted in CASPA. Two clinically related references can be from any combination of healthcare professionals with whom you work including, but not limited to, PAs, MDs, NPs, RNs, PTs, OTs, EMTs, RTs, ATs, etc. Practice managers, EMT supervisors, and others in similar supervisory roles are also acceptable. Note: References from shadowing experiences will not be accepted as a clinical reference as you are observing rather than actually performing patient care duties yourself. References MUST be sent via CASPA or they will not be considered. 

Letter of intent to study

Official transcript from baccalaureate program  and all college coursework

Note: The GRE is NOT required and will not be considered in your application review.

Got questions?

We can answer general questions about the program that are not addressed on our website. 

You can call us at 617-373-3195 or email.

PA students diagnosing a robot in the Simulation Lab

Physician Assistant Faculty

pa program coursework

Carey Barry

MHS, PA-C, MT(ASCP), DFAAPA

Chair, Department of Medical Sciences; Associate Clinical Professor Medical Sciences

202 Robinson Hall

pa program coursework

Michael Bessette

Medical Director, Associate Department Chair, Assistant Clinical Professor Medical Sciences

pa program coursework

Adam Broughton

Assistant Clinical Professor Medical Sciences

pa program coursework

Alexis Landry

Director of Clinical Education, Assistant Clinical Professor Medical Sciences

pa program coursework

Alexis Liakos

Andrew Mackie, Northeastern University

Andrew Mackie

Associate Clinical Professor Medical Sciences

Entrance to building with a bicycle and blooming tulips

Jason Parente

Associate Program Director, Associate Clinical Professor Medical Sciences

pa program coursework

Lauren Raine

Research Assistant Professor Physical Therapy, Human Movement, and Rehabilitation Sciences

329 Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Complex

Glenna Regan

Glenna Regan

Director of Didactic Education, Assistant Clinical Professor Medical Sciences

Thomas Williams, Northeastern University

Thomas Williams

Program Director; Assistant Clinical Professor Medical Sciences

202 Robinson Hal

Students on Northeastern's Boston Centennial Common

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PA Curriculum

The program spans 25 continuous months, beginning in January, with the first year focusing on foundational medical science, disease pathophysiology, and therapeutics. Students explore various medical disciplines and principles of physical diagnosis, preparing for subsequent clinical rotations through skill workshops. In addition to all university holidays, students will have breaks in April, August, and December.

During the first year, students typically spend six to eight hours daily in classes at the Health Sciences campus in Boston’s Chinatown area. This location provides convenient access to library resources, faculty, and PA Program staff, facilitating a conducive learning environment.

In the clinical year, students will be placed at clinical practice sites across Massachusetts and New England (most sites are within a 60-mile radius of Boston). Students may also be assigned to rotations in Portland, Maine; Portsmouth, New Hampshire; or Cape Cod for which housing may be provided. During clinicals, students engage in four- to five-week rotations in core disciplines, including Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Surgery, Emergency Medicine, OB/GYN, Behavioral Medicine, Family Medicine, and Orthopedics. Additionally, students have the opportunity to do a deeper dive to complement their family medicine and internal medicine rotations by completing a more selective rotation in these respective areas. There is also an opportunity to choose one elective in their preferred discipline.

All students must successfully complete the following to meet the program's graduation requirements and earn their degree of Master of Medical Science:

  • Pass all didactic courses with a minimum of a B-
  • Maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better
  • Successfully complete all Supervised Clinical Practice Experiences
  • Pass a comprehensive written examination
  • Pass the Objective Standardized Clinical Examination
  • Demonstrate professional conduct throughout the entire program

First Year: Didactic Course Sequence

Every effort is made to provide an organized, progressive flow of information for our students. Anatomy and Physiology subjects are presented so that the course work parallels that which is presented in Internal Medicine and other subjects.

PA 201: Clinical Anatomy I (4 credits)

This course teaches the structure and function of the human body. Utilizing lectures, discussion, models, and cadavers, students will have a structural introduction to the organ systems of the thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to identify normal anatomical structures, recognize abnormal anatomy, and determine the clinical implications of pathologic anatomy.

PA 203: Internal Medicine I (4 credits)

This course will focus on immunology, infectious diseases, and the hematology system. The pathophysiology, presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases involving these topics will be discussed.

PA 206: Pharmacology I (3 credits)

Focusing upon the principles of pharmacologic action, classification, and drug uses, this will be an introduction into clinical use of medications for various disease states. Emphasis will be placed upon indications, contraindications, bioavailability, drug interactions, dose response, side effects, and adverse reactions.

PA 210: Behavioral Medicine (3 credits)

This course offers students an introduction to psychiatric disease, its classification of disease states, an in-depth look at common psychiatric illnesses seen in general medical practice and emergency practice settings. Topics such as psychotherapy, psychoanalysis, pharmacological intervention, substance abuse and addiction, domestic and child abuse will be discussed also.

PA 213: Professional Practice (2 credits)

The history of the Physician Assistant profession will be discussed. Topics such as the role of the PA in the US health care system, scope of practice, professional and legal restrictions, national board certification, and state licensure will be addressed. Interdisciplinary dynamics, PA-supervisor relationships, practice management and ownership, federal and private insurers, billing, public policy trends, medical ethics, hospital credentialing, continuing medical education, and medical malpractice will be covered.

PA 215: Physical Diagnosis I (4 credits)

Using traditional lectures, simulated and standardized patients, and small student group interactions, students will be introduced to the basics of history taking and complete physical examination. Development of interviewing techniques and examination skills will be emphasized.

PA 208: Medical Physiology (3 credits)

This course will review basic principles of normal physiology including central nervous, cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, endocrines, renal, and reproductive systems of the human body. Tracking anatomy, pharmacologic, and internal medicine topics in other courses, these lectures are meant to serve as a foundation of information.

PA 235: Primary Care I (3 credits)

This course offers first year physician assistant students in-depth training in a wide variety of clinically related subjects including Public Health, Medical Genetics, Dermatology, Otolaryngology and Ophthalmology. The pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases involving these topics will be discussed. Clinical case discussions and a simulated patient experience will be utilized to build the students' critical thinking skills.

PA 218: Nutrition (2 credits)

Students will be taught the basics of human nutritional needs as well as alterations of these demands during various clinical scenarios and disease states.

PA 202: Clinical Anatomy II (4 credits)

Continuing Part 1, this course will focus upon the musculoskeletal and head and neck structure of the human body utilizing lectures, discussion, and cadavers. Clinical correlation through case studies will be emphasized.

PA 204: Internal Medicine II (4 credits)

This course will focus on diseases of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and endocrine systems. The pathophysiology, presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases involving these topics will be discussed.

PA 207: Pharmacology II (3 credits)

Continuation of Pharmacology I

PA 217: Surgery (2 credits)

The course focuses on the basic surgical concepts needed for the PA to function in primary care settings as well as major surgical areas. The course emphasizes surgical concepts, topics and surgical technique as well as attention to examination of the acute abdomen, surgical diagnosis and treatment of common surgical conditions including obstructive, infective, and neoplastic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, cardiothoracic diseases, trauma, and the vascular system. Risk assessment, wound healing, pre and postoperative care will also be addressed.

PA 212: OB/GYN (3 credits)

The spectrum of female reproduction, conception, fetal growth and development, prenatal and antenatal care, and reproductive endocrinology will be covered. Students will be given an introduction to the anatomy of the female genitourinary tract as well as gynecologic oncology, its natural course, diagnosis, and treatment. Cardiovascular disease in women will be addressed, as will gynecologic infections and sexual assault diagnosis and management. Emphasis will be placed upon history taking, gynecologic examination, counseling, testing, and disease prevention.

PA 216: Physical Diagnosis II (4 credits)

Students will continue to learn interview and examination techniques and build upon Physical Diagnosis I. Instructors will assist students in honing their interviewing and examination skills through focused examinations and varying interviewing techniques. Compilation of patent data in written form and oral presentation of patients’ medical history and examination results will be emphasized. Some instruction may take place in external clinical sites.

PA 239: Principles of Electrocardiography (1 credit)

This course is an elementary introduction to electrocardiography. Students will learn the basics of electrical impulses generated by the heart's electrical conduction system and the manifestation of these impulses on paper charts and ECG monitors. Students will learn to identify conduction abnormalities, heart blocks, ischemic and infarction changes as generated on ECGs. They will learn to calculate heart rates, axis deviations, and chamber hypertrophy.

PA 236: Primary Care II (2 credits)

This course is a continuation of Primary Care I and offers first year physician assistant students in-depth training in a wide variety of clinically related subjects, including common cardiovascular disorders, respiratory disorders and endocrinologic disorders encountered in the primary care setting. The pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases involving these topics will be discussed. Clinical case discussions and a simulated patient experience will be utilized to build the students' critical thinking skills.

PA 229: Diagnostic Imaging (1 credit)

Radiologic safety, imaging modalities, indications, contraindications, benefits and risks of use of X-ray diagnosis will be covered. Assessment of common X-rays used in primary care and emergency medicine will be addressed. Students will be taught to recognize common radiologic abnormalities. Other diagnostic tools such as ultrasonography, MRI, CT scanning, and nuclear medicine scans will be introduced.

PA 225: Emergency Medicine (2 credits)

This course provides fundamental instruction in the diagnosis and management of both common and life-threatening patient presentations to the emergency department.

PA 220: Evidence-Based Medicine (2 credits)

This course introduces the core concepts of evidence-based medicine and life-long learning, and clinical decision-making. These concepts include the process of evidence-based medicine, the interpretation of research results, and clinical reasoning based on an understanding of clinical epidemiology concepts, and the need for self-management of one's clinical knowledge.

PA 205: Internal Medicine III (4 credits)

This course will focus on diseases of the gastrointestinal, rheumatologic, and renal systems. The pathophysiology, presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases involving these topics will be discussed.

PA 223: Orthopedics (3 credits)

This course explores all aspects of diseases and conditions of bones and joints. Emphasis will be placed on the orthopedic examination in conditions such as fracture, dislocation, ligament, tendon, and muscular conditions. Joint aspiration, immobilization, splinting, and casting will be addressed in supplementary workshops.

PA 227: Critical Care Medicine (1 credit)

Students will be introduced to hemodynamic derangements in multiorgan system failure patients, including shock, trauma, cardiac arrest, acid-base and electrolyte management, and nutritional support. Other topics covered include ventilator management, invasive procedures, and diagnostic methods used in ICU care.

PA 230: Geriatrics (2 credits)

Students will be introduced to process of aging as it affects the human body and mind. Atypical presentations of common acute and chronic diseases as they are seen in older populations will be addressed as will the challenges of managing various and concomitant disease states. Pharmacologic therapy in older patients, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, patient compliance issues, and end-of-life care will be discussed as well.

PA 240: Procedural Workshops (3 credits)

This course for physician assistants focuses upon common bedside procedures performed in clinical situations. Procedures taught range from vital sign taking and phlebotomy to invasive procedures such as thoracentesis and central line placement. Using peer practicums (phlebotomy and venipuncture) and simulation models for more invasive procedures, key concepts and techniques will be taught.

PA 237: Primary Care III (2 credits)

This course is a continuation of Primary Care I and II and offers first year physician assistant students in-depth training in a wide variety of clinically related subjects including common oral health conditions, gastrointestinal and genitourinary disorders encountered in the primary care setting. The pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases involving these topics will be discussed. In addition, there will be a focus on health maintenance/preventative medicine. Clinical case discussions and a simulated patient experience will be utilized to build the students' critical thinking skills.

PA 221: Neuroscience (3 credits)

This course will present neuroanatomy and neurophysiology as they relate to clinical assessment and management of various disease states. History taking, physical examination and diagnostic imaging techniques will be discussed as they apply to neurological disease and trauma. In addition to lectures, small student group sessions will allow students to practice neurological examination techniques. Both the complete neurological examination as well as problem-focused neurological examinations will be discussed. The signs, symptoms and pathophysiology of neurologic diseases commonly encountered in Primary Care and Emergency Medicine will be covered as well as diagnostic testing modalities, radiographic imaging and laboratory tests utilized for diagnostic purposes.

PA 222: Pediatrics (3 credits)

Normal child growth and development will be emphasized as well as diagnosis and management of common childhood diseases and infections. Also discussed will be immunizations and medications used in pediatric practice, their indications, contraindications, and dosage in relation to specific disorders. Pediatric respiratory emergencies, injuries, cancer and hematologic disorders, and child abuse will be covered.

PA 231: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (2 credits)

Acute and chronic recovery from disease and injury will be covered as it applies to physician assistant practice. Implications of and indications for rehabilitative services, levels of care required, specific interventions and therapies will be discussed.

Second Year

Supervised clinical practice experiences.

Students spend the second year rotating through assigned medical disciplines and one elective rotation. These rotations will take place at various clinical sites throughout New England. Students are under the direct supervision of their clinical preceptor and will follow the preceptor's work schedule (possible nights and/or weekends). There are three scheduled breaks throughout the clinical year. All additional breaks and holidays during this year will correspond with the schedule of the student's clinical preceptor.

The Tufts PA Program has affiliation agreements with over 120 different clinical sites, the majority of which are within 60 miles of downtown Boston. These include major teaching hospitals in and around the city, community hospitals in suburban and rural areas, neighborhood health clinics, and private practices. Through 4-5-week long rotation blocks, our students are given multiple opportunities to experience health care in many different types of settings and medical disciplines in culturally diverse areas.

Core rotations are expected to be taken in New England, but students may request a selective or elective rotation be taken in another state at a new site. Students may submit a formal request to the Director of Clinical Education who will review the site and its practitioners to ensure they meet program standards. Only after these standards are met and a new affiliation agreement is enacted by both parties, may a student be granted approval for their rotation.

Some of our current clinical sites include:

  • Beth Israel Deaconess
  • Beverly Hospital
  • Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • Cambridge Health Alliance
  • Lahey Hospital & Medical Center
  • Lemuel Shattuck Hospital
  • Lowell General Hospital
  • MetroWest Medical Center
  • South Shore Hospital
  • Tufts Medical Center

In addition to clinical rotation responsibilities, students are "called-back" to campus once a month to complete End-of-Rotation Exams. At this time, students also review additional coursework needed to prepare them for clinical practice, national board examinations, and present their Capstone projects. The Capstone project is an individual effort on a medical topic chosen by the student. This graded project requires considerable effort, including library research and clinical insight, culminating in a poster presentation to PA students, faculty, and staff.

PA 250: Capstone Project (1 credit)

The purpose of the Capstone Project is to foster a clinically-relevant, scholarly activity in a mentored environment. The project serves as the culminating experience for graduate education in physician assistant studies and must be completed prior to the awarding of the MMS degree. Building upon prior clinical experiences, the program curriculum, and specific student interests, the Capstone Project gives students greater insight into healthcare-related issues, such as specific medical conditions, specific therapies, specific diagnostic tests, clinical practice guidelines, healthcare delivery systems, or patient education challenges. The deliverable for the Capstone Project is an 8-10 page paper (excluding references) and accompanying poster presentation that substantiates or refutes a clinical hypothesis through integrating an existing body of knowledge.

PA 290: Preparation for Clinical Practice (6 credits)

Preparation for Clinical Practice includes a wide variety of clinical and practice-related lectures for second-year students in an effort to prepare them for future clinical practice.

It also provides formative and summative academic events as part of the concluding curriculum and milestones of the PA curriculum. Students will present selected case studies from actual patient experiences during their clinical experiences. These presentations will be real cases the student has encountered, including\ medical histories and physical findings, details of the diagnostic workup, differential diagnoses, treatments, and actual outcomes. Students will conclude with a discussion of the disease process and address any questions from the audience of fellow students and principal faculty. These presentations provide students with presentation experience, training in consolidating clinical cases into teaching objects, and an opportunity to address challenging clinical questions from peers.

The two formative PACKRAT Examinations provide detailed content feedback for individual students as well as class performance benchmarked against the national cohort taking the examinations. Similarly, summative examinations such as the Comprehensive Examination and OSCE offer similar content feedback on student performance as well as performance as a cohort. Utilizing these results to pinpoint content or performance deficiencies, Principal Faculty will produce a customized board review lecture series designed to address cohort deficiencies in preparation for clinical practice and the national board examination (PANCE).

The OSCE results will also permit faculty to identify procedural and skill deficiencies in students and allow for individualized remediation sessions during the final weeks of the curriculum.

Using the feedback from the OSCEs, Formative and Summative examinations, the final 4 weeks of the curriculum will be structured to include focused lectures on specific medical topics.

The Final Month

The final month of the second year is a culmination of all the work students have completed throughout their second year. Students present their Capstone projects in a poster session and attend various lectures and workshops to help prepare them for their national board exams and job searches.

Rotation Course Descriptions

Below are descriptions of the supervised clinical practice experiences in the second year of the curriculum. Each block is four to five weeks in length.

PA 301: Emergency Medicine (4 credits)

The Emergency Medicine Supervised Clinical Practical Experience (SCPE) exposes students to a broad range of experiences and patient populations in the emergency room for acutely ill patients. Students will hone their skills in triage; learning to recognize and manage patients that need immediate care. They will learn to prioritize care for conditions which are less urgent. Students will be responsible for taking medical histories and performing physical examinations on acute as well as emergent patients and presenting these to the medical preceptor. When appropriate, students will perform necessary diagnostic and therapeutic measures.

PA 302: Family Medicine (4 credits)

The Family Medicine Supervised Clinical Practical Experience (SCPE) exposes students to a broad range of experiences and patient populations that emphasize the patient as an individual and family member. Students are involved in the initial and ongoing assessment of patients in all age groups as well as management of individuals with new and established diagnoses. Emphasis is placed on evaluation, management, health promotion, and preventative medicine. Students are expected to be involved in the care of acute, chronic and preventative visits.

PA 303: Inpatient Internal Medicine (4 credits)

The Inpatient Internal Medicine Supervised Clinical Practical Experience (SCPE) offers students an opportunity to become familiar with the assessment and management of varied medical problems that result in admission to the hospital. Students will attend medical rounds, perform diagnostic procedures, present case write-ups, record progress notes, and assist with discharge planning. It emphasizes the skills of collecting, assessing, and presenting patient data; ordering appropriate laboratory and diagnostic studies; counseling patients about therapeutic procedures; and helping to coordinate the contributions of other health professionals involved in management of the patient.

PA 304: Surgery (4 credits)

The Surgery Supervised Clinical Practical Experience (SCPE) exposes students to varied surgical patient care responsibilities with emphasis on general surgery, though students may have some exposure to surgical specialties and subspecialties. Students assist in surgical patients' preoperative initial assessment, which includes obtaining accurate medical histories and performing physical examinations. They also participate in preoperative management, including patient education and procedures necessary to prepare patients for surgery.  Students assist surgeons in the operating room and have an opportunity to become familiar with operating room procedures and equipment. Students are also involved in patients' postoperative evaluation and management. 

PA 305: Behavioral Medicine (4 credits)

The Behavioral Medicine Supervised Clinical Practical Experience (SCPE) is designed to provide an understanding of the behavioral components of health, disease and disability. Through exposure to patients presenting with a broad spectrum of psychiatric disorders, students will develop history taking and mental status examination skills, classification skills utilizing DSM IV TR criteria, be exposed to and evaluate different treatment modalities for varying presentations. The student will enhance their ability to recognize and categorize psychiatric disturbances and techniques of early intervention and psychiatric referral. Students are expected to be involved in the care of acute and chronic visits.

PA 306: Pediatrics (4 credits)

The Pediatric Supervised Clinical Practical Experience (SCPE) is designed to develop the students' familiarity with pediatric medicine.  The rotation will emphasize caring for a child from birth through adolescence. Students are provided opportunities to take medical histories and perform pediatric physical examinations. The focus will be on diagnosing and managing common childhood illnesses and evaluation of growth and development.  Students will work on developing skills to counsel families about immunizations, child visits, growth and development parameters, common psychosocial problems, nutrition, and accident and poisoning prevention.

PA 307: OB/GYN (4 credits)

The OB-GYN (Women’s health) Supervised Clinical Practical Experience (SCPE) allows students to participate in all aspects of OB-GYN care, including acute, preventive, chronic, and emergent situations.  Students will be exposed to prenatal, labor and delivery, and postpartum care.  Also, students will care for women across the lifespan, including menarche, infertility, menstrual conditions, benign and malignant gynecologic conditions, menopause and postmenopausal situations.

PA 308: Orthopedics (4 credits)

The Orthopedics Supervised Clinical Practical Experience (SCPE) Offers students an opportunity to care for injured and infirm patients in a variety of settings including, rehabilitation centers, and convalescent facilities, and exposes the student to issues of caring for patients with sub-acute but in many cases, multiple problems complicated by advanced age, post-acute event recovery issues, and complex social and economic problems commonly seen in this population. Students will also receive exposure to common musculoskeletal injuries from a broad range of etiologies.

PA 309: Elective (4 credits)

This elective supervised clinical practice experience is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills in an area of interest. Students will gain an understanding of the variety of problems encountered in a medical or surgical sub-specialty discipline. The understanding of the varied medical and/or surgical sub-specialty problems is accomplished through history taking, physical exam, interpretation of diagnostic testing, and the development of a plan for each presenting problem including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management. In addition to gaining clinical skills specific to the specialty of the rotation, the student will also continue to develop skills in medical problem solving and patient management. Elective rotation sites are chosen based on practice characteristics that are important for the PA student within this rotation. These may include practice location, patient populations, and availability of specific experiences and procedures.

PA 312: Ambulatory Care - Selective (4 credits)

The Ambulatory/ Outpatient selective supervised clinical practice offers students the ability to spend additional time in an outpatient medical clinic and is meant to compliment the family medicine rotation. Students are involved in the initial and ongoing assessment of patients as well as management of individuals with established diagnoses. Students may see patients in venues that include hospital ambulatory care clinics, private offices, family medicine practices, clinics and urgent care settings. As a selective, students may be placed in general medicine ambulatory rotations or a more specialized ambulatory care clinic.

PA 313: Inpatient - Selective (4 credits)

During this Inpatient Medicine supervised clinical practice experience (SCPE), students will be exposed to patients presenting with acute and chronic illness requiring admission to the hospital setting. Students will elicit and record medical histories, perform physical examinations, and be involved in the management of the admitted patient. This SCPE is meant to complement the inpatient internal medicine core rotation by offering students additional time learning how to care for admitted patients. As a selective, students may be placed in a general inpatient medicine rotation or a more specialized in-patient experience.

How to Become a Physician Assistant

Physician assistants are integral members of the healthcare industry. Here's how to become one.

Are you interested in a career as a physician assistant? Read our step-by-step guide to becoming a PA — from college to licensure.

If you’ve had a medical appointment or undergone a medical procedure recently, there’s a good chance that you received care from a physician assistant (PA).

Originally licensed to—quite literally—assist physicians and increase the number of qualified medical practitioners, PAs today provide much of the same patient care as doctors. 

Like other medical practitioners, PAs undergo years of education to gain significant clinical experience before they can begin practicing medicine. However, the process for becoming a PA differs from becoming a doctor, nurse, or nurse practitioner. 

This step-by-step guide will help you navigate how to become a physician assistant so you can begin your medical career.

What is a Physician Assistant?

A physician assistant (PA), also called a physician associate, is a healthcare professional who works directly with patients. PAs work in hospitals, doctor’s offices, and other clinical settings to diagnose and treat illness, prescribe medication, and handle preventative care. 

Physician assistants have many of the same responsibilities as doctors. In numerous clinical settings, patients may receive care from either a physician or PA. In most states, PAs work under a collaborative agreement with a physician. In practice, however, many PAs practice medicine with significant autonomy.

According to the national professional society for physician assistants, the American Academy of PAs (AAPA) , physician assistants can:

  • Diagnose and treat illnesses
  • Conduct medical histories and physical exams
  • Order and interpret diagnostic testing
  • Develop treatment plans, including prescribing medication
  • Provide advice on prevention and preventative care 
  • Perform some medical procedures and assist in surgical procedures
  • Conduct rounds in hospitals, nursing homes, and other clinical settings 
  • Plan and participate in clinical research

You’ll find many PAs who work in family medicine, internal medicine, and other general medicine settings. 

PAs can also specialize in a variety of roles, including anesthesia, obstetrics and gynecology, radiology, pediatrics, emergency medicine, and cardiology. 

Is Becoming a Physician Assistant a Good Career Choice?

Physician assistant can be an excellent career choice for anyone interested in practicing medicine. 

US News and World Report ranked physician assistant as the third best overall job and the second best job in healthcare for 2022. This evaluation is based on factors such as median salary, long-term demand, stress levels, and work-life balance.

Here are some specific reasons why you may want to consider becoming a PA.

Excellent Job Security

The job market for PAs is strong and expected to continue to grow rapidly. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics , demand for PAs may grow by as much as 28 percent between 2021 and 2031. This means there will be nearly 40,000 more jobs for PAs in the next decade.

Competitive Salaries

A job as a physician assistant can pay well. The typical annual salary range for PAs in 2022 was between $105,000 and $126,000, with a median salary of $114,000. As with many careers, PA salaries depend on level of education, years of experience, area of specialization, healthcare setting, and location.

Focus on Patient Care

If you love working with people and are interested in building relationships with your patients, PA might be a great career choice. In many settings, PAs are directly responsible for patient care. You will likely be performing hands-on medical procedures and working one-on-one with your patients to treat illnesses and advise on preventative care.

Career Flexibility

As a PA, you can pivot between specialties throughout your career. For example, you may start your career in emergency medicine, then move into a family practice. Or, you may begin in internal medicine and shift to dermatology or orthopedics. Your education and training as a PA offers the potential for a dynamic career pathway.

Schedule Flexibility

Like most careers in the medical field, PAs may be required to work long hours and fulfill on-call responsibilities. 

However, because PAs have the option to work in different types of clinical settings, you have the option to find a schedule that supports your work-life balance, such as working regular hours every week. Alternatively, you may choose shift work that allows you the flexibility, depending on your specific workplace, to choose how much and when you work. 

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Steps to Become a Physician Assistant

One of the top benefits of becoming a PA instead of a doctor is that you spend less time in the classroom before beginning your career. 

That doesn’t mean, however, that becoming a PA is easy. You will still need to earn an advanced degree and pass a certification exam before you can begin to practice medicine. 

Here are the typical steps you’ll need to take to launch your career as a physician assistant.

1. Earn Your Undergraduate Degree

Earning your bachelor’s degree is the first step on your path to becoming a physician assistant. 

If you know that you’re interested in a career in medicine early in your educational journey, you should consider earning a bachelor of science (BS) degree with a major in biology, chemistry, or a STEM field. 

A BA (bachelor of arts) degree, even with a liberal arts major, will enable you to pursue continuing education for a career as a PA. However, you will likely need to take additional coursework in biology and related fields before you can apply to PA school.

2. Gain Hands-On Clinical Experience

Before you can apply to PA school, you will need to gain experience in the field of healthcare. Most PA schools require a certain number of hours of either healthcare experience (HCE) or patient care experience (PCE). 

This requirement is one reason why becoming a PA can be an ideal choice for people interested in changing careers a bit later in life. If you have been working as an EMT, a medic,  a corpsperson in the military, a dental technician, or a radiologist, for instance, you already have the patient care experience you need to move into a career as a PA. 

3. Supplement Your Academic Record

If you earned a BS in biology with all A’s, you may be able to apply to PA school as soon as you have accumulated enough clinical experience. 

If you didn’t take many science-related courses as an undergrad, or you didn’t have a high GPA, you’ll need to supplement your academic record before you can apply to PA school. You may also need to take additional science-based coursework if you are seeking to become a PA as a career change.

Enrolling in a premedical program before you apply to PA school gives you the opportunity to take prerequisite courses you didn’t take as an undergraduate or retake them to improve your GPA. You can also complete advanced coursework to demonstrate your readiness for the academic rigors of PA school. 

4. Graduate From an Accredited PA Program

To become a PA, you’ll need to have a master’s degree in PA studies from a university program that has been accredited by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA) .

Most PA programs require going to school full time for two to three years. You’ll complete a mix of coursework in the medical sciences, including class time in a lab and rotations in a range of clinical settings. The clinical rotations offer the opportunity to explore and gain experience in different specialities.

5. Pass the PA Certification Test

After graduating from an accredited PA school, you must become certified as a physician assistant by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants (NCCPA).

To become certified, you must pass the Physician Assistant National Certifying Examination® (PANCE) . PANCE is a five-hour exam involving 300 multiple-choice questions designed to test that you have the medical knowledge you need to begin your career as a practicing PA. 

You can apply to take PANCE 180 days before your expected completion of PA school. Once your application to take the PANCE is accepted, you have 180 days to pass the exam. You may retake the exam up to three times in a calendar year.

6. Obtain State License

The final step in the process to becoming a PA is to obtain a license in the state in which you want to practice.

Every state has its own regulations and procedures for its licensing process. Once you’ve decided where you want to practice, you will need to apply to the licensing board of that state and follow the instructions for obtaining your license. 

As part of the licensing process, you will also need to apply for a National Provider Identifier (NPI) number from the US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and register with the US Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA).

What Are the Requirements for PA School?

Graduating from an accredited PA school is key to starting your career as a PA. 

In most states, a master’s degree in PA studies is required for licensure. Moreover, PA school should help you gain the medical and surgical knowledge you need to pass the PANCE, also required for state license in most states.

Acceptance into PA school is highly competitive. Each university has its own set of requirements that it uses to evaluate applicants. Generally speaking, however, you’ll most likely need to demonstrate success in the following areas to qualify for admission to PA school.

Undergraduate Prerequisite Coursework

PA schools want to see that you already have a strong foundation in science. To demonstrate this foundation, you have to show that you have successfully completed undergraduate coursework and labs in courses such as:

  • General chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry
  • Biology and microbiology
  • Anatomy and physiology
  • Medical terminology

Many PA schools will also want to see that you’ve taken significant coursework in physics, math and statistics, english, and psychology.

If you graduated with a BS in biology or a STEM-field, you may have completed many of these requirements as part of your undergraduate degree. If you did so with a strong GPA, you may not need to take additional coursework before applying to PA school.

However, if you didn’t take these types of courses as an undergraduate or if you had less than stellar grades, you may want to consider applying to and enrolling in a premedical program before you apply to PA school. 

Healthcare/Patient Care Experience

In addition to GPA and coursework, your experience working in the healthcare field is an important part of your PA school application. This experience can either be:

  • Patient care experience (PCE): roles in which you have provided hands-on patient care
  • Healthcare experience (HCE): more general work in the field of healthcare but not necessarily directly with patients

A few examples of PCE and HCE accepted by most PA schools include:

  • EMT or paramedic
  • Military medic or corpsperson
  • Medical technicians or technologists
  • Physical therapy aide
  • Phlebotomist
  • International healthcare based mission trips
  • Hospice worker
  • Dental hygienist or technologist
  • Medical social worker 
  • Mental health care counselor

While the exact number of hours varies from school to school, the more high-quality experience you have working directly with patients, the stronger your application to PA school will be. Most successful applicants to PA school have more than 1,000 hours of HCE or PCE. 

For many people, this means working in the healthcare field for a year or more after undergrad before beginning the application process. 

Multiple premedical programs focused on the PA school application allow enrolled students to take courses part time and online while working full time in a field that will allow you to gain needed clinical experience as well. 

There’s no doubt about it: becoming a certified PA can be a long and challenging process. The outcome, however, can be a highly rewarding career as a physician assistant. Investing the time and hard work now in your career as a PA can be a worthwhile investment in your future. 

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About the PA Program

Birthplace of the PA Profession

The physician assistant (PA) profession originated at Duke in 1965. Dr. Eugene A. Stead Jr., then-chairman of the Department of Medicine in the Duke University School of Medicine, believed that mid-level practitioners could increase consumer access to health services by extending the time and skills of the physician. He began a two-year curriculum to train people to fill a societal need for more medical practitioners, and expand the prior education and experience of ex-military corpsmen.

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Division and Department Affiliation

The Duke Physician Assistant Program is an educational program in the  Division of PA Studies  in the  Department of Family Medicine and Community Health  in the  Duke University School of Medicine .  The department is composed of five interdependent divisions — Community Health, Family Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, PA Studies, and Student Health.

Duke Health

The Duke University School of Medicine sits squarely between Duke University and Duke Health. Duke Health encompasses the School of Medicine, School of Nursing, three hospitals, outpatient services, a primary care network, and more.

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Learn to deliver and improve patient care in a supportive, innovative environment.

The Pitt PA Studies difference is our commitment to a multi-pronged approach to support student success throughout the program’s two-year curriculum — in both the didactic and clinical years — with resources to support all learner styles. Our program meshes traditional didactic lectures with out-of-the-classroom learning opportunities, case-based individual and group activities and hands-on skills labs. The program provides exceptional clinical placements including an elective rotation during your clinical year.  

Our faculty focuses on fostering a positive environment that supports active learning and professional competency. Faculty and staff are dedicated to implementing thoughtful and cutting-edge changes to the curriculum that prepare students to become valuable members of a health care team and to serve as strong advocates for patient health and well-being.

Physician Assistant Studies (MS) Highlights

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Plan of Study

The PA Studies Program curriculum combines didactic courses with clinical rotations to equip students with the necessary skills to become health care leaders as PAs at the end of the two-year program. 

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Accreditation

The Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA) has granted Accreditation-Continued status to the Physician Assistant Program sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh. Accreditation-Continued is an accreditation status granted when a currently accredited program is in compliance with the ARC-PA Standards.

Accreditation remains in effect until the program closes or withdraws from the accreditation process or until accreditation is withdrawn for failure to comply with the Standards. The approximate date for the next validation review of the program by the ARC-PA will be in 2028. The review date is contingent upon continued compliance with the Accreditation Standards and ARC-PA policy.

The program’s accreditation history can be viewed on the ARC-PA website at  http://www.arc-pa.org/accreditation-history-university-of-pittsburgh/ .

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Physician Assistant Studies

Our mission is to improve universal access to healthcare by graduating highly competent and confident physician assistants prepared to provide exceptional quality, ethical, patient-centered healthcare in a collaborative environment. 

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AT A GLANCE

Campus Location:

  • Smithfield, Rhode Island
  • Program begins in January

Commitment:

  • 10 terms (126 credit hours)
  • Program tuition: $109,977

Program Level: Graduate

College/School: Health & Behavioral Sciences

Small Classes

Benefit from a low student-faculty ratio of 9:1 and a supportive learning environment with experienced instructors and personalized mentorship.  

10 Clinical Rotations

Work with patients in eight core rotations and two elective rotations in inpatient and outpatient settings.

State-of-the-Art Facilities

Learn in our newly constructed facility with a high-fidelity medical simulation center and a physical exam laboratory equipped with up-to-date instruments. You’ll also study anatomy education and cadaver dissection at Brown University. 

100% Pass Rate

100 percent of Bryant graduates in the Class of 2022 passed the PANCE exam. 

Career Advancement

94 percent of graduates obtain employment within three months of graduation. 

The 2022 median salary for physician assistants was $126,010 – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

Hear From Our Students

Antonio Reisopoulos ’19, ’22 MSPAS, PA-C

“I was able to get into a career that I really wanted to do in a shorter period. We get to work at the top of our license in Rhode Island — we have some of the most progressive legislation nationwide for PAs. I get to work in an environment where I’m constantly learning and feel like a peer to other medical providers.”

Antonio Reisopoulos ’19, ’22 MSPAS, PA-C Open Door Health

Become a Competent Caregiver

As the demand for qualified healthcare professionals continues to grow, Bryant University is committed to training outstanding physician assistants who can provide competent, patient-centered care across our community. In our year-round, 27-month Physician Assistant Studies program , you’ll gain the skills and confidence to impact patient outcomes and become a leader in your profession. 

Exceptional medical education demands exceptional hands-on training. That’s why you’ll work with patients in eight core rotations and two elective rotations . During the clinical phase, you’ll be paired with and learn alongside preeminent doctors, PAs, and other clinicians affiliated with our clinical site partners, including many local and regional hospital systems and private practices. Elective rotation options are plentiful, with experiences in medical and surgical specialties in the U.S. and abroad.

You’ll benefit from our high-tech classrooms and laboratories — the best places to learn. Our wing includes two physician assistant classrooms, a high-fidelity medical simulation center, and a physical examination laboratory that mimics the most modern facilities. You’ll also study human gross anatomy at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University in its award-winning medical education building in downtown Providence. Anatomy and physiology education will continue throughout didactic education with the use of our Anatomage digital cadaver and Harvey, our cardiopulmonary simulator manikin .

Key Clinical Partners

  • The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
  • CharterCARE
  • Care New England
  • Milford Regional Medical Center
  • Steward Health Care
  • Sturdy Memorial Hospital
  • The LBJ Tropical Medical Center

Students practice on a child manikin in the high-fidelity medical simulation center.

About This Program

Mission statement, program goals.

1. Provide students with the requisite knowledge, skills, and attitude to navigate a complex and diverse healthcare environment as evidenced by the ability to: 

  • Obtain medical knowledge and perform physical examinations necessary for patient-centered care.
  • Apply evidence-based reasoning to the patient’s clinical presentation to create an appropriate, individualized treatment plan.
  • Develop inter-professional communication skills to effectively convey concise and accurate information.
  • Utilize appropriate medical diagnostics to aid in diagnosis and treatment, while decreasing unnecessary or extraneous testing.
  • Master the technical skills of clinical medicine in a safe, supportive, and instructive environment using industry standard and technologically robust experiential models.

2. Prepare our students to meet the needs of all populations within the current healthcare system by:

  • Incorporating patient-centered, ethical medical education throughout the curriculum.
  • Providing a strong primary-care-based education as well as clinical experiences in underserved communities.
  • Highlighting awareness of healthcare economics, potential barriers to accessing care, and solutions to reduce healthcare disparities.
  • Supporting diverse perspectives and inter-professional approaches to healthcare that best serve the needs of diverse patient populations.

3. Develop and support the physician assistant students’ connection to the community and the PA profession by fostering their ability to serve, advocate, and lead.

4. Encourage continuous life-long learning in the pursuit of excellence in medical practice. 

See the program’s success meeting its goals.

Technical Standards

The Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies is a broad degree attesting to general knowledge in all fields of medicine and the basic skills required for PA practice. Essential characteristics and abilities required for completion of the MSPAS degree consist of certain minimum physical and cognitive abilities and sufficient mental stability to provide reasonable assurance that candidates can complete the entire course of study and participate fully in all aspects of medical training. Bryant University expects its graduates to become fully competent physician assistants and will provide reasonable accommodation to prepare its students to reach this goal.

The program has an ethical responsibility for the safety of patients with whom the candidates will encounter both before and after completion of the MSPAS degree. Patient safety is a major factor in establishing program core technical standards required for admission to the program, promotion within the program and graduation.

All Bryant PA students must possess those intellectual, ethical, physical, and emotional capabilities necessary to undertake and achieve levels of competence in the full curriculum required by the faculty. All students must meet technical standards to graduate from the program and ultimately enter into clinical practice. Inability to meet these technical standards is grounds for dismissal.

The technical standards are housed within broader categories as listed below. Detailed descriptions of the technical standards follow.

1. Observation 2. Participation 3. Communication 4. Motor Skills 5. Intellectual-Conceptual, Integrative, and Quantitative Abilities 6. Behavioral and Social Attributes

1. Observation The student must be able to observe demonstrations and experiments in the basic sciences, including but not limited to physiologic and pharmacologic demonstrations, microscopic studies of microorganisms, and tissues in normal and pathologic states. Students must be able to observe all classroom demonstrations of clinical skills. Students must also be able to inspect or observe a patient accurately at a distance and close at hand. Students should have the ability to visualize written documents, images, telemetry monitors, EKGs, and interpret diagnostic studies. Students should be sufficiently capable of using observations to draw appropriate conclusions about patient care. Observation necessitates the functional use of the sense of vision. It is enhanced by the functional use of the sense of smell.

2. Participation The student must participate in all components of the program to include, but not limited to, classroom activities, lab sessions, peer-to-peer clinical skills practice, and clinical rotations.

3. Communication Students should be able to speak to, listen to, and observe non-verbal communication in patients to elicit accurate information. Communication includes speech, reading, and writing. The student must be able to communicate respectfully, professionally, sensitively, and efficiently in oral and written form with the patient, the patient’s family, and all members of the healthcare team.

Students must be able to communicate respectfully and professionally with peers, instructors, and mentors in both oral and written formats at all times.

4. Motor Skills Students should have sufficient motor function, skill, and dexterity to carry out basic laboratory experiments and anatomical dissections. Students must be able to use clinical examination skills to elicit information from patients by palpation, auscultation, percussion, and other diagnostic maneuvers. Students should have the motor skills to accurately perform all elements of the physical examination and use instruments and tools appropriately to gather clinical information. Motor skills include the ability to obtain laboratory, radiologic, and other diagnostic testing, as well as perform diagnostic procedures. Students should possess sufficient motor skills to be able to provide general and emergency care to patients as well as surgical care. Motor skills must be accurate and able to be performed safely. Such actions require coordination of both gross and fine muscle movements, equilibrium, and functional use of the senses of touch and vision.

5. Intellectual-Conceptual, Integrative, and Quantitative Abilities Physician assistant students must possess intellectual ability that includes visual-spatial understanding, measuring, calculating, reasoning, analysis, and synthesis. Each of these skills is required for critical thinking and problem solving. Students must combine these skills with evidence-based medicine and sound judgment to patient care to formulate a reasonable diagnosis and treatment plan.

6. Behavioral and Social Attributes Students should have the physical and emotional well-being required for full application of their intellectual abilities, exercise of sound judgment, prompt completion of all responsibilities relative to patient care, and fostering of mature, sensitive, and effective relationships with patients and all members of the healthcare team. Students must display compassion, integrity, and altruism in the face of patient care. Students should be flexible, adaptable, and able to learn in a multitude of environments.

Professionalism and respect are inherent to core qualities of a physician assistant. All students must treat faculty, staff, peers, preceptors, colleagues, and patients and their families with utmost respect and professionalism.

Admission Requirements

You must have a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution completed by October 1, 2024. (There is no preferred major.)

You will need an overall CASPA-verified undergraduate GPA and an overall CASPA-verified Biology, Chemistry and Physics (BCP) GPA of at least 3.00. You will also need to have completed the following prerequisite courses by October 1, 2024, with a minimum GPA of 3.00 overall for these prerequisite courses and a “C” or better in each class:

  • Biology for science majors with lab: 8SH
  • Chemistry for science majors with lab: 8SH
  • Human Anatomy and Physiology with lab: 8SH
  • Microbiology: 3SH
  • Organic Chemistry with lab (4 SH) or Biochemistry (3 SH)
  • Psychology: 3SH
  • Statistics: 3SH

Applicants are strongly encouraged to submit a Graduate Record Exam (GRE) score but it is not required for admission. 

  • No minimum is required on the GRE, but performance will be used to determine eligibility and competitiveness
  • Testing must have been from within the last 5 years
  • Submit score to CASPA using Bryant’s PA Program Code: 8825

We do not accept Advanced Placement/CLEP coursework to fulfill prerequisite requirements. The Bryant Physician Assistant Program does not accept transfer credits to be applied to required program coursework and does not award Advanced Placement based on prior coursework.

Your application process begins when you submit an online CASPA application as early as April 25, 2024. You then must complete a supplemental Bryant University Physician Assistant Program Application available via CASPA. The Supplemental Application Fee is $75; the link for payment is in our Supplemental Application in CASPA. Your entire completed application must be “verified” by CASPA by October 1, 2024, for your application to be considered. Be advised that the university PA program operates on a rolling admission basis, however, early application is encouraged .

You also will need: 

  • Three professional letters of reference.
  • Documentation of at least 2,000 hours of direct patient care which must be obtained by April 1, 2024.*
  • The ability to meet the program technical standards with or without reasonable accommodations. 

Selected candidates will attend an on-site interview, and if admitted, undergo background and drug screening. All matriculating students are required to obtain a Basic Life Support (BLS) Certification from American Heart Association only, prior to entering the program and are responsible for maintaining this BLS certification through graduation

*Examples of direct patient care experience include but are not necessarily limited to: emergency medical technicians and paramedics, nurses, military medics, corpsmen, health service technicians, emergency department technicians, medical scribes, physical and occupational therapy aides, respiratory therapists, medical assistants, certified nursing assistants.

International Applicants: You must complete the TOEFL within two years of application with a score greater than 100 unless you have completed a baccalaureate degree in the U.S. A certified degree and course-by-course evaluation of foreign transcripts are required to ascertain equivalences to U.S. educational standards.

The Bryant University Physician Assistant Program’s Mission Statement is to improve universal access to healthcare by graduating highly competent and confident physician assistants prepared to provide quality, ethical, patient-centered healthcare in a collaborative environment. Our strategy to accomplish this goal is to support the admission and enrollment of future clinicians who have demonstrated a similar commitment to these philosophies. While the program does not extend preference to any individual or group, application materials are scored during the file review and interview process using a scoring system that awards points to any applicant demonstrating evidence of a commitment to the philosophies embodied by the program’s mission and goals.

Rolling Admissions Schedule

Class of 2027: 

  • April 25, 2024 : CASPA application cycle opens for the Class of 2027.
  • October 1, 2024: Application cycle closes; verified application must be submitted by midnight.
  • January 7, 2025: Class of 2027 matriculates.

Be advised that the Bryant University PA program operates on a rolling admission basis.

The Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies is a 27-month, 126-semester-hour course of study. See the course catalog for detailed course descriptions and degree requirements. 

Matriculated Student and Attrition Information

Bryant university pa program attrition rate.

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Performance on the PANCE

  • NCCPA 2018-2023 Exam Summary Performance
  • NCCPA Five Year First Time Taker Summary Report

Program Demonstration of Success in Meeting Goals

  • Program Demonstration of Success in Meeting Goals

Faculty and Staff

Director of Physician Assistant Program Ashley A. Iacone, DMSc, MSPAS, PA-C Associate Clinical Professor

Medical Director Earl Jackman, DO Assistant Clinical Professor

Director of Clinical Education Danielle Cormier, PA-C, BA, MPAS Assistant Clinical Professor

Associate Director of Clinical Education Jodi Cusack, MHS, PA-C Assistant Clinical Professor

Director of Didactic Education Stephanie Potts, PA-C, MS, AT Assistant Clinical Professor

Director of Medical Simulation Stephen Sherman, PA-C, MSPAS Assistant Clinical Professor

Experiential Education Coordinator Matthew Lavoie, MSPAS, PA-C Assistant Clinical Professor

Director of Admissions and Academic Success Shaina Boyle, MBA

Program Coordinator Amy Paul

Office Coordinator Terry Garvin

Tuition and Refund Policy

Class of 2026*

  • Tuition for full 27-month program: $109,977
  • Total program fees (subject to change): $12,372

*Tuition rates are subject to annual change based on approval by the Board of Trustees, typically in the spring of the preceding academic year.

Tuition Refunds: The Bryant University Bursar will handle tuition refunds. Deposit and fees will not be refunded. A student withdrawing from Bryant must contact the Registrar’s Office and the program director in writing and complete a voluntary withdrawal form in order for the withdrawal to be official.

Tuition refunds will be calculated as follows. If written notification is received by the Registrar’s Office and the PA program director by the:

  • 1st week of classes: 80 percent
  • 2nd week of classes: 60 percent
  • 3rd week of classes: 40 percent
  • 4th week of classes: 20 percent
  • After 4th week of classes: no refund

Financial Assistance: Loan forgiveness may be available for physician assistants who quality. Some programs in Rhode Island include the State of Rhode Island Department of Health – Health Professions Loan Repayment.

Accreditation Statement

The Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant, Inc. (ARC-PA) has granted Accreditation-Continued status to the Bryant University Physician Assistant program sponsored by Bryant University . Accreditation-Continued is an accreditation status granted when a currently accredited program is in compliance with the ARC-PA Standards.

Accreditation remains in effect until the program closes or withdraws from the accreditation process or until accreditation is withdrawn for failure to comply with the Standards. The approximate date for the next validation review of the program by the ARC-PA will be June 2028. The review date is contingent upon continued compliance with the Accreditation Standards and ARC-PA policy.

The program’s accreditation history can be viewed on the ARC-PA website.

Program Director:

Ashley A. Iacone, DMSc, MSPAS, PA-C Director of Physician Assistant Program

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Physician Assistant Program section navigation

Physician assistant program.

Recognized as one of the top five Physician Assistant programs in the country, we're proud to lead the way in reshaping patient care in the U.S.

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PA Program Ranked 4th in Nation

Emory's Physician Assistant Program has a long, proud history of being one of the top-ranked programs in the country by U.S. News and World Report. Ranked #4 in 2023 , t he Emory PA Program has been ranked among the top 5 graduate-level PA Programs by US News and World Report since the first PA Program rankings were published.

Emory Farmworker Project

Life-changing care for georgia's migrant workers.

Through the Emory Farmworker Project, our PA faculty and trainees provide free on-site health care to more than 2,000 farmworkers and their families. These community members lack access to even basic medical care, and our volunteers gain experience in providing culturally sensitive, compassionate care for a wide range of health concerns to the people who need it most.

Emory Farmworker Project volunteer administering a covid vaccine

Resources and Program Information

Keep updated on the Emory PA program news, resources and learn how to donate to financially help.

The Emory Physician Assistant Program recruits educates and mentors a diverse group of students to become highly regarded physician assistants providing compassionate health care of the highest quality.

The Program values the highest standards of professionalism and team-based medicine with a commitment to the medically underserved.

Graduates are prepared to practice evidence-based primary care and preventive medicine, engage in lifelong learning and assume future leadership roles.

Open House at EmoryPA

Watch the Open House video from March 2024

View the slides from the March 2024 Open House

Download the 2023 Emory PA Program Brochure

Emory PA Program Open House Events for 2024 – Live or Virtual

The Emory PA Program will have four live on-campus Open House informational sessions in Spring 2024.  Time and Place: 3 – 6 PM in the  James B. Williams School of Medical Education Building room 130

Registration will begin at 2:30 in the lobby. Nearest campus parking is the Michael Street Parking deck visitor lot: 550 Houston Mill Road, Atlanta, 30322

The agenda includes a PA program overview with the Director of Admissions, a Question-and-Answer session with current students and faculty, and a medical campus tour with student leaders. You can register for the live event or watch remotely via Zoom. These sessions will be recorded and posted here.

Friday 4/19/2024 3 – 6 pm

Virtual Zoom registration Live registration

Friday 5/10/2024 3 – 6 pm Virtual Zoom registration Live registration

Program Options and Admissions

Pa education programs.

The Emory PA program offers a variety of education options for students interested in a career as a PA. 

Learn more about the Master's Degrees we offer:

  • Master of Medical Science in Physician Assistant Degree - MMSc-PA
  • Master of Medical Science in Physician Assistant Degree and Master of Public Health Dual Degree - MMSc-PA/MPH

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Applicants who have served their communities or their countries through volunteer activities, military service, employment opportunities, and/or service-oriented programs greatly enhance the cultural perspective of the class.

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Meet our Team

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Meet the Emory PA Students

Admission to the Emory PA Program is very competitive. For the 2022 class, we had more than 1800 applicants for 54 spots. Meet a few of our outstanding students.

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Program Graduates

Learn more about what some of our incredible graduates are doing now.

Graduation Pance

Recent Events

Class of 2022 graduation.

The Emory PA Program graduation ceremony for the Class of 2022 took place on December 18 . You can watch the recording of the ceremony by clicking the video above.

Class of 2022 Morning Honors Ceremony

The Emory PA Program held an honors and awards ceremony for 2022 prior to the Class of 2022 graduation ceremony. You can watch a recording of the ceremony by clicking on the video above.

Celebrating 50 Years!

The Emory PA Program hosted a wide variety of events in 2022 to celebrate our 50th year as a Physician Assistant Program!

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PA Program featured in Emory Medicine Magazine

The Emory PA Program is one of the oldest in the nation, having just celebrated its 50th year. With intense, hands-on student training and a distinctive emphasis on providing culturally sensitive care to medically underserved communities, Emory is at the forefront of preparing PA students for an increasingly demanding and complex world.

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How to Apply

Below you will find information about how to apply to the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Physician Assistant Program.

The 2023-24 application cycle is now closed. The 2024-25 application cycle will open on April 25, 2024.

Please read the information below to learn about our application requirements and upcoming deadlines. Please also see our pages for Military Applicants , International Applicants and NMHC Employees , as well as our Next Steps page for what to expect once your application has been submitted.

Key dates for the 2024-25 Admissions Cycle (anticipated enrollment in early June 2025):

  • Application Opens: April 25, 2024
  • Application Deadline: September 1, 2024 (by 11:59pm Central Time)
  • Interviews: September 2024 - December 2024 (anticipated to be held virtually via Zoom)
  • Classes Begin: June 2, 2025 (anticipated; subject to change)

Applicants must meet (or must demonstrate that they will meet, according to our established policies and timeline), the prerequisite degree, coursework, pre-admission clinical experience, and test requirements of this Program.

Below you will find a step-by-step guide to assist you in submitting your application. Please carefully review both this guide and the "Prerequisites" section below it to ensure that you understand our admissions requirements in full detail. We also welcome you to visit our admissions FAQ and to join us for an information session . 

We welcome you to contact us at  [email protected]  and and follow us on Instagram (@nupaprogram) to learn more about student life at our Program. Thank you for considering Northwestern.

Step-by-Step Guide

  step 1: confirm that you meet the minimum requirements,   bachelor's degree.

A completed baccalaureate (or higher-level degree) from a regionally-accredited institution, or an equivalent institution as determined by Northwestern University, is required prior to matriculation into the program.

Applicants are welcome to apply with a baccalaureate degree in progress, provided that this degree will be conferred prior to matriculation.

For applicants applying in 2024 for admission to the Class of 2027, the anticipated start date of our Program is June 2, 2025.

International applicants should review these additional considerations and requirements .

  Minimum 3.0 Overall GPA & Science GPA

Applicants must have achieved an Overall GPA of 3.0 or higher and an Overall Science GPA of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale, as calculated by CASPA, at the time of application submission.

Applications not meeting these minimum GPA requirements * at the time of application* are not eligible for application review and thus are not eligible for admission to the Program.

Competitive applicants have typically taken rigorous science courseloads and have typically achieved an Overall GPA and Overall Science GPA of 3.30 or higher.

  Minimum 1,000 Hours of Patient Care Experience Accrued at Application

Candidates must present in their CASPA materials a minimum of 1,000 hours of direct patient care experience, accrued upon the date of application submission. CASPA applications submitted with fewer than 1,000 accrued hours of direct patient care experience are not considered further for admission. 

Enrolling class cohorts  average well over 1,000 hours of direct patient care experience. 

CASPA defines a distinction   between the application Experience categories of Patient Care Experience and Healthcare Experience. When evaluating an application, we look beyond this binary definition into the actual care responsibilities held and tasks executed in each clinical role.

As such, hours accrued in most clinical roles defined by CASPA as Healthcare experience will meet our definition of patient care experience, and thus are eligible to meet our 1,000 hour requirement noted above. Our admissions committee will review experiences provided by applicants in both the Patient Care Experience and Healthcare Experience categories of the CASPA.

On our Class Profile page , you can view the clinical roles held by our current students prior to matriculation , all of which qualify as patient care experience for this Program. This list does not include all qualifying patient care experience roles and does not indicate an admissions preference for one clinical role over another.

Please contact   [email protected]  with questions about the eligibility of a given clinical role to meet our requirements.

  Completion (or Planned Completion) of the 6 Prerequisite Courses

The information below is an abbreviated version of the policies governing the completion of prerequisite coursework in accordance with our admissions requirements. For additional details, please review the Coursework Prerequisites section found at the bottom of the How to Apply page of our website.

  • There are 6 required courses.
  • Lab coursework is not required.
  • All courses must be have been completed on or after 9/1/2017 (7 year window) to be eligible.
  • All courses must have been completed for a grade of "C" or higher.
  • All courses must have been completed for 3 or more college credits (semester or quarter), with the exception of Medical Terminology, which need only be completed for 1 or more college credit.
  • Applications will still be considered if prerequisites are in progress or planned for the future per the stipulated timeline below. There is no admissions disadvantage to the applicant in this scenario.
  • Questions regarding course eligibility can be sent to [email protected]  

Required Courses

Applicants to our Program must have completed (or have a qualifying plan to complete) the six required courses noted below for a grade of "C" or higher at one or more regionally-accredited institutions of higher learning:

  • Anatomy (3 or more college credits)
  • Biochemistry (3 or more college credits)
  • Medical Terminology (1 or more college credits)
  • Microbiology (3 or more college credits)
  • Physiology(3 or more college credits)
  • Statistics (3 or more college credits)

All prerequisite coursework must be completed no earlier than 7 years prior to application cycle deadline. Thus, for the 2024-25 application cycle, all qualifying prerequisite coursework will have been completed on or after September 1, 2017. No exceptions are made to this policy.

Applications will still be considered if prerequisites are in progress or planned for the future. In fact, this is a common circumstance, and it carries no advantage or disadvantage to an applicant during application evaluation.

As of September 1, 2024, up to three prerequisite courses may be in progress or planned for the future.   In this scenario:

  • Up to three prerequisite courses may be in progress or planned to be completed between September 1, 2024 and December 31, 2024.
  • Only one prerequisite course may be in progress or planned to be completed between January 1, 2025 and May 30, 2025.

Qualifying Course Topic Coverage & Additional Topics

For additional details, please review the Coursework Prerequisites section found at the bottom of the How to Apply page of our website.

Questions regarding course eligibility can be sent to [email protected] . When inquiring, please be so kind as to include the course syllabus in your email message, as this assists our admissions committee in their evaluation. 

  There Are No Test Requirements for Domestic Applicants

The submission of Graduate Record Examination (GRE) test scores is not required and any GRE scores submitted will not be evaluated during application review.

Similarly, we do not require submission of results from theCASPer, PA-CAT, MCAT, or any other standardized test (except the TOEFL for international applicants), and submitted results will not be evaluated during application evaluation.

For International Applicants:

Official and valid TOEFL scores are required of all applicants who do not currently hold (or who are not in the process of completing) a baccalaureate degree or higher level degree from an institution of higher learning in the United States or English-speaking Canada, regardless of the official language of the country of origin or the predominant language of attended educational institutions.

Please visit the Test Requirements section at the bottom of this page  to view our TOEFL minimum score criteria.

  Additional Requirements For International Applicants

If you do not, or will not, hold a bachelor's or higher level degree from a US or English-instruction Canadian institution, you are considered an international applicant to our Program and you will need to 1) have your transcript(s) and degree(s) evaluated by an accredited service, 2) submit TOEFL results which meet our minimum requirements, and 3) meet our requirements for minimum credit hours in the United States.

Detailed information about these requirements can be found on the International Applicants page of our website.

For more information about the TOEFL requirement, including minimum scores, please visit the Test Requirements section found at the bottom of the How to Apply page of our website.

  Step 2: Understand the Two Required Applications

  brief overview.

A complete application to our Program includes two separate application submissions:

  • The CASPA Application  in "Verified" status including 3+ submitted Evaluations (Letters of Reference)
  • The Northwestern University PA Program Supplemental Application

Once you have submitted both applications, and your CASPA submission has achieved Verified status, please allow us up to 5 business days to process this information.

We will then contact you by email at the address provided to us as part of your CASPA application to confirm the complete status of your application. Your application will then be put in queue for review by our admissions committee. All applications are reviewed in the order that they achieve complete status.

  The CASPA Application

Please visit the CASPA website to start your application. Applicants must submit their  CASPA  application  to our Program by the September 1, 2024, 11:59pm Central Time deadline.

CASPA applications not in "Received", "Complete", or "Verified" status, as designated by CASPA, as of the September 1, 2024, 11:59pm Central Time deadline will not be considered further for admission. 

Please see Step 3 of this overview to learn more about our requirements with respect to the CASPA application submission.

CASPA Resources:

  • CASPA Website
  • Checking Your CASPA Notifications and Status
  • CASPA Quick Start Guide & FAQs

  The Northwestern University PA Program Supplemental Application

In addition to the CASPA application, applicants to our Program must submit the  Northwestern University PA Program Supplemental Application  by the September 1, 2024, 11:59pm Central Time application deadline.

The Supplemental Application will be launched on this webpage concurrently with the launch of the CASPA application on April 25, 2024, and can be started at that time with a current-cycle CASPA ID.

Applicants will not be able to access or submit the Supplemental Application after the September 1, 2024, 11:59pm Central Time application deadline.

Please see Step 3 of this overview to learn more about the Supplemental Application.

  Step 3: Submit Your Applications & Await Confirmation

  submitting your caspa application.

Please be sure to follow the instructions and guidelines provided by CASPA regarding completion of the application. You will designate Northwestern University.

As part of the CASPA application, you will submit a personal statement and official academic transcripts from all institutions attended at the baccalaureate or higher level, among other components. In addition, you will request that evaluators submit letters of reference (called "evaluations" in CASPA) on your behalf.

To meet the admissions requirements of our Program, your CASPA application must include:

  • 3 or more submitted evaluations
  • At least one evaluation from a healthcare professional who can discuss the applicant's abilities and performance in providing patient care, preferably someone who has supervised the applicant in a clinical setting

Personal references from friends or family members are not accepted.

As part of the CASPA application, up to 5 total evaluations may be submitted on an applicant's behalf and all submitted evaluations will be reviewed by our admissions committee. There is no admissions advantage or disadvantage associated with the number of letters (3, 4, or 5) submitted as part of the application.

Verified CASPA applications with fewer than 3 submitted evaluations will not move forward to application review until such time as at least 3 evaluations have been submitted.

  Submitting the Supplemental Application

The Northwestern University PA Program Supplemental Application will be launched on this webpage concurrently with the launch of the CASPA application on April 25, 2024, and can be started at that time with a current-cycle CASPA ID.

The Supplemental Application is available to all applicants--that is, it is not sent separately to selected applicants.

The Supplemental Application includes:

  • 3 required essay submissions
  • 1 optional essay submission
  • summary of their completed, in progress, or planned prerequisite coursework

There is a $50 application fee paid online upon Supplemental Application submission. You may view and work on the Supplemental Application without submitting payment.

  Step 4: What to Expect After Submitting Your Application

  what to expect after submitting your application.

The Northwestern University PA Program will send notification acknowledging receipt of your completed application once the required materials have been received:

  • Northwestern University PA Program Supplemental Application

Applicants are holistically evaluated on the basis of their individual merits. Admission decisions are based on the following criteria: academic record, patient care experience, health care experience, professional references (evaluations), written personal statement, supplemental application essay responses, awards/honors/accolades, and all Experiences provided via the CASPA application (leadership, volunteer/community enrichment, PA shadowing, research, teaching, extracurricular, and additional professional experiences). Select applicants are invited to interview and their candidacy is further evaluated based on interview performance.

To learn more about the rolling admissions process, sending updates, and the admissions interview and offer timeline, we invite you to visit the Next Steps page of our website.

Prerequisites

  degree prerequisites.

A completed baccalaureate degree from a regionally-accredited institution, or an equivalent institution as determined by Northwestern University, is required prior to matriculation into the program. Applicants are welcome to apply with a baccalaureate degree in progress, provided that this degree will be conferred prior to matriculation.

  • Applicants educated outside the United States and English-speaking Canada must utilize a transcript evaluation service. See the International Applicants page for details.
  • Applicants from the United States or Canada with coursework completed outside those countries do not have to utilize a transcript evaluation service if the coursework appears on their transcripts from the U.S. or Canadian institutions (e.g., study abroad).
  • Applicants must have an Overall GPA and Overall Science GPA of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale, as calculated by CASPA.

  Coursework Prerequisites

Official transcripts must show that the following prerequisites have been completed. Substitutions are not accepted.

To be considered further for admission, all prerequisite coursework must be completed no earlier than 7 years prior to application cycle deadline. Thus, for the 2024-25 application cycle, all qualifying prerequisite coursework will have been completed on or after September 1, 2017.

Applications will still be considered if prerequisites are still in progress or planned for the future. In fact, this is a common circumstance, and it carries no advantage or disadvantage to an applicant during application evaluation.

Qualifying prerequisite coursework will also adhere to the following guidelines:

  • Prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of "C" or higher. Prerequisites may also be completed with a grade of "Pass" if the granting institution certifies on their transcript that such a designation is equivalent to a grade of "C" or higher.
  • Labs are not required for any prerequisites.
  • A single course cannot be used to satisfy multiple prerequisites.
  • Coursework can be completed through any regionally-accredited institution, which includes almost all community colleges.
  • Coursework may be taken in-person or online.
  • Coursework must be taken for college credit, and must appear on an official college transcript.
  • Coursework taken for continuing education credits, "CEU" credit, or certificates of completion will not fulfill prerequisites.
  • Coursework from Kinesiology, Exercise Science and Nutrition departments may not be accepted to meet our prerequisites. Applicants are welcome to confirm course eligibility by providing the course syllabus to us at  [email protected].  Prerequisite courses must cover, in sufficient detail, the content areas listed in the table below.
  • Lower-division or "Intro/Survey"-level coursework may not fulfill prerequisites. Applicants are welcome to confirm course eligibility by providing the course syllabus to us at [email protected].     Prerequisite courses must cover, in sufficient detail, the content areas listed in the table below.
  • AP coursework will be accepted as long as classes appear on a college transcript with assigned credits. If AP coursework is completed Pass/Fail, the passing grade (or equivalent) must be a C or higher.

  Pre-Admission Clinical Experience

For the 2024-2025 application cycle, candidates must present in their CASPA materials a minimum of 1,000 hours of direct patient care experience, accrued upon the date of application submission. CASPA applications submitted with fewer than 1,000 accrued hours of direct patient care experience are not considered further for admission. Enrolling class cohorts  average well over 1,000 clinical hours at the time of application submission. In accordance with the CASPA FAQ guidance on Experiences , applicants shall include past, current and/or in-progress experiences. Do not include future or planned patient care experiences or hours. Hours associated with the completion of previous academic degrees, certifications, or training do not count as patient care experience for our Program. Preference is given to applicants having experience that requires a period of training and results in direct, hands-on patient care. When evaluating a given clinical experience, our Program considers the role, hours, level of responsibility, and degree of patient interaction.

All else equal, roles that feature greater clinical responsibility and, proportionally, a greater number of weekly hours providing direct, hands-on patient care, are valued more highly than roles of lesser responsibility or with fewer hours of weekly direct patient care. Evidence of community service or engagement (e.g. healthcare provided to underserved populations) is also highly valued.

On your CASPA application, please be sure to detail the depth and breadth of your direct clinical responsibilities in each role you have held. If you have been promoted or have been progressively assigned more clinical responsibilities in a given role over time, please highlight this for us in your application.

Applicants are encouraged to "shadow" a PA to become knowledgeable about the role of the physician assistant. This experience does not count as patient care experience. Due to conflict of interest considerations, and in the interest of maintaining equity in the admissions process, the Northwestern University PA Program is not able to assist PA Program applicants with obtaining PA shadowing experiences. You may consider contacting your local physician assistant organization (in Illinois, the Illinois Academy of Physician Assistants ) for assistance and networking opportunities.

For all applicants, patient care experience hours are automatically projected forward based on the date of CASPA application submission and the provided weekly hours. Applicants who start new positions or experiences or who wish to report significant updates to their weekly hours and/or professional responsibilities may do so via CASPA. Alternatively, updates and modifications to patient care positions and other experiences may be sent to [email protected]

  Test Requirements

Gre (graduate record examination), casper, pa-cat, and mcat.

The submission of CASPer, PA-CAT, or MCAT test scores is not required and any such scores submitted will not be evaluated during application review.

TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language)

Official TOEFL scores are required of all applicants who have not earned (or who are not in the process of earning) a baccalaureate degree or graduate degree from a regionally-accredited U.S. or Canadian college or university, regardless of the official language of the country in which the education took place or the predominant language of the degree-granting institution. Minimum required scores are listed below.

Results from the TOEFL Essentials Test or IELTS  cannot be used in fulfillment of the TOEFL requirement.

Professional or academic experience will not be considered  as a potential basis for waiving the TOEFL requirement.

Minimum TOEFL scores

Official and valid TOEFL scores must be submitted and received by our Program by the September 1, 2024, 11:59pm Central Time application deadline. PDF score report copies received at the time of testing or in the mail are not considered an official score report. TOEFL scores are valid for two years prior to the May/June of intended enrollment.

The Northwestern University Physician Assistant Program's Institution Code is 4888.

Visit the TOEFL website for more information.

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Master of Science in Health Sciences - Physician Assistant Studies (PA) Program  Application Requirements

The Physician Assistant Studies program provides a comprehensive academic and clinical medical education to prepare students for their professional roles as physician assistants. Students may enroll at either our Suwanee, Georgia campus , or our main campus in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Quick Facts: PA Studies Program

  • Duration:  26 months, full-time
  • Credits:  154
  • Location:  PCOM, PCOM Georgia
  • Start Term:  Summer (June)

PA studies student consults with a patient during rounds

PCOM's PA Studies Program Application Process

How do you apply to the pa studies program at pcom.

Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) participates in the Centralized Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA). You may obtain additional information about CASPA and apply online at CASPA .

Application Timeline for 2023-2024

When does the caspa application process open.

CASPA applications for 2023-2024 enrollment will become available on April 27, 2023.

When is the PCOM PA Studies program deadline?

All Physician Assistant Studies program applications are to be e-submitted, completed, verified and received by the PCOM Office of Admissions by CASPA no later than December 1, 2023 for both PCOM and PCOM Georgia (separate application per campus). There are no exceptions to the PA Studies program application deadline of December 1, 2023. When applying to PCOM through CASPA, you will be required to complete PCOM specific questions before submitting.

All required application materials for the Physician Assistant Studies program, including a non-refundable $75 PCOM application fee (one fee per campus), are to be received by the Office of Admissions by December 15, 2023, in order to be considered for admission by the appropriate Faculty Committee on Admissions. Note that the application fee can only be paid online through the link sent via email at receipt of a verified and completed CASPA application. Acknowledgment emails with instructions to pay the non-refundable $75 PCOM application fee using the PCOM Admissions Portal will be sent beginning in mid-June. Please check your spam folder if you do not receive an acknowledgment email a week after your application has been verified by CASPA.

How early should you apply to the PA Studies program at PCOM?

The Faculty Committee on Admissions recommends you submit a completed and verified CASPA application, which includes a PCOM specific question series, as soon as possible as our PA Studies program operates using a rolling admissions process.

Assessing PA Studies Program Applicants for Interview Consideration

Is there an interview requirement for pcom's physician assistant studies program.

Yes, an interview is required for admission to the Physician Assistant Studies program and is typically conducted from September through February although interviews may be conducted before or after this time frame. Applicants can receive an email inviting them to interview at any point between September through February.

How do you become a competitive PA Studies program applicant?

Completed and verified CASPA applications and supporting documents will be reviewed and individuals will be selected for a virtual interview by the Faculty Committee on Admissions. Interviews will be offered to those who qualify and who are deemed competitive against the larger applicant pool for the Physician Assistant Studies program, taking into consideration the following:

  • Baccalaureate degree
  • Prerequisite coursework
  • Grade Point Averages (GPAs)
  • Letters of recommendation
  • Standardized test score (TOEFL)
  • Healthcare experience
  • Other considerations

Selection for the PA Studies program at PCOM is very competitive. The requirements represent the minimum criteria for consideration for admission. Successful applicants will generally exceed the minimum criteria.

How long does it take to hear back from PCOM about the PA Studies program admission decisions?

A PA Studies program candidate can be selected for an interview at any time throughout the review process between September through February as deemed competitive by the Faculty Committee on Admissions. Decisions for interviewed candidates typically are sent within five weeks after the interview. An email will be sent to all applicants not selected for an interview after the last interview session has occurred.

Where can I see my application status and add updates to my application?

Candidates can use the application tracker in the PCOM Admissions Portal to review the status of their application. Candidates can also update their application using the “Upload Documents” section of the PCOM Admissions Portal.

Undergraduate Degree Requirements for the PA Studies Program

All applicants must complete a baccalaureate degree, preferably in science or a health-related field, from a regionally accredited college or university in the United States, Canada or the United Kingdom prior to matriculation. The PA Studies program will accept courses and labs completed online or on campus. All prerequisite coursework must be completed prior to enrollment with a grade of at least a "C" or 2.0 on a 4.0 scale with the exception of coursework completed during the spring and summer 2020 terms which may be listed as Pass in a pass/fail grading scale.

Where do I send my transcripts for the PA Studies program?

Applicants must send official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended directly to CASPA . Once enrolled at PCOM, candidates for the Physician Assistant Studies program must submit official copies of all college transcripts directly to the PCOM Office of Admissions.

Letters of Recommendation Requirement for the PA Studies Program

PA Studies applicants must submit three letters of recommendation. One recommendation MUST be from a physician (MD or DO), physician assistant or nurse practitioner in order to be considered for admission.

Where do I send my letters of recommendation?

Applicants must submit three letters of recommendation directly to CASPA. Additional recommendation letters may be sent as a PDF document to PCOM's Office of Admissions at [email protected] .

Standardized Test Scores Requirements for the Physician Assistant Studies Program

Are standardized test scores required for the pa studies program.

No, standardized test scores are not required or reviewed for admission to PCOM’s Physician Assistant Studies program with the exception of English language testing. Fluency in written and spoken English is essential for success in the program and to ensure patient safety. Applicants whose native language is not English must demonstrate objective competency in English within the past two years by satisfactory performance on the TOEFL examination. The minimum required score for the IBT (Internet Based Testing) is 79, with a minimum score of 26 for the speaking component.

Applicants for the PA Studies program are exempt from the TOEFL requirement if:

  • English was the exclusive language of instruction at the undergraduate level,
  • They have earned a degree from a regionally accredited US college or university not more than 5 years prior to the anticipated semester of enrollment, or
  • They have completed at least two (2) full-time semesters of graded coursework, exclusive of ESL courses, at an institution where English is the exclusive language of instruction not more than five (5) years prior to the anticipated semester of enrollment.

Coursework Prerequisites for Physician Assistant Studies

What courses do you need for the pa studies program.

* "General" coursework denotes the first two courses in the subject sequence for science majors.

What are the admissions prerequisites for the Physician Assistant Studies program?

  • All prerequisite coursework listed above must be completed prior to enrollment with a grade of at least a "C" or 2.0 on a 4.0 scale with the exception of coursework completed during the spring and summer 2020 terms which may be listed as Pass in a pass/fail grading scale. Coursework completed in fall 2020 and onward may not be pass/fail. Coursework completed fall 2020 onward must have a grade of a “C” or better or 2.0 on a 4.0 scale.
  • All science and math prerequisites must be completed within 10 years prior to June enrollment. (e.g., June 2014 or later).
  • One course cannot be used to satisfy multiple prerequisite courses.
  • AP coursework will be accepted provided the course and credits appear on your college transcript.
  • All courses must be completed at a regionally accredited institution.
  • The program will not accept prerequisite coursework completed as an audit.
  • The program will not accept credits completed as CLEP courses.
  • At the time of application, candidates must have the prerequisite coursework completed or be able to provide a plan in writing that demonstrates the completion of the prerequisites prior to enrollment in the program (this can be achieved by completing the "Planned or In Progress Coursework" section of CASPA). Two science/math prerequisite courses may be "Planned or In Progress" at the time of application.

What GPA do you need to get into PCOM’s PA Studies program?

Applicants must obtain an undergraduate science and cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale (as calculated by CASPA).

Can you take prerequisites at a community college for the PA Studies program?

The PA Studies program will accept credits completed at a community college.

Are online prerequisites accepted for PCOM's PA Studies program?

The program will accept courses and labs completed online or on campus.

Healthcare Experience Requirements for the PA Studies Program

How many direct patient contact hours are required to apply to pcom's pa studies program.

To be considered for an interview for the Physician Assistant Studies program, applicants must have a minimum of 200 hours of direct patient contact experience in volunteerism or employment in the healthcare industry, as documented through CASPA at the time of application. Candidates complete the requirement in a variety of ways, some of which include: working as a certified nursing assistant, pharmacy technician, phlebotomist, LPN, EMT, paramedic, scribe, medical translator, physical therapy aide, patient navigator, mental health aide, etc. Veterinary medicine hours will not be accepted towards the requirement.

Many Physician Assistant Studies program candidates have experienced medicine overseas as volunteers in clinics. Any volunteer work or paid work in a clinical setting wherein candidates are either providing hands-on care or witnessing care first hand can be acceptable, depending on the nature of the role. In-person health care shadowing experiences are counted and highly recommended.

Other Considerations for PA Studies Admissions

Applicants for the PA Studies program with graduate degrees and/or five years of healthcare experience and/or other unique circumstances or qualifications may be considered, on an individual basis, for waiver of selected published requirements. However, all Physician Assistant Studies candidates must have earned a baccalaureate degree prior to enrollment. Waiving of any criteria can only be assessed during the formal application review by the Faculty Committee on Admissions. Staff members of the Office of Admissions may not waive application requirements.

What are the background check requirements for PCOM's PA Studies program?

To ensure that students accepted to PCOM will be permitted to perform preceptorships during their second year of study, and thus ensure them the opportunity to successfully complete their MS degree requirements, PCOM requires all first year PA students to complete a criminal background check prior to matriculation. All students must have their criminal background checks processed through a PCOM chosen vendor. The Admissions Office will send notification of the process after confirmation of enrollment and must have this information on file prior to orientation. Students will not be permitted to start classes without a criminal background check received and approved by the Office of Admissions.

Application Decisions for the PA Studies Program

Candidates interviewed for PCOM's PA Studies program are evaluated based on multiple factors including:

  • Academic ability
  • Scholarly accomplishments
  • Problem solving ability
  • Decision making skills
  • Potential for professional comportment
  • Level of commitment to the profession
  • Personal preparedness
  • Congruence with program philosophy and mission

The Admissions Committee reserves the right to accept or reject applications to the chosen program based on merit.

Notification of Acceptance or Alternate Status

Following completion of the admissions process, PA Studies program applicants will be notified of the Admissions Committee's decision in writing, including any conditions that must be satisfied prior to or following enrollment. Once admitted, candidates who wish to enroll are asked to review and acknowledge PCOM's Technical Standards for Admission and Matriculation (PDF) and submit a $500 non-refundable tuition prepayment online. The acceptance packet will contain all materials required for enrollment. Applicants may be placed on the waitlist after completion of the interview process. Typically, PA Studies program candidates are selected as seats become available from February until classes begin in June. After all expected candidates arrive for orientation in June, those not selected will be notified of a final decision via their PCOM application portal.

Policy on Advanced Standing, Transfer of Credits and Experiential Learning and Graduates of Medical Schools

The Physician Assistant Studies program does not offer advanced placement based upon transfer of credits for academic work completed at other institutions of higher learning or upon credit from experiential learning. Applications are not accepted from graduates of medical schools.

Licensing Requirements

It is the sole responsibility of the applicant to determine that he/she will meet the eligibility requirements for national certification and state licensing. It is also the applicant’s sole responsibility to determine whether any particular country will allow the practice of the profession for which a PCOM degree is received and licensing in the United States is obtained.

The Physician Assistant Studies (PA) program meets all curricular requirements for the conferral of the master of science degree by national standards established by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistants (ARC-PA). Students who complete the degree will be eligible for licensure in all 50 states based on the academic curriculum.

Specifically, the academic curriculum meets state licensing requirements in: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming.

However, students should be aware that following graduation, employment is not guaranteed and each state has differing licensure requirements regarding physician supervision, prescribing practices, etc. Students who are seeking licensure outside of Pennsylvania and Georgia should refer to each state’s licensing board’s website.

The American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) has a helpful resource for navigating state and interstate licensure .

Program Statistics for the PCOM PA Studies Program

Please note the data below represents the ranges of the Class of 2025 for the Philadelphia and Georgia campuses and by no means predicts one's success as a Physician Assistant candidate or student. Each application is reviewed and evaluated in a holistic manner by the Faculty Committee on Admissions.

PA Studies - PCOM Class Statistics

  • 52 Female, 9 Male
  • 28 percent of the class reports their ethnicity to be underrepresented in medicine.
  • Average age of the incoming class: 23 (22 – 41)
  • States represented: CA, DE, FL, GA, MD, ME, MN, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, WI  
  • Total CASPA verified applications: 2,622
  • Total matriculants: 61
  • Average undergraduate cumulative GPA for PCOM's Physician Assistant Studies program as calculated by CASPA: 3.79 (Middle 50% Range 3.72 – 3.86)
  • Average undergraduate science GPA as calculated by CASPA: 3.73 (Middle 50% Range 3.66 – 3.83)

PA Studies - PCOM Georgia Class Statistics

  • 31 Female, 3 Male
  • 41 percent of the class reports their ethnicity to be underrepresented in medicine.
  • Average age of the incoming class: 24 (22 – 29)
  • States represented: CA, FL, GA, IL, MD, MS, NC, NY, OH, OR, PA, TN
  • Total CASPA verified applications: 1,627
  • Total matriculants: 34
  • Average undergraduate cumulative GPA for PCOM Georgia’s Physician Assistant Studies program as calculated by CASPA: 3.8 (Middle 50% Range 3.75 – 3.9)
  • Average undergraduate science GPA as calculated by CASPA: 3.75 (Middle 50% Range 3.59 – 3.89)

View more Physician Assistant Studies (MS) program data .

Additional Questions About the PCOM PA Studies Program

For questions regarding submission of the CASPA application and GPA calculation, contact CASPA directly at [email protected] or 617-612-2080 .

Should you have any questions related to the Physician Assistant Studies program or admissions process, please contact the respective Office of Admissions via email at:

View frequently asked questions about PCOM and PCOM Georgia's PA Studies program.

Contact the Office of Admissions

Pcom admissions.

4170 City Avenue Philadelphia, PA 19131

Toll Free: 800-999-6998 Local: 215-871-6700 Fax: 215-871-6719 Twitter: @PCOMAdmissions 

For information about PCOM programs:

PCOM Georgia Admissions

625 Old Peachtree Road Suwanee, GA 30024

Toll Free: 866-282-4544 Local: 678-225-7500 Fax: 678-225-7526 Twitter: @PCOMAdmissions 

For information about PCOM Georgia programs:

For information about the Doctor of Pharmacy program: 

PCOM South Georgia Admissions

2050 Tallokas Road Moultrie, GA 31768

Toll Free: 866-282-4544 Local: 229-668-3162 Fax: 678-225-7526 Twitter: @PCOMAdmissions 

For information about PCOM South Georgia programs:

  

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Physician Assistant Studies, M.S.

  • The College of Health Professions and Human Services
  • Department of Physician Assistant Studies

Physician assistants (PAs) are medical professionals who diagnose illness, develop and manage treatment plans, prescribe medications and often serve as a patient’s principal healthcare provider. With thousands of hours of medical training, PAs are versatile and collaborative. Physician assistants practice in every state and in every medical setting and specialty, improving healthcare access and quality. 

The Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies program prepares our graduates to provide evidence-based, equitable health care to diverse populations and who value service to others as well as life-long learning.  The physician assistant studies program is a 29-month, 105-credit-hour course of study leading to a master’s degree in physician assistant studies. This is a full-time, cohort-based program.

Application Deadline

  • Priority Deadline: January 15
  • Regular Deadline: April 1

Request Info

Physician Assistant Studies

At Kean, students develop their skills in our state-of-the-art classrooms and laboratories, as well as during supervised, hands-on clinical experiences in healthcare settings.

What You Learn

In the didactic phase of study, students take courses in basic medical sciences, behavioral sciences and behavioral ethics. In the clinical phase, students complete more than 2,000 hours of clinical rotations in medical and surgical disciplines, including family medicine, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, general surgery, emergency medicine and psychiatry.

Graduates of our program will be able to:

  • Demonstrate the knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors necessary for competent PA practice
  • Sustain a supportive and reflective learning environment that fosters empathy and a deep appreciation for diversity and inclusion
  • Work with partners within the University, in clinical practice and in the community to advance quality, patient-centered healthcare.

Graduates of an accredited program are recognized for licensure in all 50 states.

If you have admissions questions, contact Graduate Admissions at [email protected] or (908) 737-4723.

Program Information

Admission Requirements Attrition Curriculum Faculty and Staff FAQs Program Mission, Goals, and PANCE Rates Program Policies and Competencies Costs Related to the Program

Contact Us: [email protected]

Watch Video: Kean's First PA Class Receives White Coats

Application and Deadlines

Apply Now Through CASPA  Complete the Supplemental Application Technical Standards Acknowledgement Form

The PA Program begins in the  Fall  Semester . Application deadlines are as follows: CASPA "Soft" Deadline (highly recommended):  January 15  CASPA "Hard" Deadline:   April 1st Review of applications will begin following each deadline and when applications have been "verified" through CASPA. BOTH the CASPA application and the Kean University PAS supplemental application MUST be completed and "verified" by the deadline in order for the application to be fully reviewed. Kean University reserves the right to review applications received after the January deadline on an “as-needed” basis, in accordance with CASPA deadline definitions.

Physician Assistants are medical professionals who diagnose illnesses, develop treatment plans and prescribe medications. They practice in every medical setting and specialty, and they often serve as a patient’s principal healthcare provider. The profession consistently shows job growth, with the Bureau of Labor Statistics predicting a 31% growth rate from 2018 to 2028.

Carol Biscardi

Accreditation

The ARC-PA has granted Accreditation-Provisional status to the Kean University Physician Assistant Program sponsored by the Kean University.

Accreditation-Provisional is an accreditation status granted when the plans and resource allocation, if fully implemented as planned, of a proposed program that has not yet enrolled students appear to demonstrate the program’s ability to meet the ARC-PA Standards or when a program holding Accreditation-Provisional status appears to demonstrate continued progress in complying with the Standards as it prepares for the graduation of the first class (cohort) of students.

Accreditation-Provisional does not ensure any subsequent accreditation status. It is limited to no more than five years from matriculation of the first class.

The program’s accreditation history can be viewed on the ARC-PA website at  http://www.arc-pa.org/accreditation-history-kean-university/ .

Kean University Academics

The best way to see all that Kean University has to offer is to visit our vibrant urban campus.

Our admissions counselors are here to help you navigate the college application process. Learn more.

So much awaits you at Kean University. Your Kean journey begins now. Apply today.

Admissions and Prerequisites

Please click on each question heading below to learn more about admissions and prerequisite requirements for the Boston University Physician Assistant Program.

COVID-19 Considerations

My courses have shifted from in-person lecture to digital/online and pass/fail, will they still be considered, application, what is the deadline for application to the pa program, is there a supplemental application, supplemental application, when i open the pre-registration link in my web browser, the page is blank. how do i access the registration page.

For Mac users opening the pre-registration link in Safari, in some cases the link will not work and the page is blank because the browser needs to be updated. We recommend instead using Firefox or Chrome to open the pre-registration link. If you are still unable to open the link, please contact our office and we can assist you.

Why am I unable to successfully submit the Pre-Registration form?

Please ensure that you are entering your personal information  exactly  as it was entered into CASPA. For example, if you included your state’s two-letter postal abbreviation with your City of Birth in CASPA, you must also enter it into the Pre-Registration form (e.g. “Boston, MA” as opposed to “Boston”). If you unsuccessfully submit your Pre-Registration form 3 times, please email [email protected] and we will re-open the form for you.

I completed the Pre-Registration form, but still have not received a Web Login email with instruction on choosing a password for my BU web account. What should I do?

Please check your email account’s Spam/Junk folders for a message from [email protected]. If you are certain you have not received a message from that address, please email [email protected] and we will re-send the message.

What is the Supplemental Application deadline?

The Supplemental Application deadline for the 2023-2024 CASPA application cycle is September 5, 2023 at 11:59 pm Eastern Standard Time.

Prerequisite Coursework

Can you tell me more about the prerequisite courses for admission.

We have chosen a slate of prerequisite courses that we have found to be foundational to matriculating PA students at Boston University.  In order to ensure that each applicant is adequately prepared for our curriculum, we do not accept substitutions for the prerequisite courses listed on our admissions page.  We do not mandate that prerequisites be taken solely at a 4-year college or university.

Can any of my prerequisites be “In Progress” at the time of application to the PA program?

Can any of the prerequisites be taken online instead of in class.

**See COVID-19 Considerations for update to remote/online courses**

No.  All courses listed on our academic prerequisite requirement page must be completed in traditional classroom and laboratory settings.  Given the complexity and nature of PA education, we want to ensure that all applicants accepted to the program have sufficient academic preparation for success. We believe this is best achieved by taking your science class prerequisites in a classroom setting.

If I send my transcript, will you tell me which prerequisites I am missing or have fulfilled?

At this time, our office is unable to provide full transcript reviews to prospective applicants. However, if you are unsure whether you have satisfied a particular academic requisite with previously-completed or tentative coursework, please email us 1) the name and number of the course 2) the institution at which it was taken and 3) a syllabus or brief course description.

The institution where I took my courses has a different numbering system than 100, 200, 300, etc. How can I determine if my coursework meets the upper level requirements?

Our Admissions Team understands that not all colleges and universities implement the same numbering system for courses. If you are unsure about a particular course, please contact our office by email with the following information

  • The course name and number
  • Where you took the course
  • A brief course description, such as the description from a course bulletin
  • Which prerequisite you would like to apply that course to

We will respond as soon as possible, after reviewing that course.

Is there a time limit for prerequisite courses? Do courses expire?

I took a 300 level biochemistry course. does this count towards both the biochemistry and upper-level biology course requirements.

No. Courses that meet one of the prerequisite criteria cannot be used to meet a second requirement. All specific course prerequisites courses are required in addition to three upper level biology courses at the 300, 400 level or above.

I already have an advanced degree. Do I still need to complete all prerequisite courses?

Degree requirements, do i need to have a bachelors degree prior to applying, is a bachelors degree in a science related major required.

No. The program does not prefer one Bachelors degree over another. We welcome applicants from diverse academic, career, and personal backgrounds.

GPA and Test Requirements

What is the gpa requirement for admissions.

We require a minimum GPA of 3.0 in science coursework only. This number is calculated by CASPA and includes all science courses. We do not have an overall minimum GPA requirement.

Are GRE and/or MCAT scores required?

Do i need to take casper.

Yes, for the 2023-2024 CASPA cycle, all applicants are required to submit CASPer scores. More information on CASPer can be found at www.takealtus.com .

Is there a minimum CASPer score requirement

Yes, for the 2023-2024 CASPA cycle, The minimum CASPer score requirement is the 40th percentile. More information on CASPer can be found at www.takealtus.com .

How do I submit my TOEFL scores?

Please report your TOEFL scores directly to CASPA by sending them to code 0400 . You may read more about score reporting through CASPA here .

Letters of Recommendation

Can i send additional letters of recommendation to your office.

The Admissions Committee will review only the three letters of recommendation specified in its admissions prerequisites . Any additional letters of recommendation submitted will not be review. If you are unable to upload both the three letters required by the Program and those required by other programs to which you are applying within CASPA’s five-letter limit, please contact us at [email protected].

Admissions Policies

Does the bu pa program endorse any groups or engage in affirmative action policies, does the bu pa program have rolling admissions, does the bu pa program offer advanced placement or advanced standing, how do i know which courses cover the upper level biology prerequisite, i have additional information for my application, but i've already submitted my application, who should i send this information to.

Should you have further questions, please email us at [email protected]

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Prerequisites

Admissions prerequisites must be completed prior to application. For more information, please see FAQ .

Academic Prerequisites

Healthcare experience, yale pa program technical standards, interpersonal skills.

The Yale Physician Associate Program, from which students graduate with a Masters of Medical Science degree, is a graduate-level program within the Yale School of Medicine. Each applicant must have completed a baccalaureate degree prior to matriculation.

The Admissions Committee closely examines an applicant's record for evidence that the individual is capable of successfully completing graduate-level work. While a degree in a premedical science major is not required, due to the intense rigor of graduate study, a minimum cumulative science GPA of 3.0 is required . This calculation is derived automatically from the CASPA application.

For more information please email: [email protected] .

The following undergraduate/graduate math and science courses are required to be considered for admission to the Yale Program.

Statistics or Calculus

  • Probability;
  • Variables/distribution;
  • Confidence intervals;
  • Group comparisons;
  • Regression; and
  • ANOVA and chi-square.
  • Limits and continuity;
  • Differentiation;
  • Applications of differentiation; and
  • Integration.

Duration: one semester or 3-5 credits.

Human Anatomy*

  • Upper limb;
  • Lower limb;
  • Head & neck; and
  • Thorax, abdomen & pelvis.

Duration: One semester or 3-5 credits.

*Please note: Anatomy and Physiology requirements can also be met with a combined two-semester course (6-10 credits) in Anatomy & Physiology I & II.

Human or Animal Physiology*

Organic chemistry or biochemistry.

  • Chemical bonding;
  • Alcohols, esters, phenols, aldehydes, and ketones;
  • Carbohydrates and energy production; and
  • Fats and lipids.
  • Enzymology;
  • Cellular communication;
  • DNA and RNA structure and synthesis;
  • Energy and carbohydrate metabolism;
  • Amino acid and protein synthesis; and
  • Digestion and hormonal control of metabolism.

Duration: one semester of biochemistry or organic chemistry (3-5 credits) or a combined organic/biochemistry semester course (3-5 credits).

Microbiology

Undergraduate/graduate science coursework guidelines.

  • A maximum of one prerequisite course may be "in progress" at the time the CASPA application is submitted. The "in progress" course must be completed by December 31st with a grade of "B" or better. Once the course is completed, applicants must request an official transcript be sent directly to the Yale PA Admissions Office.
  • Prerequisite coursework may be completed at multiple accredited institutions, including community/junior colleges and institutions from which the applicant has not received a degree.
  • The program does not accept audited courses as prerequisites.
  • Courses that may have been taken at any period of time in the past are considered and do not "expire."
  • On-line courses from regionally accredited institutions are acceptable.

Competitive applicants are recommended (but not required) to have a minimum of six months full-time healthcare employment, or 1,000 total hours of hands-on patient care experience and/or community service in a healthcare setting. Preference is given to applicants having experience that requires a period of training and results in direct (hands-on) patient care.

  • Examples include: EMT, Paramedic, Registered Nurse, Medical Assistant, CNA, ER Tech, Physical Therapy Aide, Medical Scribe, Personal Care Provider
  • Hours associated with the completion of academic degrees, certifications, or training will not count

Evidence of community service (i.e., healthcare for under-served populations, medical mission trips) is highly valued.

PA Shadowing

Applicants are encouraged to "shadow" a PA to become knowledgeable of the role of the physician assistant; this experience does not count as patient care experience. Due to legal considerations, the Yale University PA Program is not able to assist PA Program applicants with obtaining PA shadowing experiences. Applicants may consider contacting local physician assistant organizations for assistance and networking opportunities.

CASPA Application Tip

For the class entering in the fall 2024, hours of experience ranged from 1000 to 10,888 total hours. When submitting an application through CASPA, applicants are asked to categorize their experiences as either Patient Care Experience or Healthcare Experience , and should follow the instructions provided by CASPA at that time in order to assess the distinctions and select the appropriate category.

Technical Standards

The Technical Standards are the Program expectations for certain knowledge, skills, abilities, professional attitudes and behaviors. Students must verify that they meet the Technical Standards prior to matriculation and maintain them during the entirety of their PA education in the Program. Students are obligated to alert the Program immediately of any change to their status. Students are subject to dismissal if, with reasonable accommodation, they are not able to demonstrate that they can meet the Technical Standards.

Reasonable Accommodation

The Physician Associate Program is committed to creating a respectful, accessible and inclusive learning environment, and recognizes that students with varied types of disabilities can become successful medical professionals. Students who have a disability and need accommodation should initiate discussions with Student Accessibility Services ( 203.432.2324 ) as soon as the offer of admission is received and accepted. It is the responsibility of the student to provide the Student Accessibility Services (SAS) with adequate information documenting the general nature and extent of the disability as well as the functional limitation in need of accommodation. Evaluation and implementation of an accommodation request is a collaborative effort between the student, the SAS, and the Physician Associate Program.

Should a student have or develop a condition that might place patients, the student, or others at risk, or that may affect their need for accommodation, an evaluation with the SAS may be necessary. An accommodation is not reasonable if providing the accommodation:

  • poses a direct threat to the health or safety of the student and/or others,
  • if providing the accommodation requires a substantial modification of an essential element of the curriculum as determined by the Physician Associate Program,
  • if providing the accommodation lowers academic standards, or
  • if providing the accommodation poses an undue financial burden on the University.

I. Observation

Students must have sufficient sensory capacity, with or without reasonable accommodation, to observe in the lecture hall, the laboratory, in various patient settings. Sensory skills adequate to perform a physical examination are required, including functional vision, hearing, smell, and tactile sensation. All senses must be adequate to observe a patient’s condition and to elicit information through procedures regularly required in taking a history and performing a physical examination.

II. Communication

Students must be able, with or without reasonable accommodation, to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients and others in academic and healthcare settings. Students must be able to listen attentively and speak clearly, including communications with patients from different social and cultural backgrounds. Additionally, they must be able to effectively communicate in spoken, written, and electronic formats. Students must be able to identify and describe changes in mood, activity, and posture, and perceive non-verbal communication. Students must be able to record examination and diagnostic results clearly, accurately and efficiently using various formats, including electronic platforms.

Students must have sufficient motor function to elicit information from patients through interview, physical exam, and other diagnostic maneuvers, with or without reasonable accommodation. Students must have sufficient motor function to execute movements reasonably required to provide general and emergency care to patients, including but not limited to cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the administration of intravenous medication, the application of pressure to stop bleeding, the opening of obstructed airways, the suturing of simple wounds, the handling of surgical instruments, and the performance of basic obstetrical maneuvers.

Students must be able, with or without reasonable accommodation, to negotiate patient care environments and must be able to move between settings, such as clinic, classroom building and hospital. Physical stamina sufficient to complete the rigorous course of didactic and clinical study is required. Long periods of sitting, standing, or moving are required in classroom, laboratory, and clinical experiences. Because clinical placements use electronic medical records and because the national certifying exam does not provide a paper test accommodation at this time, students must also be able to use computers and other electronic devices, and must be able to take computer-based examinations.

IV. Intellectual-Conceptual, Integrative, and Quantitative Abilities

Students must be able, with or without reasonable accommodation, to learn large amounts of complex, technical, and detailed information for independent problem solving and decision making. They must be able to learn through a variety of modalities including, but not limited to, classroom instruction, clinical settings and simulated environments; small group, team and collaborative activities; individual self-directed study; preparation and presentation of reports; and use of technology. Students must be able to memorize, measure, calculate, reason, analyze, synthesize and report clinical data. In addition, students must be able to recognize and draw conclusions about three-dimensional spatial relationships and logical sequential relationships. Students must be able to read, understand and critically evaluate the medical literature. Students must be able to demonstrate mastery of these skills and the ability to use them together in a timely fashion to formulate accurate diagnosis and management plans.

V. Professional Behavior and Social Attributes

Students must maintain the highest level of professional behavior. Students must possess and demonstrate the emotional maturity needed to participate fully in all aspects of PA training. Students must be able to exercise good judgment in all academic and patient care settings. The student must be capable of responsive, empathetic listening and must possess sufficient interpersonal skill to develop mature, compassionate, respectful relationships with peers, patients, patient families, and all members of the academic and healthcare communities. Students must demonstrate the ability to function effectively and with composure when under stress and in situations that are uncertain, unpredictable, and physically and/or emotionally challenging. Students must be able to take responsibility for their own learning, recognize limitations in their knowledge, skills and abilities, and seek appropriate assistance when limitations are identified. Students must be able to contribute to collaborative learning, accept constructive feedback from others, and always strive towards excellence. Students must be capable of regular, reliable and punctual attendance at all learning events and clinical assignments, understanding that this may require their presence during day, evening, or overnight hours, and any day of the week, often with very early morning reporting times.

VI. Ethics and Compliance with Applicable Law and Policies

Students must be able to understand the basis and content of both general and medical ethics. Students whose performance or judgment is impaired by prescribed or illicit medications, abuse of alcohol or other substances and who cannot meet the technical standards are not suitable candidates for admission, promotion, or graduation. In addition, should a student be charged or convicted of any misdemeanor or felony offense while in the Program, the student agrees to immediately notify the Program as to the nature of the legal issues. Failure to disclose prior or new offenses can lead to disciplinary action that may include dismissal. It is expected that students will maintain a high level of personal integrity, acting ethically and lawfully in their professional and personal lives.

Compassionate health care is a basic tenet of the PA profession. The program values the applicant's ability to work skillfully, thoughtfully, responsibly and constructively with people. Individuals who demonstrate flexibility and the ability to adapt to new situations are well suited to become physician assistants.

The Admissions Committee also assesses applicants on their commitment to a PA career and their awareness of the PA role as a member of the healthcare team.

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Preparatory Coursework

Our preparatory course recommendations are not prerequisites for admission, and we will review all applications regardless of prior coursework. However, competitive applicants are ready to succeed academically in our program. We strongly recommend that applicants complete all preparatory coursework prior to applying to the program, and within the last ten (10) years. Please note that coursework in progress or older than ten (10) years will not be considered during the review process. Coursework should be completed at the postsecondary level only; AP credit or coursework completed in high school does not fulfill our coursework recommendations and will not be considered during the review process. The program does not grant   Advanced Placement . Coursework may be completed at the undergraduate or post-baccalaureate level or through graduate degree work, at any regionally accredited institution of higher education. While we prefer that recommended preparatory coursework be completed in person, we will consider coursework completed online in our review.

Because preparatory coursework is strongly recommended but not required, we do not make exceptions or provide waivers for preparatory coursework. If a course does not meet the criteria described here (e.g., is a specialized psychology or statistics course, or was completed more than ten years ago), we will note the course but it will not satisfy our preparatory coursework recommendation.

Please refer to our admission  FAQ  for more information. 

We strongly recommend that applicants complete the following coursework prior to applying:

This should include at lease one semeser/quarter (3-5 units or credits) of General Biology or Human Biology. 

Microbiology

This should include at lease one semeser/quarter (3-5 units or credits) of Microbiology.

Anatomy & Physiology

This can be completed separately, as at least one semester/quarter (3-5 units or credits) of Anatomy and at least one semester/quarter (3-5 units or credits) of Physiology (including Animal, Human, or Exercise Physiology), or as two semesters/quarters (6-10 units or credits) of a combined Anatomy and Physiology course. We strongly prefer that these courses include a lab component. 

This should include at least one semester/quarter (3-5 units or credits) of General Chemistry or Biochemistry.

Organic Chemistry

This should include at lease one semeser/quarter (3-5 units or credits) of Organic Chemistry. 

This should include at least one semester/quarter (3-5 units or credits) of General Statistics or Biostatistics. Please note that specialized statistics courses, such as Statistics for Psychology, do not satisfy this recommendation. 

This should include at least one semester/quarter (3-5 units or credits) of General Psychology. Please note that specialized psychology courses, such as Developmental Psychology or Psychology of Aging, do not satisfy this recommendation. 

Upper Division Courses

In addition to the courses above, we recommend that applicants complete three (3) additional upper-division bioscience courses (3-5 units or credits each) prior to applying. Common examples of upper-division bioscience courses include, but are not limited to: Cell Biology, Embryology, Endocrinology, Genetics, Histology, Immunology, Molecular Biology, Neuroscience, Pharmacology, and Virology.

Please note that some institutions offer lower-division courses in these areas. Most upper-division courses are offered only to advanced students at four-year institutions and carry a course number of 300 or above. However, there are exceptions (for example, the University of California system classifies courses numbered 100-199 as upper division). To ensure that your coursework satisfies our upper-division course recommendation, please verify that your course is classified as upper division by your institution. Unless the course is explicitly classified as upper division by your institution, it will not satisfy our course recommendation.

Medical Terminology

We suggest that applicants, especially those without strong prior healthcare experience, consider taking a course in Medical Terminology prior to matriculation. No specific course type or units/credits are recommended.

  • Pre-Health Tracks
  • Pre-Physician Assistant

Required Courses

Courses required for admission   vary significantly   from one institution to another. These courses are mentioned frequently as being required and/or recommended:

  • Human Anatomy
  • Human Physiology
  • General Chemistry
  • Biochemistry
  • Microbiology
  • Other courses may also be required

Some of the above courses may not be offered by Northwestern University’s undergraduate program but may be available through the   Northwestern School of Professional Studies (SPS ). 

  • Northwestern undergraduates must follow   these steps to register for an SPS course . ( Scroll to the 2nd to last question. )
  • Many PA programs will accept online or community college coursework.

Because pre-requisite courses can vary so much by program, we encourage pre-PA students to research PA programs early by using the   PAEA directory   and reviewing PA program websites. 

  • Coursework that may be accepted by one PA program may not necessarily be accepted by other PA programs. 
  • It’s important for pre-PA students to communicate with each program to double-check that their coursework is accepted as fulfilling that particular program’s pre-requisites.
  • We’re also   happy to meet with students   to discuss the best way to plan and complete the necessary coursework.

Choosing a Major

PA students come from a wide variety of educational back grounds. Applicants are not required to major in a particular major in college to be eligible for admission to a PA Masters degree program.  If the physician assistant pre-requisite courses are not required as part of an applicant’s undergraduate major, these courses will need to be completed as electives or outside of the Northwestern system (there would not be a need to transfer the courses back to Northwestern).

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  1. Physician Assistant (PA) Program

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  2. PA School Prerequisites

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  4. Daemen PA Program Ranked Among Nation’s Best Graduate Schools

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  5. 5 tips to finding the PERFECT PA Program

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  6. What to Look for When Selecting a PA Program

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COMMENTS

  1. Physician Assistant (MS)

    Course credits earned in the Program are valid for a maximum of four years unless an extension is granted by the PA Program Director. To be removed from probation, students must clear any deficient grades; maintain a 3.0 GPA in all future semesters without receiving an "I," "F," "U," or "W" grade; meet the requirements listed ...

  2. Tufts University School of Medicine

    PA Curriculum. The program spans 25 continuous months, beginning in January, with the first year focusing on foundational medical science, disease pathophysiology, and therapeutics. Students explore various medical disciplines and principles of physical diagnosis, preparing for subsequent clinical rotations through skill workshops.

  3. School of Physician Assistant Studies Curriculum

    No advanced placement or advanced standing is granted, nor is transfer credit or credit for experiential learning accepted in lieu of PA courses. PA classes are open to enrolled PA students only. All PA students must complete the entire PA curriculum to be considered eligible for graduation and completion of the program. The UF PA School ...

  4. How to Become a Physician Assistant

    4. Graduate From an Accredited PA Program. To become a PA, you'll need to have a master's degree in PA studies from a university program that has been accredited by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA). Most PA programs require going to school full time for two to three years.

  5. PA School Prerequisites

    Overview of Physician Assistant Prerequisite Course Requirements by School (10 Top Ranking PA Schools) ... Any chance you (or anywhere on your site) can filter by timeline for completed prerequisite coursework and PA program application? ..thanks! Reply. Stephen Pasquini PA-C says. June 20, 2020 at 8:37 am.

  6. Become a PA: Getting Your Prerequisites and Certification

    Step 2: Attend an accredited PA program. Step 3: Become certified. Step 4: Obtain a state license. Step 5: Maintain your certification. A PA (physician associate/physician assistant) is a nationally certified and state-licensed medical professional. Learn about PA school and how to get and maintain your certification.

  7. Duke Physician Assistant Program

    Welcome to the Duke Physician Assistant Program — birthplace of the physician assistant profession. Mission. Equip learners to deliver equitable patient-centered care by providing an innovative primary care-focused curriculum, expanding and strengthening community partnerships, and developing leaders in the PA profession.. Educational Philosophy. Our Educational Philosophy assures that we ...

  8. How To Become A Physician Assistant: A Step-By-Step Guide

    A PA program involves coursework in clinical anatomy, histology, clinical therapeutics and medicine principles. You may also undergo clinical rotations or clerkships, which involve shadowing ...

  9. About the PA Program

    The Duke Physician Assistant Program is an educational program in the Division of PA Studies in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health in the Duke University School of Medicine.The department is composed of five interdependent divisions — Community Health, Family Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, PA Studies, and Student Health.

  10. Overview

    The Pitt PA Studies difference is our commitment to a multi-pronged approach to support student success throughout the program's two-year curriculum — in both the didactic and clinical years — with resources to support all learner styles. Our program meshes traditional didactic lectures with out-of-the-classroom learning opportunities ...

  11. Physician Assistant Studies

    The Bryant Physician Assistant Program does not accept transfer credits to be applied to required program coursework and does not award Advanced Placement based on prior coursework. Your application process begins when you submit an online CASPA application as early as April 25, 2024.

  12. Yale Physician Assistant Online Program

    Yale's PA Online Program awards a Master of Medical Science (MMSc) degree and prepares graduates to seek licensure as physician assistants. Our Hybrid Program The program blends online classes and coursework with in-person clinical rotations and three immersions (two on the Yale campus and one remote), so students can earn a degree from YSM ...

  13. Physician Assistant Program

    The Emory PA Program will have four live on-campus Open House informational sessions in Spring 2024. Time and Place: 3 - 6 PM in the James B. Williams School of Medical Education Building room 130. Registration will begin at 2:30 in the lobby. Nearest campus parking is the Michael Street Parking deck visitor lot: 550 Houston Mill Road ...

  14. How to Apply: Physician Assistant Program: Feinberg School of Medicine

    Key Dates. Key dates for the 2024-25 Admissions Cycle (anticipated enrollment in early June 2025): Application Opens: April 25, 2024. Application Deadline: September 1, 2024 (by 11:59pm Central Time) Interviews: September 2024 - December 2024 (anticipated to be held virtually via Zoom) Classes Begin: June 2, 2025 (anticipated; subject to change)

  15. Physician Assistant Application Requirements

    The PA Studies program will accept courses and labs completed online or on campus. All prerequisite coursework must be completed prior to enrollment with a grade of at least a "C" or 2.0 on a 4.0 scale with the exception of coursework completed during the spring and summer 2020 terms which may be listed as Pass in a pass/fail grading scale ...

  16. PA School Requirements: The Ultimate Guide

    PA school course requirements. What are the prerequisites for PA school? This is where applying to physician assistant programs becomes complicated. PA school requirements vary with every program, so it can be overwhelming to decide what classes to take. Here is a list of science prerequisites almost guaranteed to be required by all PA programs:

  17. PA School Finder

    Welcome to the 2024-2025 Physician Assistant (PA) School Finder Online PA Program Directory and PA Program Match. This is the most comprehensive, FREE, interactive guide for prospective PA school applicants with up-to-date information about every available PA program all in one place. The PA School Finder PA program and PA residency directory ...

  18. Physician Assistant Studies, M.S.

    The Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies program prepares our graduates to provide evidence-based, equitable health care to diverse populations and who value service to others as well as life-long learning. The physician assistant studies program is a 29-month, 105-credit-hour course of study leading to a master's degree in ...

  19. Physician Assistant Program

    Due to the unprecedented circumstances with the Covid-19 outbreak, we will be accepting courses that have shifted from in-person lecture to digital/online as prerequisites for the Spring 2020, Summer 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Summer 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, and Summer 2022 semesters.

  20. Master of Health Science

    The Drexel University Physician Assistant program will maintain excellence in educating competent physician assistant students, emphasizing integrity, respect for diversity, teamwork, patient advocacy and service to the community. ... General Prerequisite Course Information. Applicants may apply with a maximum of two (2) prerequisite courses ...

  21. Curriculum

    Curriculum. The 27 month PA Program course of study is divided into a 15 month didactic phase and a 12 month clinical phase. The clinical phase also includes an evidence-based Master's project. Self-directed learning is a key component of the curriculum. Subsequently, direct contact hours are limited to approximately 25 hours per week during ...

  22. Elizabethtown College

    The Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies at Elizabethtown College is a standalone master's degree program, spread over 26 months for students with a bachelor's degree from Etown or another institution. The PA program has been approved for a total of 30 students for each graduate cohort. At the culmination of the program ...

  23. Coursework

    The Master of Physician Assistant Studies program at UT Health San Antonio prepares physician assistants for their roles within the health care setting. Our classroom, laboratory and supervised clinical practice experiences emphasize quality care and clinical skills in the primary care setting. Our program consists of 126 credit hours of coursework and the class size is limited to a total of ...

  24. Prerequisites, Experience and Skills < Physician Associate Program

    The program does not accept audited courses as prerequisites. ... Applicants may consider contacting local physician assistant organizations for assistance and networking opportunities. CASPA Application Tip. For the class entering in the fall 2024, hours of experience ranged from 1000 to 10,888 total hours. ...

  25. Preparatory Coursework

    Common examples of upper-division bioscience courses include, but are not limited to: Cell Biology, Embryology, Endocrinology, Genetics, Histology, Immunology, Molecular Biology, Neuroscience, Pharmacology, and Virology. Please note that some institutions offer lower-division courses in these areas. Most upper-division courses are offered only ...

  26. Required Courses

    Because pre-requisite courses can vary so much by program, we encourage pre-PA students to research PA programs early by using the PAEA directory and reviewing PA program websites. Coursework that may be accepted by one PA program may not necessarily be accepted by other PA programs.