Georgetown University.

Sample Essays

The breadth of Georgetown’s core curriculum means that students are required to write for a wide variety of academic disciplines. Below, we provide some student samples that exhibit the key features the most popular genres. When reading through these essays, we recommend paying attention to their 

1. Structure (How many paragraphs are there? Does the author use headers?) 

2. Argument (Is the author pointing out a problem, and/or proposing a solution?) 

3. Content (Does the argument principally rely on facts, theory, or logic?) and 

4. Style (Does the writer use first person? What is the relationship with the audience?)

Philosophy Paper

  • Singer on the Moral Status of Animals

Theology Paper

  • Problem of God
  • Jewish Civilization
  • Sacred Space and Time
  • Phenolphthalein in Alkaline Solution

History Paper

  • World History

Literature Review

Comparative Analysis 

Policy Brief

  • Vaccine Manufacturing

White Paper

Critical Analysis

  • Ignatius Seminar

georgetown essay guide

How to Write the Georgetown Supplemental Essays: Expert Tips and Prompts

Georgetown University campus

Reviewed by:

Former Admissions Committee Member, Columbia University

Reviewed: 12/18/23

Not sure how to write the Georgetown essays? Below, we’ll help you craft compelling responses that will make your Georgetown application shine.

Georgetown University has academic excellence, a rich history, and a vibrant campus. So, if you want to get admitted, you must submit a strong application and write insightful supplemental essays. These responses will allow you to show that your personality and interests align with Georgetown’s Core Curriculum .

In this article, we’ll provide expert insights to help you ace your Georgetown supplemental essays. After giving you a detailed overview of the prompts, we’ll discuss how you can answer each one, and provide a few sample essays you can use as inspiration for your own writing. Let’s get started!

Georgetown Supplemental Essay Prompts 2023-2024

Here are the current essay prompts for Georgetown’s supplemental essays .

Female student typing on computet

Please elaborate on any special talents or skills you want to highlight. (250 words)

Briefly discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved. (approximately 1/2 page, single-spaced)

As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief personal or creative essay that you feel best describes you and reflects on your own background, identity, skills, and talents. (approximately 1 page, single-spaced)

Prompt #4 - Georgetown College

A liberal arts education from the College of Arts & Sciences involves encounters with new concepts and modes of inquiry. Describe something (a class, a book, an event, etc.) that changed your thinking. (Applicants to the sciences, mathematics, public policy, or languages are encouraged to include examples related to that field.) (approximately one page, single-spaced each)

Prompt #5 - School of Health

Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care. Please address your intended major (Global Health, Health Care Management and Policy, or Human Science).

Prompt #6 - School of Nursing

Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care. Please specifically address your intended major, Nursing.

Prompt #7 - Walsh School of Foreign Service

The Walsh School of Foreign Service was founded over a century ago to prepare generations of leaders to solve global problems. What is motivating you to dedicate your undergraduate studies to a future in service to the world?

Prompt #8 - McDonough School of Business

The McDonough School of Business is a national and global leader providing graduates with essential ethical, analytical, financial, and global perspectives. Please discuss your motivations for studying business at Georgetown.

How to Write Each Prompt for Georgetown

In this section, we’ll break down each prompt to help you craft compelling Georgetown University supplemental essays: 

Student typing essay on computer

How to Write the Georgetown Supplemental Essay #1 + Analysis and Tips

Analysis of Prompt #1 : This prompt allows you to highlight a specific aspect of your identity or abilities. Admissions officers are interested in understanding what makes you stand out. Your response should demonstrate self-awareness and the impact of your talents or skills.

  • Highlight Your Talent : Start by discussing the talent or skill you want to highlight and why it matters. What drives your passion for it?
  • Describe Your Experience : Offer concrete examples or experiences illustrating how you've applied this talent or skill. What accomplishments or projects can you point to?

How to Write the Georgetown Supplemental Essay #2 + Analysis and Tips

Analysis of Prompt #2 : This prompt encourages self-reflection and allows you to share a meaningful experience. Admissions officers want to know what has shaped you and why this activity is essential.

  • Select an Extracurricular Activity : Select an activity that genuinely matters to you. It could be an extracurricular, school club, or summer program.
  • Describe Your Experience : Narrate your experience and the journey you've taken. Highlight challenges and successes to make your story engaging.
  • Describe the Impact : Explain how this activity has influenced your personal growth, values, or future goals.

How to Write the Georgetown Supplemental Essay #3 + Analysis and Tips

Analysis of Prompt #3 : This prompt calls for you to express your individuality and creativity. There are no specific guidelines or themes, so it’s a great opportunity to be authentic.

  • Describe Your Background : Consider what aspect of your background or identity you want to highlight. How does it define you?
  • Make It Captivating : Feel free to use creative elements such as storytelling, metaphors, or anecdotes to make your essay engaging.
  • Highlight the Impact :   Share insights into your values, beliefs, and how your experiences have shaped them.

How to Write the Georgetown Supplemental Essay #4 + Analysis and Tips

Analysis of Prompt #4 : Georgetown College's essay prompt focuses on your encounters with new concepts and modes of inquiry. Describe something that changed your thinking, and provide examples of your field of interest.

  • Describe a New Experience : Choose an event, class, book, or other experience that significantly impacted your perspective.
  • Evaluate the Outcome and Make Connections : If you're interested in a specific field, connect your response to that area of study. Highlight how this change in thinking influenced your academic interests.

How to Write the Georgetown Supplemental Essay #5 + Analysis and Tips

Analysis of Prompt #5 : If you're applying to the School of Health, you must describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care. Be sure to address your intended major: Global Health, Health Care Management & Policy, or Human Science.

  • Describe Your Inspiration : Share the personal experiences or factors that sparked your interest in health care.
  • Align Your Goals With Your Inspiration : Clarify why you've chosen your specific major within the School of Health and how it aligns with your goals.

How to Write the Georgetown Supplemental Essay #6 + Analysis and Tips

Analysis of Prompt #6 : For applicants to the School of Nursing, this prompt is similar to the School of Health's essay. Describe the factors influencing your interest in studying health care, with a focus on the Nursing major.

  • Describe Your Experience : Emphasize what draws you to nursing. Is there a specific experience that ignited this passion?
  • Talk About Your Aspirations : Explain how your intended major in Nursing aligns with your career aspirations in health care.

How to Write the Georgetown Supplemental Essay #7 + Analysis and Tips

Analysis of Prompt #7 : Georgetown's Walsh School of Foreign Service aims to prepare students to address global challenges. In this essay, explain what motivates you to dedicate your undergraduate studies to a future in service to the world.

  • Show Your Aim : Describe your vision for how you want to contribute to addressing global issues.
  • Outline Your Commitments : Discuss any experiences or activities that demonstrate your commitment to global service.

How to Write the Georgetown Supplemental Essay #8 + Analysis and Tips

Analysis of Prompt #8 : For applicants to the McDonough School of Business, the prompt focuses on motivations for studying business at Georgetown. Here's how to approach this essay:

  • Show Your Motivation : Discuss what interests you about the field of business. Is it ethical, analytical, financial, or global perspectives?
  • Do Your Research : Explain why Georgetown's McDonough School of Business is the right place to pursue business studies. Make sure to be as specific as possible and demonstrate that you’ve taken the time to do your homework on all Georgetown has to offer.

Remember to showcase your individuality, experiences, and motivations to help the admissions committee get to know you better. This is your opportunity; make the best of it!

Examples of Georgetown Supplemental Essays That Worked

To give you an idea of how to write your own essay, here are several Georgetown application essays that worked . These essays were written by applicants who were students of the school. Take note of our expert verdict on why it worked, as it’ll be helpful when crafting yours.

male student typing on computer

Sample Essay #1

Prompt : Please elaborate on any special talents or skills you want to highlight. (250 words)

“ Within Scouting over the last ten years, I learned not only outdoors skills and the like, but also interpersonal skills. Starting in my transition to Boy Scouts, my fellow scouts recognized my ability to handle pressure and be a strong example and promoted me to [POSITION] – a leadership position to collectively organize camp-outs, lead activities, and manage conflict. Over time, more in the troop noticed my capabilities in leadership, to be an example for other scouts, and to model skills. After three years as a [POSITION], I continued to move up the ranks. I became an [POSITION], and was then elected [POSITION] – the youth leader for the entire troop. 

I participated in martial arts for several years in my local community. Initially, I struggled with every aspect, but over time, I learned not only to be better at fighting but how to persevere and work towards a goal. Again, eventually, the adult leaders of the school took notice of me practicing after class and asked me to help lead the [PROGRAM NAME] youth classes. I was eventually leading all classes of my peers. Watching those I had coached begin to master skills just as I had was beyond rewarding.”

Why Essay #1 Worked

This essay effectively demonstrates the applicant's leadership and interpersonal skills, highlighting their journey from a scout leader to a martial arts instructor. The progression and recognition of their abilities make for a compelling narrative, showcasing their ability to handle pressure, lead, and motivate others. 

It aligns with the prompt by emphasizing personal growth through these experiences and successfully conveys the candidate's leadership qualities.  

Sample Essay #2

Prompt : Briefly discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved. (approximately 1/2 page, single-spaced)

“Swimmers take your mark! Set!” Then came the blast of the starting horn. It's a sequence that’s forever in my mind. I had never been an athletic kid, but during the pandemic, I felt out of shape. I had always enjoyed swimming, so I chose to join the swim team in the winter of my sophomore year. I started off at the bottom of the ladder, one of our worst swimmers. 5:30 a.m. practices would kill; I’d have to drag myself out of the pool every day. Breaststroke, and the 200 IM, and I found my stride. My times kept dropping, and I started to earn my place on the team. I also helped the others of the team work through mental roadblocks as I was working through mine. One thing I noted from my first few meets is that the nerves always fade when you can cheer on your fellow swimmers. Every race, I would gather the new swimmers and the old, and I’d line everyone up along our side of the deck. Once the starting horn blared, the sounds were deafening. “SWIM! GO! KICK!! KICK!! COME ON!!” echoed throughout the natatorium, regardless of the size. I always liked to do team cheers like this, at meets or at practice. I felt it brought all of us closer together as teammates and as friends. Seeing this, after my junior year season, the coaches all met and selected me as captain of the team. I’ve never been more in love with the sport. 

Waking up at 5 a.m. every morning for three months is still as hard as it was at the start, but now I’m more motivated. I even took this passion and turned it into a job. Other swimmers would tell me about their summers spent working the pools, and it sounded idyllic. Sit in the sun, watch over some kids, and get breaks every hour? What was there not to like? The second I turned 16, I sent in my application. After a few months, I received an interview. The head guards asked so many questions, but every time I gave a response, it seemed like I had given the right answer. “I have always loved swimming,” I told them. “I’ve been on the swim team for 2 years now, and I’ve been chosen as a captain. I also have aquatic lifesaving, first aid, and CPR experience through Scouting.” At the end of that interview, I was offered the job. Thanks to my time spent swimming competitively, I was in a much better position than the other guards. I remember completing the 500 meters we had to swim as a final test, looking to see who else had finished, and saw most weren’t even done with their first 250. On the last day this summer, I walked to my bike and noticed the sunset falling over the pools I had spent so much time watching but never truly observing. All I could do, faced with the positive memories of both lifeguarding and the sport that had gotten me there, was pause, sit, and watch the sunset with a smile”.

Why Essay #2 Worked

This essay portrays a transformation narrative. It shows the applicant's growth from an inexperienced swimmer to becoming a captain and lifeguard, which fits well with the prompt asking about a significant school or summer activity. The descriptions of early struggles, personal progress, and leadership roles convey their dedication and enthusiasm for swimming. 

The essay connects these experiences with personal and professional growth, making it engaging and relevant to the reader. Additionally, the heartfelt reflection on watching the sunset underscores the sentimental value of these experiences.  

Sample Essay #3

Prompt : As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief personal or creative essay which you feel best describes you and reflects on your own background, identity, skills, and talents. (approximately 1 page, single-spaced)

“I come from a mid-sized suburb of [CITY] called [SUBURB NAME]. It isn’t the most notable of birthplaces – nothing like the grandeur of big cities or the natural wonder of a rural town in Montana. In response to the dreaded, “Where are you guys from?” question, instead of explaining the nuanced differences between [CITY]  and [SUBURB NAME], we simply swallow our pride and claim residence in the nearest star to home on the map. However, even these cities have points of celebration. [SUBURB NAME] has the largest concentrated population of Arab and Middle-Eastern communities outside of the Middle East. From my earliest memories, those of different backgrounds have treated one another with immense respect. Of my teachers in preschool, half wore hijabs. There was no difference in my mind between students in my elementary school playground; we were all just friends, playing the same game together. Being from [[SUBURB NAME]], I have had a unique opportunity to not only see but to participate in other cultures. Just a few months ago, I was able to attend a Ramadan festival, up late into the night eating traditional food, listening to traditional songs. I have had the opportunity to view a real Torah, to pray in a mosque, to join in a communal meal in a Sikh temple. I’ve always been outspoken about my support for diversity and equity, through protests, speeches, and other events. Within [[SUBURB NAME]], I have participated in many protests, rallies, and other political events. Four years ago, on MLK Day, I participated in a protest against racism and police brutality, marching from the local library to the city hall. Recently, I attended a protest against the banning of LGBTQIA+-centered books. I hope to continue this activism and to be an advocate for social justice into my future in college and beyond”.

Why Essay #3 Worked

This essay highlights the applicant's unique perspective and deep commitment to promoting diversity and equity. It begins with a compelling description of their hometown, emphasizing the multicultural environment, setting the stage for their passion for embracing various cultures and advocating for social justice. 

Furthermore, the essay connects these personal experiences with a desire to continue their activism in college, which aligns with Georgetown's values. The writing is concise and engaging, showcasing the applicant's strong advocacy for equity and diversity, effectively conveying their values and readiness for the Georgetown community.

Get More Sample Essays Here!

Look at our College Essay Example Database to read other Georgetown essays that worked.

FAQs: Georgetown Supplemental Essays

Here are answers to a few frequently asked questions about the Georgetown supplemental essays.

1. How Many Essays Does Georgetown Require?

Georgetown requires three general essays and one tailored to the school or program you are applying to.

2. How Important Are College Essays for Georgetown?

College essays are a vital component of your Georgetown application. They offer a chance to influence the admissions process.

3. How Long Should My Georgetown Essays Be?

The general essays should be approximately one page each (single-spaced), while school-specific essays should also be about one page each. 

4. What Should I Focus on in My Georgetown Essays?

Focus on your unique experiences, skills, and passions that make you a strong fit for the university. Showcase your potential contributions to the campus community and your enthusiasm for your chosen program.

5. Can I Use the Same Essay for Multiple Schools Within Georgetown University?

Yes, you can. However, it's better to tailor each essay to the specific school or program you're applying to. Each school may have different priorities and wants to understand why you're a good fit for their offerings.

6. Can I Exceed the Recommended Word Limit for Georgetown Essays?

It's advisable to stick to the recommended word limits. Admissions officers appreciate concise and focused responses. Going over the word limit might not work in your favor.

Final Thoughts

Crafting compelling Georgetown supplemental essays requires self-reflection and a deep understanding of the university's values and your chosen program. Tailor each response to demonstrate your unique qualities and commitment to contributing to Georgetown's diverse community. 

Be concise, stay within word limits, and research the university's resources and programs to illustrate your genuine interest. These essays are your opportunity to stand out and show how you can be an asset to Georgetown, so invest time in making them shine.

First name, vector icon of a person

Get A Free Consultation

You may also like.

What Colleges Can I Get Into? A Look at the Numbers

What Colleges Can I Get Into? A Look at the Numbers

How to Get Into Boston University: Acceptance Rates & More

How to Get Into Boston University: Acceptance Rates & More

georgetown essay guide

The Ultimate Guide to 2022-23 Georgetown Essays

The recording will load in a moment., the admissions process is hard - alexander is here to help, schedule a free consulation to meet alexander and get your questions answered, get help with:.

georgetown essay guide

Interested in working with Alexander?

Learn about the entire admissions process from a top expert, about this livestream.

georgetown essay guide

Join college consultant Alexander Oddo and CollegeVine co-founder Vinay Bhaskara to learn how to write effective, compelling, and admission worthy responses to the 2022-2023 Georgetown essays!

This stream will be interactive so be sure to drop all your questions in the chat below.

Alexander Oddo

Specialties, other recordings by alexander oddo.

georgetown essay guide

How to Create a Compelling Application Theme

georgetown essay guide

How to Get into Georgetown

georgetown essay guide

How Being a First-Generation College Student Affects your Application

georgetown essay guide

Making the Most of your Summer with Matriculate

georgetown essay guide

Make the Most of Your Summer Break with the NSLC!

Popular recent recordings.

georgetown essay guide

Physics Preparation for PreMedical, PreDental, and PreHealth College Students

georgetown essay guide

I transferred to Harvard and how you can too

georgetown essay guide

The Importance of Starting your Essays Junior Year

georgetown essay guide

Finding Your Spike with Christopher

College Advisor logo

Georgetown Essay 2023-24

' src=

Georgetown Supplemental Essays 2023-24

Supplemental essays are an important part of every college application, and Georgetown is no exception. Each Georgetown essay is an opportunity for applicants to share something unique about themselves with the admissions team. Especially when applying to such a competitive university, the Georgetown supplemental essays could be a deciding factor in your application. However, don’t let the Georgetown supplemental essays stress you out! The best way to write an outstanding Georgetown essay is by preparing early and following some useful guidelines. 

In this guide to the Georgetown supplemental essays, we’ll go over how to respond to each Georgetown essay. We’ll also fill you in on some of the other Georgetown requirements you’ll encounter during the application process. And, we’ll provide some insight into just how much weight these Georgetown essays hold when it comes to admissions decisions. 

But first, let’s learn a little bit more about the university!

Georgetown Admissions: Quick Facts

Georgetown university quick facts.

  • Georgetown Acceptance Rate: 12% – U.S. News ranks Georgetown University as #22 in its National Universities list.
  • 1 half-page (~250 word) essay
  • 1 full-page (~500 word) essay
  • 1 full-page (~500 word) school-specific essay
  • Georgetown Application Note: All Georgetown essays will be submitted through the university’s application portal. Georgetown applicants will not use the Common Application or Coalition Application when applying. 
  • #1 Georgetown Essay Tip: Use each Georgetown essay as an opportunity to highlight a new personal trait, value, skill, or talent. Your Georgetown supplemental essays should provide new information and important context to your application narrative.

Does Georgetown have supplemental essays?

Yes! There are three required Georgetown University supplemental essays. Each of the Georgetown essay prompts allows students to further expand on a new theme. The word count for each of the Georgetown University supplemental essays varies from half a page to one full page (single-spaced). 

Later, we’ll get into the Georgetown essay prompts in more detail. For now, keep in mind that each essay should showcase why you’re a perfect fit for Georgetown. So, you’ll want to think about all the reasons why you’re interested in this university specifically. Then, you’ll want to find ways to relate them to your own unique experiences and skills. 

How many essays does Georgetown require?

georgetown essay

As we mentioned, there are three Georgetown supplemental essays that all applicants are required to answer. Since Georgetown has its own application (they don’t use the Common App or Coalition App), students will need to write all new essays. What we mean by that is you won’t be using your personal statement from the Common App. However, that being said, there is a Georgetown essay prompt that is similar to the personal statement. So, you may be able to adjust your personal statement essay and incorporate these topics/themes into your Georgetown essay. 

The remaining two Georgetown essay prompts may seem familiar as they are similar to many other college essay prompts. One is a school-specific essay where you might draw on aspects from a “why major” or “why school” essay. Ultimately, the prompt you respond to will depend on your major of choice, as each school has a different one. 

The other Georgetown essay is similar to an extracurricular activities essay. Students will need to dive deeper into their interests, values, and goals in order to comprehensively respond to this prompt. 

Georgetown Essay Prompt – Talents & Skills

georgetown essay

Georgetown Essay One asks you to reflect on your skills and talents, along with your background and identity. That being said, this is not the only Georgetown essay prompt where you can touch on these aspects of your personality. Thinking about your unique skills and talents and how they’ve shaped your future educational goals will be beneficial to answering all of the Georgetown supplemental essays. 

Remember, there is no personal statement in the Georgetown application, and that is simply because they don’t use the Common App. However, there is a similar prompt in which students are asked to write a personal or creative essay. Let’s take a look at the actual prompt. 

Georgetown University Essay Prompt #1

As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief personal or creative essay which you feel best describes you and reflects on your own background, identity, skills, and talents. (approximately 1 page, single-spaced)

This essay could be qualified as a cultural diversity essay, a talents and skills essay, and even a personal statement. There are certainly many routes applicants could take when writing this Georgetown essay—one of those is expanding upon their unique skills and talents. 

Additionally, students will need to write a school-specific Georgetown essay. Below are the Georgetown essay prompts for each of the schools.

Georgetown University Essay Prompt #2

Georgetown college:, a liberal arts education from the college of arts & sciences involves encounters with new concepts and modes of inquiry. describe something (a class, a book, an event, etc.) that changed your thinking. (applicants to the sciences, mathematics, public policy or languages are encouraged to include examples related to that field.), school of health:, describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care at georgetown university. please specifically address your intended major (global health, health care management & policy, or human science)., school of nursing:, describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care. please specifically address your intended major nursing., walsh school of foreign service:, the walsh school of foreign service was founded more than a century ago to prepare generations of leaders to solve global problems. what is motivating you to dedicate your undergraduate studies to a future in service to the world, mcdonough school of business:, the mcdonough school of business is a national and global leader in providing graduates with essential ethical, analytical, financial, and global perspectives. please discuss your motivations for studying business at georgetown..

As with Essay One, this essay will be approximately 1 page, single-spaced. When completing the school-specific Georgetown essay, you’ll want to consider your academic skills and talents. How do they apply to the major and school of your interest? Why do those unique abilities make you a perfect candidate for that school?

Next, you’ll see how the Georgetown Short Essay prompt also allows you to consider your interests, talents, and skills. 

Georgetown Essay Prompt – Summer Activity

georgetown essay

The shortest of the Georgetown supplemental essays is the summer/extracurricular activities essay. Applicants will have approximately half a page to expand upon a school or summer activity that has played an important role in their lives. Here is the prompt: 

Georgetown University Summer Activity Essay Prompt

Briefly (approximately one-half page, single-spaced) discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved..

It’s important to comprehensively respond to each of the Georgetown essay prompts. For example, this Georgetown essay needs to show the meaning behind the activity in which applicants have been most involved. Basically, even though you may have had an extremely impactful experience volunteering at an elderly home one afternoon unless it’s something you consistently do, you won’t want to write about it here. 

When brainstorming, start with your biggest commitments. What activity have you been the most involved in? Why has it been so impactful to you? Think about what made you commit so much time to this particular activity. What have you gained from it? Has it shaped your future education and career goals? What skills have you acquired from taking part in the activity? 

If you’re curious, involved, and have something you’re passionate about, the challenge in writing this essay won’t be answering these questions; it will be doing so in just half a page. Keep in mind that Georgetown has a large club culture on its campus. So, they’re looking for students who are going to get involved and take advantage of the hundreds of organizations on campus. In your essay, aim to show that you’re an active participant in your particular community. 

How to write the Georgetown supplemental essays

georgetown essay

Think of each Georgetown essay as a piece of a puzzle that when put together will complete your application narrative . A well-written Georgetown essay will provide new information while answering each of the Georgetown essay prompts in its entirety. When considering how to write the Georgetown supplemental essays, and ultimately how to get into Georgetown, you’ll want to give yourself plenty of time to dedicate to each of the three Georgetown essay prompts. 

Looking at Georgetown essay examples (or any college essay examples ) will also help you get inspired before writing. When reading Georgetown essay examples, you’ll note there is no singular formula for answering these prompts. You can read a Georgetown essay example here and find prompt-specific tips in our previous Georgetown University Supplemental Essays guide . 

Now, here’s some advice for how to approach each of the Georgetown Essay prompts.

Responding to the school or summer activity essay

If you have an extracurricular activity that you’ve been doing for a long time, then this may be an easy Georgetown essay for you to write. You’ll want to explain why the activity has been so meaningful to you. This means diving deep into its significance in your life. 

Have you found out that you love writing by working on the school newspaper? Or maybe you’ve been able to fuel your intellectual curiosity through having been a member of the robotics team. Perhaps you will focus on your summers spent working as a camp counselor and the leadership skills that you gained from doing so.  

Go beyond the superficial with this (and every) Georgetown essay. The impact of the extracurricular activity is much more important than the activity itself. Truly consider how it’s shaped your personality, values, skills, or goals. And, if you feel like it is central to your experience, consider touching on a challenge you’ve faced or a specific opportunity you took advantage of.

Responding to the cultural diversity or “personal statement” essay

This one-page Georgetown essay will be similar to the personal statement in the Common App. However, you won’t have multiple essay prompts to choose from. Essentially, this Georgetown essay will be a combination of a cultural diversity and personal statement essay—a sort of hybrid take on each. Let’s take a look at the prompt again: 

Consider the important aspects of you as a person that you haven’t yet had the opportunity to highlight within your application. What would you like to mention and how will it make you an even more competitive candidate? Consider your personal experiences, background, culture, identity, skills, and talents. What has had a large impact on shaping you as a person? How will you bring what you’ve learned from those experiences to the “diverse community” at Georgetown? Make sure you speak to something that has been meaningful and impactful for you. A successful Georgetown essay will exude passion—and that can’t be faked!

Rather than writing about something you think admissions wants to hear about, write about something that is truly important to you. Note that the prompt specifies you can write a “creative essay.” So, if you love writing, then let your creativity and imagination go wild here. However, don’t get so carried away that you forget to stay on topic and answer the prompt. 

Responding to the school-specific essay

These Georgetown supplemental essays are an opportunity to explain what has drawn you to a specific course of study. Again, you’ll need to answer the school-specific Georgetown essay prompt that pertains to you. However, almost all of them will want you to reference certain experiences, skills, or interests that have led you to your school of interest. 

This essay is a combination of a “why major” and “why school” essay all in one. Why do you belong in that particular school and program at Georgetown? If you know your specific major interests and career goals, feel free to mention them! 

Looking at Georgetown essay examples and tips may help you in crafting your own essay. Additionally, you might want to check out these Georgetown majors before starting this school-specific Georgetown essay.  

Does Georgetown care about essays?

georgetown essay

So just how important are your Georgetown supplemental essays when it comes to your “how to get into Georgetown” gameplan ? Put simply—they’re very important. Georgetown admissions really does care what applicants write in their Georgetown essays. Georgetown is a top-ranking, competitive university with a low acceptance rate. Therefore, the candidate pool is full of many academically high-achieving students who can’t all be accepted. Most everyone will have impressive GPAs, rigorous course loads, ample extracurriculars, and high test scores. 

This is where each Georgetown essay can play a pivotal role in the admissions process. The Georgetown essays are opportunities to show the admissions officers just what makes you stand out from the crowd. These Georgetown supplemental essays should be uniquely yours—they shouldn’t read as though any student could have written them. This unique insight into your life helps admissions imagine the contribution you’d make on campus. Basically, with a holistic admissions process, they are an important factor in the admissions decision process. 

What is Georgetown looking for in essays?

Georgetown admissions does note that one of the most important criteria they consider is in fact academic performance. However, as we’ve mentioned, many academically high-achieving students apply. So, how can you set yourself apart from the rest?

Admissions carefully looks for students who will add to and benefit from the Georgetown campus community . They want students who care about being a part of something bigger than themselves. They place importance on traits such as motivation, resilience, and ambition when considering applicants. This is why with each Georgetown essay you’ll want to take your responses deeper than simply surface-level.

Go beyond the what of your experiences and think about the why behind them. Truly consider the meaning, significance, and impact that the experiences you choose to write about have had on you. This will help you to write impressive, passionate, and authentic Georgetown essays that can help to set your application apart.  

When is my Georgetown application due?

Even if you write incredible Georgetown supplemental essays, it won’t matter if you don’t submit your application and all of the Georgetown requirements on time. Applications have a tendency to sneak up on students, especially during a busy senior-year fall. So, when is the Georgetown application deadline? Well, that depends if you are applying early or not. 

Here are the Georgetown deadlines : 

  • Early Action: November 1
  • Regular Decision: January 10 

Consider that you need to complete all of the Georgetown requirements by the application deadline of your choosing. Since Georgetown has its own application portal, applicants will first submit a quick application that takes only a few minutes. Within a day of having done so, applicants will get instructions on how to submit the supplements and the rest of the application. 

Check out a full list of the requirements, deadlines, and decision result dates in order to best plan your application process. Additionally, read this article for important information about the application process at Georgetown. 

How do I make my Georgetown essays stand out?

georgetown essay

With a 12% acceptance rate and a #22 spot on the National Universities list, you’re competing with top candidates when you apply to Georgetown. So, your essays are what will truly let your personality shine and allow admissions to envision you on campus. That is, of course, if you write some stellar Georgetown essays. 

The Georgetown University supplemental essays have distinct prompts. However, while the content may be completely different, the best Georgetown supplemental essays will accomplish similar things. So, how can you wow admissions with your Georgetown University essays?

Here are 3 tips for writing a memorable Georgetown essay:

Tips for A Memorable Georgetown University Essay

1. demonstrate skills that admissions values..

Admissions explicitly says on their website that they value students who show resilience, ambition, and motivation. Use your essays to demonstrate these qualities. Of course, don’t make up experiences or try to push yourself into a box trying to impress admissions. Draw on your personal experiences to show personal reflection, curiosity, and passion. 

2. Choose your topic carefully.

This goes for every one of the Georgetown essay prompts. It doesn’t necessarily matter what you write about, but rather what it means to you. Brainstorm ideas to come up with topics that show who you are. You’re aiming to impress admissions, but you also want to be authentic. Choose topics that excite you and display your unique qualities. 

3. Get creative.

Ideally, you’re captivating your reader right from the start. Spend time coming up with a hook or choosing an engaging anecdote to immerse the reader in your essay. The Georgetown supplemental essays shouldn’t read as an objective, academic essay. Feel free to get creative and show off your writing skills; just make sure that you fully answer the prompt!

CollegeAdvisor has plenty of resources to help you prepare for application season! Check out this webinar in order to better understand what Georgetown looks for in applicants. You’ll get helpful tips on how to complete your application from former admissions officers. 

Georgetown Essay – 5 Takeaways

georgetown essay

In this Georgetown Essay guide, we’ve gone over the required Georgetown essay prompts that all applicants will need to complete. If you’re considering how to get into Georgetown, know that academics and the Georgetown supplemental essays play an important role in the admissions process. No matter your approach, the best way to get ahead and write a captivating Georgetown essay is by giving yourself plenty of time to do so. 

Since we’ve covered a lot of information in this Georgetown Essay guide, here are 5 Key Takeaways:

5 Key Takeaways for a Georgetown University Essay Guide

1. georgetown university has its own unique application portal..

This means that your school-specific, personal, and extracurricular activities essay will each be submitted via the university’s application portal. Make sure you submit the first part of the application as soon as possible in order to be able to set up an account and get started on your supplements!

2. There are 3 required Georgetown essays.

While all students will respond to two of the same Georgetown essay prompts, the third will vary depending on the school you’re applying to. However, you don’t need to be 100% sure of your major to write a great school-specific essay. The purpose of this Georgetown essay is mainly to learn more about your academic interests and future goals.

3. Georgetown is a competitive institution.

This means every part of your application matters! Yes, academics and extracurriculars are important, however, so are your essays. Be mindful of the topics you write about in your Georgetown supplemental essays. Each Georgetown essay should add new information to your application that complements your candidate profile. 

4. Complete all the application requirements.

No matter how wonderful your Georgetown essays are, it won’t matter if admissions never reads them. Make sure that you know all of the requirements needed to complete the application. Give yourself plenty of time to get letters of recommendation and write your Georgetown essays. 

Your Georgetown supplemental essays should reflect who you are. Be genuine when writing your essays. Show you are a self-reflective, ever-evolving, and curious human being. Of course, think carefully about what traits, values, and experiences you want to highlight in your application. Show the best parts of who you are and how you’d enrich the campus community.

Writing the Georgetown University supplemental essays can be a stressful part of the application process. But, you’re certainly not alone! CollegeAdvisor has plenty of Georgetown-specific resources such as this webinar to help you craft a competitive application. Remember that reading Georgetown essay examples will help you get inspired to write your own. Of course, when reading Georgetown essay examples, personal statement examples , or any other essay examples, don’t try to mimic stories or ideas. Simply use them as inspiration and motivation in order to tell your story.

We hope this guide has given you some helpful insights into how to craft your Georgetown supplemental essays – good luck!

georgetown essay guide

This essay guide was written by Sarah Kaminski. Looking for more admissions support? Click here to schedule a free meeting with one of our Admissions Specialists. During your meeting, our team will discuss your profile and help you find targeted ways to increase your admissions odds at top schools. We’ll also answer any questions and discuss how CollegeAdvisor.com can support you in the college application process.

Personalized and effective college advising for high school students.

  • Advisor Application
  • Popular Colleges
  • Privacy Policy and Cookie Notice
  • Student Login
  • California Privacy Notice
  • Terms and Conditions
  • Your Privacy Choices

By using the College Advisor site and/or working with College Advisor, you agree to our updated Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy , including an arbitration clause that covers any disputes relating to our policies and your use of our products and services.

PrepScholar

Choose Your Test

Sat / act prep online guides and tips, 3 top tips for writing exceptional georgetown essays.

author image

College Essays

feature_georgetown

With an acceptance rate of less than 12 percent , Georgetown is ranked as an extremely competitive school . If you want to be a part of the student body, you need to impress, and one of the best opportunities you have to do that is in your Georgetown essays.

Don't let the Georgetown essay prompts intimidate you. Though they may look complicated at first—and they do ask complex questions—some foresight and planning will help you write essays that are sure to impress.

This guide will walk you through the Georgetown essays, giving you a look into the expectations and thought process behind each of the essay prompts .

Feature Image: Patrickneil /Wikimedia Commons

What Should You Know About the Georgetown Essay Prompts?

Georgetown doesn't use the Common or Coalition Application . Instead, you'll be filling out an application tailored specifically to their desires, though it may cover most of the same information.

Because of that, you'll want to pay extra close attention to what you discuss in your essays. Your essays should be tied specifically to Georgetown rather than the more general approach of the Coalition or Common Application .

The Georgetown essays include one short essay of about a half-page, single-spaced, one longer one-page essay required of all students, and a second one-page essay specifically tied to one of Georgetown's four schools: Georgetown College, the School of Nursing and Health Studies, Walsh School of Foreign Service, and the McDonough School of Business.

Students in the arts—specifically music, dance, theater, and studio art—may submit additional portfolios as part of their application, but it isn't required.

body_maze-3

What Are the Required Georgetown Essay Prompts?

Because Georgetown's application is only for Georgetown, you'll immediately notice that they're a lot more specific than the Common or Coalition prompts. You should keep that specificity in mind as you answer the questions, thinking not just about why you want to go to a good school, but why you want to attend Georgetown specifically .

How to Answer the Georgetown Short Essay Prompt

Discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved. (One half-page, single spaced.)

This question is pretty straightforward. Though you've no doubt discussed your extracurriculars throughout your application, this question asks you to think deeper about one of them . Ask yourself why you do those activities, and what they personally mean to you.

"Why," not "what," should be the question you're answering . Flesh out your mentions of extracurriculars in your application with discussions of why you do them and what you've learned. The activity you discuss should be significant to you—not something you do purely for fun or something you do because your parents make you.

As with the first question, don't inflate things to look more impressive. If you spent most of your summer watching TV, that might be relevant if you're an aspiring screenwriter, and you can mention it—but again, answer the question of why . Why did you choose the shows you did? What did you learn from them?

That said, watching TV isn't the best choice. You'd be better off discussing how you spent your summer working on an original short film or participating in a workshop for aspiring screenwriters—but no matter what your preferred activity, there is a way to discuss why it's significant to you and what you learned from it.

This prompt gives you space to discuss your interests, particularly the things that can't be represented by numbers as grades and test scores can. It gives Georgetown a clearer picture of you, which helps in their decision.

This is also a space to expand on participation. Maybe you never became captain of the swim team and you've been worried that the lack of leadership might count against you. In this essay, you can explain that though that was your goal, you didn't quite make it—but that you learned a lot anyway.

This essay really is about what's significant to you, so there are no wrong answers—it's your execution that matters . Avoid being too general, or focusing too much on picking the most impressive thing from your roster if that thing didn't actually matter to you. Be genuine with what's significant to you and your essay will be stronger for it.

body_student-6

How to Answer the Georgetown Essay Prompt for All Applicants

As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief essay, either personal or creative, which you feel best describes you. (One page, single-spaced.)

Notice how the emphasis on this question is on you. This is called a "Why You?" style essay — though the application is for Georgetown, the admissions office wants to know why you'll be a good fit for the college and what you in particular will bring to the student body .

What this means is that Georgetown doesn't want to hear about how they have the best program or the greatest campus. They want to know about you and what makes you unique .

When answering this question, think about what makes you a good fit for Georgetown's student body. Consider their mission statement , their origin as a Catholic and Jesuit college , and what that means today.

That doesn't mean that you need to identify yourself as Catholic if you aren't (please don't do that), but that you should consider the role that faith plays in Georgetown's approach to education . How does their mission statement connect to your own life and educational goals?

Demonstrating that you understand the school's mission and how you can contribute to it as a student is one of the most important parts of this question.

But "Why You?" is only part of the question . The specific mention of diversity is important, too. Its inclusion in the question means that it's important to Georgetown, and they want you to demonstrate that it's important to you, too.

Don't get too fixated on typical meanings of "diverse." We often use the word to refer to the variety of genders, sexualities, races, socio-economic statuses, and so on that exist in the world, but diversity of thought is worthwhile, too. Of course, you should write about your gender, sexuality, race, and so on if it's relevant to what you'll bring to campus—and it often is—but don't feel like it's all you have to offer.

Think about what your experience has taught you, and how those lessons will contribute to Georgetown's diverse student body. That can mean discussing overcoming socio-economic hardship, or it can mean relating how you and your seven brothers used to squabble until you realized working together got chores done faster. Everybody has a unique story to tell, and this is Georgetown offering you space to tell yours .

Georgetown invites you to get creative here, but if you want to take a more embellished approach than a traditional essay, be sure that that creativity comes through in your writing and language rather than in the events . Don't inflate things to look more interesting or diverse than you are—this is your chance to flesh out the grades and test scores with your personality, so be sure it's your personality that the admissions office sees.

How to Answer the Georgetown College Essay Prompt

Georgetown College is the largest undergraduate school at Georgetown University, and contains many of the school's arts and sciences programs.

What does it mean to you to be educated? How might Georgetown College help you achieve this aim? (Applicants to the Sciences and Mathematics or the Faculty of Languages and Linguistics should address their chosen course of study.) (One page, single-spaced.)

This question is asking about your personal relationship with education and learning. But more than that, it's asking you why you want to attend Georgetown, making it a "Why Us?" essay .

When answering this prompt, think about your goals and how Georgetown fits into them . They don't need to hear about how they're a good school and you've always wanted to attend a competitive college—they already know that, and most other students also want to attend a good school. Why Georgetown specifically, as opposed to all the other possible schools you could apply to?

This is a good place to demonstrate familiarity with their mission and curriculum. Are there particular classes or faculty driving your decision to attend? Mention them!

Think holistically here. How will attending Georgetown enrich your education and help you reach your career goals? Keep their mission statement in mind as you write—consider the ideas of diversity, service to humanity, and community and how those fit into your goals.

Again, avoid generalities. Your essay should have enough concrete connection to Georgetown that you couldn't easily swap another school's name in and still have it make sense. Of course, there will always be some overlap with other schools, but be sure that the true spirit of Georgetown comes through in your essay.

body_nurse

How to Answer the Georgetown School of Nursing & Health Studies Essay Prompt

Georgetown's School of Nursing and Health Studies is exactly what it sounds like. This is where you'll be applying if you're interested in any of the health care fields, which is reflected in the prompt.

Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care. Please specifically address your intended major (Global Health, Health Care Management & Policy, Human Science, or Nursing). (One page, single-spaced.)

This question isn't quite a clear-cut "Why Us?" or "Why You?" question, unlike the previous ones. Instead, it's asking "Why Health Care?"

Again, always keep in mind Georgetown's mission as a college: diversity, discussion, and the well-being of humanity. All of these things can factor into your essay in a meaningful way.

Think beyond health care being a reliable and well-paying field. Why do you want to care for people? Why the health field, specifically? Tying Georgetown's mission into this question is a great way to demonstrate your interest in the field, but also in the specific ways that this school teaches.

In this question, Georgetown wants you to demonstrate your interest in the field. If you're invested in health care, you're more likely to succeed in the program. The admissions office also wants to know what passion and interest you'll bring to the school, making you a student they want to invest in.

If you don't already know why you've chosen to pursue health care over other fields, now's the time to start thinking about it. Health care can often be thankless, difficult, and even frightening if you're working in emergency situations. What drives you to do it anyway?

Maybe you've struggled with illness yourself, and you want to commit to researching cures. Or maybe you're fascinated by the ways that disease impacts society, and you want to learn more about prevention and how to enact it on an individual basis. No matter what your career goal is, it's important that you can explain why you've chosen this field over all others.

However, be sure you can tie your interest to Georgetown specifically. Your essay will be even stronger if it explains not just what appeals to you about health care, but why Georgetown is the right college to help you achieve your goals.

How to Answer the Walsh School of Foreign Service Essay Prompt

If you're interested in international relations, Wash School of Foreign Service is likely where you'll be applying.

The Walsh School of Foreign Service was founded more than a century ago to prepare generations of leaders to solve global problems. What is motivating you to dedicate your undergraduate studies to a future in service to the world? (One page, single-spaced.)

This is a perfect example of a  "Why Us?" question. Of all the schools out there, and all the programs, what led you to apply to Georgetown's school of foreign service? 

The trick to this question is being specific. Sure, the Walsh School of Foreign Service has interesting classes, great professors, and a strong track record for job placements, but so do a lot of other schools out there. What does it offer that other schools can't? In your response, be sure to mention specific courses/internship opportunities/professors who will give you opportunities unique to Georgetown.

We give more advice on how to answer this question under the next prompt, which is also a Why Us question!

body_business-2

How to Answer the McDonough School of Business Essay Prompt

The McDonough School of Business is exactly what it sounds like. If you're attending Georgetown with an interest in business, you'll need to answer the following prompt:

The McDonough School of Business is a national and global leader in providing graduates with essential ethical, analytical, financial and global perspectives. Please discuss your motivations for studying business at Georgetown. (One page, single-spaced.)

Like the Walsh School of Foreign Service, the McDonough School of Business prompt is a classic "Why Us?" question , asking you to identify not just that Georgetown is a good school, but why it's the right school for you and your interests.

To answer this question, consider the university's ethos and curriculum. Look at their course offerings and consider those as well as whatever reasons you have for applying. Think specifically, not generally— beyond it being a well-respected university, what does Georgetown have to offer you that other well-respected universities do not?

Georgetown wants to hear that you're committed to their program specifically, so answer in specifics. Identify features of their program in particular, and be sure to answer the question of why those features draw you to Georgetown.

If you have a personal anecdote about Georgetown, such as a moment on a tour, a personal connection to the campus, or admiration for a particular alumni, this essay is a good place to discuss it. If not, it's always a good idea to use concrete specifics, such as classes and extracurriculars that appeal to you. Fold those into a discussion of Georgetown's mission and your own career goals to paint a complete picture of why this is the right school for you.

body_success-5

What Does a Successful Georgetown Essay Look Like?

Planning an essay can be difficult as you try to weigh what the school might want against everything you could possibly cover. Thankfully, there's at least one successful Georgetown essay out there you can read in its entirety :

"Listen, girl. He's over 60 and speaks no English. There is no way we would hire him." His tone was rude, but I sadly understood why my dad wasn't hired. I faced my hopeful dad and watched his smile drop as I told him that Dave just remembered that they hired someone yesterday and that they really couldn't afford to hire anyone else. My dad was disappointed, but nonetheless he graciously shook Dave's hand and thanked him for his time. Job searching is difficult for everyone, but in a world full of Daves, it's almost impossible. Daves are people who look at my family and immediately think less of us. They think illegal, poor and uneducated. Daves never allow my dad to pass the first round of job applications. Daves watch like hawks as my brother and I enter stores. Daves inconsiderately correct my mother's grammar. Because there are Daves in the world, I have become a protector for my family. I excuse their behavior as just being a "typical American." I convince my mother that they are only staring at her lovely new purse. I convince my dad they are only shouting about store sales to us. Aside from being a protector, I am also an advocate. As an advocate, I make sure my family is never taken advantage of. I am always looking out for scams and discrepancies. I am the one asking the questions when we buy or sell a car. I make sure all details are discussed and no specifics are left unanswered.

It's not hard to see why the writer was accepted to Georgetown. This essay clearly demonstrates her experience and understanding of the world. The last paragraph is a great example of how to turn that experience into something actionable—she wants to go into public service, politics, or diplomacy because of how she's helped her parents and the bigotry she's witnessed as she's done so.

We know from reading exactly what the writer will bring to Georgetown: an understanding of the world and the way it's treated her and her family. She demonstrates her understanding of diversity clearly, which answers the first prompt—it shows what makes her unique as well as what she'll contribute.

The essay shows her personal story and how that's influenced her lifelong plans. Because the admissions office understands where she comes from and the essay finishes with where she hopes to go—as well as covering some of the obstacles she's overcome—they have a complete picture of her as a student.

One area the essay could be improved is strengthening the connection to Georgetown specifically. This essay is quite strong—she did get into Georgetown with it—but spending a little more time reflecting on how her life experience connects to Georgetown's mission would give it a little extra oomph . As it is, this could be an application essay for pretty much any school. Drawing a clear connection from your experiences to the college you're applying to demonstrates a stronger degree of interest, making your essay stand out.

body_study-4

Key Points of Advice for Georgetown Essays

No matter which prompts you're answering, it's a good idea to follow general advice for your Georgetown essays, too. Though the application for Georgetown is unique to the school, it still follows most of the common rules of college applications, so be sure to read up on some common tips for college applications .

#1: Read Prompts Carefully

Don't just answer the surface-level question. You have quite a bit of space to answer each of these, so read each one carefully, understand the deeper questions it might be asking, such as "Why You?" and be sure to answer those as well. Brainstorming will be a huge help here, as you can get all of your ideas out and select the ones that support your point the best.

#2: Connect Your Story to Your School

When you're writing "Why Us?" essays, think about your story—the things that have made you who you are, your ambition, your goals—and add in how Georgetown is the next step on your journey. Think beyond that it has a good reputation or that lots of impressive people have graduated from there. Draw a clear line between you and Georgetown by tying your experience in with its curriculum and mission statement. This will demonstrate that you're not just reusing the same essay for a bunch of schools, and that Georgetown is your real goal.

#3: Edit and Revise

Editing and revision are your best friends when it comes to a polished Georgetown essay. Don't just fire off a draft and call it good. Spend some time planning, writing, editing, and revising , being sure to start early so you can let your drafts rest between readings.

Spending more time will take some of the stress out of writing and let you put in more effort to get it into shape. The longer you have, the more thought you can put into it, so start early!

What's Next?

Give yourself plenty of time to get your Georgetown essay done by staying on top of all the deadlines for your application .

What else do you need to get into your dream school aside from stellar essays? This guide has all the requirements to get into Georgetown .

Even if you're not going to Georgetown, you should understand the college application process from start to finish. This helpful guide will walk you through applying to college starting from your freshman year of high school!

georgetown essay guide

Want to write the perfect college application essay? Get professional help from PrepScholar.

Your dedicated PrepScholar Admissions counselor will craft your perfect college essay, from the ground up. We'll learn your background and interests, brainstorm essay topics, and walk you through the essay drafting process, step-by-step. At the end, you'll have a unique essay that you'll proudly submit to your top choice colleges.

Don't leave your college application to chance. Find out more about PrepScholar Admissions now :

Craft Your Perfect College Essay

Melissa Brinks graduated from the University of Washington in 2014 with a Bachelor's in English with a creative writing emphasis. She has spent several years tutoring K-12 students in many subjects, including in SAT prep, to help them prepare for their college education.

Student and Parent Forum

Our new student and parent forum, at ExpertHub.PrepScholar.com , allow you to interact with your peers and the PrepScholar staff. See how other students and parents are navigating high school, college, and the college admissions process. Ask questions; get answers.

Join the Conversation

Ask a Question Below

Have any questions about this article or other topics? Ask below and we'll reply!

Improve With Our Famous Guides

  • For All Students

The 5 Strategies You Must Be Using to Improve 160+ SAT Points

How to Get a Perfect 1600, by a Perfect Scorer

Series: How to Get 800 on Each SAT Section:

Score 800 on SAT Math

Score 800 on SAT Reading

Score 800 on SAT Writing

Series: How to Get to 600 on Each SAT Section:

Score 600 on SAT Math

Score 600 on SAT Reading

Score 600 on SAT Writing

Free Complete Official SAT Practice Tests

What SAT Target Score Should You Be Aiming For?

15 Strategies to Improve Your SAT Essay

The 5 Strategies You Must Be Using to Improve 4+ ACT Points

How to Get a Perfect 36 ACT, by a Perfect Scorer

Series: How to Get 36 on Each ACT Section:

36 on ACT English

36 on ACT Math

36 on ACT Reading

36 on ACT Science

Series: How to Get to 24 on Each ACT Section:

24 on ACT English

24 on ACT Math

24 on ACT Reading

24 on ACT Science

What ACT target score should you be aiming for?

ACT Vocabulary You Must Know

ACT Writing: 15 Tips to Raise Your Essay Score

How to Get Into Harvard and the Ivy League

How to Get a Perfect 4.0 GPA

How to Write an Amazing College Essay

What Exactly Are Colleges Looking For?

Is the ACT easier than the SAT? A Comprehensive Guide

Should you retake your SAT or ACT?

When should you take the SAT or ACT?

Stay Informed

georgetown essay guide

Get the latest articles and test prep tips!

Looking for Graduate School Test Prep?

Check out our top-rated graduate blogs here:

GRE Online Prep Blog

GMAT Online Prep Blog

TOEFL Online Prep Blog

Holly R. "I am absolutely overjoyed and cannot thank you enough for helping me!”

Georgetown Supplemental Essays 2023-24 – Prompts and Advice

September 11, 2023

Georgetown supplemental essays

The nation’s oldest Jesuit institution of higher learning is also its most selective, as Georgetown University welcomed just 13% of applicants to the Class of 2027 onto its historical and notably beautiful Washington, D.C. campus. Whenever you are applying to a school of Georgetown’s caliber, where the average admitted applicant has a 1470 SAT score and is at (or near) the top of their high school class, you need to find ways to set yourself apart from the pack. Toward that aim, prospective Hoyas need to take advantage of the Georgetown supplemental essays.

(Want to learn more about How to Get Into Georgetown? Visit our blog entitled:  How to Get Into Georgetown: Admissions Data and Strategies  for all of the most recent admissions data as well as tips for gaining acceptance.)

The goal is to write compelling, standout compositions. Your essays should showcase your exceptional writing ability and reveal more about who you are as an individual. Below are Georgetown’s essay prompts for the 2023-24 admissions cycle along with tips about how to address each one.

Georgetown Supplemental Essays – Prompt 1

Indicate any special talents or skills you possess. (250 words)

If you are a world-class athlete, you are likely already in the recruitment process. If you placed high in AIME or won a National Merit Scholarship, that is already stated in the awards section. Therefore, using the prized 250 words of real estate to merely rehash the fact that you won an award for something you are good at would not be an inspiring move. Instead, use this essay as an opportunity to offer a new level of depth and understanding about your talent(s). In addition to discussing the talent you possess, touch on the journey of how you developed your abilities.

A few years back, Malcolm Gladwell popularized the idea that becoming an expert at anything takes 10,000 hours of practice. Consider talking about the grind and sacrifice it took you to become great at a given skill. Describe how you see that skill becoming even more finely-tuned/developed over time. If this skill fits into your future academic/career plans, all the better—share that too!

Georgetown Supplemental Essays – Prompt 2

Briefly discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved. (approximately 1/2 page, single-spaced) 

Perhaps you are the captain of a team, the editor-in-chief of your school paper, or the president of a club. On the other hand, you may simply be a valuable contributing member. Regardless of whether you are a leading man/woman or a still-essential bit player, make sure that you use your writing ability to show the admissions officer what type of involved team member you are rather than merely telling them.

You can also discuss how you have engaged with your high school local/community. Share what you have learned from interacting with people of a different ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual identity, etc. Draw on past evidence of your commitment to being a positive force in the context of your activity/activities. Also be sure to speculate how that is likely to manifest on Georgetown’s campus. Research and cite Hoya student-run organizations, local nonprofit groups, or anything else you are drawn to. The admissions committee wants to understand precisely how you will contribute to their campus community of 7,000+ undergrads. Drawing the link between your past efforts and future aims is critical here. For example, if you’ve done work with Habitat for Humanity throughout your teens, it will be most impactful if you express your commitment to joining Georgetown’s chapter of Habitat for Humanity in the future.

Georgetown University Supplemental Essays – Prompt 3

As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief essay, either personal or creative, which you feel best describes you. (approximately 1 page, single-spaced)

Whether you decide to write about yourself in a way that is light, creative, humorous, personal, sincere, or vulnerable (any are perfectly fine), aim to reveal a picture of yourself that cannot be gleaned from elsewhere in your application materials.

Take note of the wide-open nature of this prompt. While there are no limits to the way in which you approach this essay, here are some angles to consider:

  • A perspective you hold
  • An experience you had
  • A community you belong to
  • Your cultural or family background
  • Something you’ve had to overcome

The admissions officer looking at your essay is hoping to connect with you through your written words. So be open, humble, thoughtful, inquisitive, emotionally honest, mature, and insightful. No matter what type of story you tell, the goal is to have the reader come away saying, “I can definitely see this applicant as a contributing member of our talented and engaged student community.”

Georgetown Supplemental Essays — The School-Specific Essay

Depending on the College or School that you are applying to at Georgetown, you’ll need to write a separate school-specific essay. At their core, all of them are “Why Us” essays, so as you address each prompt (see below), be sure to include Georgetown-specific offerings and opportunities that support your reasoning, interests, and future plans.

Elements of a great Georgetown “Why Us?” essay

  • Cite school-specific  academic programs , professors,  research opportunities ,  internship/externship programs , and  study abroad programs .
  • Reference student-run organizations at Georgetown that align with your passions.
  • Describe how you take advantage of Georgetown’s immense resources both inside and outside of the classroom.
  • Make sure to touch on both a) why Georgetown is the perfect fit for you and) why you are the perfect fit for Georgetown. Covering both topics is essential.

Common mistakes on a Georgetown “Why Us?” essay .

  • Fawning over the picturesque Gothic-style Georgetown campus (it is quite beautiful, but they already know that).
  • Georgetown is top-ranked, prestigious, and has a great reputation. Again, they know!
  • Too many generic expressions of feeling (e.g., It has been my dream since I was a toddler to be a Hoya…).
  • Recycled statements from your other “Why Us?” essays that come across as stale, impersonal, or worst of all–irrelevant/inaccurate.

Georgetown College: A liberal arts education from the College of Arts & Sciences involves encounters with new concepts and modes of inquiry. Describe something (a class, a book, an event, etc.) that changed your thinking. (Applicants to the sciences, mathematics, public policy or languages are encouraged to include examples related to that field.).

Since you’ll be encountering all kinds of new topics and ways of thinking at Georgetown, the admissions committee is interested in discovering how you’ve interacted with new and surprising information in the past. Keep in mind that the ways in which your thinking changed are much more important than the class, book, or event you select, so choose something that allows you to demonstrate your open-mindedness, curiosity, and willingness to challenge yourself—this might be a book you read in English class, a lecture you attended, a summer course you engaged in, etc. Note that Georgetown encourages certain types of applicants to choose examples related to their prospective field of study.

Further, be sure to describe why you are interested in a liberal arts education from Georgetown specifically.

Georgetown Supplemental Essays (Continued)

School of nursing & health studies: describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care. please specifically address your intended major (global health, health care management & policy, human science, or nursing)..

“A nurse is not what you do, it is who you are.”

This quote from an anonymous source captures the idea that becoming a nurse is a calling; not a profession you just stumble into. Healthcare in general is no different. Healthcare professionals are willing to work long shifts in the service of others, be on the frontlines of a pandemic, and deal with life’s toughest challenges (e.g., suffering and death) on a regular basis. Many applicants share stories of caring for sick relatives, experiencing a tough medical episode themselves, or observing the challenges faced by a particular community as inspiration for studying nursing or healthcare. In addition to your school-specific research, this essay is a chance to show the admissions committee that you are a passionate and mature healthcare or nursing candidate and that this field is genuinely “who you are.”

Walsh School of Foreign Service: The Walsh School of Foreign Service was founded more than a century ago to prepare generations of leaders to solve global problems. What is motivating you to dedicate your undergraduate studies to a future in service to the world?

International service is not something every 17/18-year-old in the country is dreaming about doing as a vocation. There is likely a very interesting story surrounding what motivated you to apply to the Walsh School of Foreign Service and this essay invites you to share this very narrative. You don’t need to look any deeper than today’s headlines to identify powerful and immensely challenging global problems. Whether you are aiming for a B.S. in Business and Global Affairs, a B.S. in Foreign Service, or a B.S. in Global, International, and Comparative History, you likely have a highly specific set of academic and career goals taking shape in your mind.

If you can communicate these goals and the motivations behind them while sharing a vision for how you will contribute to the betterment of humankind in one or multiple regions of the world, then you are likely to end up with an excellent Walsh essay. Moreover, you’ll want to be sure to discuss why Walsh in particular will be a great fit for you.

McDonough School of Business: The McDonough School of Business is a national and global leader in providing graduates with essential ethical, analytical, financial and global perspectives. Please discuss your motivations for studying business at Georgetown.

Before you start writing, you’ll want to do some McDonough-specific research and think about why a business education from McDonough in particular will be a great fit for your interests and goals. Further, to stand out, applicants need to connect the resources they’ve chosen to experiences they’ve had, demonstrating that they have availed themselves of every opportunity to dive into the business world during their high school years. Of course, not everyone has parents who hand them money to invest in the stock market or land them an internship at Goldman Sachs in 9th grade.

Relevant experiences can include high school investing clubs, participation in activities like FBLA, summer programs/courses in business/finance/economics, running your own local small business or e-business (Etsy, landscaping, etc.), or just a regular old retail job. The important thing to highlight is what you learned from your experiences, how you’ll bring that newly acquired knowledge to the classroom at Georgetown, and how your experiences have informed & influenced what you hope to continue learning in college.

How important are the Georgetown supplemental essays?

There are a whopping 8 factors that Georgetown considers to be “very important” to the evaluation process. These are: rigor of secondary school record, character/personal qualities, class rank, GPA, standardized test scores, recommendations, extracurricular activities, and most relevant to this blog—the application essays. The essays undoubtedly play a significant role in the admissions process at Georgetown. They can help the committee decide who to admit when choosing between similarly-credentialed (GPA, test scores, etc.) applicants.

Want personalized assistance with your Georgetown supplemental essays?

Interested in working with one of our experienced and knowledgeable essay coaches as you craft your Georgetown supplemental essays? We encourage you to get a quote  today.

  • College Essay

' src=

Andrew Belasco

A licensed counselor and published researcher, Andrew's experience in the field of college admissions and transition spans two decades. He has previously served as a high school counselor, consultant and author for Kaplan Test Prep, and advisor to U.S. Congress, reporting on issues related to college admissions and financial aid.

  • 2-Year Colleges
  • Application Strategies
  • Big Picture
  • Career & Personality Assessment
  • College Search/Knowledge
  • College Success
  • Costs & Financial Aid
  • Dental School Admissions
  • Extracurricular Activities
  • Graduate School Admissions
  • High School Success
  • High Schools
  • Law School Admissions
  • Medical School Admissions
  • Navigating the Admissions Process
  • Online Learning
  • Private High School Spotlight
  • Summer Program Spotlight
  • Summer Programs
  • Test Prep Provider Spotlight

College Transitions Sidebar Block Image

“Innovative and invaluable…use this book as your college lifeline.”

— Lynn O'Shaughnessy

Nationally Recognized College Expert

College Planning in Your Inbox

Join our information-packed monthly newsletter.

Sign Up Now

  • Search All Scholarships
  • Exclusive Scholarships
  • Easy Scholarships to Apply For
  • No Essay Scholarships
  • Scholarships for HS Juniors
  • Scholarships for HS Seniors
  • Scholarships for College Students
  • Scholarships for Grad Students
  • Scholarships for Women
  • Scholarships for Black Students
  • Scholarships
  • Student Loans
  • College Admissions
  • Financial Aid
  • Scholarship Winners
  • Scholarship Providers

georgetown essay guide

Apply to vetted scholarship programs in one click

Student-centric advice and objective recommendations.

Higher education has never been more confusing or expensive. Our goal is to help you navigate the very big decisions related to higher ed with objective information and expert advice. Each piece of content on the site is original, based on extensive research, and reviewed by multiple editors, including a subject matter expert. This ensures that all of our content is up-to-date, useful, accurate, and thorough.

Our reviews and recommendations are based on extensive research, testing, and feedback. We may receive commission from links on our website, but that doesn’t affect our editors’ opinions. Our marketing partners don’t review, approve or endorse our editorial content. It’s accurate to the best of our knowledge when posted. You can find a complete list of our partners here .

How to Respond to the 2023/2024 Georgetown Supplemental Essay Prompts

georgetown essay guide

Cece Gilmore is a Content Writer at Scholarships360. Cece earned her undergraduate degree in Journalism and Mass Communications from Arizona State University. While at ASU, she was the education editor as well as a published staff reporter at Downtown Devil. Cece was also the co-host of her own radio show on Blaze Radio ASU.

Learn about our editorial policies

georgetown essay guide

Bill Jack has over a decade of experience in college admissions and financial aid. Since 2008, he has worked at Colby College, Wesleyan University, University of Maine at Farmington, and Bates College.

georgetown essay guide

Maria Geiger is Director of Content at Scholarships360. She is a former online educational technology instructor and adjunct writing instructor. In addition to education reform, Maria’s interests include viewpoint diversity, blended/flipped learning, digital communication, and integrating media/web tools into the curriculum to better facilitate student engagement. Maria earned both a B.A. and an M.A. in English Literature from Monmouth University, an M. Ed. in Education from Monmouth University, and a Virtual Online Teaching Certificate (VOLT) from the University of Pennsylvania.

How to Respond to the 2023/2024 Georgetown Supplemental Essay Prompts

The Georgetown University supplemental essays are an important part of the overall application. Georgetown has a 12% acceptance rate , so your very best writing is required here. Remember, you are not alone in this Georgetown supplemental essay writing process! Keep reading our guide to learn more about how to best respond to the Georgetown supplemental essays. 

Breaking down the Georgetown supplemental essays

Georgetown requires all applicants to respond to three prompts. 

Here is a breakdown of the word count for the Georgetown supplemental essays: 

  • Short Essay – approximately ½ page, single spaced
  • Essay 1- approximately 1 page, single spaced
  • Essay 2- approximately 1 page, single spaced, response based on intended school

Georgetown Supplemental essay questions for all applicants

Short essay.

Briefly discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved (½ page, single spaced)

This is an opportunity to expand on an extracurricular activity that you are passionate about and have participated in the most. 

Some questions to help brainstorm your response could include: 

  • Did you receive any leadership roles in this activity? 
  • Why do you love this activity? 
  • When did you become interested in this activity? 

Once you establish your main activity, write a story surrounding this event and detail a narrative! Do your best to connect back to Georgetown. Think of Georgetown clubs you want to become involved in to continue to pursue your interests. For example, if you love participating in track and field, but do not want to participate at the college level, discuss joining the Georgetown University Running Club. Additionally, try to really show not tell how significant this activity is in your life. For example, you could detail a narrative of how going for a run allows you to clear your mind and helps you cope with stress! Ultimately, this is your time to expand upon a passion you have and why you are passionate about it! 

As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief personal or creative essay which you feel best describes you and reflects on your own background, identity, skills and talents. (1 page, single spaced)

Although this is one of the first questions asked by Georgetown, it may be smart to save this question for the end. This is because there are a lot of prompts that Georgetown asks that reveal many of your interests and skills. 

Therefore, to ensure you are not repeating yourself in your responses, answer this question last. Every essay you are responding to should reveal something new! 

Once you are ready to answer this question, brainstorm some of the following questions: 

  • What is missing from your application that you want to highlight about yourself? 
  • Are there any skills you possess that have not been touched upon? 
  • Is there a leadership position you were involved in that you want to detail? 
  • What would you do if you had to go on stage at a talent show? 

It is important to use this question as an outlet to showcase your skills, talents, and interests. 

Some examples of some skills, talents, or interests can be: 

  • Playing an instrument 
  • Participating in a sport
  • Speaking a different language
  • Mastering a video game
  • Able to do something others cannot

You should be not just stating what talents you have, but also a short narrative or story surrounding each skill. Describe how you discovered this skill or how long it took you to become the expert you are today. 

Therefore, it is important to be short and thoughtful with your word choices. Eliminate any filler words and only describe the important parts of your story.

This prompt is quite broad, which can make it challenging to respond to. It is important to try and come up with a topic for this essay that has not been discussed in your application thus far. Remember, Georgetown has most likely already read about your academic and athletic achievements. So, try to be more creative in your response!

So what should you write about? 

To help you brainstorm creative topics for this essay, think of the following questions: 

  • What are you known as in your friend group? (Exp: the artsy one, the funny one…) 
  • Are there any quirks you possess? 
  • Do you belong to any communities? 
  • What kind of background did you come from? 
  • Have you ever had to overcome anything? 
  • What are you passionate about? 
  • Is there anything that makes you stand out from other applicants? 

If you are still having trouble coming up with a topic idea for this essay, do not fret. Remember, Georgetown does not use the Common App . This means that you could potentially use your response to the Common App as an answer to this essay.

If you are going to use your Common App essay response to answer this question make sure you are: 

  • Not repeating yourself in your application
  • Answering the question entirely
  • Revealing a new piece of information about yourself

Essentially, Georgetown wants to be able to connect with your application and your personal and unique experiences. Therefore, be yourself and always reveal new things!

Essay #2: Georgetown school-specific essay questions

Each school-specific prompt should not exceed one-page, single-spaced. 

Georgetown College essay

A liberal arts education from the College of Arts & Sciences involves encounters with new concepts and modes of inquiry. Describe something (a class, a book, an event, etc) that changed your thinking. (Applicants to the sciences, mathematics, public policy or languages are encouraged to include examples related to that field.) 

Georgetown College admissions wants to hear all about your way of thinking! Try to brainstorm a time in which your mind was changed – this can be anything from reading a book to seeing a TED Talk to having a conversation with a teacher. Whatever event, be sure you are picking one that most closely aligns to your intended major such as mathematics or public policy. Remember, you want to show, not tell! So describe this change of thinking through a story! Try to include details to bring your experience to life such as reading your book while driving through the mountains or seeing a TED talk in class and immediately having millions of ideas rushing through your brain. Additionally, it may be wise to describe your thinking prior to the event and then after the event. This will show how exactly you have changed and how much. Now, go one step further and connect back to Georgetown! Doing so will impress the admissions officers and truly demonstrate how you are a perfect fit for the Georgetown community. It’s a good idea to allude to how you will continue to take this new way of thinking to the Georgetown community. 

Questions to consider

  • What is a time in which you changed your thinking on a topic? 
  • What did you learn from changing your thinking? 
  • How will you take what you have learned and apply it while at Georgetown? 

School of Health essay

Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care at Georgetown University. Please specifically address your intended major (Global Health, Health Care Management & Policy, or Human Science).

This essay question should be fairly easy if you have a passion for studying health care. Ultimately, you just need to explain why you want to study health care! And specifically, why you want to study health care at Georgetown. So, write a story describing your interest in global health, healthcare management & policy or human science! After detailing this narrative, go into detail about why Georgetown is a perfect fit for you. Describe any specific classes, professors, clubs, or the location of DC to demonstrate your interest in Georgetown. The most important thing is that you are tying your response back to Georgetown! 

  • Why do you want to major in your chosen major?
  • What do you aspire to do with your degree?
  • Why did you choose to apply to Georgetown? 

School of Nursing essay

Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care. Please specifically address your intended major Nursing. 

If you are considering the School of Nursing, then you obviously have a passion for helping people. Therefore, you should not focus on this fact in your response. Remember, these Georgetown supplemental essays are an opportunity to make yourself stand out from other applicants – so try to really think about this question. 

In order to avoid any cliches, try thinking of the following questions to help you brainstorm your response: 

  • What has been an eye-opening experience you have had that has influenced your decision to apply to the School of Nursing? 
  • Why the Georgetown School of Nursing? 
  • Why do you want to help people? 
  • Was there a specific instance in which you realized nursing was your calling? 
  • Is there anyone close to you who works in the medical or nursing field? 

After brainstorming, begin your response by describing a narrative. Tell your story about why you became interested in nursing and studying in the medical field. Whatever your story may be, use that as the backbone of your response for this essay. 

Try to answer the following questions in your essay: 

  • What have you learned from this passion? 
  • What change do you hope to bring to your future profession? 
  • What do you hope to do with this degree? 
  • What will you become involved in while at Georgetown? 

The most important thing is that you are tying your response back to Georgetown. Specify how and why Georgetown’s program and resources are the best fit for you. 

See also : Top nursing scholarships

Walsh School of Foreign Service essay

The Walsh School of Foreign Service was founded more than a century ago to prepare generations of leaders to solve global problems. What is motivating you to dedicate your undergraduate studies to a future in service to the world?

International service is a rather uncommon major and profession to go into. Therefore, there is most likely a story behind your decision to choose this school. 

Start by brainstorming the following questions: 

  • What inspired you to pursue this major? 
  • Is there someone who inspired you to pursue this particular degree? 
  • What do you want to do with this degree? 

Now that you have a good idea of what you want to write about, detail exactly what degree you are intended to pursue. Communicate what your goals are for this degree. What do you hope to accomplish? 

In addition, describe how you plan to contribute to change the world for the better. 

Afterwards, connect back to Georgetown by writing about the programs, clubs, and/or opportunities you hope to take advantage of while studying there. 

McDonough School of Business essay

The McDonough School of Business is a national and global leader in providing graduates with essential ethical, analytical, financial and global perspectives. Please discuss your motivation for studying business at Georgetown.

In order to stand out from other applicants, begin by detailing any background you may have in business. This could be anything from taking a business class in high school to creating your own brand that went viral. Once you describe your business background, connect back to the McDonough School of Business specifically. 

There are a lot of business schools out in the country, so why Georgetown? In order to accurately answer this question, you should have done adequate research on the following aspects of the McDonough School of Business: 

  • Class sizes
  • Travel opportunities
  • Clubs and organizations

Becoming familiar with these aspects of the school allows you to write about the factors that are most important to you. Be open and honest–which factors appeal to you most,  and why? 

Final thoughts on responding to the Georgetown supplemental essays

The Georgetown supplemental essays are quite challenging, but they are completely worth the effort.  Georgetown heavily relies upon the supplemental essay responses to select applicants, so it is important that your application is well-rounded. Make sure that you are not repeating anything when writing your essays. In addition, always connect your experiences back to Georgetown by detailing what you want to become involved in on campus. 

Additional resources

Are you curious about how many colleges to apply to , how to choose a college , or when to take the SAT/ACT ? Do not worry because Scholarships360 has you covered! In addition, we have numerous resources to help you through the rest of your college essays. Check out our guides on how to write an essay about yourself , how to write a successful admissions essay , and how to write 250 or 500 word essays. Throughout your college application journey, make sure that you apply to all the scholarships you qualify for! 

Start your scholarship search

  • Vetted scholarships custom-matched to your profile
  • Access exclusive scholarships only available to Scholarships360 members

Scholarships360 Recommended

georgetown essay guide

10 Tips for Successful College Applications

georgetown essay guide

Coalition vs. Common App: What is the difference?

georgetown essay guide

College Application Deadlines 2023-2024: What You Need to Know

Trending now.

georgetown essay guide

How to Convert Your GPA to a 4.0 Scale

georgetown essay guide

PSAT to SAT Score Conversion: Predict Your Score

georgetown essay guide

What Are Public Ivy League Schools?

3 reasons to join scholarships360.

  • Automatic entry to our $10,000 No-Essay Scholarship
  • Personalized matching to thousands of vetted scholarships
  • Quick apply for scholarships exclusive to our platform

By the way...Scholarships360 is 100% free!

Facebook

Georgetown University 2020-21 Essay Prompt Guide

Regular Decision: 

Georgetown 2020-21 Application Essay Question Explanations

The Requirements: 1 essay of 250 words; 1 half-page essay; 2 page-long essays

Supplemental Essay Type(s):  Activity , Why

Prompt 1: Indicate any special talents or skills you possess. (250 words)

This prompt may come first on the list, but we think you should save it for last! For the other essays on the Georgetown application, we ask you to dig deep and share personal stories that showcase talents and interests. Don’t dry the well by listing all of your (many!) skills and talents too soon. Every essay should reveal something new to admissions. So once you finish polishing your other pieces, ask yourself: what’s missing? Is there some critical puzzle piece that will help connect your other three essays? Or have you been dying to get something off your chest that didn’t fit anywhere else? This essay could be the perfect outlet for you to showcase your more personal skills, interests, and quirks. If the rest of your essays showcase your drive to work in international relations, perhaps your answer to this prompt could showcase a lighter side: your love of experimental cooking (and impressive knife skills!). Or maybe explain how learning a new language helped you learn how to whistle! While you should aim to showcase genuine skills that you have put effort into cultivating, you can also have a little bit of fun. This prompt is the most open-ended one on the application, so show admissions something they won’t find anywhere else on your application.

Prompt 2: Briefly discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved. (approximately 1/2 page, single-spaced) 

The Georgetown application kicks off with a fun twist on the classic activity essay, which asks you to expand on an extracurricular endeavor that you care about. For starters, we’d give you basically the same advice the prompt does: focus on one of the activities “in which you have been most involved.” Although we usually urge students to write about items that haven’t appeared elsewhere on their application, the activity essay is an exception since it specifically asks you to address an item on your resume. So, pick something with meat! When have you had the opportunity to take on a leadership role? How has four years of debate club shaped the way you communicate? Was it difficult coaching pee wee soccer as a freshman, and what motivated you to stick with it?

On the other hand, Georgetown is also giving you the opportunity to talk about camp, so if you have amazing camp stories that show your character and personality, definitely write about them! But think more along the lines of “The Parent Trap” and less along the lines of “Wet Hot American Summer.” If you don’t have a fantastic camp story about the time you saved everyone in your cabin by knowing the cure for poison ivy, think about another activity you’ve been involved in and why you’ve decided to spend so much of your time doing it. Why is it meaningful to you?

Prompt 3: As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief essay, either personal or creative, which you feel best describes you. (approximately 1 page, single-spaced)

This is one of the hardest prompts! What do you mean, tell you about myself in my own words? What do you want to know?! Where do I start? Birth? School? Puberty? Calm down! Think about why they’re asking you this question and it will all fall into place. While many applications can often read similarly with impressive grades, extracurriculars, and teacher recommendations, this essay makes it so you can differentiate yourself with your personality. Do you have a very sarcastic sense of humor, do you make more dad jokes than your own father, do all of your friends refer to you as the “artsy” one? Georgetown wants to know that you’re more than your application, that you’re a real person with quirks and weird habits and endearing qualities! It also doesn’t hurt to keep in mind that G-town specifically names “personal” and “creative” as two separate categories. If you fancy yourself a writer, now could really be your time to shine.

And remember, Georgetown isn’t on the Common App ! Did you write your Personal Statement on Common App prompt #1 ? You could be in luck. If you chose a different prompt, don’t worry, you still might be able to recycle your Common App essay here — and it’s never too late to take our good advice on writing an essay about your background!

Georgetown University School-Specific Prompts.

(each school-specific prompt should not exceed 1 page, single-spaced), georgetown college: what does it mean to you to be educated how might georgetown college help you achieve this aim (applicants to the sciences and mathematics or the faculty of languages and linguistics should address their chosen course of study.).

Despite the heady tone of the introductory question, this prompt is nothing more than a classic why essay. (Promise!) Try reading it in reverse: address your chosen course of study. How will Georgetown help you pursue this interest? How will this experience make you a more educated person (and what does it mean to educated)? Not so bad! Going in this order, kick off your writing process with a little research: what programs interest you? Is there something specific in the curriculum that calls out to you? A professor’s name that you recognize? Drilling into the details in your research will make it clear (if not totally obvious) why Georgetown is the perfect place for you to study chemistry, or linguistics, or religion. 

Once you have a solid map of your school-specific interests, it’s time to turn the lens back on your experiences. It’s one thing to say you want to study journalism in the nation’s capital, but it’s more convincing and memorable if you also mention your award-winning coverage of a student council election for your school paper. You can define what it means to be “educated” by showing admissions where you are now and describing how far you hope to go with the help of a Georgetown education.

School of Nursing & Health Studies: Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care. Please specifically address your intended major (Global Health, Health Care Management & Policy, Human Science, or Nursing).

If we know anything about applying to medical programs, it is this: everyone wants to help people; everyone wants to make the world a better place; everyone wants to make a meaningful contribution. Few fields lend themselves to service-oriented clichés and platitudes as readily as medicine does. To safely navigate the minefield of hackneyed generalizations, start with something personal! What one eye-opening experience that made you believe healthcare could be your calling? Perhaps it was a single moment, like accidental eye contact at the ER in a public hospital. Or maybe it was something more long-term, such as the struggle of navigating your school in a wheelchair after knee surgery. Whatever the case, use your personal story as the backdrop for your argument. What did you learn? What problems do you hope to tackle? What change do you hope to help create? As we said, it’s not enough to want these things, in general. Your job is to show admissions why health studies interest you personally.

Walsh School of Foreign Service: Briefly discuss a current global issue, indicating why you consider it important and what you suggest should be done to deal with it.

This prompt may seem to want something other than a personal essay, but it doesn’t want a policy paper either. Think about this as an opportunity to showcase two critical aspects of your character: your values and your problem-solving skills. If this advice sounds familiar, perhaps it’s because you worked on the Common App’s fourth prompt: the solver essay . If you did, you may already have an excellent draft to draw upon for Georgetown. (Remember: they aren’t on the Common App!) And if you’re starting from scratch, the same advice applies it is important that the problem you choose is linked to your life and the world in a meaningful way. The whole purpose of this exercise is to reveal something valuable about yourself to admissions, so be sure to link the problem you highlight to your passions, actions, or aspirations. Ask yourself, what kind of mark would you like to leave on the world? How do you think you can positively contribute to a cause that is important to you? If you had the power to make a lasting impact in any area at all, what would it be? While building the personal connection is key, you’ll also want to leave yourself some space to spell out at least a few steps you might take to address your global issue of choice.

McDonough School of Business: The McDonough School of Business is a national and global leader in providing graduates with essential ethical, analytical, financial and global perspectives. Please discuss your motivations for studying business at Georgetown.

If you think we’ve never seen an essay with the line, “I love money,” you would be wrong. Spoiler: this does not make a great first impression. Studying business is about so much more than dollars and cents, and the prompt offers a few other aspects of business you’ll learn about in this program including “ethical, analytical, financial and global perspectives.” In order to get some perspective, we’d recommend doing your homework. Like any classic why essay, the best answers are personal and specific, so go beyond your general interest in business and try to figure out specifically why Georgetown could be the right fit for you. Is in the location? The professors? The travel opportunities? Allow yourself to follow every lead and fall down every rabbithole as you root through the program website. Your essay should paint a picture of the kind of student you will be at Georgetown, from the classes you’ll take to the activities you’ll pursue. How will this education prepare you for your dream career?

About CEA HQ

View all posts by CEA HQ »

Ivy Divider

We're here to help.

Contact us for information on rates and more!

  • I am a * Student Parent Potential Partner School Counselor Private College Counselor
  • Name * First Last
  • Phone Type Mobile Landline
  • Street Address
  • Address City State / Province / Region Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cabo Verde Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czechia Côte d'Ivoire Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Eswatini Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People's Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Macedonia Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine, State of Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Réunion Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Sweden Switzerland Syria Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, the United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Türkiye US Minor Outlying Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Viet Nam Virgin Islands, British Virgin Islands, U.S. Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Åland Islands Country
  • Which best describes you (or your child)? High school senior High school junior College student College grad Other
  • How did you find CEA? Internet Search New York Times Guidance counselor/school Social Media YouTube Friend Special Event Delehey College Consulting Other
  • Common App and Coalition Essays
  • Supplemental Essays
  • University of California Essays
  • University of Texas Essays
  • Resume Review
  • Post-Grad Essays
  • Specialized Services
  • Waitlist Letters
  • Private School Essays
  • General College Counseling
  • School list with priorities noted:
  • Anything else we should know?
  • Email This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
  • Agnes Scott College
  • Alvernia University
  • American University
  • Amherst College
  • Babson College
  • Bard College
  • Barnard College
  • Baylor University
  • Bennington College
  • Bentley University
  • Berry College
  • Bethany College
  • Bishop’s University
  • Boston College
  • Boston University (BU)
  • Bowdoin College
  • Brandeis University
  • Brown University
  • Bryn Mawr College
  • Bucknell University
  • Butler University
  • California Institute of Technology (Caltech)
  • California Lutheran University
  • Capitol Technology University
  • Carleton College
  • Carnegie Mellon University
  • Catawba College
  • Centre College
  • Chapman University
  • Claremont McKenna College
  • Clark University
  • College of Mount Saint Vincent
  • College of William and Mary
  • College of Wooster
  • Colorado College
  • Colorado School of Mines
  • Columbia University
  • Cornell University
  • Culver-Stockton College
  • D'Youville University
  • Dartmouth College
  • Davidson College
  • Drexel University
  • Duke University
  • Earlham College
  • Elon University
  • Emerson College
  • Emory University
  • Flagler College
  • Fordham University
  • George Mason University
  • Georgetown University
  • Georgia State University
  • Georgia Tech
  • Gonzaga University
  • Harvard University
  • Harvey Mudd College
  • Haverford College
  • Hillsdale College
  • Hofstra University
  • Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Illinois Wesleyan University
  • Indiana University Bloomington
  • Ithaca College
  • Johns Hopkins University
  • Kalamazoo College
  • Lafayette College
  • Lehigh University
  • Lewis and Clark College
  • Linfield University
  • Loyola Marymount University (LMU)
  • Lynn University
  • Macalester College
  • Malone University
  • Manchester University
  • Marist College
  • Mary Baldwin University
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
  • Meredith College
  • Monmouth College
  • Moravian University
  • Morehouse College
  • Mount Holyoke College
  • New York University (NYU)
  • North Park University
  • Northwestern University
  • Occidental College
  • Oklahoma City University
  • Olin College of Engineering
  • Pepperdine University
  • Pitzer College
  • Pomona College
  • Princeton University
  • Providence College
  • Purdue University
  • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • Rice University
  • Saint Elizabeth University
  • Santa Clara University
  • Sarah Lawrence College
  • Scripps College
  • Seattle Pacific University
  • Smith College
  • Soka University of America
  • Southern Methodist University
  • St. John’s College
  • Stanford University
  • Stonehill College
  • Swarthmore College
  • Syracuse University
  • Texas A&M University
  • Texas Christian University
  • The College of Idaho
  • The George Washington University
  • The New School
  • Trinity College
  • Tufts University
  • Tulane University
  • University of California
  • University of Central Florida (UCF)
  • University of Chicago
  • University of Cincinnati
  • University of Colorado Boulder
  • University of Florida
  • University of Georgia
  • University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
  • University of Maryland
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • University of Miami
  • University of Michigan
  • University of Minnesota
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC)
  • University of North Carolina at Charlotte
  • University of North Carolina at Greensboro
  • University of Notre Dame
  • University of Oklahoma
  • University of Oregon
  • University of Pennsylvania
  • University of Pittsburgh
  • University of Richmond
  • University of San Diego
  • University of San Francisco
  • University of Southern California (USC)
  • University of Texas at Austin
  • University of Tulsa
  • University of Vermont
  • University of Virginia (UVA)
  • University of Washington
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Vanderbilt University
  • Vassar College
  • Villanova University
  • Virginia Tech
  • Wake Forest University
  • Washington and Lee University
  • Washington University in St. Louis
  • Wellesley College
  • Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI)
  • Yale University

Email

Want free stuff?

We thought so. Sign up for free instructional videos, guides, worksheets and more!

georgetown essay guide

One-On-One Advising

Common App Essay Guide

Common App Essay Prompt Guide

Common App Essay Guide

Supplemental Essay Prompt Guide

YouTube Tutorials

  • YouTube Tutorials
  • Our Approach & Team
  • Undergraduate Testimonials
  • Postgraduate Testimonials
  • Where Our Students Get In
  • CEA Gives Back
  • Undergraduate Admissions
  • Graduate Admissions
  • Private School Admissions
  • International Student Admissions
  • Common App Essay Guide
  • Supplemental Essay Guides
  • Coalition App Guide
  • The CEA Podcast
  • Admissions Stats
  • Notification Trackers
  • Deadline Databases
  • College Essay Examples
  • Academy and Worksheets
  • Waitlist Guide
  • Get Started

The Ivy Coach Daily

  • College Admissions
  • College Essays
  • Early Decision / Early Action
  • Extracurricular Activities
  • Standardized Testing
  • The Rankings

September 9, 2023

2023-2024 Georgetown University Supplemental Essay Prompts

Students read on the lawn at Georgetown University.

Georgetown University has released its 2023-2024 admissions essays for applicants to the Class of 2028 . The Jesuit institution, which has for years bucked the trend of joining The Common Application , asks applicants to respond to three essays in addition to one essay that is school-specific within the broader university. So, what are this year’s essay prompts? Let’s dive in!

2023-2024 Georgetown Essay Topics and Questions

Essays for all georgetown applicants.

All Georgetown applicants must answer the following three essay prompts

1. Please elaborate on any special talents or skills you would like to highlight (250 words) .

Applicants should focus on a skill related to the hook they’ve showcased in the activities section of their Georgetown application. After all, Georgetown’s admissions committee doesn’t care if an applicant can juggle. Even if the skill doesn’t relate to the student’s hook, the talent must showcase intellectual curiosity or it’s a wasted opportunity.

2. Briefly discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved (approximately 1/2 page, single-spaced) .

Applicants should shine a spotlight on one of their more meaningful activities. And, yes, this activity should relate to the student’s hook. If a student is interested in studying political science, the activity they write about for this essay prompt should not relate to physics. Georgetown’s admissions committee wants to see how applicants are going to make the world better in a small but meaningful way. As such, this is an opportunity to show rather than tell how they’ve done that to date through the prism of a specific extracurricular pursuit.

3. Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief personal or creative essay which you feel best describes you and reflects on your own background, identity, skills, and talents. (approximately 1 page, single-spaced)

It’s unsurprising that unlike many of its peer institutions, Georgetown has made few changes to its application in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling outlawing Affirmative Action. After all, Georgetown’s longtime Dean of Admissions Charles Deacon is well known for his aversion to change. For example, it took a worldwide pandemic for the man to finally switch to notifying applicants of their decisions via the Internet rather than snail mail.

While this essay is similar to last year’s third essay prompt required of all applicants, the wording is slightly different. Unlike last year’s prompt, Georgetown has included “background” and “identity.” Last year, the prompt read, “As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief essay, either personal or creative, which you feel best describes you.”

Now, keep in mind that some schools, like Johns Hopkins University , included bold language that very much capitalized on the loophole Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts penned in his majority opinion outlawing Affirmative Action , allowing schools to continue to consider a candidate’s race in context: “Nothing in this opinion should be construed as prohibiting universities from considering an applicant’s discussion of how race affected his or her life, be it through discrimination, inspiration, or otherwise.” Georgetown, unsurprisingly, didn’t go nearly as far in its language under its reluctant-to-modernize admissions czar — but it’s a step nonetheless.

Students need not be underrepresented minorities to answer this prompt powerfully. Students can instead write about their faith, community, or experiences, but we do encourage applicants who are underrepresented minorities to subtly make it clear since Georgetown, like all highly selective universities, continues to wish to admit a diverse class of students.

Georgetown School-Specific Essays

For the school-specific essay, irrespective of the school, the essay should not exceed one page, single-spaced.

Georgetown College of Arts and Sciences

A liberal arts education from the College of Arts & Sciences involves encounters with new concepts and modes of inquiry. Describe something (a class, a book, an event, etc.) that changed your thinking. (Applicants to the sciences, mathematics, public policy or languages are encouraged to include examples related to that field.)

Georgetown’s admissions committee wants to understand how an applicant thinks. Through a specific anecdote or anecdotes (no matter a student’s chosen field of study) — be it via a book, event, classroom discussion, lecture, or anything — it behooves applicants to shine a light on how they are filled with conviction. Yet, they’re also malleable to change when presented with better ideas. And, of course, it wouldn’t hurt to pepper — by showing rather than telling — the importance of the Jesuit tradition and, in particular, Cura personalis, in their storytelling.

McDonough School of Business

The McDonough School of Business is a national and global leader in providing graduates with essential ethical, analytical, financial and global perspectives. Please discuss your motivations for studying business at Georgetown.

This essay prompt presents applicants with an opportunity to share an origin story — as high schoolers rather than as children — for their interest in business. Ideally, the origin story traces to an activity featured in the student’s Georgetown activities section. And, of course, McDonough isn’t looking to admit future business titans just out for money. They want to understand how applicants will make the world better in a small but meaningful way. As such, McDonough applicants should infuse their essays with Jesuit traditions — and why they matter to them in business. And, yes, this essay should also be infused with Why McDonough and Why Georgetown specifics (and, no, name-dropping professors and listing classes don’t count as genuine specifics).

Walsh School of Foreign Service

The Walsh School of Foreign Service was founded more than a century ago to prepare generations of leaders to solve global problems. What is motivating you to dedicate your undergraduate studies to a future in service to the world?

Walsh is looking to learn the origin story of an applicant’s interest in foreign service — as high schoolers rather than as children. Through a specific anecdote or anecdotes, which ideally trace back to the student’s activities so they’re showing rather than telling, applicants should highlight how they hope to leave a mark on the wall in a way that can be actualized. Stopping climate change can’t be actualized. Incentivizing countries to be greener — based on specific research and insights — is much more doable.

School of Health

Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care at Georgetown University. Please specifically address your intended major (Global Health, Health Care Management & Policy, or Human Science).

Georgetown’s School of Health seeks to understand a student’s origin story, as a high schooler, for their interest in the disciplines under the School of Health’s umbrella. A grandparent becoming ill with breast cancer is not the way into such an essay since it’s all too common and doesn’t say enough about how a student thinks and how they wish to leave a mark on their field.

Instead, applicants should tell a small story that ideally relates to an activity they’ve participated in during high school, that showcases precisely why they want to contribute to the health field and how they hope to make a difference — and always in a small but deeply meaningful way.

Ivy Coach’s Assistance with Georgetown Essays

If you’re interested in submitting essays that will wow Georgetown’s admissions committee, fill out Ivy Coach ’s free consultation form , and we’ll be in touch to outline our college admissions counseling services for seniors.

You are permitted to use www.ivycoach.com (including the content of the Blog) for your personal, non-commercial use only. You must not copy, download, print, or otherwise distribute the content on our site without the prior written consent of Ivy Coach, Inc.

Related Articles

georgetown essay guide

Using A.I. to Write College Admission Essays

October 13, 2023

georgetown essay guide

Word and Character Limits in College Essays

September 27, 2023

georgetown essay guide

What English Teachers Get Wrong About Writing College Essays

georgetown essay guide

Bragging in College Essays: Is It Ever Okay?

September 26, 2023

georgetown essay guide

What Not to Write: 3 College Essay Topics to Avoid

September 24, 2023

georgetown essay guide

2023-2024 Caltech Supplemental Essay Prompts

September 14, 2023

TOWARD THE CONQUEST OF ADMISSION

If you’re interested in Ivy Coach’s college counseling,
fill out our free consultation form and we’ll be in touch.

Fill out our short form for a 20-minute consultation to learn about Ivy Coach’s services.

Add Project Key Words

georgetown essay guide

A Guide to the Georgetown Essays 2021-2022

Padya Paramita

October 14, 2021

georgetown essay guide

Year after year, Georgetown University remains one of the most prestigious universities in the country. Understandably, gaining admission is not easy—Georgetown has an acceptance rate of only 15% (and reached a record low of 12% last year). Whether you’re applying to this DC school for its well-renowned undergraduate business program, or you see yourself becoming as successful in your field as alums Bill Clinton and Bradley Cooper, you first have to overcome the Georgetown essays 2021-2022 . 

Georgetown University is not a part of the Common Application and doesn’t use the Common App personal statement prompts, but rather offers its own set of essays to understand who you are and where your interests lie. Regardless of whether you’re an applicant to Georgetown College, the School of Nursing and Health Studies, the Walsh School of Foreign Service, or the McDonough School of Business, you have to write strong responses to the Georgetown essays 2021-2022 in order to frame yourself as a must-have candidate that stands out from other applicants.  

Prompts for the Georgetown Essays 2021-2022

Short essay.

Indicate any special talents or skills you possess (250 words).

If you are really proud of one of your abilities, now is the time to show it. Georgetown wants students who bring a variety of backgrounds and interests, this essay is a good opportunity to show a new side of yourself. Your talent doesn’t have to be an external ability such as playing the piano or writing sonnets. Neither is it required that you have received an award for this talent!

You can write about an internal characteristic such as an easy facility for making friends with new people. Or it can be something quirky like being a phenomenal cartoonist. In fact, it is better if the skill you mention is unique because your Georgetown essays 2021-2022 need to establish you as a memorable candidate. For questions like this, you don’t want to answer with a typical talent, or an ambiguous characteristic. We can assure you that many of your peers are going to be talented writers, musicians, and singers. You need to bring your own exceptional spin. As for personal characteristics, asserting that a trait like kindness is your greatest asset is frankly boring and vague. Think about what differentiates you.

The main point of your essay should emphasize why this talent or skill is meaningful to you. Why are you particularly proud of this talent? Make sure you’ve addressed all parts of the prompt. Is it a natural skill, or did it take time to develop? Will you continue to use this talent in your future goals and career? What have you learned about yourself while pursuing this skill? Let the reader understand why this talent matters so much, and exactly why it’s an admirable ability.

Briefly (approximately one-half page, single-spaced) discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved.

Each year, Georgetown receives thousands of applications from students with stellar grades. By asking such a question through the Georgetown essays 2021-2022, the school is interested to know the kind of impact you’ve made in your community in order to distinguish you from the rest of the applicants. The school wants to know what part of your current high school career holds the most significance to you and how that in turn will influence the way you contribute to the Georgetown community. By asking this question, Georgetown wants to know the type of leader you are, how you collaborate with others, and what you care about the most.

To think about the activity you want to elaborate on, take a look at your activities list. A question like this should highlight one of the extracurriculars listed at or near the top of your activities list. In the activities section, you only had 150 characters, including spaces to describe what you did. But if it truly is an activity that has mattered, there’s far more to say. Reflect on what kind of leader you were while participating in the activity, if it’s an initiative that you started, why it is important to you, and the people you connected with. Half of a page is about 250 words, so really focus your answer on the impact rather than spending too much time describing what you did as part of the activity.

Long Essays

Compose two essays (approximately one page, single-spaced each) on the topics given below.

Essay 1 - All Applicants:

As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief essay, either personal or creative, which you feel best describes you.

While the previous question highlights what you’ve done and how you’ve made an impact, this question attempts to get more to the core of who you are. Alongside evaluating your academic achievements, Georgetown especially considers your “accomplishments outside of the classroom, demonstrated commitment to the broader community, and personal qualities such as resiliency, motivation and, ambition are certainly considered.” They want to see whether you possess qualities that can not only uniquely add to the Georgetown community but benefit from it as well. 

It can be difficult to figure out where to even begin brainstorming this question — you can probably name a few different points or facets of your life that you consider core to your personality and character. To write this essay, it would be wise to write about the same topic as the Common App personal statement . Since Georgetown admissions officers won’t be looking at your Common App, it’s absolutely okay to draw from your personal statement, as that essay is also about a story that is completely unique to you. This prompt provides you with a chance to tell a story that doesn’t apply to 99% of other students. Your response could also focus on a part of your background that has shaped you or it could highlight an experience that you believe distinguishes you from your peers. The prompt also says you can get creative with your essay, so don’t be afraid to think out of the box. Unlike the Common App, which isn’t school-specific, you can even add a sentence or two at the end of this prompt as you’re only submitting this response to Georgetown!

Essay 2 - according to your choice of college within Georgetown University

Applicants to georgetown college:.

What does it mean to you to be educated? How might Georgetown College help you achieve this aim? (Applicants to the Sciences and Mathematics or the Faculty of Languages and Linguistics should address their chosen course of study).

This question might sound intimidating at first, but if you break it down and read each part carefully, you’ll notice that this is a typical “why school” essay. Admissions officers use this question within the Georgetown essays 2021-2022 to determine your fit for not just the university, but Georgetown College itself. One of the biggest reasons colleges use supplemental essays is to make sure that the applicant and the school are a strong match for each other. By understanding what appeals to you about the college, and your choice of school within GU, as well as how you can benefit from its resources, the reader can understand whether you would thrive at this DC institution.

The most component part of any “why school” is to demonstrate that you’ve done research on the college. This is an academically-focused essay so make sure your response is centered around how an education at Georgetown College can hone your current skills and reach your goals. It’s absolutely essential that you mention resources that Georgetown specifically can offer you. What appeals to you about the Linguistics or Psychology major at GU specifically? Is there a particular professor whose research you have followed? Is there a course within your chosen department that fits perfectly with your dream career? Let the school know why you believe you’re the perfect fit — help them see it as well. 

Applicants to the School of Nursing and Health Studies:

Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care. Please specifically address your intended major (Health Care Management & Policy, Human Science, Global Health, or Nursing).

Georgetown knows that all students applying to the School of Nursing and Health Studies have a passion for medicine, want to help people, and imagine a career for themselves in healthcare. This question asks you to dig deeper. What makes your specific interest in the field unique? The school wants to see that you have done your research on Georgetown’s nursing school specifically and understand the resources that make the college unique. 

In this essay — without overlapping with the previous question about who you are — you have to expand on a story related to your love for medicine that only applies to you. Lots of students may have been inspired by their own or their relatives’ illnesses, while others might have realized their calling for the profession through an internship junior year. Since you have about 500 words you can write in detail about how your interest in medicine originated, the ways in which you explored the interest further both academically and through extracurriculars, and then delve more into how your choice of major at Georgetown can help you reach your aspirations. Why Health Care Management & Policy, and why at Georgetown? Make sure the reader understands that you understand the school’s offerings and resources and that you’re ready to make the most of them. 

Applicants to the Walsh School of Foreign Service:

Briefly discuss a current global issue, indicating why you consider it important and what you suggest should be done to deal with it.

The Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown is one of the best known schools in the world for studying international affairs. Admissions officers use this prompt to understand both your personality, character, and values. The School of Foreign Service wants to see where your priorities lie, what your goals are, and how an education in one of the school’s unique majors such as Regional and Comparative Studies and International Political Economy can help you get there. The school is looking for ambitious, open-minded, and curious individuals, and using this prompt among the Georgetown essays 2021-2022 can be an effective way of doing so.

If you’ve answered the 4th prompt among the Common App personal statement essays ( Describe a problem you’ve solved or a problem you’d like to solve.) , you can write a similar response here. Remember that while this question asks for a current global issue, you’re still writing supplemental essays for your application. This prompt is less about what problem you’ve chosen, and more about getting to know what’s important to you and how you react when faced with one. Moreover, since it doesn’t have to examine a problem the world has already solved, you can use this prompt to delve deeper into your academic interests, specifically within the Walsh School. Is your desire to end climate change connected with your selection of the college’s Science, Technology & International Affairs major? Carefully choose an issue that shows your personal stake, as well as conveys you as an individual aware of the world around them.

Applicants to the McDonough School of Business:

The McDonough School of Business is a national and global leader in providing graduates with essential ethical, analytical, financial and global perspectives. Please discuss your motivations for studying business at Georgetown.

As one of the top undergraduate business schools in the United States, the McDonough School wants to know how you hope to benefit from a business degree from Georgetown specifically. They want to know what you want from a business degree at this stage — how will you take advantage of Georgetown’s hands-on opportunities? What impact have you made on your community and what are you bringing to the classroom? How will you add to the diversity of your cohort?

The word limit allows you to go into details about discovering your love for not just business — but your specific interest in the discipline. Whether it’s marketing or accounting, ask yourself questions to start brainstorming exactly what motivates you. Was there one instance that catalyzed your passion and goals? How have you explored the subject of your interest since then? How has your curiosity about the topic grown? The majority of your essay should be dedicated to tying your interest in with what McDonough has to offer. Note which professor you can’t wait to learn from or a class that stands out to you on your way to becoming a future entrepreneur.

Further Tips for Writing the Georgetown Essays

  • Don’t underestimate the power of your extracurriculars - Admissions officers want to know what makes you tick outside the classroom. Don’t just shrug off the first essay and repeat information word for word from what you’ve already included in your activities list. They want to know about your perspective and identity. Your activities could have shifted your views in a way that you might not have even realized before sitting down to write the essay. And you won’t be able to analyze their impact properly if you don’t look at them from a more nuanced angle.
  • Research both the college of your choice and the university as a whole - While you definitely have to go in-depth to understand what makes the college of your choice within Georgetown special, it’s also essential that you understand what makes Georgetown unique. This means understanding its identity and values , researching its unique opportunities, and really knowing why you think you would be a good fit. The fit automatically shines through in your writing if you’ve worked to authentically connect your research to your interest in the school.

Georgetown University is a dream school for many students. Naturally, the competition is not easy. To help admissions officers understand what you can bring to campus and how the school can help you grow and thrive, take advantage of these prompts to explain what makes you unique. With the right amount of research, the extracurriculars and grades to back it up, and passion for your field of interest, you can give yourself a fair shot at this well-esteemed university. Good luck! 

Tags : georgetown essays 2021-2022 , georgetown essays , Georgetown University , applying to georgetown

Schedule a free consultation

to find out how we can help you get accepted.

Think you can get into a top-10 school? Take our chance-me calculator... if you dare. 🔥

Last updated March 22, 2024

Every piece we write is researched and vetted by a former admissions officer. Read about our mission to pull back the admissions curtain.

Blog > Essay Advice , Private University , Supplementals > How to Write the Georgetown Supplemental Essays

How to Write the Georgetown Supplemental Essays

Admissions officer reviewed by Ben Bousquet, M.Ed Former Vanderbilt University

Written by Kylie Kistner, MA Former Willamette University Admissions

Key Takeaway

You might remember from our How to Get into Georgetown post that Georgetown uses its own application, so you won’t be applying through Common App or Coalition.

Still, you’ll have a few different essays to write. All applicants respond to the first two prompts, and then you’ll respond to another prompt based on the school or college to which you’re applying.

Let’s take a look.

Prompts for All Applicants

Short essay (approximately one-half page, single-spaced).

You’ll be writing both of the following essays, no matter what your intended major is.

Briefly discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved.

To kick off your Georgetown supplementals, you’ll start with this extracurricular activities essay . Georgetown already gives you some guidance about which activity to pick. They direct you to write about the one in which you’ve been most involved. Now, “most involved” could look like a lot of different things: it could be the one you’ve done the longest, the one you’ve dedicated the most time to recently, or the one in which you’ve had the biggest impact. Because you have some freedom in how you interpret Georgetown’s directions, you should pick the activity that you’ve dedicated a great deal of time and effort to and that has had the most significance in your life.

As with any extracurricular activities essay, your goal is to write about your activity in a way that shows the extent of your involvement. When Georgetown asks you to write about the “significance to you” of your activity, you can discuss the activity’s personal significance, how it’s shaped your goals or future, or how it’s changed you as a result of the impact you’ve had.

Essay One (approximately one single-spaced page)

As georgetown is a diverse community, the admissions committee would like to know more about you in your own words. please submit a brief essay, either personal or creative, which you feel best describes you..

You’ve got a couple of options with this prompt. If you want, you can write something entirely new specifically for Georgetown. But since Georgetown isn’t on Common App, you can also consider re-purposing your Common App personal statement here. The 650-word length should be about one page single-spaced, but you may have to do a bit of revising.

A quick word of caution: Although the prompt says you can submit a creative essay, keep in mind that the goal of this essay should still be to reveal something personally meaningful about yourself to the admissions committee. Your essay can be creatively written, but it should still be about you. In other words, probably don’t submit a work of creative fiction.

School- and College-Specific Prompts

You’ll only be writing one of the following prompts. Choose the one that corresponds with the school or college you’re applying to. No matter which prompt you choose, make sure you do some thorough research about the school or college ahead of time.

Essay Two (approximately one single-spaced page)

Georgetown college: what does it mean to you to be educated how might georgetown college help you achieve this aim (applicants to the sciences and mathematics or the faculty of languages and linguistics should address their chosen course of study.).

In this creative take on a “why us” essay, Georgetown wants to know what you think it means to be educated and why Georgetown, specifically, is a good place to educate you. Strong responses to this question will be clear and direct yet creative. You should draw on specific features of Georgetown College that are appealing to you and related to your answer about what it means “to be educated.” Those features might include specific opportunities, coursework, College values, educational approaches, community beliefs, and more.

School of Health: Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care. Please specifically address your intended major (Global Health, Health Care Management & Policy, or Human Science).

If you’re applying to the School of Health, then this is the question you’ll be answering. You might write about an event that sparked your interest in health care, an activity you’ve been involved in that inspired you, or a health care topic that particularly fascinates you. Of course, don’t forget to also discuss why you’ve chosen your intended major specifically—at that point, it may also be a good idea to throw in a subtle nod or two to why Georgetown’s major is a good fit for you.

School of Nursing: Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care. Please specifically address your intended major Nursing.

This one’s similar to the previous one. You’ll want to write about what inspired you to be interested in health care, and you’ll want to focus on why you’ve decided to pursue nursing in particular. Were you inspired by someone, an event, or an academic interest you have? What kind of nursing are you interested in? Is there a specific aspect of nursing that appeals most to you? Is there anything specific about nursing at Georgetown that’s compelling? Answering these kinds of questions will help the admissions committee see that you’re a good fit for the nursing program.

Walsh School of Foreign Service: The Walsh School of Foreign Service was founded more than a century ago to prepare generations of leaders to solve global problems. What is motivating you to dedicate your undergraduate studies to a future in the service world?

This prompt's first sentence gives you a hint: Walsh prepares future “leaders to solve global problems.” Since it’s always good to show values alignment in supplementals, your answer could have something to do with leadership, problem-solving, or a global approach. The key in this kind of supplemental essay is to be specific. Write about particular problems you’re interested in solving, people you want to work with, aspects of the Walsh School that are compelling, or beliefs you have about foreign or public service.

McDonough School of Business: The McDonough School of Business is a national and global leader in providing graduates with essential ethical, analytical, financial and global perspectives. Please discuss your motivations for studying business at Georgetown.

There are all kinds of motivations people have for studying business. Whatever yours are, make sure they’re clear and specific. Try to avoid generalities like “I want to study business because I want to be an entrepreneur.” Dig a little deeper: what’s the how and why behind your motivations? Why are they significant to you? How will they help you impact the world around you? Finally, remember to address the last part of the question: why you want to study business at Georgetown specifically. This essay is a great place to incorporate some of the particular opportunities, coursework, faculty, research, etc. that has led you to apply to Georgetown in the first place.

Now hop on over to the Georgetown application if you’re ready to start writing! Or, if you need a little more guidance before jumping in, consider joining the Essay Academy , our comprehensive digital college essay course. ✏️

Liked that? Try this next.

post preview thumbnail

The Incredible Power of a Cohesive College Application

post preview thumbnail

How A Selective Admissions Office Reads 50k Applications In A Season

post preview thumbnail

How to Write Supplemental Essays that Will Impress Admissions Officers

post preview thumbnail

20 College Essay Examples (Graded by Former Admissions Officers)

"the only actually useful chance calculator i’ve seen—plus a crash course on the application review process.".

Irena Smith, Former Stanford Admissions Officer

We built the best admissions chancer in the world . How is it the best? It draws from our experience in top-10 admissions offices to show you how selective admissions actually works.

  • Share full article

Advertisement

Supported by

Five Takeaways From Nikole Hannah-Jones’s Essay on the ‘Colorblindness’ Trap

How a 50-year campaign has undermined the progress of the civil rights movement.

georgetown essay guide

By Nikole Hannah-Jones

Nikole Hannah-Jones is a staff writer at the magazine and the creator of The 1619 Project. She also teaches race and journalism at Howard University.

Last June, the Supreme Court ruled that affirmative action in college admissions was not constitutional. After the decision, much of the discussion was about its impact on the complexions of college campuses. But in an essay in The Times Magazine, I argue that we were missing the much bigger and more frightening story: that the death of affirmative action marks the culmination of a radical 50-year strategy to subvert the goal of colorblindness put forth by civil rights activists, by transforming it into a means of undermining racial justice efforts in a way that will threaten our multiracial democracy.

What do I mean by this? Here are the basic points of my essay:

The affirmative-action ruling could bring about sweeping changes across American society.

Conservatives are interpreting the court’s ruling broadly, and since last summer, they have used it to attack racial-justice programs outside the field of higher education. Since the decision, conservative groups have filed and threatened lawsuits against a range of programs that consider race, from diversity fellowships at law firms to maternal-health programs. One such group has even challenged the medical school of Howard University, one of the nation’s pre-eminent historically Black universities. Founded to educate people who had been enslaved, Howard’s mission has been to serve Black Americans who had for generations been systematically excluded from American higher education. These challenges to racial-justice programs will have a lasting impact on the nation’s ability to address the vast disparities that Black people experience.

Conservatives have co-opted the civil rights language of ‘colorblindness.’

In my essay, I demonstrate that these challenges to racial-justice programs often deploy the logic of “colorblindness,” the idea that the Constitution prohibits the use of race to distinguish citizens and that the goal of a diverse, democratic nation should be a society in which race does not determine outcomes for anyone. Civil rights leaders used the idea of colorblindness to challenge racial apartheid laws and policies, but over the last 50 years, conservatives have successfully co-opted both the rhetoric and the legal legacy of the civil rights era not to advance racial progress, but to stall it. And, I’d argue, reverse it.

Though the civil rights movement is celebrated and commemorated as a proud period in American history, it faced an immediate backlash. The progressive activists who advanced civil rights for Black Americans argued that in a society that used race against Black Americans for most of our history, colorblindness is a goal. They believed that achieving colorblindness requires race-conscious policies, such as affirmative action, that worked specifically to help Black people overcome their disadvantages in order to get to a point where race no longer hindered them. Conservatives, however, invoke the idea of colorblindness to make the case that race-conscious programs, even to help those whose race had been used against them for generations, are antithetical to the Constitution. In the affirmative-action decision, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., writing for the majority, embraced this idea of colorblindness, saying: “Eliminating racial discrimination means eliminating all of it.”

The Supreme Court’s decision undermines attempts to eliminate racial inequality that descendants of slavery suffer.

But mandating colorblindness in this way erases the fact that Black Americans still suffer inequality in every measurable aspect of American life — from poverty to access to quality neighborhoods and schools to health outcomes to wealth — and that this inequality stems from centuries of oppressive race-specific laws and policies. This way of thinking about colorblindness has reached its legal apotheosis on the Roberts court, where through rulings on schools and voting the Supreme Court has helped constitutionalize a colorblindness that leaves racial disparities intact while striking down efforts to ameliorate them.

These past decisions have culminated in Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard, which can be seen as the Supreme Court clearing the way to eliminate the last legal tools to try to level the playing field for people who descend from slavery.

Affirmative action should not simply be a tool for diversity but should alleviate the particular conditions of descendants of slavery.

Part of the issue, I argue, is that the purpose of affirmative action got muddled in the 1970s. It was originally designed to reduce the suffering and improve the material conditions of people whose ancestors had been enslaved in this country. But the Supreme Court’s decision in the 1978 Bakke case changed the legally permissible goals of affirmative action, turning it into a generalized diversity program. That has opened the door for conservatives to attack the program for focusing on superficial traits like skin color, rather than addressing affirmative action's original purpose, which was to provide redress for the disadvantages descendants of slavery experienced after generations of oppression and subordination.

Working toward racial justice is not just the moral thing to do, but it is also crucial to our democracy.

When this country finally abolished slavery, it was left with a fundamental question: How does a white-majority nation, which wielded race-conscious policies and laws to enslave and oppress Black people, create a society in which race no longer matters? After the short-lived period of Reconstruction, lawmakers intent on helping those who had been enslaved become full citizens passed a slate of race-conscious laws. Even then, right at the end of slavery, the idea that this nation owed something special to those who had suffered under the singular institution of slavery faced strident opposition, and efforts at redress were killed just 12 years later with Reconstruction’s end. Instead, during the nearly 100-year period known as Jim Crow, descendants of slavery were violently subjected to a dragnet of racist laws that kept them from most opportunities and also prevented America from becoming a true democracy. During the civil rights era, when Black Americans were finally assured full legal rights of citizenship, this question once again presented itself: In order to address the disadvantage Black Americans faced, do we ignore race to eliminate its power, or do we consciously use race to undo its harms? Affirmative action and other racial-justice programs were born of that era, but now, once again, we are in a period of retrenchment and backlash that threatens the stability of our nation. My essay argues that if we are to preserve our multiracial democracy, we must find a way to address our original sin.

Nikole Hannah-Jones is a domestic correspondent for The New York Times Magazine focusing on racial injustice. Her extensive reporting in both print and radio has earned a Pulitzer Prize, National Magazine Award, Peabody and a Polk Award. More about Nikole Hannah-Jones

What are your chances of acceptance?

Calculate for all schools, your chance of acceptance.

Duke University

Your chancing factors

Extracurriculars.

georgetown essay guide

4 Great Georgetown Essay Examples

What’s covered:, essay example 1 – special talents, essay example 2 – personal statement, essay example 3 – the meaning of being educated, essay example 4 – speech and debate, where to get feedback on your essay .

Georgetown is a prestigious university located right outside of Washington D.C. that is known for its great public policy and international relations programs. With so many eager applicants wanting to attend this highly-selective school, you need to have strong essays to stand out from the crowd. In this post, we’ll share real essays students have submitted to Georgetown, and share what they did well and how they could be made even better (Names and identifying information have been changed, but all other details are preserved).

Please note: Looking at examples of real essays students have submitted to colleges can be very beneficial to get inspiration for your essays. You should never copy or plagiarize from these examples when writing your own essays. Colleges can tell when an essay isn’t genuine and will not view students favorably if they plagiarized. 

Read our Georgetown essay breakdown to get a comprehensive overview of this year’s supplemental prompts.

Prompt: Please indicate any special talents or skills you possess. You should write in either paragraph or bulleted-list format. (200-250 words)

Bending down, I pluck a four-leaf clover from a sea of genetically identical Trifolium. After capturing this anomaly on film, I press it, adding it to my collection. Ever since I first discovered four-leaf clovers, I honed my observational skills until I could find them with ease. Now, I am a master of small details and the proud owner of 22 four-leaf clovers. 

My memory for special occasions is unrivaled. Within my brain, I categorize and store dates: birthdays, anniversaries, check-ins, etc. I take pride in remembering my friends’ and family’s important days and being there to celebrate or support, listen or laugh, or simply spend time with them. Attentiveness and thoughtfulness are at the foundation of who I am. 

When I saw the unicycle under the tree, I was elated yet apprehensive. All-day on Christmas, I practiced riding it: I waggled my arms as I sought my balance, caught myself each time I fell, and continued to stand up to try again. Through perseverance and determination, I eventually found my balance, and five months later, I could easily ride alongside my sister’s scooter through the park. 

My party trick is walking on my hands. With a beet-red face and dirty palms, I carefully fall out of my handstand and back into an upright position. I always giggle when I do so, observing the shocked, entertained faces of the people around me. My unusual talent facilitates joy and laughter, and inevitably, connection.

What the Essay Did Well

This essay is successful because of how random it is! When a prompt asks for a special talent or skill, many people might be tempted to write about some extracurricular they excel at or a characteristic they have like leadership or perseverance, but this student chose to share a collection of unrelated fun facts about themselves. We would never know about their collection of four-leaf clovers or how they walk on their hands from the rest of the application. This essay really takes advantage of the prompt to humanize the applicant and share the little details that make them unique.

Another thing this essay does well is combining the suggested structures. The disjointed paragraphs describing a new talent give the effect of a bulleted list, but each skill is contextualized in its own paragraph. They could have just written “ I can ride the unicycle” , but instead we learned about this student’s perseverance through their explanation of riding a unicycle.

Even if they chose to only write about one special talent, this student does a great job of drawing the reader into the moment. We are there, crouching down and looking into the sea of green clovers. We are there, watching them struggle to balance on the unicycle. We are there, hearing them giggle as they dust off their hands and stand rightside up. The inclusion of sensory details like these really brings the reader into the story, making it so much more enjoyable to read.

What Could Be Improved

Since each paragraph is completely unrelated to the others, this essay could benefit from a few transitions to make it clear there’s a jump from one skill to another. If the student wanted to keep the list-like feel, they could start each paragraph with a quick recap and then jump into the rest of the paragraph. For example, the first paragraph would start like “ An eye of four-leaf clovers.” , and then go into the paragraph. 

Prompt: As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief essay, either personal or creative, which you feel best describes you. (Approximately 1 page, single-spaced)

Faded dye. Loose threads. Peeling rank stripes. 

On the surface, my Brazilian Jiu Jitsu belts are a display of my martial arts progression. But in each worn belt there are stories of sweat and tears, triumph and loss, challenges and growth. Like the changing colors of a seasonal rank promotion, I myself have changed, adopting new skills with each belt added to my collection. These scraps of fabric are more than my prized possessions; they’re an album of my life’s most defining moments. 

Crisp white and too small, my first belt was worn by a girl who was eager to learn self-defense, but was anxious to try something new. Enraptured, I’d watch higher ranked students grapple, excitedly envisioning myself performing the same graceful Kosoto-gari throws and powerful rear-naked choke holds that I saw on the mats. However, expectations can be a harsh antithesis to reality: any visions of my future martial arts prowess crumbled upon encountering dive roll drills. 

Deceived by its simple, somersault-like appearance, I vaulted my crouched body with gusto, only to flop onto my side like an exhausted cat. No problem. I positioned myself for another attempt. The same “floppy-cat” predicament ensued. Again! This time I rolled into my teammate. Frustrated, I began to ask my coach for pointers, but stopped upon realizing I was holding up the drill line. Over and over, each effort yielded the same undesirable results. Shame coursed through my veins as I returned to the back of the line. 

Now, when I watched my classmates spar, I looked on with envy; it seemed like they were speeding towards a rank promotion while I was drowning in my own incompetence, marked to forever remain a white belt. This dismal attitude followed me until I met my training partner, Ann. She was a higher-ranked teammate and seasoned athlete, so I was flustered by the thought of her seeing me struggle. But when it came time to practice our dive rolls, I was surprised to see her fumble like me. Unlike me, Ann wasn’t one to struggle on her own: she shot her hand into the air, immediately getting our coach’s attention. With a patient smile, he walked us through the technique, occasionally allowing Ann to stop and check that I understood; within minutes, both of us could perform solid dive rolls. While this moment brought a surge of pride, it also opened my eyes to my biggest shortcoming – lacking the courage to advocate for my needs. 

Realizing this problem, I set on the path to correcting my mistakes. Whenever I struggled with a move, I made an effort to consult my coaches and teammates, working to build both my skills and rapport. Forging bonds with my teammates also allowed me to adopt moves from their grappling style, sparking an appreciation for the lessons learned from each training partner. With each week that went by, my progress became more noticeable. Where there were previously gaps in my technique and hesitation in my movements, I could now see my skills improving and my desire to speak up develop. No longer was my white belt crisp and new; it was now faded and grayish, hiding memories of difficult, yet rewarding matches in its stitching.

Ultimately, my biggest mistake was struggling by myself. While jiu jitsu is an individual sport, it’s not an isolated one. Ann, my coaches, and my teammates were more than my competitors; they were my best learning resources and closest supporters. 

Since wearing my first belt, I’ve learned to change my despairing attitude to one of openness and determination. Challenges will continue to come my way, whether they come in the form of a jiu jitsu opponent or a grueling exam. Only I can put in the work to achieve my desired outcomes, but I’ve come to see that I don’t have to face my difficulties alone. Now, I look to the future with anticipation for the next obstacle to overcome. Who knows? Perhaps a black belt awaits.

For a prompt that asked to get to know the applicant better, this is an amazing essay. We learn so much about this student from her response. We know one of her main passions is Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, we get to see her biggest weakness stand in the way of her success and then watch as she overcomes that, and we learn about how she approaches challenges both on and off the mat. 

How is this essay able to convey so much information while still being interesting to read? The author does an excellent job of placing us in the moment by showing us what is occurring. Right from the beginning, we see a little girl with a brand-new belt eagerly watching tumbles and choke holds. Then, rather than just telling us she struggled with dive rolls, she describes the process in detail and compares her failures to a “floppy-cat”. These depictions help bring the reader into the story and make it so much easier to envision what she went through. She also brings us into her mind, telling us about the shame and envy she felt when she originally struggled and how she now understands the importance of getting help.

Also notice how the essay doesn’t come to an end once she has her “aha” moment and her mindset towards approaching challenges shifts. She takes two paragraphs to bring us down from the climax of the essay and continues to show us how she took time to grow once she started asking for help. We aren’t led to believe she immediately became a jiu jitsu master after her one experience, which is a common mistake students make in their essays. It took months, if not years, for her to get to where she is now, so although her mindset shifted when she was younger, we get to see how her new perspective influenced her after that one example.   

One way this essay could be made even greater is by including an internal monologue to show us her emotions. This student already did an excellent job of showing us what happened externally, but when it comes to her feelings and thoughts at the moment, she tells us about them. 

Instead of telling us she was frustrated when she kept messing up the dive rolls, she could have written something like this: “With every failed attempt a little voice in my head nagged at me over and over. You’re never going to get it. You’re terrible at this. Stop holding up the line, it’s not going to work. ” These lines convey so much more emotion than just telling us she was frustrated. It helps us understand how she thinks, as well as make it more relatable because everyone knows what it’s like to feel hopeless and annoyed at yourself when you can’t do something correctly.

Incorporating more of her internal monologue would further elevate this essay which already does a good job of showing us what happened.

Peering out at my 7-year-old constituents, I scratch the stick-on beard around my chin and adjust my top hat. “Ten score and three years ago,” I begin, “Abraham Lincoln was born.”

Even as a child, my fascination with politics extended beyond schoolwork. From memorizing the names of politicians to voluntarily delivering presentations on presidents to my second-grade class, I immersed myself in studying government. But education extends beyond mere memorization; it allows people to directly engage with a diverse array of ideas and perspectives to achieve a deeper understanding of the human experience, and more broadly, the world. To be educated is not a singular state of being; rather, education is a continuous, evolving process. Education empowers individuals with the knowledge and the experience to catalyze societal change. The College of Arts & Sciences will marry instruction in political theory with opportunities for community engagement, which, as an aspiring constitutional lawyer, will enable me to break systemic barriers to civic involvement. 

At Georgetown, I am eager to major in Government, minoring in Justice and Peace Studies, to investigate the role of governing institutions in providing democratic access for underrepresented populations. Georgetown’s wealth of course offerings will allow me to simultaneously receive formal classroom instruction and wield this knowledge to serve underserved communities. Through courses like JUPS 280 “Gender, Immigration, & Social Justice,” I will deepen my understanding of disparities in democratic participation by exploring the intersectionality of race, gender, and socioeconomic status. Combining my passions for academia and volunteerism, I am also eager to engage in CBL courses like UNXD 130 “Social Action” to further my inquiry into the mechanisms driving successful social movements, on both local and global scales. Georgetown’s intimate classroom environment will expose me to the different perspectives of contemporary political theory and foster critical thought about world issues, including civic disengagement. 

Furthermore, pursuing undergraduate research will allow me to continue exploring the limited democratic participation of marginalized communities to understand the mechanisms that inhibit political engagement. Under Professor Nadia Brown, I will concentrate my research on possible legislation to break the barriers to civic engagement for African American women. Through the Royden B. Davis Fellowship, I will apply my research to implement sustainable programs in the D.C. metropolitan area to bridge disparities in voter participation among different racial groups. Georgetown’s array of research opportunities will enable me to connect with a community of diverse-minded changemakers, expanding my exposure to various dimensions of the human condition. Collaborating with my peers through research will not only kindle my insatiable curiosity, but also cultivate an analytical perspective when examining democratic institutions. 

Immersing myself in the college’s mission for cura personalis and social justice will allow me to employ my research and study of the theory of social action in the Georgetown community. Through the D.C. Schools project, for example, I will work to combat the language barrier by providing literacy services to elementary school students in D.C. Or, partaking in multidimensional dialogue with the passionate individuals of Educating Residents about Social Equality (ERASE) will enable me to interact with a community of people varied in culture, passion, and thought. I am aware of my limited perspective; engaging with Georgetown’s diverse student body will allow me to grow cognizant of the wide range of lived human experiences.

The College of Arts and Sciences’ dedication to uniting traditional classroom experience with experiential learning will enable me to venture into the world with the tools and mindset to spur democratic reform and cultivate a more accessible democracy for all individuals. As a Hoya, I will employ my global curiosity and inclusive nature to bolster civic engagement for underrepresented populations, both on campus and beyond. Georgetown will be a haven for my pursuits as a student and an activist, embodying engagement with diverse individuals and ideas to generate social reform.

This prompt is very specific. It’s not asking you to “describe a time” or “reflect on an instance.” It is concrete: admissions officers want answers. When they finish your essay, they should be able to say both:

  • what it means to you to be educated, and
  • how Georgetown will help you become educated.

This student does a great job of answering these questions, and, more specifically, of answering these questions at the right point in their essay . Great points can be difficult to understand if they’re presented in a disorganized way, but this essay’s strong structure ensures the writer’s ideas come across clearly.

First, they provide readers with a goofy image from their childhood, which immediately makes us interested in their story. But they wisely don’t spend too much time on the anecdote, and instead transition to explicitly answering the prompt’s first question: 

“To be educated is not a singular state of being; rather, education is a continuous, evolving process. Education empowers individuals with the knowledge and the experience to catalyze societal change.” 

The student then dives straight into a discussion of the specific resources at Georgetown that will immerse them in this “continuous, evolving process,” including a minor, courses, a professor, and a variety of extracurriculars. 

Seeing as the second half of this prompt is essentially a “Why This College?” prompt, this specificity is crucial, as it shows admissions officers that the student has spent real time thinking about how they would contribute to their school, and they aren’t just applying for superficial reasons related to location or prestige.

What Could Be Improved 

Most of the areas of improvement for this essay involve style and flow. For example, the student uses very long sentences throughout this essay. While those sentences are grammatically sound, constantly having to wade through all those words makes for a less enjoyable reading experience. 

Relatedly, one of the strange realities of college essays is that, while you spend many hours writing and revising your essays, admissions officers have no choice but to read them extremely quickly, because they have so many to get through. That means you want your points to be as easy to digest as possible, and long sentences force your reader to expend more energy tying various threads together.

For example, take the sentence:

“Combining my passions for academia and volunteerism, I am also eager to engage in CBL courses like UNXD 130 ‘Social Action’ to further my inquiry into the mechanisms driving successful social movements, on both local and global scales.”

This sentence goes from two of the student’s passions, to a course at Georgetown, to one of their academic goals. All this jumping around means two things. First, the points don’t get much individual attention, which means the student’s personality gets a little lost. And second, the student needs to spend extra words tying distinct ideas together. A more productive use of words might look something like:

“Ever since I did my first beach cleanup with my dad in 2010, I have had a passion for volunteerism. That project, and most of the others I’ve been involved in over the years, have been geared towards improving my local community. While rewarding, I feel ready to learn more about how to be an activist on a broader scale, through CBL courses like UNXD 130 ‘Social Action.’”

The same point about length applies to paragraphs, as longer paragraphs can be more difficult to follow, and thus your reader is more likely to get lost. If you keep the focus of each paragraph narrow (e.g., each paragraph is about a different value, a different childhood experience, or a different issue within ‘voting rights’), your reader can move through your ideas more efficiently.

For example, at the point in the essay where the “Combining my passions” sentence appears, the writer is pivoting from talking about their interest in government to their interest in activism. Regardless of whether their original sentence or our revised one is used, the student’s progression of ideas would be easier to follow if there was a paragraph break just before, as each paragraph would then be focused on just one thing.

Finally, to expand on a point made above about the student’s personality getting lost at points, there are numerous places in this essay where the student’s writing feels stilted and brochure-like. Having a strong personal voice in your college essays is crucial, as that’s a big way admissions officers can become familiar with your personality. After all, it is you who they are considering admitting to their school. By reciting facts from the course catalog, you aren’t telling them anything they don’t already know.

If you’re worried your essay might not be personal enough, read each sentence, then ask yourself “Why is this point important to me?” Then, try to incorporate that answer into your writing, if it’s not already there.

For example, in this essay, the student writes the following sentences about voting access:

  • “I am eager to major in Government, minoring in Justice and Peace Studies, to investigate the role of governing institutions in providing democratic access for underrepresented populations.”
  • “Through courses like JUPS 280 ‘Gender, Immigration, & Social Justice,” I will deepen my understanding of disparities in democratic participation by exploring the intersectionality of race, gender, and socioeconomic status.”
  • “Through the Royden B. Davis Fellowship, I will apply my research to implement sustainable programs in the D.C. metropolitan area to bridge disparities in voter participation among different racial groups.”

While they make it clear that voting access is important to them, they do not make it personal. They do not tell us why it is important to them, and thus this student doesn’t distinguish themselves from any other applicant who’s passionate about voting access. To fix this problem, the student could write:

“As a young history buff, I was excited to vote from the second I learned what voting was. I imagined the big booths, volunteers with American flag paraphernalia, and ‘I Voted’ stickers left and right. When I got to the voting center, however, I was greeted by a line down the block of women with crying babies, kids late for school complaining about the wait, and disabled individuals resting on curbs. It was devastating to see our communities struggling so hard for their basic rights. Through educating our generation, I think things will change in the future. I am excited to take courses like JUPS ‘Gender, Immigration, & Social Justice’ so that I can understand how disparities in democratic participation come to be and can be better equipped to address them in the future.”

“The bedrock of sustainable democracy is widespread participation,” my voice echoes throughout the room. “By lowering the age to vote, we ensure the voices of American youth are heard in our government.”

Joining my school’s speech and debate program was a natural extension of my passion for global affairs. Engaging in U.S. Extemporaneous Speaking, I was exposed to the breadth of issues facing humanity, from the immorality of lethal autonomous weapons to the barriers to youth civic engagement. By immersing myself in these global questions, public speaking sustains my unrelenting curiosity about the mutli-dimensional human experience.

Beyond my exposure to these global issues, speech and debate sparked conversation with a passionate group of diverse-minded individuals. From spending hours analyzing each other’s speeches to cheering our teammates on in the adrenaline rush of competition, we bonded over our shared zest for speaking. Heated discussions often emerged: “If young people aren’t mature, why are they allowed to drive or get a job?” one teammate asks; “Yet they would still vote for Kanye for president,” another chimes in. I thrived in our disagreement, paving the way for collaboration and growth.

Over the past four years, I’ve grown up with this team. Sifting through photos, my coach finds one of me at my first competition, dressed in a tiny gray blazer and a maroon button-down. My forehead was plastered with wrinkles, eyes paralyzed with fear. In truth, speech and debate invigorated me unlike anything else. In this environment, my voice is imbued with a mixture of passion, determination, and excitement. Discussing these global issues, public speaking is a platform for my emotions, thoughts, and passions.    

Now, as Captain, I watch as ten freshmen note my every hand gesture and vocal inflection. I am eager to witness their eyes twinkle as they speak, eloquently and effortlessly.

This “Extracurricular Essay” has an outstanding structure. It is extremely easy to follow, as each paragraph has a clear, singular focus. First, we learn how speech and debate expanded this student’s awareness of global issues. Then we learn how this activity taught them that disagreement is helpful for growth. Finally, we learn how it helped them come into themself socially. Each paragraph helps the reader gain a deeper understanding of the student, to create a beautiful arc where we are rooting for the student, even though we already know they succeeded.

Additionally, the student uses a conversational yet reflective voice that draws readers in and makes us feel like we’re an old friend of theirs, instead of a total stranger. This connection is achieved through, to give one example, the “heated discussions” about humorous topics they had with their speech and debate teammates. 

Another place where we feel close to the writer is in their description of the photo from their first competition. Their honest, open reflection on how they felt in that moment simultaneously shows humility and how far they’ve come since. That balance, which is really the core of strong college essays, is incredibly difficult to strike, and here this student does so masterfully.

Lastly, the student does a flawless job of subtly pointing out their leadership experience in the last paragraph. They don’t appear to be boasting, but rather position themself as caring about the younger students and invested in the future of this club which has meant so much to them, qualities which admissions officers value highly.

This essay is clear, concise, and compelling, and thus doesn’t have much room for improvement. That said, we all get writer’s block sometimes, or struggle to execute an idea in the way we envisioned. So, with any example essay, it can be useful to think about alternative approaches someone could take. 

Specifically, if you struggle with structure, you might want to approach this kind of extracurricular essay prompt with a narrow, specific focus in mind, rather than covering awareness of global issues, the development of a particular skill, and your own personal growth in the same essay, as this student does. For example, you might choose to highlight just one of the following things:

  • Leadership experience
  • Interpersonal connections
  • Self-growth
  • Academic exploration

It is always better to be more focused than less when writing your college essays. If you are worried that you do not have the finesse to discuss a broad range of ideas in a short amount of space, opt to discuss one idea in a deep and meaningful way.

Want feedback like this on your Georgetown essay before you submit? We offer expert essay review by advisors who have helped students get into their dream schools. You can book a review with an expert to receive notes on your topic, grammar, and essay structure to make your essay stand out to admissions officers.

Haven’t started writing your essay yet? Advisors on CollegeVine also offer expert college counseling packages . You can purchase a package to get one-on-one guidance on any aspect of the college application process, including brainstorming and writing essays.

Related CollegeVine Blog Posts

georgetown essay guide

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write the Georgetown Supplemental Essays: Examples + Guide 2023/2024

    Create an outline based on either Approach One, Approach Two (recommended), or Approach 3 (as explained in our "Why us?" guide). Georgetown College essay example. Example: In history class, the dialogue surrounding the Civil Rights Movement often presents African Americans as a unified group fighting to resist racist policies.

  2. How to Write the Georgetown University Essays 2023-2024

    All Applicants. Prompt 1: Briefly discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved. ( 1/2 page, single-spaced) Prompt 2: As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words.

  3. 2023-24 Georgetown University Essay Prompt Guide

    Georgetown 2023-24 Application Essay Question Explanations. The Requirements: 1 essay of 250 words; 1 half-page essay; 2 page-long essays Supplemental Essay Type(s): Activity, Why, Diversity Prompt 1: Please elaborate on any special talents or skills you would like to highlight.(250 words) This prompt may come first on the list, but we think you should save it for last!

  4. A Guide to the Georgetown Essays 2023-2024

    A Guide to the Georgetown Essays 2023-2024. Georgetown University continues to hold its place as one of the country's top universities. Securing admission to this esteemed school is no easy feat, as Georgetown boasts an acceptance rate of just 12%. Whether you aspire to join their renowned undergraduate business program or envision yourself ...

  5. Georgetown Supplemental Essays

    Georgetown Essay Guide Quick Facts: Georgetown acceptance rate: 12%— U.S. News ranks Georgetown as a highly competitive school. Requirements for the Georgetown supplemental essays : 1 half-page (~250 word) essay. 1 full-page (~500 word) essay. 1 school-specific essay (~500 words)

  6. How to Write the Georgetown Essay Supplements 2021-2022

    Prompt 1: Briefly discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved. (1/2 page, single-spaced, or approximately 300-400 words depending on font size) Prompt 2: As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words.

  7. Sample Essays

    Sample Essays. The breadth of Georgetown's core curriculum means that students are required to write for a wide variety of academic disciplines. Below, we provide some student samples that exhibit the key features the most popular genres. When reading through these essays, we recommend paying attention to their . 1.

  8. How to Write the Georgetown Supplemental Essays: Expert Tips and Prompts

    How to Write the Georgetown Supplemental Essay #4 + Analysis and Tips. Analysis of Prompt #4: Georgetown College's essay prompt focuses on your encounters with new concepts and modes of inquiry. Describe something that changed your thinking, and provide examples of your field of interest. Describe a New Experience: Choose an event, class, book ...

  9. The Ultimate Guide to Applying to Georgetown

    Georgetown's two required essays are: Essay 1: Briefly discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved. (Half page, single-spaced) Essay 2: As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief essay ...

  10. Georgetown University's 2023-24 Essay Prompts

    Words. All students applying to Georgetown will have to answer 3 essay prompts: two general essays and one school-specific essay. Option 1. Please elaborate on any special talents or skills you would like to highlight. Option 2.

  11. The Ultimate Guide to 2022-23 Georgetown Essays

    Description. Join college consultant Alexander Oddo and CollegeVine co-founder Vinay Bhaskara to learn how to write effective, compelling, and admission worthy responses to the 2022-2023 Georgetown essays! This stream will be interactive so be sure to drop all your questions in the chat below. Advisor.

  12. Georgetown Essay

    In this Georgetown Essay guide, we've gone over the required Georgetown essay prompts that all applicants will need to complete. If you're considering how to get into Georgetown, know that academics and the Georgetown supplemental essays play an important role in the admissions process. No matter your approach, the best way to get ahead and ...

  13. 3 Top Tips for Writing Exceptional Georgetown Essays

    This guide will walk you through the Georgetown essays, giving you a look into the expectations and thought process behind each of the essay prompts. Feature Image: Patrickneil/Wikimedia Commons . What Should You Know About the Georgetown Essay Prompts? Georgetown doesn't use the Common or Coalition Application. Instead, you'll be filling out ...

  14. Georgetown Supplemental Essays 2023-24

    Your essays should showcase your exceptional writing ability and reveal more about who you are as an individual. Below are Georgetown's essay prompts for the 2023-24 admissions cycle along with tips about how to address each one. Georgetown Supplemental Essays - Prompt 1. Indicate any special talents or skills you possess.

  15. 4 Tips for Writing the Georgetown Supplemental Essays

    This article will review tips on how to craft stellar essays and how to apply this advice to your writing. 1. Be Concise. One of Georgetown's supplemental prompts has a half-page word limit, which translates to about 200 words, while the other prompt has a one-page, or 350 word, limit. Since these essays are short, you will want to be concise ...

  16. How to Respond to the 2023/2024 Georgetown Supplemental Essay Prompts

    Keep reading our guide to learn more about how to best respond to the Georgetown supplemental essays. Breaking down the Georgetown supplemental essays. Georgetown requires all applicants to respond to three prompts. Here is a breakdown of the word count for the Georgetown supplemental essays: Short Essay - approximately ½ page, single spaced ...

  17. 2020-21 Georgetown University Essay Prompt Guide

    Georgetown 2020-21 Application Essay Question Explanations. The Requirements: 1 essay of 250 words; 1 half-page essay; 2 page-long essays. Supplemental Essay Type(s): Activity, Why. Prompt 1: Indicate any special talents or skills you possess. (250 words) This prompt may come first on the list, but we think you should save it for last!

  18. 2023-2024 Georgetown University Supplemental Essay Prompts

    Essays For All Georgetown Applicants. All Georgetown applicants must answer the following three essay prompts. 1. Please elaborate on any special talents or skills you would like to highlight (250 words). Applicants should focus on a skill related to the hook they've showcased in the activities section of their Georgetown application.

  19. A Guide to the Georgetown Essays 2021-2022

    Prompts for the Georgetown Essays 2021-2022 Short Essay. Indicate any special talents or skills you possess (250 words). If you are really proud of one of your abilities, now is the time to show it. Georgetown wants students who bring a variety of backgrounds and interests, this essay is a good opportunity to show a new side of yourself.

  20. How to Write Georgetown's Personal or Creative Essay

    Read CollegeVine's Guide to Georgetown's Essays or these Examples of Great Georgetown Essays. What You Can Write About for Georgetown's Personal Essay This is an open-ended, personal essay prompt. As such, applicants should use this essay to describe who they are. Because Georgetown has a standalone application, this is a great place to ...

  21. How to Write the Georgetown Supplemental Essays

    You've got a couple of options with this prompt. If you want, you can write something entirely new specifically for Georgetown. But since Georgetown isn't on Common App, you can also consider re-purposing your Common App personal statement here. The 650-word length should be about one page single-spaced, but you may have to do a bit of ...

  22. How to Write the Georgetown Supplement Essays 2020-2021

    Briefly (approximately one-half page, single-spaced) discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved. Georgetown doesn't have word limits, and our take on these "length" requirements are relatively loose. This should be between ½-¾ of a page, single-spaced.

  23. 5 Takeaways From Nikole Hannah-Jones's Essay on 'Colorblindness' and

    Five Takeaways From Nikole Hannah-Jones's Essay on the 'Colorblindness' Trap. How a 50-year campaign has undermined the progress of the civil rights movement. Share full article.

  24. 4 Great Georgetown Essay Examples

    Essay Example 1 - Special Talents. Essay Example 2 - Personal Statement. Essay Example 3 - The Meaning of Being Educated. Essay Example 4 - Speech and Debate. Where to Get Feedback on Your Essay. Georgetown is a prestigious university located right outside of Washington D.C. that is known for its great public policy and international ...