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the great migration project multimedia presentation edgenuity

The Great Migration

Writing Workshop: The Great Migration

the great migration project multimedia presentation edgenuity

World War 1 and the Interwar Years

( U1.LS.9) Unit Test

the great migration project multimedia presentation edgenuity

World War II

Unit Test: Multimedia Presentation on WWII

the great migration project multimedia presentation edgenuity

The Cold War

Unit Test: Writing Workshop

the great migration project multimedia presentation edgenuity

Civil Rights and Liberties

(U4.LS.5) Unit Test: Project

the great migration project multimedia presentation edgenuity

Contemporary Nation

(U4.LS.5) Unit Test: Short Writing

the great migration project multimedia presentation edgenuity

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Critical Acclaim for the Great Migration Study Project

“The outstanding contribution made by Anderson in  The Great Migration Begins  is the painstaking analysis of the evidence found for each individual. Carefully weighing the data accumulated in the last century, he has uncovered inconsistencies and provided new insights, as well as confirming previous accounts. This extraordinary reference book will quickly become the first book examined in a scholarly study of the early colonial period.” Marsha Hoffman Rising, CG, CGL, FASG “Historians will welcome the initial publication of The Great Migration Study Project as the authoritative reference work on the founders and first families of New England. Noted for editorial thoroughness and candor, as well as for scholarly scrupulosity, these volumes correct and wholly supersede all previous genealogical compilations. I look forward eagerly to the completion of this invaluable series.” Michael McGiffert, Editor,  William and Mary Quarterly "These volumes, as will future additions, offer a critical summary of a vast body of genealogical works and also act as a valuable guide to the published and unpublished sources on early New England. . . A section at the end of each sketch entitled "Comments" addresses matters that do not fit into the usual format. These comments are invariably interesting, in part because of Anderson’s sense of humor and skill as a writer. . .This reference work fulfills a far broader mission than the purely genealogical. It is a must-buy for libraries and is highly recommended for teachers. I urge my colleagues in colonial history to take a peek, but be warned: the sketches are addictive." Gloria L. Main, University of Colorado at Boulder,  The William and Mary Quarterly , October 1997 "It is no exaggeration to say that this series continues to be the most important work on the earliest New England immigrants since James Savage wrote his Genealogical Dictionary more than one hundred and forty years ago." Joseph C. Anderson II,  Maine Genealogist , May 2003   “New England genealogy and history have acquired a new foundation with the publication of The Great Migration Begins. Only a few times in a generation does a work of this breadth and quality appear. The Great Migration Begins clearly ranks among the greatest in American genealogy.” Henry B. Hoff, Editor,  The New England Historical and Genealogical Register “As one who has spent thirty years tracing the German Palatine immigrants to colonial America in the 18th century, I certainly can appreciate the hard work, long hours, deep thought, and dedication that have gone into Robert Charles Anderson’s monumental study  The Great Migration Begins . Bob’s unsurpassed genealogical skills and years of expertise in chronicling these 17th century New Englanders have served him well in this remarkable project. He has shown, yet again, that in order to really find out about one family — all the families of a specific community should be thoroughly investigated. By immersing himself in their lives and times and carefully evaluating the myriad of historical sources that document their intriguing story, Bob Anderson has made these colonists come alive and created a magnificent work against which all future efforts of this kind surely will be measured.” Hank Z Jones, Jr., FASG "The highest tests of proof and probability are applied. It is an awesome and humbling performance. . . Publication of The Great Migration Begins is a milestone for colonial, regional and family historians. . . Henceforward "Anderson" will replace "Savage" as the authority of first resort, a new "marvel of the age" for a new century." Roger Thompson, University of East Anglia, Norwich "This work supersedes that of James Savage and Charles Pope. . . As the authoritative source on early New Englanders, Anderson has saved future researchers countless hours of work in dozens – if not scores – of genealogical and other materials. Just about everything they need is here. Painstakingly researched in British and American archives and thoroughly documented, the volumes are also judicious in their conclusions. . . The Great Migration Begins promises to become an indispensable tool for historians as well as genealogists." Virginia DeJohn Anderson, The New England Quarterly, June 1997 "Anderson’s landmark work is recognized as a core reference tool that updates and supersedes previous books on Colonial New England genealogy." Library Journal, April 1, 1999 “Is there anyone who knows the 20,000 men, women, and children who arrived in New England from 1620 to 1640 better than Robert Charles Anderson? One can almost imagine him walking down the street in Roxbury, Plymouth, or Salem in 1635 and greeting them all by name: “Good day, Goody Chilton.” “Good day, Master Robert.” What an inestimable service he has done any researcher by combining all the available sources, be they passenger lists, town records, land grants, or letters and diaries. No one could be more demanding or precise in his methods and evaluation of the evidence, nor more persevering and energetic in the face of such an enormous project. The perfect man for the job.” John W. Tyler, Editor of Publications, Colonial Society of Massachusetts

the great migration project multimedia presentation edgenuity

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The Great Migration

By: History.com Editors

Updated: December 15, 2023 | Original: March 4, 2010

An African American family on the move during the latter half of the Great Migration, circa the 1960s.

The Great Migration was the relocation of more than 6 million Black Americans from the rural South to the cities of the North, Midwest and West from about 1916 to 1970. Driven from their homes by unsatisfactory economic opportunities and harsh segregationist laws, many Black Americans headed north, where they took advantage of the need for industrial workers that arose during the First World War. During the Great Migration, Black people began to build a new place for themselves in public life, actively confronting racial prejudice as well as economic, political and social challenges to create a Black urban culture that would exert enormous influence in the decades to come.

What Caused the Great Migration?

After the Civil War and the Reconstruction era, racial inequality persisted across the South during the 1870s, and the segregationist policies known as " Jim Crow " soon became the law of the land.

Black Southerners were still forced to make their living working the land due to Black codes and the sharecropping system, which offered little in the way of economic opportunity, especially after crop damage resulting from a regional boll weevil infestation in the 1890s and early 1900s.

And while the Ku Klux Klan had been officially dissolved in 1869, the KKK continued underground after that, and intimidation, violence and lynching of Black southerners were not uncommon practices in the Jim Crow South.

Did you know? Around 1916, when the Great Migration began, a factory wage in the urban North was typically three times more than what Black people could expect to make working the land in the rural South.

The Great Migration Begins

When World War I broke out in Europe in 1914, industrialized urban areas in the North, Midwest and West faced a shortage of industrial laborers, as the war put an end to the steady tide of European immigration to the United States.

With war production kicking into high gear, recruiters enticed Black Americans to come north, to the dismay of white Southerners. Black newspapers—particularly the widely read Chicago Defender —published advertisements touting the opportunities available in the cities of the North and West, along with first-person accounts of success.

Life for Migrants in the City

By the end of 1919, some scholars estimate that 1 million Black people had left the South, usually traveling by train, boat or bus; a smaller number had automobiles or even horse-drawn carts.

In the decade between 1910 and 1920, the Black population of major Northern cities grew by large percentages, including New York City (66 percent), Chicago (148 percent), Philadelphia (500 percent) and Detroit (611 percent).

Many new arrivals found jobs in factories, slaughterhouses and foundries, where working conditions were arduous and sometimes dangerous. Female migrants had a harder time finding work, spurring heated competition for domestic labor positions.

Aside from competition for employment, there was also competition for living space in increasingly crowded cities. While segregation was not legalized in the North (as it was in the South), racism and prejudice were nonetheless widespread.

After the U.S. Supreme Court declared racially based housing ordinances unconstitutional in 1917, some residential neighborhoods enacted covenants requiring white property owners to agree not to sell to Black people; these would remain legal until the Court struck them down in 1948.

Rising rents in segregated areas, plus a resurgence of KKK activity after 1915, worsened Black and white relations across the country. The summer of 1919 began the greatest period of interracial strife in U.S. history at that time, including a disturbing wave of race riots.

The most serious was the Chicago Race Riot of 1919 —it lasted 13 days and left 38 people dead, 537 injured and 1,000 Black families without homes.

Impact of the Great Migration

As a result of housing tensions, many Black residents ended up creating their own cities within big cities, fostering the growth of a new, urban, Black culture. The most prominent example was Harlem in New York City, a formerly all-white neighborhood that by the 1920s housed some 200,000 Black people.

The Black experience during the Great Migration became an important theme in the artistic movement known first as the New Negro Movement and later as the Harlem Renaissance , which would have an enormous impact on the culture of the era.

The Great Migration also began a new era of increasing political activism among Black Americans, who after being disenfranchised in the South found a new place for themselves in public life in the cities of the North and West. The civil rights movement directly benefited from this activism.

Black migration slowed considerably in the 1930s, when the country sank into the Great Depression , but picked up again with the coming of World War II and the need for wartime production. But returning Black soldiers found that the GI Bill didn’t always promise the same postwar benefits for all.

By the 1970s, when the Great Migration ended, its demographic impact was unmistakable: Whereas in 1900, nine out of every 10 Black Americans lived in the South, and three out of every four lived on farms, by 1970 the South was home to only half of the country’s Black population, with only 20 percent living in the region’s rural areas. The Great Migration was famously captured in Isabel Wilkerson’s The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America ’ s Great Migration .

The Great Migration (1910-1970). National Archives . The Long-Lasting Legacy of the Great Migration. Smithsonian Magazine . Great Migration: The African-American Exodus North. NPR: Fresh Air .

the great migration project multimedia presentation edgenuity

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The Great Migration

the great migration project multimedia presentation edgenuity

“ The Great Migration is a multimedia project for National Geographic and Canadian national current affairs magazine Maclean’s . It tells the story of sockeye salmon, which migrate hundreds—if not thousands—of miles upriver from the ocean against the current in order to return to the place of their birth four years earlier. Upon arriving, they mate and die, but their bodies rejuvenate the forests and rivers, playing an important role in the local ecosystems. During the last decade, their numbers have both dipped to near-collapse levels and swelled to near-record levels, and one of the largest environmental disasters in Canadian history dumped mining effluent into the salmon habitats. This project raised awareness of these threats facing salmon habitats and the incredible phenomenon of their migration and lifecycle.”

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The Great Migration: A City Transformed (1916-1930)

Ancestral Correspondence, Lonnie Graham, film still.

Scribe Video Center will explore the history and impact of the Great Migration (1916–30) on Philadelphia, when blacks fled the South for economic opportunities in the Northern states, giving rise to new African-American neighborhoods. A body of oral histories will serve as the core inspiration for this multimedia project, told by Philadelphia residents who experienced the Great Migration firsthand. Selected media artists will create site-specific installations, interactive games, and audio tours on the subject, using material from these archival interviews and input from local community groups, for public debut in 2016, the Great Migration's centennial. The project will challenge participants and audiences to consider the compelling and transformative history that led to huge shifts in the culture and makeup of Philadelphia.

Sonic Migration by Mendi and Keith Obadike. Photo by Carlton Jones.

The Great Migration: A City Transformed (1916-30)

Apr 15–Jun 15, 2016 Scribe Video Center, 4212 Chestnut Street, 3rd Floor, Philadelphia

Interview with Freehaven Masjid in Lawnside, NJ. Photo by Diana Soukhaphonh, courtesy of Scribe Video Center.

Questions of Practice: Louis Massiah on Technology and Storytelling

Scribe Video Center

Scribe Video Center

Barbara Earl Thomas, A Joyful Noise, 2022, paper cut with hand-printed color. Photo by Spike Mafford / Zocalo Studios, courtesy of Claire Oliver Gallery, New York, and the artist. 

Pew Fellow James Allister Sprang on Creating Installations with “Spatial Sound” 

Ahn Sekwon, Lights of Wolgok-dong, 2005, digital C-print, 70.8" x 94.5". Photo courtesy of the artist.

Fellow to Fellow: Adebunmi Gbadebo and Odili Donald Odita on Meaning in Materiality 

The Barnes Foundation, Returning to Before, performed as part of William Edmondson: A Monumental Vision exhibition, choreographed by Brendan Fernandes. Photo by Daniel Jackson for Embassy: Interactive.

IMAGES

  1. PPT

    the great migration project multimedia presentation edgenuity

  2. The Great Migration: PowerPoint and Student Infographic Notes by

    the great migration project multimedia presentation edgenuity

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    the great migration project multimedia presentation edgenuity

  4. The Great Migration Project Multimedia Presentation.pptx

    the great migration project multimedia presentation edgenuity

  5. The Great Migration: PowerPoint and Student Infographic Notes by

    the great migration project multimedia presentation edgenuity

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VIDEO

  1. Big changes coming to the 'Greatest Show on Earth'

  2. Paragress Feature Presentation (2009) In G-Major (My Version)

  3. "Migration" Trailer

  4. The second great migration

  5. Great Migration Lesson

  6. THE GREAT MIGRATION CHRONICLES,MARA RIVER 2023

COMMENTS

  1. The Great Migration.pptx

    The Great Migration Project: Multimedia Presentation By: Destiny Corona People who made important contributions to the Harlem Renaissance • Langston Hughes • Zora Neale Hurston • Countee Cullen • Louis Armstrong • Paul Robeson • Josephine Baker • Aaron Douglas • Marcus Garvey

  2. PDF Warm-Up The Great Migration

    Answer. (Sample answer) The Great Migration was the movement of African. Americans to Northern cities in the 1910s and 1920s. Big cities such. as Chicago and New York City grew. Named after a neighborhood in. New York City, the Harlem Renaissance was an explosion of African. American culture in the 1920s and 1930s.

  3. Great_Migration

    The Great Migration is a term used to describe the mass migration of African Americans from the southern United States to the industrial centers of the Northeast and Midwest between the 1910s and 1960s.. This event is shown by one of the most famous African American painters of the 20 th century, Jacob Lawrence. Lawrence's Migration Series tells the story of the Great Migration.

  4. The Great Migration Study Project

    In 1990 the Great Migration Study Project commenced publication of the quarterly Great Migration Newsletter, which ran for 25 volumes, ceasing publication at the end of 2016. Each issue of the Newsletter includes as its centerpiece a lengthy Focus article, which examines closely one of the early New England towns or an important set of early ...

  5. PDF The Great Migration

    Jesse Owens. The Great Migration was one of the largest movements of people in United States history. It lasted from 1910 through the late 1960s or early 1970s. Approximately six million African American people moved from the southern portion of the United States to northern, western, and midwestern states to find better opportunities for ...

  6. HHSO AZ-US History B

    This site will help you better understand your Edgenuity lessons. ... US/AZ History B. The Great Migration. Writing Workshop: The Great Migration. World War 1 and the Interwar Years ( U1.LS.9) Unit Test. World War II. Unit Test: Multimedia Presentation on WWII. The Cold War. Unit Test: Writing Workshop. Civil Rights and Liberties (U4.LS.5) Unit ...

  7. PDF Warm-Up Creating a Multimedia Presentation

    media , such as photographs, music, and video. Thinking about Unity. In a multimedia presentation, you use visuals to present ideas. For example, an image of two trees is a. of unity. symbol. 3. Developing Ideas for a Presentation.

  8. Critical Acclaim for the Great Migration Study Project

    Joseph C. Anderson II, Maine Genealogist, May 2003. "New England genealogy and history have acquired a new foundation with the publication of The Great Migration Begins. Only a few times in a generation does a work of this breadth and quality appear. The Great Migration Begins clearly ranks among the greatest in American genealogy.".

  9. Great Migration: Definition, Causes & Impact

    The Great Migration was the movement of more than 6 million Black Americans from the South to the cities of the North, Midwest and West from about 1916 to 1970.

  10. The Great Migration

    The Great Migration. This is the story of The Great Migration. That mass movement of 6 million African Americans out of the rural Southern United States to the urban Northeast, Midwest, and West occurred between 1916 and 1970. Why did they leave? To escape crushing poverty and racial persecution. " They left as though they were fleeing some ...

  11. PowerPoint Presentation

    PowerPoint Presentation - The Great Migration. This page uses frames, but your browser doesn't support them.

  12. The Great Migration

    "The Great Migration is a multimedia project for National Geographic and Canadian national current affairs magazine Maclean's. It tells the story of sockeye salmon, which migrate hundreds—if not thousands—of miles upriver from the ocean against the current in order to return to the place of their birth four years earlier.

  13. PDF Louis Armstrong (1901 1971)

    Other Writers of the Harlem Renaissance. wrote about African American women in novels such. as Passing. wrote poems such as "The Harlem Dancer" and. "The Lynching" and inspired other Harlem Renaissance poets. used the rhythms and language of spirituals. in his poetry. wrote The Ballad of the Brown Girl and Color. 14.

  14. The Great Migration: A City Transformed (1916-1930)

    Scribe Video Center will explore the history and impact of the Great Migration (1916-30) on Philadelphia, ... A body of oral histories will serve as the core inspiration for this multimedia project, told by Philadelphia residents who experienced the Great Migration firsthand. Selected media artists will create site-specific installations ...

  15. r/edgenuity on Reddit: Anyone know if the multimedia presentation is

    Hi, It looks like you're asking why you received a 0% on a Journal/Online Content/Practice assignment. For ONLY practice/online content/journal activities, Edgenuity looks for keywords in your writing. If you have at least ONE of the keywords its looking for, you will get FULL CREDIT (100%).

  16. PDF Warm-Up Enhancing a Presentation with Multimedia

    multimedia. repetition. rhetorical question. more than one form of communication used to connect with an audience. to judge something in a careful and thoughtful way. a question asked to create an effect rather than provoke a specific answer. a statement of a particular viewpoint that is supported by reasons and evidence.

  17. PDF Strategic Planning and Solution Mapping for BWA

    •Evolution and Migration path towards the target network • Architecture at core and access segments •Operation and business support applications • Convergence strategy for network, services and operations November 2007 ITU/BDT Plan and BWA mapping - O.G.S. slide 16 Strategic Planning and Solution Mapping Architecture migration: Topology

  18. PDF 3G/UMTS-An evolutionary path to Next Generation Networks

    Migration of Mobile Networks Circuit switchedCircuit switched CS voice / packet dataCS voice / packet data IP coreIP core GSM UMTS UWC-136 CDMA endtoendIPendtoendIP GPRSGPRS WLAN HiperLAN/ 802.11 IMT-2000 CDMA Multi-Carrier Optimally Connected Anywhere, Anytime Ad hoc NetworksAd hoc Networks New Radio Interface? New Radio Bluetooth Interface ...

  19. PDF 3G/UMTS & Evolution: Sharing experience and success gained in ...

    To promote a common vision of the development and Long Term Evolution of 3G/UMTS, and to ensure its worldwide commercial success: by expressing a strong industry voice promoting 3G/UMTS technology and its evolutions through lobbying and promotional actions globally. by forging dialogue between operators, manufacturers, administrations ...

  20. PDF Warm-Up Creating a Multimedia Presentation

    Prompt: Identify a situation in which there is a division that could benefit from increased unity. You may choose an example of division in the country, your community, your school, a group, or a team. Create a multimedia presentation that presents the problem and demonstrates how increased unity can be achieved to solve it.

  21. PDF UMTS deployments in Europe

    For the GSM operators UMTS allows a smooth migration from 2G to 2G and 3G. Dual mode mobile stations. Core Network common to GSM and UMTS. Reuse of 2G services. As Mobile Application Protocol is common to GSM and UMTS, the success of GSM roaming can be kept and extended. UMTS subscribers will benefit from the GSM foot print + Japan + Korea.