Rewritten Life

  • [ March 15, 2020 ] Show #018 – Social Entrepreneurship: Be a Changemaker and Do Something That Matters with Author Laurie Ann Thompson! Show
  • [ March 15, 2020 ] Show #017 – Creativity, Arts, and Film making with Damon and Elise Evans from Film School 4 Teens (FS4T) Show
  • [ March 5, 2020 ] Show #016 – Woman’s Nutrition Coach Erin Burkes Discusses Holistic Living, Lifestyle ‘Diet,’ and Emotional Eating! Show
  • [ March 5, 2020 ] Show #015 – Calling All Youth – ‘Dream, Dare, Do’ With Kidpreneur Life Founder Jude Paul! Show
  • [ February 8, 2020 ] Show #014 – Clinical Nutritionist Kim Kirschner Talks About Why a Whole Food, Plant-Based Diet is the Best for Life and Disease Prevention! Show

6 Simple Ways We Can All Make the World a Kinder Place

how to make the world kinder essay

We all dream of a kinder, more peaceful world, but the truth is most people don’t believe it’s even possible. It’s hard to imagine a world like that when the one we’re in now is full of war, inequality, and injustice.

It may seem impossible, but with a collective effort, we can create a world that is loving, kinder, and benefits everyone . It just takes small actions from each individual.

So what kind of steps can you take? Check out the list below to get some insight into how you can help create a kinder world now.

Give someone a smile

In today’s crazy non-stop world we are constantly distracted. Things like social media, technology, and feelings of missing out cause us to stay stuck on autopilot. This makes it hard to be aware of your surroundings let alone other people.

That’s why we should slow down connect with each other in person. Something as simple as a smile can make this easier. Smiling is contagious and makes us all feel good.

When someone smiles at you, you automatically want to smile back. A smile shows a person that they deserve kindness and develops an automatic connection that wouldn’t be possible if we were staring at our phones.

Respect others

Lack of respect is a huge contributing factor to how people respond to each other. From personal relationships to international relationships, respect is a necessary component for any successful interaction.

Respecting others means treating each other as equals. It means understanding that people have different perspectives and experiences. It means being non-judgmental.

We all deserve respect, so why not give someone the gift of being treated fairly and as an equal?

Focus on the positives

The world is full of negativity; at least that’s what you might believe if you ever watch the news or talk to other people. When you watch most news you get nothing but stories of war, the latest health scare, and dire statistics. Now, think about your conversations with other people. How many of us complain about life on a regular basis? We’re all guilty of it . We complain about work, about our relationships, and everything in between.

There’s just so much negativity clouding things sometimes it gets hard to see the light, but the reality is there are just as many positive things going on in the world.

It’s all about where our focus lies. Yes, there are heartbreaking stories going on in the world, but there are just as many heartwarming stories of love, perseverance, and unity. Instead of living in fear and hysteria, why don’t we choose to focus on the good stuff and do what we can to make a positive impact?

Realize we are all humans

Many of us believe in the illusion that we are separate and different. Things like racism and prejudice stem from this belief. It’s sad to think that something like the color of a person’s skin can give the impression of being inadequate.

When you realize this is just an illusion you will see that we are all the same. We all need air. We all need water. We all want love, security, and the opportunity to improve our lives.

Yes, we may have different religious beliefs or live in different countries, but we all want and need the same basic things. Once you start looking at life from this vantage point the world immediately becomes kinder .

Focus on yourself

When I think of the time people dedicate to focusing on things outside of their control , I am astonished. We focus on things like celebrity gossip to or who said what on Twitter.

Instead of wasting time worrying about what other people are doing, why don’t we take a step back and focus on what we can control? Ourselves.

You can only control what you do as an individual. You cannot control the thoughts, feelings, or actions of others . So when you start taking control of yourself can control the way you react, the way you treat others, and the things that give your life meaning.

This, in turn, teaches others to take control of their lives as well. When we all do this we can create a world that is full of respect and harmony.

Be understanding

Humans have a long history of persecuting individuals for their beliefs, status, race, or actions. The violence and judgment behind these things are born from ignorance. Ignorance by definition is the lack of knowledge or information.

This lack of knowledge and awareness is the root of so many problems. If we take the time to understand each other we can look at the world through compassionate eyes.

Everyone cannot fit inside the same box, and that is what makes life so beautiful. It’s the variety of it all that adds depth and magic to life.

So you see, making the world a kinder place doesn’t have to be a far-fetched impossible goal. It just takes a small consistent effort from everyone. You can start spreading the message now with our Kindness Cards .

Related Articles

How to boost your mental health through acts of kindness.

5 Health Benefits of Being Kind Treating people with love and respect goes a long way. But, what if I told you there is actual science-backed research that shows there is a health benefit behind […]

Top 20 Movies and TV Shows About Kindness

Here are some of the best movies and TV shows about kindness. […]

Spread Kindness Through Encouragement

Taking the time to encourage others can have far-reaching effects on their life. […]

© 2022 RewrittenLife.com | Powered by Knup Solutions

Keep up to date with the Big Issue

The leading voice on life, politics, culture and social activism direct to your inbox.

11 ways to make the world a kinder place

For World Kindness Day, we bring you 11 ways you can show some kindness… and maybe feel better too.

World Kindness Day

World Kindness Day, which takes place every year on November 13, is a celebration of the ties that bind our communities together. Thousands of tiny acts of kindness turning from ripples into waves and spreading hope and goodness around the world. You can join the celebration by pledging to do one kind thing today.

“I do believe that kindness is the most important thing that we have, as human beings, to make everybody’s life better,” says David Jamilly, founder of the non-profit Kindness UK.

“Kindness is a positive value that encompasses a lot of other values like compassion, altruism, empathy, sympathy.

“We’re in a very, very challenged world at the moment and the only way that we can work together and communicate together, find solutions together, have community together, is through kindness.”

But the more surprising thing is that in being kind, we are not just helping others, we are healing ourselves. Numerous studies have shown that people who carry out more acts of kindness feel better themselves.

In an 2020 survey by the Mental Health Foundation , 63 per cent of UK adults agreed that when other people are kind to them it had a positive impact on their mental health. The same proportion said the reverse – being kind to other people had a positive impact on their own mental health.

Mental health campaigner and novelist Matt Haig says kindness can offer “a way out” if you’re dealing with depression or anxiety.

“Mental illness, through no fault of our own, very often makes you self-absorbed. It sends you inward. There’s a therapeutic, healing effect of caring. It’s this paradox: often behaviour we see as selfless, is actually in a very deep sense self-serving. It’s actually good for us,” he explains.

“Self-care is actually caring for others, they’re not opposites. And I really, genuinely believe that it’s good for our brain chemistry, it’s good for our lives and our relationships. And it’s good for the world we live in.”

To help you and your community, The Big Issue has brought together 11 suggestions for how you can celebrate World Kindness Day 2021. Because, as Aesop wrote in The Lion and the Mouse, “No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted.”

Engage your empathy online

We live in a culture that is all too quick to judge people, often without really knowing the full context of their actions. Before you share your righteous hot take on Twitter, Haig suggests a few questions you might want to ask yourself first: “Why am I talking about this? Am I trying to make the world better? Or am I just venting? Am I performing a little bit? Is there a better way to affect change than targeting individuals?”

Give to a local food bank

In the wake of the £20 government cut to universal credit, foodbanks are struggling to keep up with demand. Recently, Sabine Goodwin, coordinator for the Independent Food Aid Network (IFAN), told us that low supplies have forced a number of independent food banks – which often have fewer resources and less funding than larger projects – to reduce the size of the parcels they distribute.

You can donate food staples, toiletries and other essentials, or you can even set up a direct debit to make a regular cash donation. Find a food bank near you and the kind of items you can donate with The Big Issue’s guide .

dog in shelter

Give a dog a bone (or a kitty some kibble)

Animals need kindness too. Across Britain, the RSPCA and SSPCA look after thousands of abused, abandoned, neglected or unwanted animals. Many centres run Amazon Wish Lists, so in just a few clicks you could send some nourishment and comfort to a good doggo, or purring pussy cat. 

You don’t even need to get out of your pyjamas. In Scotland, the SSPCA has a handy directory of all the local lists . If you’d like to donate in England or Wales, you can find out how by searching for your local RSPCA rescue centre .

Donate your old furniture

Furniture poverty is on the rise in the UK. The campaign group End Furniture Poverty estimates that 4.8 million people are living without at least one essential appliance and only two per cent of social housing comes furnished.

So the next time you’re updating the look of your home, why not give your old furniture a new life by donating it to someone in need? As a bonus, it’s also more environmentally friendly than sticking it in the dump. Read how you can get donating here . 

Even a fake smile releases endorphins and serotonin, which elevate your mood and act as natural painkillers, so slapping on a grin is a good way to make yourself feel better. But it can also be a really easy act of kindness. Smiling is contagious, so when you smile at someone, there’s a good chance they’ll reciprocate. Then they can enjoy all the lovely brain chemicals too.

Leave a legacy

The benefits of kindness don’t rely on you knowing the recipient. One of the most Earth-shaking ways you can be kind right now is to pledge to donate your organs to someone else when you die.

The Big Issue spoke to organ donation campaigner Jim Lynskey before he sadly died while waiting for a heart transplant. He said there is a terrible shortage of donated organs. 

“I’ve known a patient to be on the urgent list for seven months, sat in hospital, being kept alive by external pumps and other apparatus. It speaks volumes that on an urgent waiting list, it’s a seven-month wait at times. It’s just shocking.”

Find out about being an organ donor here . And remember – it’s vital that you tell your family and friends about your wishes.

Phone someone you love

Stop and think for a minute. Who could use a phone call? Not a text, an honest-to-god phone call. If you know someone who might be feeling lonely right now, be the one to pick up the phone.

Write a positive comment

The internet is full of negative comments. Let’s change that. Next time you see a stellar social media post or read a well-written article, let the person know! Together we can create a kinder online experience.

Volunteer your time

If you’re lucky enough to have some free time, volunteering to help others is a rewarding, and kind, thing to do. On World Kindness Day, make a plan for how you could help this Christmas. Volunteering is a great way to get physical exercise boost your wellbeing, make friends and developing new skills. 

Support your local Big Issue vendor

Big Issue vendors are out in all weather, bringing you an award-winning magazine and earning an income. When you’re heading to work, or going round the shops, take a moment to stop, say hello and buy a magazine.

Or if you don’t have a vendor near you, you can buy this week’s magazine from the online shop or take out a subscription to make sure we can continue to support our vendors over this difficult period. You can even link your subscription to a chosen vendor with our online map .

Don’t forget to be kind to yourself

This isn’t a selfish aim. “If you are good to your body and your mind, then you are much more likely to be to have some spare capacity to throw out,” said Jamilly. “If you are kind to yourself, it’s much easier to do things for others.”

It might be taking time for a breathing exercise, going for a run, or making yourself a nice warm hot chocolate. Whatever recharges your batteries to face another day.

Support our vendors this winter and beyond

Vendor martin Hawes

Recommended for you

David Duke, Street Soccer Scotland founder

Street Soccer Scotland founder David Duke: 'You don't get anything in life without sacrifice'

how to make the world kinder essay

9 LGBTQ+ trailblazers who defined and redefined modern Britain 

beats bus

Beats Bus: How a Hull group is using hip-hop to fight poverty and protect young people from gangs

how to make the world kinder essay

Women share harrowing accounts of painful NHS hysteroscopies: 'I begged the doctor to stop'

Most popular.

Renters: A mortgage lender's window advertising buy-to-let products

Renters pay their landlords' buy-to-let mortgages, so they should get a share of the profits

Pound coins on a piece of paper with disability living allowancve

Exclusive: Disabled people are 'set up to fail' by the DWP in target-driven disability benefits system, whistleblowers reveal

next dwp cost of living payment 2023

Here's when UK households to start receiving last cost of living payments

how to make the world kinder essay

Strike dates 2023: From train drivers to NHS doctors, here are the dates to know

Enjoyed the baftas get our free film archive special here....

how to make the world kinder essay

Developing a kinder society to make the world better

berli

When I see news about terrorism, I feel sad. Why do people blame each other's religion? When I see so much racism around, I feel confused. Why should people be selective of other people, if we are same?  Sometimes, I think...is it too hard to be respectful, tolerant and good?  When terrorism is everywhere and it stands in the name of Islam, it's pretty scary. People start to judge Muslim's and say that we are terrorists. I'm Muslim and it hurts to know that your religion is being mistreated like that, almost everywhere. One day, my friend had to move abroad due to her parents' work. She told me that most of her friends usually made a joke of her religion and said that Muslims are terrorists. If the logic is that all Muslim's are terrorists, then all humans on this planet would die, because there is a large population of Muslim's on this earth.

In this era, people are selfish and feel that what they believe is the only true thing. They are too proud and want everything to be their way, without realising that they're living in diversity. Two days ago, there was a new man who came into a village near mine. The villagers wouldn't allow him to stay in that village just because he was Christian. How can people who live in the country with a lot of diversity act like that? How will the world be better if society acts like this? 

We should change our mindset to create a better society. We live in diversity and should respect it because it's what makes us all alive. One day, I cried because of the respect that was given to Muslims after the New Zealand terrorist attack. People gathered around Muslims to protect them during prayer and wearing hijabs. If people in this world were like them, the world would be more peaceful. There would no racism, because we are same. There would be no wrong religion, because every religion is right and doesn't teach people to do evil things.

There's no difficult way to create a kinder society. We just have to respect each other. There are many actions to create it, such us tolerance and being kind to everyone.

Let's see how beautiful our world can be when filled with kindness and diversity. Imagine if there's no diversity in this world, we would never know what 'respect' is. If we judge and refuse diversity, it means we shut out the world, because the world is dull of diversity and kindness.

View the discussion thread.

Related Stories

Various art

Competition in the world of art

El Mercado

Shades of Identity

Art For All Art Within Logo

Embracing Culture Through Leadership, Art and Innovation

C 2019 Voices of Youth. All Rights Reserved. 

Moments Log

Blogging every moment of your life

World of Coffee: Journeying through the Global Coffee Culture and Brewing Methods

The Power of Compassion: Making the World a Kinder Place.

Table of contents, the impact of compassion on mental health and well-being, how compassion can foster stronger relationships and connections, the role of compassion in creating positive social change, cultivating compassion: strategies for developing a more compassionate mindset.

The Power of Compassion: Making the World a Kinder Place .

Compassion is a powerful force that has the ability to transform not only the lives of individuals, but also the world as a whole. It is a quality that is often undervalued in today's fast-paced and competitive society, but its impact on mental health and well-being cannot be overstated. In this section, we will explore the profound effects of compassion on our mental health and how it can contribute to creating a kinder and more empathetic world.

At its core, compassion is the ability to understand and empathize with the suffering of others. It is a deep sense of concern and care for the well-being of others, and it goes beyond simply feeling sorry for someone. When we practice compassion, we are able to connect with others on a deeper level, recognizing their pain and offering support and understanding.

Research has shown that compassion has numerous benefits for our mental health and well-being. When we show compassion towards others, it activates the reward centers in our brain, releasing feel-good hormones such as oxytocin and dopamine. These hormones not only make us feel happier and more fulfilled, but they also have a positive impact on our physical health, reducing stress and boosting our immune system.

Furthermore, practicing compassion has been linked to increased levels of self-esteem and self-worth. When we extend kindness and understanding to others, we also develop a greater sense of our own value and worthiness. This can have a profound impact on our mental health, as it helps to counteract negative self-talk and self-criticism.

Compassion also plays a crucial role in building and maintaining healthy relationships. When we approach others with compassion, we create an environment of trust and understanding. This fosters deeper connections and allows for open and honest communication. In turn, this can lead to greater satisfaction in our relationships and a sense of belonging and connection.

In addition to its individual benefits, compassion has the power to create a kinder and more empathetic world. When we practice compassion, we inspire others to do the same. It creates a ripple effect, spreading kindness and understanding throughout our communities and beyond. This can lead to a more harmonious and inclusive society, where individuals feel seen, heard, and valued.

However, it is important to note that compassion is not always easy. In a world that often values individual success and achievement above all else, it can be challenging to prioritize the needs of others. It requires us to step outside of our own experiences and perspectives and truly listen and understand the experiences of others. It requires us to be vulnerable and open-hearted, even in the face of pain and suffering.

But the rewards of compassion far outweigh the challenges. By practicing compassion, we not only improve our own mental health and well-being, but we also contribute to a more compassionate and empathetic world. We have the power to make a difference, one act of kindness at a time.

In conclusion, compassion has a profound impact on our mental health and well-being. It has the ability to make us happier, more fulfilled, and more connected to others. By practicing compassion, we not only improve our own lives, but we also contribute to creating a kinder and more empathetic world. So let us embrace the power of compassion and work together to make the world a kinder place.

The Power of Compassion: Making the World a Kinder Place.

At its core, compassion is the ability to understand and empathize with the suffering of others. It is the willingness to extend a helping hand, to offer support and comfort to those in need. When we approach our relationships with compassion, we create a safe space for others to be vulnerable and open up about their struggles. This vulnerability, in turn, strengthens the bond between individuals, fostering a sense of trust and understanding.

Compassion allows us to see beyond our own needs and desires, and instead focus on the well-being of others. It encourages us to listen actively, to be present in the moment, and to truly understand the experiences and emotions of those around us. By doing so, we validate their feelings and let them know that they are not alone in their struggles. This validation can be incredibly powerful, as it helps individuals feel seen and heard, and ultimately strengthens the connection between them.

In addition to fostering stronger relationships, compassion also has the ability to create a ripple effect. When we show compassion to others, it inspires them to do the same. It creates a chain reaction of kindness and empathy, spreading positivity and making the world a better place. This ripple effect can extend far beyond our immediate relationships, reaching communities and even entire societies.

Compassion also plays a crucial role in conflict resolution and reconciliation. When we approach conflicts with compassion, we are more likely to seek understanding and find common ground. Instead of focusing on blame and resentment, we can shift our perspective and try to see the situation from the other person's point of view. This empathy allows us to find solutions that are mutually beneficial and promotes a sense of harmony and unity.

Furthermore, compassion has been shown to have numerous health benefits. Research has found that individuals who practice compassion regularly experience lower levels of stress, anxiety, and depression. It also boosts the immune system and promotes overall well-being. By cultivating compassion in our relationships, we not only improve the lives of others but also enhance our own mental and physical health.

In conclusion, compassion is a powerful force that has the ability to transform our relationships and make the world a kinder place. By approaching our interactions with empathy and understanding, we create stronger connections and foster a sense of trust and support. Compassion also has the potential to create a ripple effect, inspiring others to show kindness and empathy. It plays a crucial role in conflict resolution and reconciliation, promoting harmony and unity. Moreover, compassion has numerous health benefits, improving both our own well-being and the well-being of those around us. So let us embrace compassion and make a conscious effort to spread kindness and empathy, for it is through these acts that we can truly make a difference in the world.

Compassion is a powerful force that has the potential to transform the world into a kinder and more empathetic place. It plays a crucial role in creating positive social change by fostering understanding, promoting equality, and inspiring acts of kindness.

At its core, compassion is the ability to recognize and empathize with the suffering of others. It is the willingness to extend a helping hand and offer support to those in need. When we approach the world with compassion, we are able to see beyond our own experiences and connect with the struggles and challenges faced by others.

Compassion is not just a passive emotion; it is a call to action. It compels us to take steps towards alleviating suffering and promoting social justice. By recognizing the inherent worth and dignity of every individual, compassion challenges us to work towards creating a more equitable society.

One of the ways in which compassion can create positive social change is by fostering understanding. When we approach others with compassion, we are more likely to listen to their stories, perspectives, and experiences. This allows us to gain a deeper understanding of the issues they face and the barriers they encounter. By actively listening and seeking to understand, we can break down stereotypes and prejudices, promoting a more inclusive and accepting society.

Compassion also plays a crucial role in promoting equality. When we recognize the suffering and injustice faced by marginalized communities, we are compelled to take action to address these inequalities. Compassion drives us to advocate for equal rights and opportunities for all individuals, regardless of their race, gender, or socioeconomic status. It pushes us to challenge systems of oppression and work towards a more just and equitable society.

Acts of kindness inspired by compassion have the power to create a ripple effect, spreading positivity and inspiring others to do the same. When we witness acts of compassion, we are reminded of the goodness that exists in the world. This can motivate us to engage in our own acts of kindness, creating a cycle of compassion that has the potential to transform communities and societies.

Compassion is not limited to individual actions; it can also drive collective efforts towards social change. When individuals come together with a shared sense of compassion, they can create powerful movements that challenge the status quo and advocate for systemic change. History has shown us the power of compassion in driving social movements, from the civil rights movement to the fight for gender equality. These movements have brought about significant change by mobilizing individuals who are driven by a shared sense of compassion and a desire for a more just and compassionate world.

In conclusion, compassion plays a vital role in creating positive social change. It fosters understanding, promotes equality, and inspires acts of kindness. By approaching the world with compassion, we can work towards creating a more empathetic and inclusive society. Let us harness the power of compassion to make the world a kinder place for all.

Compassion is a powerful force that has the ability to transform not only individuals but also the world around us. It is the ability to understand and empathize with the suffering of others, and to take action to alleviate that suffering. In a world that often seems filled with negativity and division, cultivating compassion is more important than ever. By developing a more compassionate mindset, we can make the world a kinder and more harmonious place.

One strategy for developing a more compassionate mindset is to practice empathy. Empathy is the ability to put ourselves in someone else's shoes and truly understand their perspective and emotions. By actively listening and seeking to understand others, we can develop a deeper sense of empathy. This can be done through engaging in meaningful conversations, reading books or articles that explore different perspectives, or even participating in empathy-building exercises. By practicing empathy, we can begin to see the world through the eyes of others and develop a greater sense of compassion.

Another strategy for cultivating compassion is to practice self-compassion. It is important to remember that compassion starts from within. We must first be kind and understanding towards ourselves before we can extend that kindness to others. Self-compassion involves treating ourselves with the same care and understanding that we would offer to a loved one. This can be done by practicing self-care, setting boundaries, and being mindful of our own needs. By cultivating self-compassion, we can develop a greater capacity for compassion towards others.

A third strategy for developing a more compassionate mindset is to practice gratitude. Gratitude is the practice of acknowledging and appreciating the good things in our lives. By focusing on the positive aspects of our lives, we can develop a greater sense of empathy and compassion towards others. Gratitude can be practiced through journaling, meditation, or simply taking a few moments each day to reflect on the things we are grateful for. By cultivating gratitude, we can shift our focus from negativity to positivity and develop a more compassionate outlook on life.

In addition to these strategies, it is important to remember that compassion is a skill that can be developed and strengthened over time. Like any skill, it requires practice and effort. It is important to be patient with ourselves and to recognize that developing a compassionate mindset is a lifelong journey. By consistently practicing empathy, self-compassion, and gratitude, we can gradually cultivate a more compassionate mindset and make a positive impact on the world around us.

In conclusion, cultivating compassion is essential for making the world a kinder and more harmonious place. By practicing empathy, self-compassion, and gratitude, we can develop a more compassionate mindset. It is important to remember that compassion is a skill that can be developed and strengthened over time. By consistently practicing these strategies, we can make a positive impact on the world and create a more compassionate society. Let us embrace the power of compassion and work together to make the world a kinder place.

Share this:

10 Ways To Build A Kinder World

Discover how you can play your part in making the world a kinder place…

The power to make our world a nicer, happier place to live is right at our fingertips. Even the smallest gesture can brighten someone’s day and make them feel understood, loved and valued. Here are 10 ways you can #bekind to help create a better world for us all:

1. Help The Vulnerable

There are lots of ways you can help vulnerable people and animals. You could:

  • Volunteer at your local food bank
  • Offer to get shopping for an elderly neighbour or family member
  • Raise money for a local animal charity
  • Visit a care home and offer

2. Say ‘Thank You’

Make your appreciation known. Thank someone who has made you a lovely meal or helped you deal with a difficult situation in your life. These two little words can mean a whole lot.

3. Be Courteous

Let someone who is in a rush skip the queue ahead of you. Hold the door open for the person behind you. Wash up the dishes after someone has cooked a meal for you. There are LOTS of little ways to be courteous and kind.

4. Pay Compliments

Give compliments to spread joy and happiness. Tell someone if you love their coat or if you’re impressed by their talent – everyone loves to be complimented! It takes next to zero energy or effort to pay a compliment, yet it can make someone feel very special indeed.

5. Be A Good Listener

Look the person in the eye when they’re talking and give them time to say what they want to say without any interruptions. Being a good listener shows that you care and that you are a kind, supportive person.

6. Be Present

We live in a busy, hectic world that’s filled with far too many distractions. We could all do with spending less time online and more time living in the here and now. Put your phone away and give your full focus to family and friends when you’re spending time with them.

7. Help With Chores

Offer to help out around the house more. You could cook dinner once a week, take out the bins, or take the dog out for a daily walk.

8. Look For Opportunities

Keep your eyes peeled for opportunities to be kind. Be aware of your surroundings and of people who may need a helping hand. Offer the elderly lady who just boarded the bus your seat or help your neighbour unlock their front door when they’re juggling bags of shopping. There are always opportunities to be kind – we just need to look out for them!

9. Share To Show You Care

That book you couldn’t put down? Lend it to a friend who you think will enjoy it just as much! You could let your brother borrow that shirt he’s been eyeing up or share the box of chocolates you have stashed away.

10. Be Kind To Yourself

You matter too! Sometimes, we can be our own worst critics. Try to focus on your strengths and the individual things that make you  you ! Be positive about yourself when you’re talking to others. For more advice on how to be kind to yourself, click here . Looking for more ways to spread a smile? Click here to find 10 random acts of kindness you can try today!

how to make the world kinder essay

Related Posts

  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Helpful Free Resources
  • Happiness & Fun
  • Healthy Habits
  • Love & Relationships
  • Mental Health
  • Mindfulness & Peace
  • Purpose & Passion
  • Fun & Inspiring
  • Submit a Post
  • Books & Things
  • Tiny Buddha’s Breaking Barriers to Self-Care

Tiny Buddha

“Don’t wait for people to be friendly. Show them how.” ~Unknown

Sometimes I stop to think about how in the world I ended up where I have. I started off with very little, and somehow along the way I have ended up generally happy and on my own two feet.

My adolescence up to my early twenties had its share of dark days. Whether or not we are lucky enough to have a small handful of people that stick by us no matter what, more often than not we can find ourselves feeling incredibly lonely.

For a long time through my rough days, I held a sort of grudge against the rest of the world. I had convinced myself that everyone was only looking out for themselves, and I had lost faith in the idea that people were mostly good.

Where was that feeling of community? Or helping out your neighbors? What about equality and accepting others’ differences?

The world felt large, dark, and lonely. I felt very let down.

What I didn’t realize at the time was that as much as those close to me have influenced my growth and my life, those I consider strangers have made just as strong an impact. By closing out the rest of the world, I was really hindering my growth and happiness . Let me explain.

I had an accident a few years back, and unfortunately, I was far from home and by myself when the incident occurred.

Many strangers witnessed the accident and casually passed by. Two people who could have just as easily done the same, leaving the accident for someone else to take care of, chose to step in and come to my aide.

They had no obligation to help, and in fact, had places to be. Instead, they stopped to help me, waited until the paramedics arrived, helped to contact someone I knew, and confirmed that I would be okay.

I was shocked that people who didn’t even know my name were spending so much time taking precautions to ensure my safety.

My world was jolted—and I kind of liked it.

This was the first instance of many that changed how I live my day-to-day life.

A complete stranger went out of their way to do good for me, and in return, I would do the same for others.

I opened myself to the idea that maybe not all people were selfish and maybe they were all, in fact, just like me: feeling alone, caught up and looking desperately for that one person to prove them wrong.

It took a while and a lot of courage, but I began to step outside my comfort zone and behave how I always wished others would. I spoke to strangers on the train and in long lines, made friends in waiting rooms, and more. I listened to their stories, even if they didn’t give me a chance to respond.

I have stopped to check on strangers who looked unwell, offered directions when someone looked lost, given advice, returned and watched strangers’ belongings, and made frustrated parents’ children stop crying by making silly faces or cracking not-so-funny jokes.

Once, while studying in a coffee shop, I heard the chaos of a car accident outside and saw an elderly man, looking distraught, alone, and waiting for the police to aid him. Remembering how alone I was and the help I had received during my own trauma, I grabbed a drink from the shop, delivered it to him, and ensured he was being tended to before returning to my work.

Each encounter I have made has had a different influence, a different story, a different result— some small, some large, and some that I cannot measure or know. Each has made my day, and hopefully, theirs, a happier one.

The bigger picture fell into a place for me a couple of years ago. I greeted a homeless man who was down and out and who I would run into frequently. I stopped briefly to listen to a joke he said he had written.

As I laughed and turned to head back on my way, he stopped and said, “Thank you for listening. I have been wanting to share that with someone for a long time. Have a good day on purpose!”

That was it right there. “Have a good day on purpose.” On purpose.  

Acting with goodness will bring goodness. Each day you wake up, you have a choice to make. You can either go on through your day, your routines, as you always do, or you can choose to broaden your world.

Opening myself up to these so-called strangers with a positive point of view, open mind, and a helping hand has changed my perspective on life a trillion times over.

Rather than waiting for and expecting others to prove me wrong, I began to take initiative and found that what I was looking for all along was always there. I just needed to pull myself out from the negative space I was in in order to see it.

I have seen the good come back around to me in so many ways.

From that first pair of strangers who helped me through a scary accident, to people approaching me with compliments, and even some offering a smile on days when I could not bear to carry my own.

I have had those who barely know me take a chance on me, trust me, and even lay themselves on the line to help me advance my career. Just recently, a woman gifted me a handmade scarf she was selling because she noticed I was shaking in the cold.

None of these people knew me when we reached out to support and pass positive energy to one another. Some became friends ; many I will remember for a long time; all I am lucky to have encountered, whether or not I can pinpoint why.

Making the first move to talk to or help a stranger can be difficult at first, and I will be the first to admit that it won’t always be received how you expect.

Start with by smiling, holding the door open, offering a genuine compliment, or cracking a joke in passing.

The experience is jarring to some as, sadly, kindness is not an action most expect. Just know that no matter what the outcome, you have done something to trigger a positive thought and perhaps make a difference in that person.

All of a sudden, I realized I didn’t feel so alone. I felt a deeper understanding and connection to those around me. All of a sudden the world is not so large, dark, void, and scary.

Photo by oh_pretty_love

' src=

About Edit Danilian

Edit Danilian is a teacher living in California. She is a passionate, forever student, who believes in humor, love and has a mouth with less than perfect timing. You can follow her on twitter @ DaniandB .

Did you enjoy this post? Please share the wisdom :)

Facebook

Related posts:

how to make the world kinder essay

Free Download: Buddha Desktop Wallpaper

how to make the world kinder essay

Recent Forum Topics

  • Looking backwards
  • Friendships
  • My dad is a drug addict
  • Intrusive and Anxious Thoughts
  • growing up – becoming adul / procrastination – in connection to childhood trauma
  • There’s always something missing..
  • Lies – stay or leave?
  • Digital wellbeing journey ✨
  • Why pursue meaning in life
  • Moral dillemas

Fun & Inspiring

Let Life Happen

Let Life Happen

GET MORE FUN & INSPIRING IMAGES & VIDEOS .

Latest Posts

How Our Emotional Triggers Can Actually Be Great Gifts

How Our Emotional Triggers Can Actually Be Great Gifts

How Admitting Your Weaknesses Could Actually Make You Stronger

How Admitting Your Weaknesses Could Actually Make You Stronger

The Art of Bereavement: A Simple Creative Practice for the Grieving

The Art of Bereavement: A Simple Creative Practice for the Grieving

Bulletproof Self-Love: How to Build an Unshakeable Relationship with Yourself

Bulletproof Self-Love: How to Build an Unshakeable Relationship with Yourself

5 Simple Ways to Make JOY Your Job This Year

5 Simple Ways to Make JOY Your Job This Year

This site is not intended to provide and does not constitute medical, legal, or other professional advice. The content on Tiny Buddha is designed to support, not replace, medical or psychiatric treatment. Please seek professional care if you believe you may have a condition.

Tiny Buddha, LLC may earn affiliate income from qualifying purchases, including from the Amazon Associate Program.

Before using the site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use .

Click to opt-out of Google Analytics tracking.

Who Runs Tiny Buddha?

Lori

Get More Tiny Buddha

  •   Twitter
  •   Facebook
  •   Instagram
  •   Youtube
  •   RSS Feed

Credits & Copyright

  • Back to Top

how to make the world kinder essay

Opinion | How to make the world a kinder place

Share this:.

  • Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)
  • Click to print (Opens in new window)
  • Click to email a link to a friend (Opens in new window)
  • Dick Spotswood
  • Endorsements
  • Editorial Cartoons
  • Marin Voice

Photo by Norma Mortenson/Pexels

When my boys were teens, they each wanted a car.

Great, their dad and I said. Get a job, save up your money — enough for a car, insurance and repairs — and you’ll have what you want.

And that’s just what they did, one at an organic gelato shop and the other at a restaurant.

While the paychecks that led to the cars were the “reward” for their hard work, there was a much-bigger reward — an understanding of what it’s like to work face-to-face with people for minimum wage. An understanding of human psychology without having to pay for a pricey college textbook or take a class.

Let’s just say it was an enlightening if not exactly an always happy experience.

Oh, they enjoyed their bosses and their coworkers, and they loved their paychecks and what it allowed them to buy. But dealing with the public? That was hard, and that was many years before the coronavirus pandemic, when everyone is stressed and eager to have a sense of normalcy, and thus losing their patience, often refusing to wear masks and screaming at minimum-wage workers who ever-so-politely have to remind them that it’s store policy and, I dunno, a general kindness.

It’s not hard, really, to think about others and not just yourself as we all try to make our way through the biggest health and economic crisis this generation has ever experienced. We’re all in this together, right?

Evidently not.

And so I recently found myself thinking about their experiences in the service industry as well as my own so many years ago for a few reasons.

When I wrote about dining out during a pandemic , I went to Bunglaow 44 in Mill Valley, a restaurant I frequented before the pandemic and one that I saw was doing all the right things when it came to the early days of outside dining. I dined incognito until it was time to pay the check, when I told my server why I was there and asked her how it’s been for her.

Challenging, she said, which is what my kids said and what I knew firsthand when it comes to working with the public. And for minimum wage, which is not enough to afford to rent a room — let alone an apartment — anywhere in Marin.

It was her boss, Bungalow’s co-owner Peter Schumacher, who posted a quote from the late Anthony Bourdain on Facebook that gave me pause:

“You can always tell when a person has worked in a restaurant. There’s an empathy that can only be cultivated by those who’ve stood between a hungry mouth and a $28 pork chop, a special understanding of the way a bunch of motley misfits can be a family. Service industry work develops the ‘soft skills’ recruiters talk about on LinkedIn — discipline, promptness, the ability to absorb criticism, and most important, how to read people like a book. The work is thankless and fun and messy, and the world would be a kinder place if more people tried it. With all due respect to my former professors, I’ve long believed I gained more knowledge in kitchens, bars, and dining rooms than any college could even hold.”

That was true for me when I dropped out of college to follow a boyfriend to Colorado, and worked a string of minimum-wage service industry jobs. I was treated poorly, as if I were ignorant — I was not — and not worthy of any sort of dignity, which I am. All of us are.

My kids experienced the same.

You cannot work with the public and come away without loving people — the ones you work with, that is, who are indeed like family and who work hard for not much. You learn that some of them work two or three jobs just to survive, but don’t complain.

You also cannot work with the public and come away without hating people. It’s where you see the worst of people, the entitlement and rudeness, and experience being treated poorly by the very people who depend on us. Isn’t that ironic?

What this pandemic has revealed is that the people we often think so little of, the ones who stock the shelves and ring up our groceries or deliver them or wait on us and clean up after us, the ones most likely to get COVID-19 and die from it, are essential workers, as much as the health-care workers and firefighters and others who work hard to keep us safe and healthy, but for a heck of a lot less money and benefits.

They may not have gone to college or finished college, but they are doing work we actually need done. How can we not treat them kindly?

As Jeff Burkhart, aka Barfly, recently wrote , we might be at a time when those who provide service finally have the upper hand. They can demand things, like customers wear masks, and perhaps even respect. Anyone who is putting their life and the lives of their loved ones on the line so the public can live comfortably deserves that.

If Marin parents are looking for ways to teach their kids to be empathetic adults, maybe they should stop worrying so much about college and help them find a minimum-wage job servicing the public. As Bourdain wrote, “the world would be a kinder place if more people tried it.”

And if there’s anything the world needs more of right now, it’s kindness.

Vicki Larson’s opinion column So It Goes runs every other week. Contact her at [email protected] and follow her on Twitter at OMG Chronicles .

More in Opinion

The Marin Municipal Water District has adopted a five-year strategy after months of planning around how the agency can improve.

Opinion | George Russell: Marin Municipal Water District reveals 5 year strategic plan

The IJ editorial board published election endorsement editorials for many races on the Marin ballot ahead of the March 5 vote.

Endorsements | Marin IJ endorsements for the March 5 primary election

President Joe Biden

Commentary | Bay Area Voice: Why do we talk about older people so negatively?

Marin IJ Readers' Forum for Feb. 23, 2024

Letters to the Editor | Marin IJ Readers’ Forum for Feb. 23, 2024

Writing an essay

Making the world a kinder place essay

World kindness day is celebrated on 13 November every year to promote the importance of kindness in our communities and the world.

In today’s fast-paced and competitive world, it can be easy to lose sight of the power of a kind gesture or word.

However, it is important to understand that small acts of kindness can make a big impact and have the potential to change someone’s day, or even their life.

In fact, research has shown that being kind not only makes the recipient happy, but also improves our own well-being and mental health.

One of the main reasons why we should strive to make the world a kinder place is because kindness is contagious.

When we are kind to others, not only do we make them feel good, but we also inspire them to pay it forward and spread kindness to others.

This creates a positive domino effect that can have a ripple effect on our society.

Imagine a world where everyone goes out of their way to do something kind for someone else – it would create a harmonious and compassionate community where individuals feel valued and supported.

Moreover, kindness helps to break down barriers and bring people from different backgrounds together. In a world that is becoming increasingly divided, small acts of kindness can help bridge the gaps and promote understanding and empathy.

It allows us to see each other as fellow human beings, rather than focusing on our differences.

This can lead to a more inclusive and tolerant society, where everyone is treated with kindness and respect regardless of their race, religion, or social status.

Additionally, kindness has the power to heal and bring hope to those who are struggling.

In times of hardship or tragedy, a kind gesture or word can provide a glimmer of light and remind people that they are not alone. It can also inspire them to keep going and have faith in humanity.

With so much negativity and suffering in the world, acts of kindness can give people the strength and courage to persevere and overcome their challenges.

Furthermore, kindness can also benefit our physical health.

It has been proven that performing acts of kindness can boost our immune system, reduce stress and anxiety, and even lower blood pressure.

When we are kind, our body releases a hormone called oxytocin, also known as the ‘love hormone,’ which promotes feelings of trust and connection.

So, not only does kindness make us feel good emotionally, but it also has a positive impact on our physical well-being.

In conclusion, it is evident that making the world a kinder place is crucial for the betterment of society as a whole.

Kindness has the power to create a positive ripple effect, promote inclusivity and understanding, bring hope to those in need, and even improve our own well-being.

Therefore, on this World Kindness Day, let us all make a conscious effort to spread kindness in our communities and beyond.

As the Dalai Lama said, ‘Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible.’

Greater Good Science Center • Magazine • In Action • In Education

Mind & Body Articles & More

How educators can help make a kinder world, by integrating character education, sel, and mindfulness, schools can cultivate the inherent goodness in students..

“Education which stops with efficiency may prove the greatest menace to society,” wrote Martin Luther King Jr. in 1947. “The most dangerous criminal may be the man gifted with reason, but with no morals.”

In recent decades, research has lent support to his argument. With our new scientific understanding of the social, emotional, and ethical development of students, I think we can safely say that academic achievement alone no longer counts as a “successful” education. The work of educators shapes human beings—which means that education helps shape our world.

That is why every year at our Summer Institute for Educators we start by asking participants from all over the globe, “What kind of world do you want to live in?” And while their responses may differ, they do have one thing in common: creating all these varied worlds requires people who are kind and good.

how to make the world kinder essay

So, how can formal education play a role in helping people to embrace kindness and goodness? The building blocks are already there to help educators do this work, namely in the fields of character education , social-emotional learning , and mindfulness . But the magic really happens when all three are integrated together—and are grounded by a sense of purpose and strong moral identity.

Purpose and moral identity provide the “why”

Scientists are starting to make great inroads into understanding the deeper psychological tenets of human morality. Two areas, in particular, are emerging as critical factors in cultivating virtue: purpose and moral identity.

Purpose is inherently moral, as can be seen in its scientific definition : “having a goal in life that you care deeply about and that contributes to the world beyond yourself in some productive sense.” For example, you might aim to transform the health care system into an equitable one and so go into medicine, or your purpose could be to support your family. You might want to live according to your religious or spiritual beliefs or work toward bridging differences.

Moral identity speaks to how important being a good person is to their sense of self. Researchers have found that a strong moral identity encourages students to make ethical decisions and motivates them to behave prosocially even when they don’t get any recognition for it. 

Cultivating a sense of purpose and a strong identity, moral and otherwise, is the key developmental task of adolescents. (In truth, this task starts much younger, but it becomes more pronounced in the teen years.) But while teens may be still deciding or actually have an idea of who they want be (moral identity) and what they want to offer the world (purpose), they need guidance and skills to achieve these things. This is where character education, SEL, and mindfulness can help by providing the “how” to purpose and identity’s “why.”

This is especially critical for middle and high school teachers whose students may push back on stand-alone lessons in SEL, mindfulness, or character. Researchers have found that putting these skills into context that relates directly to students’ lives makes the skills meaningful and students more willing to learn them.

Character education provides the “what”

Character education offers students the opportunity to think about what virtues they would like to cultivate and what those virtues look like in action. 

While educating young people for character is not a new concept—this idea was at the heart of early American education , as well as ancient Vedic , Buddhist , and Confucian systems of education—schools in the 20th century fell away from this purpose for understandable reasons. With the growing diversity of our communities, “whose values do we teach?” and “whose responsibility is it to teach these values?” became compelling and challenging questions to answer.

The Basics of Character Education for Educators

The Basics of Character Education for Educators

This brief course is designed for teachers who are new to the field or would like to brush up on the research.

The field of character education , however, has not shied away from these questions. Many programs offer a list of virtues such as responsibility, fairness, and honesty to be taught on a monthly basis, mainly through stories, activities, and service projects, and integrated into the school culture and climate. And while some may argue that virtue development is the domain of the family, I would argue that school is a perfect place to practice and discuss—and hence deepen—students’ understanding of virtues and virtuous behavior.

So, in this way, character education provides the “what”—the content of what we are supposed to teach in order to cultivate kind and good people. And the beauty of doing this work in our diverse schools and communities means that educators and caregivers can work together to adapt and create this content to fit their values, and, as a result, grow in their understanding and acceptance of other human beings.

But character education when taught mainly as a list of virtues has its limitations . Students may be able to define and identify qualities such as honesty, gratitude, and integrity, but do they have the skills to put them into action? In other words, how do we help kids to not only know the good, but to actually do the good?

This is where social-emotional learning can help.

Social-emotional learning provides the “how”

Social-emotional learning (SEL) has grown by leaps and bounds in schools in the last 20 years. Very simply, SEL teaches the social and emotional skills that help us build better relationships with ourselves and each other, and to make ethical, caring decisions. Research has found that when implemented correctly, SEL can help increase academic success, improve student attitudes and relationships, and decrease risky behavior.

So, how can SEL support character education? By providing the skills necessary to put virtue into action. In other words, SEL is the “how” to character education’s “what.”

The Basics of Social-Emotional Learning for Educators

The Basics of Social-Emotional Learning for Educators

This brief course is for people who are new to SEL or would like to brush up on the latest in the field.

For example, compassion is a virtue found in almost every spiritual and wisdom tradition, and is one that is badly needed in today’s world. While many of us aspire to be compassionate people, the reality is that it can actually be a difficult virtue to express. Indeed, research has discovered that if we feel like someone deserved their suffering, if the other person doesn’t look like us, if we feel like we’re in a rush, or if another person’s suffering is too much to handle—all these things can prevent us from expressing compassion.

Social and emotional skills can help us overcome these inner limitations. Educators all over the world have students in their classes who experience unbelievable challenges in their lives—and a normal response is to act compassionately toward them. But sometimes the emotional toll of seeing so much suffering on a daily basis can lead to burnout, which makes feeling and expressing compassion difficult, if not impossible. However, having the skills to identify, navigate, and release challenging emotions can help educators avoid burnout and continue to act with compassion in a safe, life-giving way.

But SEL, too, has its limitations. We can be equipped with the knowledge and skills for resolving conflict, for lessening our stress, for identifying our biases, for working cooperatively, etc. But can we use these skills in the heat of the moment? If someone says or does something that sets off an emotional trigger in us, can we remain composed enough to actually respond in a way that upholds the virtues we hold dear?

This is where mindfulness can help.

Mindfulness makes it “stick”

Similar to SEL, mindfulness in schools has taken off like gangbusters in the last decade. At the GGSC, we define mindfulness as “maintaining a moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and surrounding environment, through a gentle, nurturing lens.” Research on mindfulness in schools , while limited, suggests that students who practice mindfulness show greater well-being, increased academic success, and stronger relationship skills.

The Basics of Mindfulness for Educators

The Basics of Mindfulness for Educators

This brief course gives teachers the opportunity to experience and learn about mindfulness, while considering how to share practices with students and colleagues.

For students, mindfulness helps them deepen their awareness of the connection between their emotions, thoughts, and bodily sensations, making them better able to regulate their emotions, which then impacts things such as their behavior, stress levels, relationships, and ability to focus.

In other words, mindfulness helps SEL skills to stick by making students capable of using them when needed.

Take, for example, a student who is terrified of tests. When a pop quiz is announced by his teacher, rather than making an excuse to leave the classroom, the student “mindfully” notices that he’s starting to sweat and feel nauseous. This cues him to use his SEL skills for calming himself, including deep breathing and positive self-talk.

How to put it all together

So, to recap, character education provides us with the virtues that we wish to uphold in our lives, SEL gives us the skills to put those virtues into action, and mindfulness helps us to grow our inner awareness and ability to use those skills when needed. And a sense of purpose and moral identity will help students apply these insights into themselves to changing the world for the better.

What does this look like in schools?

Let’s say a middle school student named Mia is working on a group project and notices that a friend is cheating by copying the work of another group, which could ultimately affect the outcome for the whole group. Mindfulness helps her to notice that her fists are clenching and her heart is pounding. She uses her SEL conflict resolution skills to talk to her friend, which helps her to practice honesty and care, both character virtues that are important to her.

The fusion of these ideas also applies to teachers. Imagine a new white, first-grade teacher named John who is struggling with the demands of teaching, along with understanding his culturally and economically diverse students. His practice of mindfulness helps him to take a deep breath to center himself before responding to a student who, according to John, has not followed directions. His self-awareness training in SEL cues him to recognize that he may be making assumptions about his students and that he needs to question those assumptions. Finally, being a warm but demanding educator dedicated to social justice is an important part of his character.

Fortunately, many character, SEL, and mindfulness programs already integrate aspects of these three areas. For example, the MOSAIC program out of Rutgers brings together SEL and character. The Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues focuses on character, but has elements of SEL and mindfulness, while CASEL’s new definition of SEL has elements of character. And both researchers and practitioners are beginning to integrate SEL with mindfulness.

So, is this a complete picture of holistic child development that can help create a world filled with kind and good people? Not at all—in fact, it’s a fairly simplistic one. This journey is actually very complex. As child development expert Marvin Berkowitz said: “It’s rocket science.” But it’s a place to start, and it uses the tools that educators already have in their hands.

About the Author

Vicki zakrzewski.

Vicki Zakrzewski, Ph.D. , is the education director of the Greater Good Science Center.

You May Also Enjoy

Five Ways to Raise Kind Children

This article — and everything on this site — is funded by readers like you.

Become a subscribing member today. Help us continue to bring “the science of a meaningful life” to you and to millions around the globe.

Home / Essay Samples / Social Issues / Social Problems

Making the World a Better Place

Essay details

Social Issues

Social Problems

  • Words: 833 (2 pages)

Please note! This essay has been submitted by a student.

Get quality help now

how to make the world kinder essay

Verified writer

Proficient in: Social Issues

how to make the world kinder essay

+ 75 relevant experts are online

More Social Problems Related Essays

SSNP has immense impact on reducing poverty especially crisis time, when people do not have any option or choice. During this time, their income fall greatly, even they lose their jobs and their crops land and living houses by ...

The desire to live in a peaceful world without any social issues has always been a dream for humans. The world has always been striving to become a better place through the acts of kindness and support towards the negative ...

When people watch movies it is usually for entertainment, but most movies usually bring up a social issue. A social issue helps to show people the main problem that is occurring in the movie or the point of the movie. For ...

After World War II, the U.S. entered the 1950s with a strong economy. Business boomed, and unemployment was at an all time low. Women returned to the home from the factories to raise a new baby boom generation. America it seemed ...

There are two ways to define a social problem. The subjectivist outlook looks at social problems as topics of concern. A social problem is thus based on people’s subjective sense that something is or isn’t a problem in response ...

Celebrities have a huge influence on social issues in the society, serving as a role model to many. These youths look up to them as a good example, which can lead to some even wanting to be just like them. As much as fame and ...

Public Service Announcements are messages made to inform and brings awareness to the public based on a specific issue; these announcements are helpful in gathering a community’s attention pertaining to social affairs that ...

What is foster care? Foster care is a system in which a minor is placed into a group home, ward, or a private home of a state certified caregiver also called "foster parents'. In order for a minor to be put into foster care the ...

I, Tonya is a movie based on the figure skater, Tonya Harding, and life during fame. Tonya was seen, to the skating world, as a low class redneck instead of a wealthy, classy, figure skaters. She was judged unfairly at the ...

apologies

This feature is still in progress, but don't worry – you can place an order for an essay with our expert writers

We use cookies to offer you the best experience. By continuing, we’ll assume you agree with our Cookies policy .

Choose your writer among 300 professionals!

You cannot copy content from our website. If you need this sample, insert an email and we'll deliver it to you.

Please, provide real email address.

This email is exists.

Help your kid make the world better

Who doesn’t want their kids to make the world a better place? And children want to make the world better. Inspire them to step up to the challenge with these practical, positive, and powerful ideas from Nat Geo Family.

Make the world better—with kindness

Children who are kind feel better about themselves and often generate the same positive feelings in those around them. But they don’t necessarily get there on their own. Kids need positive role models (ie, you!) as well as practice. Check out these simple ideas that will bring out the kindness in your kid. With kindness comes gratitude. Teach your kids the importance of being thankful .

Make the world better—with art

Sure, art can make you feel good—whether you’re creating it or looking at it. But keeping art in kids’ lives also helps them understand different perspectives, making them more open to new ideas that can help the world. Keep them inspired by art with these ideas . Create for plastic-free crafts . Cooking is also an art! Bring children’s creativity into the kitchen—and some goodness to the dinner table—with these kid-friendly recipes .

Make the world better—with activism

The best way to make the world a better place? Change what isn’t working! Grow kids’ confidence by getting them involved in issues they care about, and show them that even the smallest efforts can make a big difference. Take a look at these inspiring ways to get involved and promote real change . They might even save the Earth . Keep all these ideas—plus others—in one easy-to-grab place with this free mini-book (pdf). It’s packed with ways kids can truly make the world better.

  • Terms of Use
  • Privacy Policy
  • Your US State Privacy Rights
  • Children's Online Privacy Policy
  • Interest-Based Ads
  • About Nielsen Measurement
  • Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information
  • Nat Geo Home
  • Attend a Live Event
  • Book a Trip
  • Inspire Your Kids
  • Shop Nat Geo
  • Visit the D.C. Museum
  • Learn About Our Impact
  • Support Our Mission
  • Advertise With Us
  • Customer Service
  • Renew Subscription
  • Manage Your Subscription
  • Work at Nat Geo
  • Sign Up for Our Newsletters
  • Contribute to Protect the Planet

Copyright © 1996-2015 National Geographic Society Copyright © 2015-2024 National Geographic Partners, LLC. All rights reserved

  • Daily Nurse
  • Springer Publishing Company
  • Springer Publishing Connect
  • Faculty Nurse
  • Nursing Diversity
  • Neonatal Network
  • Employer Log In

Minority Nurse

5 Easy Ways to Make the World a Kinder Place

Nov 30, 2017 | Blog , Minority and Community Health , Nursing Stress Management

how to make the world kinder essay

The modern holiday season has become more of a mad dash from November though the new year. There are so many school plays to see, cookies to bake, family and friends to visit, shopping to do, packages to ship. With all that added to a normally jammed work and life schedule, the holidays become a blurred jumble to get thorough rather than enjoy.

Here are five easy ways to make your holiday season a little nicer, a little kinder, and a lot more satisfying.

1. Give What You Can

Part of the reason giving is so satisfying is because it requires you to share something valuable to you with someone else. If you have money to give, buy some extra presents for kids who might not get much. Spend some of your extra on gift cards to grocery stores and drop them off at a local food pantry. If you have extra goods in your home (unused sweaters, coats, blankets) find places that need those items and drop them off.

2. Spend Your Time

If you don’t have much extra money, spend your time in ways that are equally valuable. Take an afternoon to visit with shut-ins in your town. Bake some homemade goodies to share with neighbors or a senior center. Volunteer your nursing know how to teach a group of kids about health and wellness. Walk some dogs at the pet shelter. Knit baby caps or pack up hurricane relief boxes for areas hard hit this year. The world needs a lot of things right now and time is in short supply. Give some of yours and watch what an impact it has.

3. Work Hard to Spread Cheer

Hustle and bustle doesn’t always make for happy people. The lines in stores, the traffic on the roads, and the time spent on extra errands can make even the most even-keeled person cranky. But a lot of cranky people make everything that much worse. Make an effort to be the person who is kinder than the next. Feed the birds. Hold the door open for someone. Let the person with two items go ahead of you in line. Chat with someone sitting next to you at a community event or a professional gathering. When you are kinder, it spreads to others.

4. Reflect Alone and Together

Take time to think about what the season means to you. Dig deep and uncover what will make the season more joyful and more joy-filled. Do you want to hear more music or do you need silence? Do you need to be around people or do you need a day to yourself? What purpose do you want to fulfill in the new year? Find others who have similar thoughts about this time of year and spend some time talking and hearing each other. Then move into the next month with intention and a vision for making the season better for you.

5. Connect with Others

Connect face-to-face with people you care about or with people you have lost touch with. It’s easy to lose connections in today’s online environment, but the real joys of something as simple as a cup of coffee with a friend can soothe your soul. Reach out to others. Heal old wounds or repair the relationships worth fixing (don’t even consider wasting your time on the ones that aren’t). Recognize that we all carry our own burdens and that together they may be lessened.

How will you make the world a kinder place this year?

  • Recent Posts

Julia Quinn-Szcesuil

  • Casey Green Talks About Critical Care Transport Nursing - February 16, 2024
  • Meet Cardiac Nurse Diana-Lyn Baptiste - February 16, 2024
  • Perianesthesia Nurses Celebrate Dynamic Career Choice - February 10, 2024

Submit a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

See Our Champions of Nursing Diversity

how to make the world kinder essay

Sign up now to get your free digital subscription to Minority Nurse

Get the latest issue.

Ad

Home

  • Kidlink home
  • Project center
  • Student works
  • Teacher center
  • Art gallery

You are here

Wai-question 4. what can i do to make the world a better place, question 4. what can i do to make the world a better place.

www.hindihelpguru.com - HindiHelpGuru.com - Internet Ki Short & Sweet Jankari Hindi me

  •  Education
  •  Exam Tips
  •  Study Materials
  •  Banking Tips
  •  Essay In Hindi
  • General Knowledge

Making The World A Kinder Place Essay

- Last updated on Dec 17, 2023

Making The World A Kinder Place Essay: In a world that often seems chaotic and divided, the need for kindness has never been more pressing. We frequently begin lying to one another when we become engrossed in the negativities of this life. We gripe about everything and believe that life is meaningless or that the world is a terrible place to live. Stress, anxiety, and sadness are eventually brought on by all of these bad ideas. The only thing we need to focus on is how to improve and create a more pleasant environment for ourselves in this planet, which is not as horrible as many of us may believe. Here are some suggestions for improving, pacifying, and perfecting the earth.

how to make the world kinder essay

The Power of Kindness

Kindness is a universal language that transcends cultural boundaries. It has the power to bridge gaps, heal wounds, and create a sense of unity among diverse communities. In our fast-paced lives, taking a moment to extend a kind gesture or offer support can have a ripple effect, influencing others to do the same.

Cultivating Compassion in Everyday Life

To make the world a kinder place, we must first cultivate compassion in our daily lives. This involves being mindful of our interactions with others, understanding their perspectives, and choosing empathy over judgment. Simple acts such as actively listening, offering a helping hand, or expressing gratitude can contribute significantly to creating a more compassionate world.

Acts of Kindness: From Small to Significant

Kindness comes in various forms, from small, everyday gestures to more significant acts that can make a lasting impact. Holding the door for someone, offering a genuine compliment, or volunteering at a local community center are examples of small acts that contribute to a positive and compassionate environment. On a larger scale, supporting charitable organizations, participating in community projects, and advocating for social justice issues are ways to make a meaningful difference.

The Domino Effect of Kindness

One of the remarkable aspects of kindness is its domino effect. When individuals experience kindness, they are more likely to pass it on to others. This creates a chain reaction, fostering a culture of compassion that can extend far beyond individual interactions. By consciously choosing kindness, we contribute to a collective effort to make the world a better place.

Also Read This :   Lachit Borphukan Essay In English

Overcoming Challenges with Kindness

In the face of adversity and challenges, kindness becomes a powerful tool for resilience and healing. Whether it’s offering support to someone going through a difficult time or promoting understanding in the midst of conflicts, choosing kindness can help build bridges and foster a sense of unity in our communities.

Teaching Kindness to Future Generations

To create a lasting impact, it is crucial to instill the value of kindness in future generations. Educators, parents, and community leaders play a vital role in teaching empathy, compassion, and the importance of making a positive difference in the world. By incorporating kindness into educational curricula and leading by example, we can shape a more compassionate and harmonious world for generations to come.

making the world a kinder place essay is a collective responsibility that starts with individual choices. By recognizing the power of kindness, cultivating compassion in our daily lives, and embracing the ripple effect of positive actions, we can contribute to creating a more empathetic and connected world. Let us strive to be the catalysts for change, inspiring others to join in the journey towards a kinder and more harmonious global community.

Nithin Name Meaning In Kannada

EU AI Act: first regulation on artificial intelligence

The use of artificial intelligence in the EU will be regulated by the AI Act, the world’s first comprehensive AI law. Find out how it will protect you.

A man faces a computer generated figure with programming language in the background

As part of its digital strategy , the EU wants to regulate artificial intelligence (AI) to ensure better conditions for the development and use of this innovative technology. AI can create many benefits , such as better healthcare; safer and cleaner transport; more efficient manufacturing; and cheaper and more sustainable energy.

In April 2021, the European Commission proposed the first EU regulatory framework for AI. It says that AI systems that can be used in different applications are analysed and classified according to the risk they pose to users. The different risk levels will mean more or less regulation. Once approved, these will be the world’s first rules on AI.

Learn more about what artificial intelligence is and how it is used

What Parliament wants in AI legislation

Parliament’s priority is to make sure that AI systems used in the EU are safe, transparent, traceable, non-discriminatory and environmentally friendly. AI systems should be overseen by people, rather than by automation, to prevent harmful outcomes.

Parliament also wants to establish a technology-neutral, uniform definition for AI that could be applied to future AI systems.

Learn more about Parliament’s work on AI and its vision for AI’s future

AI Act: different rules for different risk levels

The new rules establish obligations for providers and users depending on the level of risk from artificial intelligence. While many AI systems pose minimal risk, they need to be assessed.

Unacceptable risk

Unacceptable risk AI systems are systems considered a threat to people and will be banned. They include:

  • Cognitive behavioural manipulation of people or specific vulnerable groups: for example voice-activated toys that encourage dangerous behaviour in children
  • Social scoring: classifying people based on behaviour, socio-economic status or personal characteristics
  • Biometric identification and categorisation of people
  • Real-time and remote biometric identification systems, such as facial recognition

Some exceptions may be allowed for law enforcement purposes. “Real-time” remote biometric identification systems will be allowed in a limited number of serious cases, while “post” remote biometric identification systems, where identification occurs after a significant delay, will be allowed to prosecute serious crimes and only after court approval.

AI systems that negatively affect safety or fundamental rights will be considered high risk and will be divided into two categories:

1) AI systems that are used in products falling under the EU’s product safety legislation . This includes toys, aviation, cars, medical devices and lifts.

2) AI systems falling into specific areas that will have to be registered in an EU database:

  • Management and operation of critical infrastructure
  • Education and vocational training
  • Employment, worker management and access to self-employment
  • Access to and enjoyment of essential private services and public services and benefits
  • Law enforcement
  • Migration, asylum and border control management
  • Assistance in legal interpretation and application of the law.

All high-risk AI systems will be assessed before being put on the market and also throughout their lifecycle.

General purpose and generative AI

Generative AI, like ChatGPT, would have to comply with transparency requirements:

  • Disclosing that the content was generated by AI
  • Designing the model to prevent it from generating illegal content
  • Publishing summaries of copyrighted data used for training

High-impact general-purpose AI models that might pose systemic risk, such as the more advanced AI model GPT-4, would have to undergo thorough evaluations and any serious incidents would have to be reported to the European Commission.

Limited risk

Limited risk AI systems should comply with minimal transparency requirements that would allow users to make informed decisions. After interacting with the applications, the user can then decide whether they want to continue using it. Users should be made aware when they are interacting with AI. This includes AI systems that generate or manipulate image, audio or video content, for example deepfakes.

On December 9 2023, Parliament reached a provisional agreement with the Council on the AI act . The agreed text will now have to be formally adopted by both Parliament and Council to become EU law. Before all MEPs have their say on the agreement, Parliament’s internal market and civil liberties committees will vote on it.

More on the EU’s digital measures

  • Cryptocurrency dangers and the benefits of EU legislation
  • Fighting cybercrime: new EU cybersecurity laws explained
  • Boosting data sharing in the EU: what are the benefits?
  • EU Digital Markets Act and Digital Services Act
  • Five ways the European Parliament wants to protect online gamers
  • Artificial Intelligence Act

Related articles

Digital transformation in the eu, share this article on:.

  • Sign up for mail updates
  • PDF version
  • Share full article

Advertisement

Supported by

Square Feet

When Science Class Is in a Former Macy’s

Charter schools are popping up in struggling malls as landlords look for alternative tenants and communities seek to increase educational opportunities.

Children in navy blue and khaki school uniforms walking single file through a colorful hallway.

By Paul Sullivan

In the early morning in November, with a chill still in the air, three lines of cars inch across the open, cracked parking lot at the Sumter Mall in Sumter, S.C.

It’s still hours before the doors open at Belk, a department store with roots in the Southeast and the mall’s last remaining anchor tenant. The mall, which is about 60 percent vacant, has a hodgepodge of other tenants. Call center workers are parking or being dropped off for their shifts. People are making their way into a nearby Planet Fitness.

But on the other side of the parking lot, scores of young children dash out of cars and through a mall entrance. They’re not playing hooky; they’re going to school in a former J.C. Penney store. And if all goes according to plan, they will keep going there for years as the school adds more grades and takes over more of the mall each year.

Developers across the country are putting new schools in struggling malls, a growing trend that serves several purposes: increasing educational opportunity, revitalizing communities and reimagining the thousands of vacant retail spaces that make once-vibrant shopping centers a blight.

“We’ve definitely seen all kinds of alternative uses of malls — to redevelop, repurpose and reimagine them,” said Thomas Dobrowski, vice chairman of the capital markets group at Newmark, a real estate services company.

Mr. Dobrowski added that more mall owners were coming around to the idea of adding schools as retail tenants dropped out. “I remember malls where 10,000 to 15,000 square feet was devoted to schools,” he said. “Now, more higher education and schools are wanting to take vacant anchor boxes for full educational use. That could be 80,000 square feet and up.”

Nationally, mall vacancy rates were about 10.3 percent in the fourth quarter of last year, up from 10.2 percent in the pandemic, according to a report from Moody’s Analytics.

Community malls like the one in Sumter have been hit even harder as consumer tastes change. “Retailers that have traditionally been mall-based have been closing underperforming stores and are now looking to smaller-format open-air suburban centers for expansion,” the commercial real estate services firm CBRE said a recent report .

But at Sumter Mall, a combination of community initiative, philanthropic interest and pragmatism on the part of the mall owner, the Hull Property Group, has led to the creation of a new tenant, Liberty STEAM Charter School.

The school was started five years ago by Greg A. Thompson, a local businessman and philanthropist, who was seeking a way to bolster the fortunes of his hometown and help him attract workers. Liberty STEAM plans to add a grade a year, with a fourth grade coming in the fall.

“Our mission is to prove that we can give a world-class education to everyone and, in particular, to our disadvantaged children,” he said. In Sumter, only 30 percent of the students can read, write or do math at their grade level.

Liberty STEAM did not start in a mall. Initially, classes were held in an unused elementary school in an underserved part of Sumter, but the school quickly outgrew the space (though the building still houses kindergarten and first grade).

After looking for a larger space, Mr. Thompson, the founder and chief executive of the Thompson Construction Group, chose the enormous, mostly empty mall after failing to reach deals for more traditional school properties in the town, which has a population of about 43,000. It gives Liberty STEAM room to keep adding grades for the next decade, as well as other services for children.

“We want to focus on the whole child,” Mr. Thompson said. “As we grow the school, we’ve had conversations to have a doctor there. We want to have a little clinic and an eye doctor there, too.”

Mr. Dobrowski said the arrangement offered many advantages for schools and landlords. Malls are generally in highly trafficked areas, so they are easy to get to. And they can be a blank canvas for a school to reimagine how it wants the inside to look.

For owners, selling or renting the spot of a former anchor tenant to a school brings life to what was a dark, empty part of a vast mall, revitalizing 400,000 square feet or more of unused space. The conversions are also a great driver of good will in the community.

“You’re not going to get the same rent as a retail tenant or a medical office tenant,” Mr. Dobrowski said. “It has to be used more as, ‘How can I improve the community and ingratiate myself here?’”

In Sumter, Trevor T. Ivey, the executive director of Liberty STEAM, said moving into the mall aligned with the school’s mission of revitalization. “It’s important for people to understand that the mall fits in with the approach that we’re going to revitalize our community and renovate its buildings,” he said.

High Point Academy in Spartanburg, S.C., is an example of a school’s being part of a larger redesign. It operates in a space in an outlet mall that once housed a Waccamaw Pottery store, which was home to a church before the academy moved in. The mall now has a volleyball center and a medical office to supplement the school.

James M. Hull, founder of the Hull Property Group, which owns and manages the Sumter Mall and another three dozen malls in 18 states, said Liberty STEAM was the third school in one of the company’s malls. The other two are in Greenwood, S.C., and Augusta, Ga.

When he considered putting schools in his malls, he did so with an eye toward the overall return on the investment. “I am not doing any of this philanthropically,” he said. “I’m doing this because it’s in my best financial interest to be a good steward of the property.”

But for Mr. Thompson, who sits on Sumter’s Development Board, the investment in Liberty STEAM and the mall is part of an initiative to help revitalize the town and make sure his businesses can attract workers to the area and retain them.

“If we want to have sustainable success, we need to have educational success to create the work force of the future,” he said.

KIPP, the national charter school operator, has about a half-dozen schools in malls, with a high school being built inside a former Macy’s store in Nashville.

“We left the four walls and mixed it up on the inside,” said Marc Gauthier, founding principal at KIPP Antioch Global Middle and High Schools, which will run the high school in the Macy’s shell. “Where the men’s department was will be our weight room. Where the escalators once were, we’re drawing in some natural light. The bottom floor will be our science lab.”

Reworking the Macy’s was cheaper than building a high school on farmland, which was all that was available. “Having built ground-up buildings and knowing how expensive that is, it was attractive to already have a shell, the utilities, the zoning, the parking,” said Daniel Gennaoui, who was the chief financial officer for the KIPP schools in Nashville.

The renovation cost about $200 to $250 a square foot, whereas new construction would have been upward of $300 a square foot. “We’re very cost conscious,” he said. “Every dollar we spend on a school building is a dollar we’re not spending on a teacher or a program.”

Mr. Thompson said he wanted the school to serve as a model for improving education in the Southeast.

“More money doesn’t solve the problem,” he said. “The right vision, the right leaders and the right followers solves the problem.”

A caption in an earlier version of this article reversed the identities of the two people in the photo. Greg Thompson, the founder of Liberty STEAM, is on the right, not the left. Trevor Ivey, the school’s executive director, is on the left.

How we handle corrections

Paul Sullivan , the  Wealth Matters  columnist from 2008 to 2021, is the founder of  The Company of Dads , a work and parenting site aimed at fathers. He is also the author of  The Thin Green Line : The Money Secrets of the Super Wealthy and  Clutch : Why Some People Excel Under Pressure and Others Don’t.  @sullivanpaul More about Paul Sullivan

an image, when javascript is unavailable

The Definitive Voice of Entertainment News

Subscribe for full access to The Hollywood Reporter

site categories

‘feud’ bosses explain mid-season bottle episode with james baldwin and truman capote.

Director Gus Van Sant and writer Jon Robin Baitz say the imagined encounter in episode five of Ryan Murphy’s FX series draws from writings found in Baldwin’s diaries.

By Brande Victorian

Brande Victorian

  • Share this article on Facebook
  • Share this article on Twitter
  • Share this article on Flipboard
  • Share this article on Email
  • Show additional share options
  • Share this article on Linkedin
  • Share this article on Pinit
  • Share this article on Reddit
  • Share this article on Tumblr
  • Share this article on Whatsapp
  • Share this article on Print
  • Share this article on Comment

Feud

[This story contains spoilers from episode five of Feud : Capote vs. The Swans , “The Secret Inner Lives of Swans.”]

In a move that likely would’ve been met with disapproval by Truman Capote’s once-beloved “swans,” the wealthy socialite foes of the In Cold Blood author are decentralized in episode five of Feud: Capote vs. The Swans in favor of opening up dialogue about the position gay men were allowed to occupy in 1970s New York high society.

Related Stories

Critics' conversation: winter tv's wicked games, diane lane on the unfiltered slim keith, her betrayal and what the real swans would say about 'feud' season 2.

In the episode, Baldwin both empathizes with Capote’s downtrodden state while also encouraging him to take back his power and finish what he started — soberly — with the now-posthumously published novel Answered Prayers . By Chalk’s account, Baldwin was the perfect literary figure to insert into the idealized encounter.

“He was an advocate not just for Black people, but for queer people, for people being themselves and being safe,” the actor tells The Hollywood Reporter.

Baldwin also had his own swans of sorts to contend with as a Black gay man in America, ultimately choosing to relocate to Paris to escape racial and sexual prejudices.

“Everything that was James was not acceptable,” Chalk explains. “One of the reasons he was not such a centerpiece of the Black civil rights movement is because of his sexuality and his ‘isms’ that were perceived to not be super masculine.”

To that end, Murphy and his team made the decision to incorporate the fa-word into the series’ dialogue as a jarring depiction of how easily the swans, Ann Woodward ( Demi Moore ) and Lee Radziwill ( Calista Flockhart ) in particular, were able to substitute gay slurs for decorum when it suited their emotional state.

“We talked a lot about the use of those words, particularly the use of the word ‘f—’ and ‘f—ot,’ and how it was depicted in the show,” Murphy explained in a press conference ahead of the season, attended by THR . “Obviously, it’s a word none of us like, none of us use, and we had a lot of conversation about it, but it was so important to [Truman]. It was the thing that he claims that [Ann] did and also that Lee did to him that broke his heart and broke his soul, because he thought that was such a betrayal.

“So for us,” Murphy added, “as difficult as it was to articulate, it was about being true to the characters and the time and the power of words. We researched that quite heavily and we had a lot of conversations about, ‘Should we leave it in? Should we take it out?’ But ultimately, we did [leave it in]. And as a gay person who that word has been used about since I was 3 years old, I really understand the wound of it and the pain of it and how it really can turn your life upside down. So we decided to be honest.”

What was the inspiration for this bottle episode centered on James Baldwin and Truman Capote?

JON ROBIN BAITZ Of course, it’s an imagined event. It’s a little play and I’m a playwright, and I love to do things that look at things from the side. I needed — and then everyone agreed — an observer with a great heart to come in and warn Truman, and attempt to rectify the situation he was in. I find James Baldwin to be an avatar of wisdom, and a life in poetry and a life in the heart. The exile part that he recommends, ultimately, was something that Baldwin did. He moved to Paris. He saw what the world was becoming. Had Truman been able to follow his advice, he might have lived another, what, 30 years? Baldwin’s wise and not invested in pettiness.

What do we know about the real relationship between Truman Capote and James Baldwin, and what kind of research informed how that episode was shaped?

BAITZ In Baldwin’s diaries there’s mention of crossing paths with Truman. They had a kind of ambivalent relationship. I think Baldwin was kinder because he was naturally kinder about Truman, but he was very much hurt by Truman. Truman dismissed Baldwin’s writing as second-rate, about which he was spectacularly wrong, and I think he was threatened by him.

There’s a lot of commentary in the episode about white women privilege and gay men being used as their accessories. Talk about opening up that conversation.

BAITZ Also, these women are possessions in many cases. They are objects and their husbands would’ve been threatened by a straight dude hanging out with them. And so, unwittingly perhaps, to some extent, they know that they can adopt a gay mascot. It turns out to be about character, unfortunately, not about sexual preference.

Do you think there was a certain naiveté about these women that they thought Capote would never use their lives for his material gain?

BAITZ People lie to themselves and say things like, “Oh, yes, but it’ll never happen with to me. They love me too much. I love them too much,” and that becomes a kind of mantra, a delusion. I think it was Joan Didion who said, “Writers are always selling someone out.” They did get warned by Marella Agnelli, and she banned him from her life at a certain point.

VAN SANT Also, the type of writing that he was doing was the kind of thing that their social circle would read. He did disguise the names, but because the events were so specific that it was unmistakably them to their friends who mattered, that just was too much for them. I think they were also changeable enough that they didn’t have any trouble just dropping Truman. He was one of their many friends. It was sad, but he had to go.

The f-word is said casually between Baldwin and Capote, but it’s also weaponized against Capote by some of the swans. Was there any hesitation about having that word in the series, why did you ultimately choose to use it?

BAITZ It’s peppered sort of deliberately in moments of exposure and intimacy in contrast to their public public personas. The swans let their hair down when they’re by themselves together. And I think that word in some ways still has a kind of pop of power sometimes, particularly in a show that’s about manners and modes and formality. But that was instinctive and, in real life, that’s sort of what happens when people are at home.

Why do you think Truman ultimately was never able to recover and finish his novel?

VAN SANT I personally think it was mostly his celebrity from In Cold Blood that elevated him to the point where he was hanging out with these socialites and spending his time doing that. He wasn’t really spending time writing. He wrote a little, but then he was, I think, partying and celebrating and it got out of control. The alcohol and the pills kept it so that the novel Answered Prayers wasn’t as clear to him anymore as maybe it once could have been.

The eight-episode limited series Feud: Capote vs. The Swans releases new episodes on FX Wednesdays at 10 p.m., streaming the following day on Hulu. Read THR ‘s season coverage here .

THR Newsletters

Sign up for THR news straight to your inbox every day

More from The Hollywood Reporter

Wendy williams’ guardian sues lifetime parent company a+e networks ahead of documentary (reports), ‘game of thrones’ spinoff ‘the hedge knight’ gets 2025 release date, úrsula corberó, charles dance, richard dormer join eddie redmayne in ‘the day of the jackal’ series, behind the ukrainian series made in the war zone, harry potter tv series aiming for 2026 debut on max, ‘tv’s top 5’: amy schumer on making a deeply personal (and timely) second season of ‘life & beth’.

Quantcast

IMAGES

  1. Best Earth Essay for Kids from class 3 to 6

    how to make the world kinder essay

  2. Learning How the World Works Essay Example

    how to make the world kinder essay

  3. The Perfect World Free Essay Example

    how to make the world kinder essay

  4. Lesson Zone AU

    how to make the world kinder essay

  5. 002 Essay Example How To Make The World Better Place Science Can Help

    how to make the world kinder essay

  6. 4 Simple Steps to Create a Kinder World

    how to make the world kinder essay

VIDEO

  1. Making the world 🌎🌍 a kinder place essay writing

  2. You should be kinder to this world ❤️

  3. Kinder Our World

  4. DIY Kinder joy with paper #shorts #tonniartandcraft #youtubeshorts #love #art#craft

  5. make the world a kinder place🙂

  6. Just for fun eggs Prank😀 #telugu #viral #uk #telugushorts #uk #teluguvlogs #funny #trending

COMMENTS

  1. 6 Simple Ways We Can All Make the World a Kinder Place

    Give someone a smile In today's crazy non-stop world we are constantly distracted. Things like social media, technology, and feelings of missing out cause us to stay stuck on autopilot. This makes it hard to be aware of your surroundings let alone other people. That's why we should slow down connect with each other in person.

  2. 11 ways to make the world a kinder place

    11 ways to make the world a kinder place For World Kindness Day, we bring you 11 ways you can show some kindness… and maybe feel better too. Laura Kelly 13 Nov 2021 World Kindness Day, which takes place every year on November 13, is a celebration of the ties that bind our communities together.

  3. Making the world a kinder place essay writing

    Making the world a kinder place essay writing ️ Making the World a Kinder PlaceIntroduction:In a world that is often marked by division, hatred, and indiffe...

  4. Think Globally, Act Personally. 5 ways to make our world a kinder place

    Here are five simple ways to start. 1. See the Value In Others Why see value in others? Because everyone has value. The trick, sometimes, is allowing yourself to see it. Everyone is someone's...

  5. How to Change a Life and Make the World a Kinder Place

    Try this exercise: Pretend everyone is your friend. Treat them accordingly. When you're in traffic and see someone trying to turn in, pretend the other driver is your friend. Pretend you know and like the person. Be friendly! Smile and wave them in ahead of you. Kindness combats depression and even chronic pain.

  6. Developing a kinder society to make the world better

    There would be no wrong religion, because every religion is right and doesn't teach people to do evil things. There's no difficult way to create a kinder society. We just have to respect each other. There are many actions to create it, such us tolerance and being kind to everyone. Let's see how beautiful our world can be when filled with ...

  7. The Power of Compassion: Making the World a Kinder Place

    In a world that often seems divided and disconnected, compassion has the potential to bridge the gaps and make the world a kinder place. At its core, compassion is the ability to understand and empathize with the suffering of others. It is the willingness to extend a helping hand, to offer support and comfort to those in need.

  8. 10 Ways To Build A Kinder World

    10 Ways To Build A Kinder World | Hidden Strength Discover how you can play your part in making the world a kinder place… The power to make our world a nicer, happier place to live is right at our fingertips. Even the smallest gesture can brighten someone's day and make them feel understood, loved and valued.

  9. The World Is a Kinder Place When You're Kind

    The World Is a Kinder Place When You're Kind By Edit Danilian "Don't wait for people to be friendly. Show them how." ~Unknown Sometimes I stop to think about how in the world I ended up where I have. I started off with very little, and somehow along the way I have ended up generally happy and on my own two feet.

  10. How to make the world a kinder place

    How to make the world a kinder place. When my boys were teens, they each wanted a car. Great, their dad and I said. Get a job, save up your money — enough for a car, insurance and repairs ...

  11. Making the world a kinder place essay

    Making the world a kinder place essay World kindness day is celebrated on 13 November every year to promote the importance of kindness in our communities and the world. In today's fast-paced and competitive world, it can be easy to lose sight of the power of a kind gesture or word.

  12. How Educators Can Help Make a Kinder World

    Two areas, in particular, are emerging as critical factors in cultivating virtue: purpose and moral identity. Purpose is inherently moral, as can be seen in its scientific definition: "having a goal in life that you care deeply about and that contributes to the world beyond yourself in some productive sense."

  13. Making The World A Better Place

    Another way to make the world a better place is by reducing our eco-footprint. We can start by not using single-use plastic. Instead of plastic water bottles, we can use reusable water bottles instead. A lot of the plastic goes into the ocean which kills thousands of animals and makes the water dirty. We need to use more public transportation ...

  14. Help your kid make the world better

    Make the world better—with art. Sure, art can make you feel good—whether you're creating it or looking at it. But keeping art in kids' lives also helps them understand different ...

  15. Making The World A Kinder Place Essay In English

    Making The World A Kinder Place Essay In English, We have discussed in this video hope you have liked this video or if you any quarry write it in the comment...

  16. making the world a kinder place essay

    About Press Copyright Contact us Creators Advertise Developers Terms Privacy Policy & Safety How YouTube works Test new features NFL Sunday Ticket Press Copyright ...

  17. 5 Easy Ways to Make the World a Kinder Place

    2. Spend Your Time. If you don't have much extra money, spend your time in ways that are equally valuable. Take an afternoon to visit with shut-ins in your town. Bake some homemade goodies to share with neighbors or a senior center. Volunteer your nursing know how to teach a group of kids about health and wellness.

  18. 21 Ways to Make the World a Kinder Place

    21 Ways to Make the World a Kinder Place: 1. Smile at people when they walk by you! They'll almost always smile back. 2. Reach out to a friend you haven't talked to in a while. 3. Hold the door open for someone. 4. Compliment a stranger! 5. Be patient with someone that you're frustrated with. 6.

  19. WAI-Question 4. What can I do to make the world a better place?

    Write an essay expressing your ideas and your feelings toward having a better future for all. Post your essay in your page in Kidspace-Write a poem about friends and friendship. Post your poem in the Kidspace to share with your online classmates. Post comments in their pages; Make an acronym with the word LOVE.

  20. Making The World A Kinder Place Essay

    Making The World A Kinder Place Essay - Last updated on Dec 17, 2023 Making The World A Kinder Place Essay: In a world that often seems chaotic and divided, the need for kindness has never been more pressing. We frequently begin lying to one another when we become engrossed in the negativities of this life.

  21. EU AI Act: first regulation on artificial intelligence

    Once approved, these will be the world's first rules on AI. Learn more about what artificial intelligence is and how it is used. What Parliament wants in AI legislation. Parliament's priority is to make sure that AI systems used in the EU are safe, transparent, traceable, non-discriminatory and environmentally friendly. AI systems should be ...

  22. Making the world a kinder place essay/how to make the world a kinder

    7 Share 295 views 3 days ago Essay on Make Earth A Better Place || Make Earth Great To Live This video is all how we can make our Earth a great place to live here happily. Which activities...

  23. Black workers are enjoying a jobs boom in America

    That is one of the motivations for the Biden administration's proposal to subsidise child care and make pre-kindergarten free, a policy which would need a Democratic sweep in the election later ...

  24. What to Know About Indonesia's Election

    Indonesia, the world's third-largest democracy, will hold its general election on Wednesday. Election Day is a national holiday, and on average, about 75 percent of eligible voters have turned out.

  25. Making the World a Kinder Place Essay, Speech, Paragraph or ...

    Making the World a Kinder Place Essay, Speech, Paragraph or Short Note in English, Kindness essay#makingtheworldakinderplace#makingtheworldakinderplaceessay...

  26. When Science Class Is in a Former Macy's

    Initially, classes were held in an unused elementary school in an underserved part of Sumter, but the school quickly outgrew the space (though the building still houses kindergarten and first grade).

  27. 'Feud' Episode 5: James Baldwin and Truman Capote's Real Relationship

    To that end, Murphy and his team made the decision to incorporate the fa-word into the series' dialogue as a jarring depiction of how easily the swans, Ann Woodward and Lee Radziwill (Calista ...

  28. Essay on Making the World a Kinder Place//Making the World a Kinder

    Essay on Making the World a Kinder Place//Making the World a Kinder Place Essay/How to make a better place essay.