9 Creative Problem Solving Tools For Your Next Breakthrough Idea

This is a suite of 9 creative problem solving tools from Erik op ten Berg. He’s an expert in creative thinking or applying creativity from the Netherlands.

He’s been working in this field for 25 years and has a Master of Science from Buffalo State University in New York.

His creative problem solving process takes a challenge and finds ideas that are new, useful and meaningful. I guarantee you this process will help you mobilise your group’s creative thinking skills.

You and your group will find original ideas which are always there. This helps you get to the holy grail of breakthrough thinking and quite possibly the ‘next big thing’.

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Interview with Erik op ten Berg

Watch this video to see Erik describe in detail how each tool / activity works with examples.

Please note that the video and audio quality is a little shaky in places. Sorry about that! We had some technical issues with Skype that were difficult to overcome.

Four Stages of Creative Problem Solving

The first two stages help you and your group ‘explore ideas’. The third stage helps you select the best ideas and the fourth tests the feasibility of your best ideas.

These are the four stages you need to go through (no skipping a stage please):

  • Idea generation
  • Idea expansion
  • Idea selection
  • Idea feasibility

Always start with the ABC Avalanche and then use 1 or 2 of the next 5 tools to expand the list of possible solutions.

1. ABC Avalanche (3:55sec on video)

A very basic brainstorming technique but extremely powerful.

This tool asks people to generate at least 26 ideas for a specific challenge sorting them by their first letters. It takes about 10-15 minutes.

  • Write down the central question.
  • Write down the letters of the alphabet.
  • Generate many ideas sorting them by their first letters.
  • Complete the alphabet.

Because participants focus on generating a specific number of ideas they postpone their judgments.

These attitudes are core to creative problem solving:

  • Generating many alternative ideas.
  • Postponing judgments.
  • Moving past the first few (obvious) ideas.

Depending on the number of people in the session you can split into sub-groups. Feel free to build in a little competition between the groups if you like.

From this stage you have at least 26 starting ideas and people won’t have jumped into judging whether they are good ideas or not.

2. Breaking Assumptions (7:38min on video)

This is a second stage to an ABC Avalanche.

One of the very classical thinking techniques because to be truly creative you need to break patterns.

Once you’re aware of a pattern or an assumption in your idea generation so far you can deliberately break this assumption and new ideas will come forward and present themselves.

  • List 5 assumptions present in the question or in the list of ideas.
  • Take the opposite of each assumption.
  • Imagine new solutions that run opposite to the initial assumptions.
  • Add these to your list of ideas.

You ask the group to identify any patterns or assumptions that are built into either the challenge or list of ideas they’ve generated so far.

Then you ask them to take the opposite view (i.e. break that assumption) and come up with any new solutions and add them to your list of ideas.

3. Association Flower (11:13min on video)

Also a second stage technique after ABC Avalanche giving you and your group extra ‘access points’ from which to consider the challenge and generate more ideas.

This technique will generate a long list of associated keywords that can be used to generate even more ideas related to the original challenge.

  • Write down a keyword about the challenge in the centre of the flower and four words that are associated with the keyword around it (see template on next page).
  • Write around this keyword four associations.
  • Then follow each of the 4 words in turn up its branch writing associated keywords as you go.
  • Then use all these words to think in a new way about your challenge and generate even more ideas.
  • Make the list of ideas as large as possible.

4. Visual Connections (15:33min on video)

Another way to create new ‘access points’ from which to generate new ideas.

  • Focus on an interesting object, picture or an article in a newspaper.
  • Write down your thoughts, reactions, impressions and observations.
  • Make connections to the central topic and write these down as new ideas.
  • Repeat this several times and expand your list of ideas.

You could bring a deck of pictures with you, or a set of magazines, or even ask the participants to bring their own magazines so they’re an integral part of the process.

5. SCAMPER (18:31min on video)

Use the 8 words from the acronym to approach the challenge from a different angle and generate a larger list of creative ideas.

SCAMPER is the summary of 72 questions used by Alex Osborn who is the man that founded the concept of brainstorming in the early 40s.

  • SUBSTITUTE: parts, the whole, material…
  • COMBINE: functions, material, just different…
  • ADAPT: other color, place, use, form, timing…
  • MAXIMIZE: bigger, stronger, longer, more time, macro level, use more often…
  • MINIMIZE: smaller, lighter, shorter, micro level, less important…
  • PUT TO OTHER USES: other context…
  • ELIMINATE: parts, functions, material…
  • REVERSE: sequence, upside down, inside out…

There’s no need to do all these words. Let them go wherever they want to go to create more productive access points to tackle the original challenge.

6. Analogy with nature (22:32min on video)

Sometimes people are using this technique as biomimicry .

Your question to the group: what kind of animals are you thinking about when you use your imagination?

Get them to list lots of animals quickly and ask them to select one. What is it that makes this an extraordinary animal?

Once you have that list of characteristics about the animal use those words as access points to generate more ideas about the challenge. What you’re doing here is using the beauty of nature and bringing that connection back to the challenge.

  • List several names of animals.
  • Choose a special animal with no link to the problem.
  • List 10 characteristics about this animal.
  • Use each characteristic as a stimulus for new ideas.
  • Make a force-to-fit to the problem and boost your list of ideas.

Next step is to select ideas through a process of prioritization that you want to go deeper into and do further work on to develop them further.

7. Selecting ideas & COCD Box (24:37min on video)

Using a combination of dots (or hits as Erik calls them) and his COCD box you’re looking to boil down your grand list of ideas down to about 15 really good ones (5 in each color – blue, red and yellow).

  • 5-15 IDEAS: everybody selects his or her 1-3 favorite hits; make out of these a top 3.
  • 15-40 IDEAS: 5 sparkling ideas per person; focus on these and define an overall top 5 using dots or hits.
  • >40 IDEAS: select individually 5-8 blue-red-yellow ideas (COCD-box); define the BIG 5 in each color.

Once you have 5 good ideas in each of the coloured boxes look for themes across them to try and boil everything down to a Top 5 by making some smart combinations.

If you’re looking for breakthrough ideas (and most often you will be) the ideas in the red box will be the ones you want to focus on in the next stage.

8. Concepting (30:07min on video)

What you’re looking to do now is enrich your ideas into concepts. You do this by combining your headline ideas with other ideas that are closely related from your overall list.

Take each red idea in turn and see if you can bundle in other ideas from the grand list.

  • Focus on the selected ideas.
  • Take one idea and add on different ideas (with and without dots) from the idea list, to enrich the original idea.
  • Do this for all the selected ideas.
  • Give the enriched ideas an attractive title.
  • Go on with these results.

Then give the enriched ideas a more attractive title.

9. PPCO (33:38min on video)

This is one of Erik’s little gems he got out of his Master of Science in Buffalo.

At this stage you’re looking to expand and test your best ideas or concepts for feasibility.

  • Pluses : what is good, positive about the idea.
  • Potentials : what are the possibilities if the idea were pursued.
  • Concerns : phrase shortcomings or limitations of the idea as questions.
  • Overcomes : generate ideas to overcome the ‘burning’ concerns.

PPCO is like a SWOT analysis but in a more positive end. A moving towards approach instead of getting away approach. Facing truth and reality in a way of opportunities.

Pluses : Let’s see why we should do this idea. Potentials : What are the extra potentials of this idea that you haven’t considered before? These are extra or super pluses. Concerns : ‘how can I overcome (insert negative point here) …” Overcomes : your last stage of creative thinking where you’re generating answers of how to overcome your concerns.

You end with a triple positive state with very realistic backgrounds. That’s the kind of creativity you need when you have a good idea and you want to move it further whilst trying to taste a bit of the potential of it.

Creative problem solving is a process that, if you have the right tools and activities at hand, you can consistently achieve fantastic results from.

For your session to be a success you need to make sure you move past the first few obvious ideas, you generate tonnes of alternatives and that you postpone judgment on the quality of each idea until the appropriate moment.

How does your experience stack up? Do you have any secrets you’d like to share in the comments below?

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About the Author

Erik op ten Berg (1963) holds a Master of Science Degree in Creativity and Change Leadership, and is educated in Innovation Management at Delft Technical University in The Netherlands. He is a well-known trainer in Creative Problem Solving, and moderator of hundreds of change focused brainstorm workshops. Besides his own company Pioen consult he is also partner at the “Center for the Development of Creative Thinking” (COCD) in Belgium.

Thanks great would like to communicate with Erik Op Ten Berg

dear Rakesh! send me an email at [email protected] ; I will appologize for the delays in my answer because of some Summer holiday trips until August 22…

Thanks for sharing all these ideas. Very interesting and it generates a lots of ideas. One of them is the potential use of istock or getty image platform to search visuals using key words for Visual connections exercises. Wonder if you have try something like this in the past.

Great idea Dany. You need to be careful of potential copyright infringements obviously but there are loads of free stock image repositories out there too you can use in the way you suggest.

hi Dany! visual connections are an “easy way” to create access to thoughts that didn’t came up before; you can do this offline and also online; my experience with group thinking is better with offline pictures then online; bur for individual practice the online inspiration can be very productive and provocative; I wish you lots of creative detours in your own thinking; best wishes, Erik op ten Berg

Very educative, very informative, very useful for a trainer/coach. Thanks for great help to trainer community. World owes you a lot.

excellent approach

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How to Be a More Creative Problem-Solver at Work: 8 Tips

Business professionals using creative problem-solving at work

  • 01 Mar 2022

The importance of creativity in the workplace—particularly when problem-solving—is undeniable. Business leaders can’t approach new problems with old solutions and expect the same result.

This is where innovation-based processes need to guide problem-solving. Here’s an overview of what creative problem-solving is, along with tips on how to use it in conjunction with design thinking.

Access your free e-book today.

What Is Creative Problem-Solving?

Encountering problems with no clear cause can be frustrating. This occurs when there’s disagreement around a defined problem or research yields unclear results. In such situations, creative problem-solving helps develop solutions, despite a lack of clarity.

While creative problem-solving is less structured than other forms of innovation, it encourages exploring open-ended ideas and shifting perspectives—thereby fostering innovation and easier adaptation in the workplace. It also works best when paired with other innovation-based processes, such as design thinking .

Creative Problem-Solving and Design Thinking

Design thinking is a solutions-based mentality that encourages innovation and problem-solving. It’s guided by an iterative process that Harvard Business School Dean Srikant Datar outlines in four stages in the online course Design Thinking and Innovation :

The four stages of design thinking: clarify, ideate, develop, and implement

  • Clarify: This stage involves researching a problem through empathic observation and insights.
  • Ideate: This stage focuses on generating ideas and asking open-ended questions based on observations made during the clarification stage.
  • Develop: The development stage involves exploring possible solutions based on the ideas you generate. Experimentation and prototyping are both encouraged.
  • Implement: The final stage is a culmination of the previous three. It involves finalizing a solution’s development and communicating its value to stakeholders.

Although user research is an essential first step in the design thinking process, there are times when it can’t identify a problem’s root cause. Creative problem-solving addresses this challenge by promoting the development of new perspectives.

Leveraging tools like design thinking and creativity at work can further your problem-solving abilities. Here are eight tips for doing so.

Design Thinking and Innovation | Uncover creative solutions to your business problems | Learn More

8 Creative Problem-Solving Tips

1. empathize with your audience.

A fundamental practice of design thinking’s clarify stage is empathy. Understanding your target audience can help you find creative and relevant solutions for their pain points through observing them and asking questions.

Practice empathy by paying attention to others’ needs and avoiding personal comparisons. The more you understand your audience, the more effective your solutions will be.

2. Reframe Problems as Questions

If a problem is difficult to define, reframe it as a question rather than a statement. For example, instead of saying, "The problem is," try framing around a question like, "How might we?" Think creatively by shifting your focus from the problem to potential solutions.

Consider this hypothetical case study: You’re the owner of a local coffee shop trying to fill your tip jar. Approaching the situation with a problem-focused mindset frames this as: "We need to find a way to get customers to tip more." If you reframe this as a question, however, you can explore: "How might we make it easier for customers to tip?" When you shift your focus from the shop to the customer, you empathize with your audience. You can take this train of thought one step further and consider questions such as: "How might we provide a tipping method for customers who don't carry cash?"

Whether you work at a coffee shop, a startup, or a Fortune 500 company, reframing can help surface creative solutions to problems that are difficult to define.

3. Defer Judgment of Ideas

If you encounter an idea that seems outlandish or unreasonable, a natural response would be to reject it. This instant judgment impedes creativity. Even if ideas seem implausible, they can play a huge part in ideation. It's important to permit the exploration of original ideas.

While judgment can be perceived as negative, it’s crucial to avoid accepting ideas too quickly. If you love an idea, don’t immediately pursue it. Give equal consideration to each proposal and build on different concepts instead of acting on them immediately.

4. Overcome Cognitive Fixedness

Cognitive fixedness is a state of mind that prevents you from recognizing a situation’s alternative solutions or interpretations instead of considering every situation through the lens of past experiences.

Although it's efficient in the short-term, cognitive fixedness interferes with creative thinking because it prevents you from approaching situations unbiased. It's important to be aware of this tendency so you can avoid it.

5. Balance Divergent and Convergent Thinking

One of the key principles of creative problem-solving is the balance of divergent and convergent thinking. Divergent thinking is the process of brainstorming multiple ideas without limitation; open-ended creativity is encouraged. It’s an effective tool for generating ideas, but not every idea can be explored. Divergent thinking eventually needs to be grounded in reality.

Convergent thinking, on the other hand, is the process of narrowing ideas down into a few options. While converging ideas too quickly stifles creativity, it’s an important step that bridges the gap between ideation and development. It's important to strike a healthy balance between both to allow for the ideation and exploration of creative ideas.

6. Use Creative Tools

Using creative tools is another way to foster innovation. Without a clear cause for a problem, such tools can help you avoid cognitive fixedness and abrupt decision-making. Here are several examples:

Problem Stories

Creating a problem story requires identifying undesired phenomena (UDP) and taking note of events that precede and result from them. The goal is to reframe the situations to visualize their cause and effect.

To start, identify a UDP. Then, discover what events led to it. Observe and ask questions of your consumer base to determine the UDP’s cause.

Next, identify why the UDP is a problem. What effect does the UDP have that necessitates changing the status quo? It's helpful to visualize each event in boxes adjacent to one another when answering such questions.

The problem story can be extended in either direction, as long as there are additional cause-and-effect relationships. Once complete, focus on breaking the chains connecting two subsequent events by disrupting the cause-and-effect relationship between them.

Alternate Worlds

The alternate worlds tool encourages you to consider how people from different backgrounds would approach similar situations. For instance, how would someone in hospitality versus manufacturing approach the same problem? This tool isn't intended to instantly solve problems but, rather, to encourage idea generation and creativity.

7. Use Positive Language

It's vital to maintain a positive mindset when problem-solving and avoid negative words that interfere with creativity. Positive language prevents quick judgments and overcomes cognitive fixedness. Instead of "no, but," use words like "yes, and."

Positive language makes others feel heard and valued rather than shut down. This practice doesn’t necessitate agreeing with every idea but instead approaching each from a positive perspective.

Using “yes, and” as a tool for further idea exploration is also effective. If someone presents an idea, build upon it using “yes, and.” What additional features could improve it? How could it benefit consumers beyond its intended purpose?

While it may not seem essential, this small adjustment can make a big difference in encouraging creativity.

8. Practice Design Thinking

Practicing design thinking can make you a more creative problem-solver. While commonly associated with the workplace, adopting a design thinking mentality can also improve your everyday life. Here are several ways you can practice design thinking:

  • Learn from others: There are many examples of design thinking in business . Review case studies to learn from others’ successes, research problems companies haven't addressed, and consider alternative solutions using the design thinking process.
  • Approach everyday problems with a design thinking mentality: One of the best ways to practice design thinking is to apply it to your daily life. Approach everyday problems using design thinking’s four-stage framework to uncover what solutions it yields.
  • Study design thinking: While learning design thinking independently is a great place to start, taking an online course can offer more insight and practical experience. The right course can teach you important skills , increase your marketability, and provide valuable networking opportunities.

Which HBS Online Entrepreneurship and Innovation Course is Right for You? | Download Your Free Flowchart

Ready to Become a Creative Problem-Solver?

Though creativity comes naturally to some, it's an acquired skill for many. Regardless of which category you're in, improving your ability to innovate is a valuable endeavor. Whether you want to bolster your creativity or expand your professional skill set, taking an innovation-based course can enhance your problem-solving.

If you're ready to become a more creative problem-solver, explore Design Thinking and Innovation , one of our online entrepreneurship and innovation courses . If you aren't sure which course is the right fit, download our free course flowchart to determine which best aligns with your goals.

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problem solving and creative thinking

Problem Solving and Creative Thinking

Jun 14, 2012

1.06k likes | 2.23k Views

Problem Solving and Creative Thinking. Problem Solving. What is a Problem? A problem arises when a living creature has a goal but does not know how this goal is to be reached.

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Presentation Transcript

Problem Solving What is a Problem? A problem arises when a living creature has a goal but does not know how this goal is to be reached. [A problem exists] whenever one cannot go from the given situation to the desired situation simply by action. [K. Dunker, On Problem Solving, (1945) p. 1] What is Problem Solving? Problem Solving is the process of working out or discovering how to reach such a goal.

What is creative thinking? Creative thinking is the process of generating novel ideas and alternative courses of action, no matter how good those ideas and alternatives might be. Creative thinking should not be seen as an alternative to critical thinking When you have recognised a problem, then you should employ creative thinking to produce some options for solving the problem, then you should employ critical thinking If you haven’t come up with enough options to begin with, then your critical thinking decision procedure might produce the wrong result… a dangerous result!

Creative Thinking, Critical Thinking, and Problem Solving Creative thinking supports critical thinking … While critical thinking focuses on step-by-step, linear processes aimed at arriving at a correct answer, creative thinking begins with possibility, multiple ideas, and suspended judgement. It might be said that creative thinking supports the ideas with which critical thinking works. Thus, even though these two kinds of thinking work in different ways, they actually support one another and aim at the same ultimate goal, which is to solve a problem … At the beginning of the process, creative methods are used to examine the problem environment, generate ideas, and make associations. Then the analysis and judgment faculties are brought into play, and the possibilities are analyzed for a possible solution. [Robert Harris, CB pp. 115-6]

Who is this man?

Archimedes Great inventor, mathematician etc. The Screw  The Lever

Archimedes Helped protect Syracuse from the Romans in the siege of 213BC The Mirror The Claw

Archimedes’ puzzle • Did the smithy replace some of the kings gold with silver? • How did Archimedes find out? • (Not Archimedes style to torture the smithy)

Solution to Archimedes’ puzzle. • The solution, which occurred when he stepped into a public bath and caused it to overflow, was to put a weight of gold equal to the crown, and known to be pure, into a bowl which was filled with water to the brim. Then the gold would be removed and the king’s crown put in, in its place. An alloy of lighter silver would increase the bulk of the crown and cause the bowl to overflow. [Vitruvius, De Architectura] • And the wreath was impure!

Creative thinking! • It was very useful to Archimedes • He was well respected and treated in Syracuse • Marcellus, the Roman general, ordered his life to be spared when Syracuse finally fell • But his obsession with maths was ultimately his downfall! • Can we be like Archimedes? • Can we learn to be creative thinkers?

4 Methods for Generating Ideas • Associative Techniques • Analytic Techniques • Brainstorming • Role Playing

Associative Techniques • Compare something familiar to something unfamiliar. • Close analogy e.g. apples and pears • Remote analogy e.g. Pringles • Forced analogy…

Forced Analogy 1 • The problem: recreating that dazzling 360 degree panoramic holiday view • The forced analogy: a wreath • The answer!

Forced Analogy 2 • The problem: vertigo • The forced analogy: swimming • The answer!

Forced Analogy 3 • The problem: Carrying lots of shopping when its raining • The forced analogy: a tennis player • The answer!

Analytic Techniques • Breaking a problem down into smaller parts • E.g. How can I make the All Blacks win the Rugby World Cup? • Vital components of the problem: • Henry: Just one:ensuring the ABs perform to their capacity • Hence the 4 Rs of Henry’s regime • Rest • Rotation • Relationships within team are friendly • Really discreet signaling during matches

Analytic Techniques • Unfortunately (as we know), Henry didn’t analyse the problem thoroughly. • He missed a vital component of the problem: • The Barnes Factor

Analytic Techniques • Good analytic techniques will help to ensure that all of the important components of the problem are addressed

Brainstorming • Deliberately set about coming up with alternatives, and write them all down, no matter what. • No idea is a bad idea (at least just yet) • Edward de Bono 6 hats – green hat time • One company generated 2,200 ideas in one day!

Roleplaying • Roleplaying. Attempt to simulate aspects of the problem and proposed solutions. Try to imagine details of the relevant outcomes after your choice has been made, and attempt to put yourself in the shoes of other people. • A good method for gathering information and gaining perspective • E.g. Theoretical vs. practical lecturing • E.g. Customers-eye-view of displays • E.g. Hand-out-of-the-car-window aerodynamics

But Archimedes was not just a creative thinker... • He was also a prolific problem solver • So, how can we harness these 4 idea creation techniques to help us solve problems? • Ideas should be generated after the problem has been properly understood and represented

The Main Message Solving real problems is a two step process: Model Solution Problem In order to generate potentially fruitful ideas, and thereby make it more likely that you solve your problem, make sure you represent the problem in the right way.

The Lights Example • One and only one of the switches (A, B & C)on the outside of the room turns on all of the lights (x, y & z) in the room • From outside, you cannot see into the room • The wiring is hidden from view • You are not allowed to damage any of the property • Is there a way of knowing for sure which switch turns the lights on? • Once you enter the room, you cannot leave again to rearrange the switches xyz C B A

The Lights Example Switches: Possible arrangements: A 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 B 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 C 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 – on, 0 – off

The Bird-Train Problem (Posner, 1973) • Station 1 and Station 2 are 50 miles apart on a straight train track • Train 1 leaves Station 1 at the same time that Train 2 leaves Station 2 • Both trains travel at 25 miles per hour toward the other station • The bird starts directly above Train 1 and flies above the track until it reaches Train 2. Then it flies back to Train 1 etc. • The bird flies at 230 miles per hour • How far has the bird flown by the time the trains meet?

The Bird-Train Problem (Posner, 1973)

The Drop Block Problem What will happen to the block of wood when the person lets go of it?

The Drop Block Problem The block will drop down as it is drawn to earth by gravity

The Drop Block Problem … so long as the person is on earth.

The Drop Block Problem It will float up if the person is under water.

The Drop Block Problem And it will go nowhere (or a little bit sideways?!) if the person is in space.

So, how can I best represent a problem? Suggestion 1: Drop presuppositions that aren’t explicit in the original statement of the problem

The Nine Dot Problem (Maier, 1931) • Can you connect all of the dots with just 4 straight lines? • You cannot take your pen off the paper • You can’t use a ridiculously big pen • The second line must start where the first line finished. The third line must start where the second line finished etc. • Imagine the dots are drawn on a flat an immovable surface • The solution…

Solution to The Nine Dot Problem (Maier, 1931)

How can I best represent a problem? Suggestion 1: Drop presuppositions that aren’t explicit in the original statement of the problem.

A Terrible Accident • There was a terrible accident on the motorway coming into Wellington • A man was killed on impact and his son was rushed to hospital with life-threatening injuries • At the hospital, the surgeon saw the boy and said: “I can’t operate, that’s my son” • What is going on here? • Many of us assume that surgeons have to be male, making us come up with crazy answers for a simple question

How can I best represent a problem? Suggestion 1: Drop presuppositions that aren’t explicit in the original statement of the problem. Suggestion 2: Make sure you represent everything explicit in the original statement of the problem.

2 old high school math club pals meet up after many years On a street somewhere: Ted: All three of my sons celebrate their birthday today. Can you tell me how old each one is? (Ted is a bit weird) Fred: Yes, but you have to tell me something about them… Ted: The product of their ages is 36. Fred: I need more info… Ted: The sum of their ages is equal to the number of windows in the building next to us… Fred: I need more info… Ted: My oldest son has blue eyes. Fred: That is sufficient!  Can Fred really know how old Ted’s sons are? How?

2 old high school math club pals meet up after many years • Age of the first son: x • Age of the second son: y • Age of the third son: z • Safe assumption: x ≥ y ≥ z

2 old high school math club pals meet up after many years “The product of their ages is 36”: xyz • 1 1 • 2 1 • 3 1 • 9 4 1 • 9 2 2 • 6 6 1 • 6 3 2 • 4 3 3

2 old high school math club pals meet up after many years “The sum of their ages is equal to the number of windows in the building next to us…” xyz • + 1 + 1 = 38 • + 2 + 1 = 21 • + 3 + 1 = 16 • 9 + 4 + 1 = 14 • 9 + 2 + 2 = 13 • 6 + 6 + 1 = 13 • 6 + 3 + 2 = 11 • 4 + 3 + 3 = 10

How can I best represent a problem? Suggestion 2: Make sure you represent everything explicit in the original statement of the problem.

There are five houses, each of a different color and inhabited by men of different nationalities, with one unique pet, drink, and car. Some facts are given: 1. The Englishman lives in the red house. 2. The Spaniard owns the dog. 3. The man in the green house drinks cocoa. 4. The Ukrainian drinks eggnog. 5. The green house is immediately to the right (your right) of the ivory house. 6. The owner of the Oldsmobile also owns snails. 7. The owner of the Ford lives in the yellow house. 8. The man in the middle house drinks milk. 9. The Norwegian lives in the first house on the left. 10. The man who owns the Chevrolet lives in the house next to the house where the man owns a fox. 11. The Ford owner's house is next to the house where the horse is kept. 12. The Mercedes-Benz owner drinks orange juice. 13. The Japanese drives a Volkswagen. 14. The Norwegian lives next to the blue house. Who owns the Zebra?

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Home Collections Strategy / Business Plan Problem solving

Problem Solving Presentation Templates

Present the problem-solving processes effectively with our premade problem solving powerpoint templates and google slides themes. crafted to guide you from problem identification to resolution, these free templates breathe life into complex strategies. they feature creative, fully editable infographics, like puzzles and light bulb designs..

Problem solving

  • Analytical Thinking: Breaking down a problem into smaller parts to understand its nature.
  • Creative Thinking: Thinking outside the box to find unique and effective solutions.
  • Decision Making: Choosing the best course of action among different alternatives.
  • Team Collaboration: Working together to generate diverse perspectives and solutions.
  • Communicate the problem statement clearly to stakeholders.
  • Exhibit potential solutions and their implications.
  • Rally teams around a unified strategy.
  • Track progress and outcomes.

In such scenarios, the design and layout of your presentation matter as much as its content. And this is where Slide Egg steps in!

  • Diverse Designs: From representing problem identification, business solutions, problem-solving techniques, and strategies to process steps, our slides have it all.
  • Creative Infographics: Our slides are adorned with multicolor infographics like puzzle pieces, human brains, ladders, bulbs, stars, magnifiers, locks, and keys to captivate your audience.
  • User-Friendly: Our problem solution slides  offers 100% editable features, allowing you to tailor the content to fit your narrative seamlessly.
  • Cost-Efficient: For those on a budget, we provide free problem and solution slides so you can experience the quality of our offerings.

Become an expert with SlideEgg

How To Build A Problem Solving PowerPoint

How To Build A Problem Solving PowerPoint

We're here to help you, what is problem solving presentation templates.

Problem Solving Presentation Templates is a set of pre-designed PowerPoint slides that you can use to present and explain problem-solving strategies. The templates provide visuals and text that you can use to describe the problem-solving process, from identifying the problem to finding a solution.

Where can we use these Problem Solving Slides?

You can use these Problem Solving Slides for corporate meetings, educational classes, team-building events, or workshops. You can also use them to help facilitate brainstorming sessions and critical thinking activities.

How can I make Problem Solving PPT Slides in a presentation?

Start by creating a slide that outlines the problem. This should include the problem statement and a brief description of the context. Including brainstorming, researching, listing potential solutions, analyzing the data, and finally arriving at a solution. Suppose you want to create slides by yourself. Visit Tips and tricks for detailed instructions.

Who can use Problem Solving Presentation Templates?

Anyone can use Problem Solving PPT Templates to present a problem-solving strategy or process visually engagingly. These templates can be used by professionals, educators, students, business owners, and anyone looking to share a problem-solving approach with an audience.

Why do we need Problem Solving Presentation Slides?

Presenting a problem-solving Presentation slide helps illustrate complex concepts and issues. It can also engage an audience, provide visual context and simplify data. Problem-solving slides can convey ideas and solutions effectively and explore different solutions and alternatives.

Where can I find free Problem Solving Presentation Templates?

Many websites offer free Problem Solving Presentation Templates. Slide egg is one of the best PowerPoint providers. Our websites have uniquely designed templates that allow you to share the problem and help to track progress towards a solution.

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  5. Problem-Solving Stages PowerPoint Template & Slides

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COMMENTS

  1. Creative problem solving

    Jan 8, 2013 • Download as PPT, PDF •. 58 likes • 91,129 views. V. VijayKrKhurana. Creative problem solving techniques / strategies; Steps in creative problem solving process. Business. 1 of 22. Download now. Creative problem solving - Download as a PDF or view online for free.

  2. PPT

    CREATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING PURPOSE: To develop the awareness and the skills necessary to solve problems creatively. Optimist International. LEARNING OBJECTIVES 1. Define creative problem solving. 2. Be familiar with common mental blocks to creative thinking process. 3. Explore ways to be more creative. 4.

  3. An introduction to creative problem solving

    Dec 9, 2014 • Download as PPTX, PDF •. 5 likes • 8,388 views. B. betseykenn. Creative Problem Solving Overview. Education. 1 of 16. Download now. An introduction to creative problem solving - Download as a PDF or view online for free.

  4. 9 Creative Problem Solving Tools (Free PPT and PDF Download)

    Four Stages of Creative Problem Solving. The first two stages help you and your group 'explore ideas'. The third stage helps you select the best ideas and the fourth tests the feasibility of your best ideas. These are the four stages you need to go through (no skipping a stage please): Idea generation. Idea expansion.

  5. Creative Problem-Solving PowerPoint and Google Slides Template

    Download our presentation template for MS PowerPoint and Google Slides to showcase the framework, steps, ... You can depict the Osborn-Parnes creative problem-solving process and how it provides a structured framework for generating innovative solutions to address issues. Moreover, you can illustrate the roles of different individuals involved ...

  6. Free Design Thinking Process PPT Template

    Signup Free to download. Design Thinking is a human-centered, iterative process for creative problem-solving. It focuses on understanding users and their problems to generate innovative solutions and experiment through prototyping and testing. Use this PowerPoint template to cover every stage of the Design Thinking process and present the best ...

  7. 20+ Best Problem Solving Models and Techniques PowerPoint ...

    Buy PowerPoint Template. 5. Kepner-Tregoe Method PowerPoint Template - Creative PPT Template to Discover the Practical way to Make the Best Decisions Under Pressure. The Kepner-Tregoe method is a problem-solving and decision-making technique developed in the 1960s by Charles H. Kepner and Benjamin B. Tregoe.

  8. Get Started with Design Thinking

    Design thinking is a methodology for creative problem solving. You can use it to inform your own teaching practice, or you can teach it to your students as a framework for real-world projects. The set of resources on this page offer experiences and lessons you can run with your students. This gives educators interested in teaching design ...

  9. Creative Problem Solving PowerPoint Template

    So, download this PPT right now to share a compelling presentation on this subject. Our pre-designed Creative Problem Solving Process PPT template is readily available for download for MS PowerPoint, Apple Keynote and Google Slides. It is incorporated with high definition vector-based graphics.

  10. CREATIVE THINKING & PROBLEM SOLVING

    CREATIVE THINKING & PROBLEM SOLVING. CREATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING • Introductions • Purpose • Learning Objectives. CREATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING PURPOSE: To develop the awareness and the skills necessary to solve problems creatively.. LEARNING OBJECTIVES 1. Define creative problem solving. 2. Be familiar with common mental blocks to creative thinking process.

  11. Problem Solving Powerpoint Templates and Google Slides Themes

    SlidesCarnival templates have all the elements you need to effectively communicate your message and impress your audience. Download your presentation as a PowerPoint template or use it online as a Google Slides theme. 100% free, no registration or download limits. Get these problem-solving templates to create effective presentations that offer ...

  12. Problem solving. Free PPT & Google Slides Template

    Problem solving Slides. This simple, green and yellow Problem Solving template comes with all the basics and more: agendas, timelines, statistical figures, graphs and charts, topics and concepts and plenty of space for images and text. You can use these slides to prepare for your next lesson, workshop or course. Just fill in your details, add ...

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    Creative Problem Solving. An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author. Download presentation by click this link.

  14. What Is Creative Problem-Solving & Why Is It Important?

    Its benefits include: Finding creative solutions to complex problems: User research can insufficiently illustrate a situation's complexity. While other innovation processes rely on this information, creative problem-solving can yield solutions without it. Adapting to change: Business is constantly changing, and business leaders need to adapt.

  15. Creative problem solving skills & process

    Creative problem solving skills & process. Mar 13, 2018 • Download as PPTX, PDF •. 8 likes • 2,591 views. Charles Cotter, PhD. Creative problem solving skills, process, tools, techniques and best practice principles. Business. 1 of 57. Download now. Creative problem solving skills & process - Download as a PDF or view online for free.

  16. How to Be a More Creative Problem-Solver at Work: 8 Tips

    8 Creative Problem-Solving Tips. 1. Empathize with Your Audience. A fundamental practice of design thinking's clarify stage is empathy. Understanding your target audience can help you find creative and relevant solutions for their pain points through observing them and asking questions.

  17. Creative Problem Solving PowerPoint Template

    Creative Problem Solving PowerPoint Template. Customize. We will customize this slide for you to fit your exact needs. Customize Now. $4.99. Creative Problem Solving - 4x3. Creative Problem Solving - 16x9. Add to Cart Buy Membership.

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    Creative Thinking, Critical Thinking, and Problem Solving Creative thinking supports critical thinking …. While critical thinking focuses on step-by-step, linear processes aimed at arriving at a correct answer, creative thinking begins with possibility, multiple ideas, and suspended judgement. It might be said that creative thinking supports ...

  19. Free Problem Solving PowerPoint Templates & Google Slides

    Present the problem-solving processes effectively with our premade problem solving PowerPoint templates and Google Slides Themes. Crafted to guide you from problem identification to resolution, these free templates breathe life into complex strategies. They feature creative, Fully editable infographics, like puzzles and light bulb designs.