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Women's and Gender Studies Theses and Dissertations

Theses/dissertations from 2023 2023.

Social Media and Women Empowerment in Nigeria: A Study of the #BreakTheBias Campaign on Facebook , Deborah Osaro Omontese

Theses/Dissertations from 2022 2022

Going Flat: Challenging Gender, Stigma, and Cure through Lesbian Breast Cancer Experience , Beth Gaines

Incorrect Athlete, Incorrect Woman: IOC Gender Regulations and the Boundaries of Womanhood in Professional Sports , Sabeehah Ravat

Transnational Perspectives on the #MeToo and Anti-Base Movements in Japan , Alisha Romano

Theses/Dissertations from 2021 2021

Criminalizing LGBTQ+ Jamaicans: Social, Legal, and Colonial Influences on Homophobic Policy , Zoe C. Knowles

Dismantling Hegemony through Inclusive Sexual Health Education , Lauren Wright

Theses/Dissertations from 2020 2020

Transfat Representation , Jessica "Fyn" Asay

Theses/Dissertations from 2019 2019

Ain't I a Woman, Too? Depictions of Toxic Femininity, Transmisogynoir, and Violence on STAR , Sunahtah D. Jones

“The Most Muscular Woman I Have Ever Seen”: Bev FrancisPerformance of Gender in Pumping Iron II: The Women , Cera R. Shain

"Roll" Models: Fat Sexuality and Its Representations in Pornographic Imagery , Leah Marie Turner

Theses/Dissertations from 2018 2018

Reproducing Intersex Trouble: An Analysis of the M.C. Case in the Media , Jamie M. Lane

Race and Gender in (Re)integration of Victim-Survivors of CSEC in a Community Advocacy Context , Joshlyn Lawhorn

Penalizing Pregnancy: A Feminist Legal Studies Analysis of Purvi Patel's Criminalization , Abby Schneller

A Queer and Crip Grotesque: Katherine Dunn's , Megan Wiedeman

Theses/Dissertations from 2017 2017

"Mothers like Us Think Differently": Mothers' Negotiations of Virginity in Contemporary Turkey , Asli Aygunes

Surveilling Hate/Obscuring Racism?: Hate Group Surveillance and the Southern Poverty Law Center's "Hate Map" , Mary McKelvie

“Ya I have a disability, but that’s only one part of me”: Formative Experiences of Young Women with Physical Disabilities , Victoria Peer

Resistance from Within: Domestic violence and rape crisis centers that serve Black/African American populations , Jessica Marie Pinto

(Dis)Enchanted: (Re)constructing Love and Creating Community in the , Shannon A. Suddeth

Theses/Dissertations from 2016 2016

"The Afro that Ate Kentucky": Appalachian Racial Formation, Lived Experience, and Intersectional Feminist Interventions , Sandra Louise Carpenter

“Even Five Years Ago this Would Have Been Impossible:” Health Care Providers’ Perspectives on Trans* Health Care , Richard S. Henry

Tough Guy, Sensitive Vas: Analyzing Masculinity, Male Contraceptives & the Sexual Division of Labor , Kaeleen Kosmo

Theses/Dissertations from 2015 2015

Let’s Move! Biocitizens and the Fat Kids on the Block , Mary Catherine Dickman

Interpretations of Educational Experiences of Women in Chitral, Pakistan , Rakshinda Shah

Theses/Dissertations from 2014 2014

Incredi-bull-ly Inclusive?: Assessing the Climate on a College Campus , Aubrey Lynne Hall

Her-Storicizing Baldness: Situating Women's Experiences with Baldness from Skin and Hair Disorders , Kasie Holmes

In the (Radical) Pursuit of Self-Care: Feminist Participatory Action Research with Victim Advocates , Robyn L. Homer

Theses/Dissertations from 2013 2013

Significance is Bliss: A Global Feminist Analysis of the Liberian Truth and Reconciliation Commission and its Privileging of Americo-Liberian over Indigenous Liberian Women's Voices , Morgan Lea Eubank

Monsters Under the Bed: An Analysis of Torture Scenes in Three Pixar Films , Heidi Tilney Kramer

Theses/Dissertations from 2012 2012

Can You Believe She Did THAT?!:Breaking the Codes of "Good" Mothering in 1970s Horror Films , Jessica Michelle Collard

Don't Blame It on My Ovaries: Exploring the Lived Experience of Women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and the Creation of Discourse , Jennifer Lynn Ellerman

Valanced Voices: Student Experiences with Learning Disabilities & Differences , Zoe DuPree Fine

An Interactive Guide to Self-Discovery for Women , Elaine J. Taylor

Selling the Third Wave: The Commodification and Consumption of the Flat Track Roller Girl , Mary Catherine Whitlock

Theses/Dissertations from 2010 2010

Beyond Survival: An Exploration of Narrative Healing and Forgiveness in Healing from Rape , Heather Curry

Theses/Dissertations from 2009 2009

Gender Trouble In Northern Ireland: An Examination Of Gender And Bodies Within The 1970s And 1980s Provisional Irish Republican Army In Northern Ireland , Jennifer Earles

"You're going to Hollywood"!: Gender and race surveillance and accountability in American Idol contestant's performances , Amanda LeBlanc

From the academy to the streets: Documenting the healing power of black feminist creative expression , Tunisia L. Riley

Developing Feminist Activist Pedagogy: A Case Study Approach in the Women's Studies Department at the University of South Florida , Stacy Tessier

Women in Wargasm: The Politics of Womenís Liberation in the Weather Underground Organization , Cyrana B. Wyker

Theses/Dissertations from 2008 2008

Opportunities for Spiritual Awakening and Growth in Mothering , Melissa J. Albee

A Constant Struggle: Renegotiating Identity in the Aftermath of Rape , Jo Aine Clarke

I am Warrior Woman, Hear Me Roar: The Challenge and Reproduction of Heteronormativity in Speculative Television Programs , Leisa Anne Clark

Theses/Dissertations from 2007 2007

Reforming Dance Pedagogy: A Feminist Perspective on the Art of Performance and Dance Education , Jennifer Clement

Narratives of lesbian transformation: Coming out stories of women who transition from heterosexual marriage to lesbian identity , Clare F. Walsh

The Conundrum of Women’s Studies as Institutional: New Niches, Undergraduate Concerns, and the Move Towards Contemporary Feminist Theory and Action , Rebecca K. Willman

Theses/Dissertations from 2006 2006

A Feminist Perspective on the Precautionary Principle and the Problem of Endocrine Disruptors under Neoliberal Globalization Policies , Erica Hesch Anstey

Asymptotes and metaphors: Teaching feminist theory , Michael Eugene Gipson

Postcolonial Herstory: The Novels of Assia Djebar (Algeria) and Oksana Zabuzhko (Ukraine): A Comparative Analysis , Oksana Lutsyshyna

Theses/Dissertations from 2005 2005

Loving Loving? Problematizing Pedagogies of Care and Chéla Sandoval’s Love as a Hermeneutic , Allison Brimmer

Exploring Women’s Complex Relationship with Political Violence: A Study of the Weathermen, Radical Feminism and the New Left , Lindsey Blake Churchill

The Voices of Sex Workers (prostitutes?) and the Dilemma of Feminist Discourse , Justine L. Kessler

Reconstructing Women's Identities: The Phenomenon Of Cosmetic Surgery In The United States , Cara L. Okopny

Fantastic Visions: On the Necessity of Feminist Utopian Narrative , Tracie Anne Welser

Theses/Dissertations from 2004 2004

The Politics of Being an Egg “Donor” and Shifting Notions of Reproductive Freedom , Elizabeth A. Dedrick

Women, Domestic Abuse, And Dreams: Analyzing Dreams To Uncover Hidden Traumas And Unacknowledged Strengths , Mindy Stokes

Theses/Dissertations from 2001 2001

Safe at Home: Agoraphobia and the Discourse on Women’s Place , Suzie Siegel

Theses/Dissertations from 2000 2000

Women, Environment and Development: Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America , Evaline Tiondi

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Berkeley Berkeley Academic Guide: Academic Guide 2023-24

Gender and women's studies.

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

Bachelor of arts (ba).

The undergraduate program in Gender and Women's Studies (GWS) is designed to introduce students to the intersectional analysis of gender, women, and sexuality, focusing on gender and sexuality as categories of analysis and on the workings of power in social and historical life. The department offers an introduction to feminist theory as well as more advanced courses that seek to expand capacities for critical reflection and analysis and to engage students with varied approaches to feminist research. The curriculum draws students into interdisciplinary and intersectional analysis of specific gender practices through investigating areas such as feminism in a transnational world, the politics of representation, feminist science studies, gender and work, gender and health, and queer visual culture. Students learn to apply methods derived from the social sciences, the humanities, and other interdisciplines germane to the study of gender. They explore a growing body of feminist and queer theory that revises our understanding of gender, sexuality, society, and culture.

Our students have a unique opportunity to interact with an amazing cadre of  GWS faculty . The program allows our students to pursue a broad array of careers and interests after graduation. Gender and Women's Studies students get significant personalized attention. The department is known for its investment in the well-being of its students, and its smaller size produces a supportive community among students, faculty, and staff.

Declaring the Major

To declare the Gender and Women’s Studies major, the student must have completed  GWS 10 and have a minimum Grade Point Average (GPA) of 2.0. To complete the major, students must complete two of the three gateway courses ( GWS 10 ,  GWS 14 , LGBT 20AC ) . For details on how to declare the major, please see the   department's website .

Honors Program

To be eligible for the GWS Honors Program (GWS H195A and GWS H195B), students must have an overall 3.3 GPA, and a 3.5 GPA in the major. In addition, eligible students must write a brief proposal, to be approved by the faculty teaching GWS 101, and have a GWS faculty member or affiliate agree to chair the honors thesis by the beginning of the fall term of their senior year.  GWS H195 cannot be used as an elective in the major.

To receive honors in GWS, students must have a 3.6 for honors, a 3.8 for high honors, or a 3.9 for highest honors. In addition, the student must receive a minimum of an A- in both GWS H195A and GWS H195B.

For details on how to declare the major  click here .

Minor Program

The Department of Gender and Women's Studies offers a minor in Gender and Women's Studies. For further information regarding minor requirements, please see the Minor Requirements tab on this page. Students must declare the Minor the semester before they intend to graduate.  Once they have decided to minor in the program, they must complete and submit the GWS Minor Worksheet to the undergraduate adviser.  After fulfilling all course requirements, students must complete a Completion of L&S Minor form  and submit it to the GWS Undergraduate Adviser in 608 Social Sciences Building.

Other Minor Offered by the Department of Gender and Women's Studies

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies  (Minor)

Visit Department Website

Major Requirements

In addition to the University, campus, and college requirements, listed on the College Requirements tab, students must fulfill the below requirements specific to their major program.

General Guidelines

  • All courses taken to fulfill the major requirements below must be taken for graded credit, other than courses listed which are offered on a  Pass/No Pass  basis only. Other exceptions to this requirement are noted as applicable.
  • No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs, with the exception of minors offered outside of the College of Letters & Science.
  • A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 must be maintained in both upper and lower division courses used to fulfill the major requirements.

For information regarding residence requirements and unit requirements, please see the College Requirements tab.

Lower Division Prerequisites

Upper division requirements , minor requirements.

Students who have a strong interest in an area of study outside their major often decide to complete a minor program. These programs have set requirements.

All minors must be declared before the first day of classes in your Expected Graduation Term (EGT). For summer graduates, minors must be declared prior to the first day of Summer Session A. 

All upper-division courses must be taken for a letter grade. 

A minimum of three of the upper-division courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements must be completed at UC Berkeley.

A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required in the upper-division courses to fulfill the minor requirements.

Courses used to fulfill the minor requirements may be applied toward the Seven-Course Breadth requirement, for Letters & Science students.

No more than one upper division course may be used to simultaneously fulfill requirements for a student's major and minor programs.

All minor requirements must be completed prior to the last day of finals during the semester in which the student plans to graduate. If students cannot finish all courses required for the minor by that time, they should see a College of Letters & Science adviser.

All minor requirements must be completed within the unit ceiling. (For further information regarding the unit ceiling, please see the College Requirements tab.)

Requirements

To declare the minor in Gender and Women's Studies students must complete the  GWS Minor Worksheet  to register the minor with the department once they have decided to minor in the program.

After completion of the minor requirements, students must submit a Completion of  L&S Minor form  to the department's undergraduate adviser the semester the student plans to graduate. Please see the undergraduate adviser for advising while pursuing the minor program.  All courses to satisfy the minor must be taken in the Gender and Women’s Studies Department.  Students must declare the Minor the semester before they intend to graduate.

College Requirements

Undergraduate students must fulfill the following requirements in addition to those required by their major program.

For detailed lists of courses that fulfill college requirements, please review the  College of Letters & Sciences  page in this Guide. For College advising appointments, please visit the L&S Advising Pages. 

University of California Requirements

Entry level writing.

All students who will enter the University of California as freshmen must demonstrate their command of the English language by fulfilling the Entry Level Writing requirement. Fulfillment of this requirement is also a prerequisite to enrollment in all reading and composition courses at UC Berkeley. 

American History and American Institutions

The American History and Institutions requirements are based on the principle that a US resident graduated from an American university, should have an understanding of the history and governmental institutions of the United States.

Berkeley Campus Requirement

American cultures.

All undergraduate students at Cal need to take and pass this course in order to graduate. The requirement offers an exciting intellectual environment centered on the study of race, ethnicity and culture of the United States. AC courses offer students opportunities to be part of research-led, highly accomplished teaching environments, grappling with the complexity of American Culture.

College of Letters & Science Essential Skills Requirements

Quantitative reasoning.

The Quantitative Reasoning requirement is designed to ensure that students graduate with basic understanding and competency in math, statistics, or computer science. The requirement may be satisfied by exam or by taking an approved course.

Foreign Language

The Foreign Language requirement may be satisfied by demonstrating proficiency in reading comprehension, writing, and conversation in a foreign language equivalent to the second semester college level, either by passing an exam or by completing approved course work.

Reading and Composit ion

In order to provide a solid foundation in reading, writing, and critical thinking the College requires two semesters of lower division work in composition in sequence. Students must complete parts A & B reading and composition courses in sequential order by the end of their fourth semester.

College of Letters & Science 7 Course Breadth Requirements

Breadth requirements.

The undergraduate breadth requirements provide Berkeley students with a rich and varied educational experience outside of their major program. As the foundation of a liberal arts education, breadth courses give students a view into the intellectual life of the University while introducing them to a multitude of perspectives and approaches to research and scholarship. Engaging students in new disciplines and with peers from other majors, the breadth experience strengthens interdisciplinary connections and context that prepares Berkeley graduates to understand and solve the complex issues of their day.

Unit Requirements

120 total units

Of the 120 units, 36 must be upper division units

  • Of the 36 upper division units, 6 must be taken in courses offered outside your major department

Residence Requirements

For units to be considered in "residence," you must be registered in courses on the Berkeley campus as a student in the College of Letters & Science. Most students automatically fulfill the residence requirement by attending classes here for four years, or two years for transfer students. In general, there is no need to be concerned about this requirement, unless you go abroad for a semester or year or want to take courses at another institution or through UC Extension during your senior year. In these cases, you should make an appointment to meet an adviser to determine how you can meet the Senior Residence Requirement.

Note: Courses taken through UC Extension do not count toward residence.

Senior Residence Requirement

After you become a senior (with 90 semester units earned toward your BA degree), you must complete at least 24 of the remaining 30 units in residence in at least two semesters. To count as residence, a semester must consist of at least 6 passed units. Intercampus Visitor, EAP, and UC Berkeley-Washington Program (UCDC) units are excluded.

You may use a Berkeley Summer Session to satisfy one semester of the Senior Residence requirement, provided that you successfully complete 6 units of course work in the Summer Session and that you have been enrolled previously in the college.

Modified Senior Residence Requirement

Participants in the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP), Berkeley Summer Abroad, or the UC Berkeley Washington Program (UCDC) may meet a Modified Senior Residence requirement by completing 24 (excluding EAP) of their final 60 semester units in residence. At least 12 of these 24 units must be completed after you have completed 90 units.

Upper Division Residence Requirement

You must complete in residence a minimum of 18 units of upper division courses (excluding UCEAP units), 12 of which must satisfy the requirements for your major.

Student Learning Goals

Learning goals for the major.

Knowledge About the Field

  • Intersectionality: Analyze gender as it intersects with other relations of power such as race, ethnicity, sexuality, class, nationality, religion, geography, ability, and age; distinguish universalist understandings of gender, women, and sexuality from multi-dimensional analyses that recognize interconnectivity and mutual constitution of categories.
  • Gender issues: Recognize the social, political, economic, national, and cultural dimensions of gender as these relate to disparities in power and privilege. Become familiar with a range of past and present major issues pertaining to gender, such as race and citizenship, reproductive and sexual politics, media representation, understandings of masculinities and femininities, racialization of gender and sexuality, women's enfranchisement, gender and violence, identity politics, immigration, sex discrimination, changing families, gender and environment, labor, language, health disparities, gender and science, histories of colonialism, nation-state formations.
  • Feminisms, Feminist Theories and Feminist Research: Describe and distinguish a broad range of feminist theories and practices in their specific cultural and historical contexts both nationally and internationally; identify the contributions and limits of disciplinary, interdisciplinary and transdiciplinary feminist research and scholarship.
  • Historicization and contextualization: Articulate differences in sociopolitical contexts that inform opinions, theories, identities, subcultures and politics pertaining to gender and sexuality. Discuss issues of gender and sexuality in the context of their specific histories, knowledge frames, and politics. Work flexibly with a variety of epistemological approaches, recognizing each as culturally specific and inherently limited.

Ways of Communicating

  • Visual Media and New Technologies: Evaluate, interpret, and generate information from a variety of sources, including print and electronic media, film and video, and internet technologies.
  • Written and Verbal Communication: Express ideas effectively, both verbally and in written form, tailoring arguments and presentation styles to audience and context.

Critical Practice

  • Creativity: Bring together a variety of texts, ideas, theoretical, political, empirical, aesthetic, and rhetorical approaches in order to respond imaginatively to social, political, and intellectual issues.
  • Collaboration: Work collectively, take initiative, offer and receive constructive criticism, exchange ideas and creatively work together toward a common endeavor.
  • Engaged Practices: Engage in a variety of feminist approaches, linking theory with practice. Learn how to be an effective advocate informed by transnational, political, sociocultural, and philosophical contexts.
  • Knowledge production: Understand that social, cultural, and scientific knowledges are rarely pre-given, but produced. Demonstrate ways in which various cultural practices, including cultural traditions, academic practices, and information genres participate in and shape specific productions of knowledge, considering roles played by aesthetic forms, scientific journals, popular fiction, news media, the internet, and practices of citation.
  • Ethics: Articulate ethical positions of scholarly and activist theories of gender; that is, consider what approaches inform value judgments on specific gendered or feminist practices. Understand other ethical research concerns such as human subjects and plagiarism.
  • Critical self-awareness: Demonstrate self-reflexivity about one's ideas and social and political positions.

Critical Thinking

  • Critical analysis: Identify and evaluate arguments, rhetorical styles, synthesize ideas, and develop well-substantiated, coherent, and concise arguments.
  • Logical reasoning: Identify and follow a logical sequence or argument through to its end; recognize faulty reasoning or premature closure.
  • Abstract thinking: Generalize for a specific purpose and/or in a way that clarifies and heightens understanding of major issues at stake; identify the essential or most relevant elements of a concept, event, object, text, etc.
  • Argumentation: Marshal appropriate and relevant evidence in order to develop a clear claim or stance using specific rhetorical approaches.

Doing Research

  • Problem solving: Identify important historical and contemporary issues relating to gender and women's studies, evaluate various responses to them, and adapt the knowledge gained through this process to everyday situations.
  • Research Skills: Produce or locate resources and learn to build a research agenda. Read broadly in order to develop well-focused projects, using primary and secondary sources. Delineate key points in scholarly articles and respond to them. Use different modes of research, including empirical methods, scholarly literature, and theoretical and artistic engagement. Develop advanced library skills tailored to specific research projects, including facility with electronic databases, bibliographic reference materials, archival documents, and image and sound repositories.
  • Interdisciplinarity: Draw from multiple fields of study or define new fields; grasp means and significance of expanding, crossing, transgressing, or bridging disciplinary boundaries.

Major Maps help undergraduate students discover academic, co-curricular, and discovery opportunities at UC Berkeley based on intended major or field of interest. Developed by the Division of Undergraduate Education in collaboration with academic departments, these experience maps will help you:

Explore your major and gain a better understanding of your field of study

Connect with people and programs that inspire and sustain your creativity, drive, curiosity and success

Discover opportunities for independent inquiry, enterprise, and creative expression

Engage locally and globally to broaden your perspectives and change the world

  • Reflect on your academic career and prepare for life after Berkeley

Use the major map below as a guide to planning your undergraduate journey and designing your own unique Berkeley experience.

View the Gender and Women's Studies Major Map PDF.

The Department of Gender and Women’s Studies Undergraduate Advising office provides students with support and assistance to help guide them through the academic bureaucracy and ensure that they have a successful undergraduate experience at Berkeley:

  • Counseling regarding their education and GWS courses
  • Declaring the major
  • Assessing their progress in the major
  • Administrative concerns (i.e., course enrollment, add/drops, L&S policy)
  • Major information, courses, independent studies, Honors Program, GWS student group
  • Graduate programs and career information and referrals

The department strives to and is committed to providing a safe, inclusive environment for students. Students are welcome, feel supported, respected, and valued, and receive the ultimate advising experience to ensure academic advancement through the program.

The Undergraduate Advisor's Office (UA) is located in 608 Social Sciences Building.  You can contact Eric Stanley, VP of Pedagogy at  [email protected] for further assistance regarding the major and minor programs.

Academic Opportunities

Gws honors program, honors thesis prize.

The department Honors Thesis Prize is given to the student who has demonstrated excellence in research and writing of the honors thesis. The instructor of the honors thesis class will recommend the student to the faculty committee.

Departmental Citation

The Departmental Citation is an award recognizing undergraduate excellence in the UC Berkeley Gender and Women's Studies Department. Each year the department selects one graduating senior to receive this award for his/her outstanding accomplishments in GWS. A faculty committee reviews the materials of students who meet the following criteria:

  • Officially graduating in spring or summer of the current year, or who have finished their degree in summer or fall of the prior year and haven't previously applied.
  • Students are awarded the citation on the basis of scholarship with the criteria of an overall 3.5 GPA or higher and a 3.8 major GPA. The GPA includes the prerequisite courses taken for the major. All seniors can qualify to be considered for the Departmental Citation. When determining their selection, the faculty committee takes into consideration the overall GWS record and activities of qualified students, but it also focuses particular attention on the student's GWS research or project.

Excellence in Action Award

The department's Excellence in Action Award is given to the student who has demonstrated academic excellence and a commitment to community service. The faculty and staff will make recommendations to the faculty committee and the committee will review and select the student from the recommended candidates.

David Getman Memorial Award in LGBT Studies

The Getman Award is awarded to the student who achieves the highest academic excellence in the LGBT Minor.  Prospective recipients will be identified, screened, and selected by a committee of faculty in Gender and Women’s Studies appointed by the Chair. 

David Getman Memorial Award in Global Women's Issues

The Getman Award in Global Women's Issues is awarded to a student who demonstrates a concrete commitment to the advancement of women’s rights and issues worldwide.  Prospective recipients will be identified, screened, and selected by a committee of faculty in Gender and Women’s Studies appointed by the Chair. 

Research Funding for Majors

Majors can apply for funding to help support the costs of GWS-related research or of presenting a GWS-related paper at a conference. Individual awards can be up to $250 for domestic travel or $300-$500 for international travel. Funding levels for other costs (e.g., copying, small payments for interview subjects, etc.,) will depend on the budget presented, but will generally range between $50 and $200. Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis until the year’s funds are exhausted. Each major can receive funding up to two times over the course of their undergraduate career, although priority will be given to applicants who have not yet received funding. Recipients will be asked to write a very brief report summarizing how they used the funding. To apply, download the application from our website and email the completed form to the student services adviser.

Center for Race and Gender Undergraduate Student Grants Program

The Center for Race and Gender (CRG) at the University of California Berkeley, announces the availability of grants of $100 to $1,000 to fund undergraduates for research or creative projects that address issues of race and gender. Topics should be consonant with CRG’s mandate to support critical student research on race, gender, and their intersections in a wide variety of social, cultural, and institutional contexts, especially on the Berkeley campus and its neighboring communities, but also in California, the nation, or the world.

Study Abroad

Gender and Women’s Studies supports students interested in studying aboard, both through the  Berkeley Study Abroad Program   or through a non-BSAP program. The department will work with students to ensure they have a productive and expansive experience, whether they are interested in taking courses for the major, in completing general education requirements, or in living/studying in another country and immersing themselves into that culture.

Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program (URAP)

UC Berkeley is well known for its dynamic research environment. As an undergraduate student there are many ways to participate in research on campus. One such program is URAP, which provides opportunities for students to work with faculty on cutting-edge research. By working closely with faculty, students can cultivate professional relationships, enhance their research skills, and deepen their knowledge and skills in areas of special interest. Applications are online. For a complete listing and description of research projects, visit the  URAP website .

Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship/L&S

This program (SURF/L&S) allows UC Berkeley undergraduates in the College of Letters & Science to spend the summer doing concentrated research in preparation for a senior thesis. Application deadline generally is in the spring. See  surf.berkeley.edu  for more information.

Haas Scholars Program

The Robert & Colleen Haas Scholars Program funds financial aid eligible, academically talented undergraduates to engage in a sustained research, field study, or creative project in the summer before and during their senior year at UC Berkeley. Each year, twenty Haas Scholars are selected from all disciplines and departments across the University on the basis of the merit and originality of their project proposals. For more information, call 510-643-5374, consult the  website , or visit the program office in 5 Durant Hall.

Ronald McNair Scholars Program

The McNair Scholars Program prepares selected UC Berkeley undergraduates for graduate study at the doctoral level. Twenty to thirty McNair Scholars are selected each year to participate in both academic and summer activities. The McNair Scholars Program aims to increase the number of students in underrepresented doctoral programs. For further information, please see the program's website .

Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Program at Berkeley

The Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship (MMUF) program at UC Berkeley targets students with exceptional academic promise and potential for careers that will contribute to diversity and equal opportunity in the academy. The program supports fellows by providing guidance, role models and the environment and resources to strive for the highest academic goals. Fellows will realize their greatest potential as graduate students to later become extraordinarily successful faculty members and emerge as role models for future generations. For further information, please see the program's website .

Select a subject to view courses

  • Gender and Women’s Studies

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies

Gws n1b reading and composition 3 units.

Terms offered: Summer 2008 8 Week Session, Summer 2007 8 Week Session, Summer 2006 10 Week Session Training and instruction in expository writing in conjunction with reading literature. The readings and assignments will focus on themes and issues in women's studies. Reading and Composition: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Summer: 6 weeks - 8 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Format: Six hours of Lecture and One hour of Discussion per week for 8 weeks. Eight hours of Lecture and One hour of Discussion per week for 6 weeks.

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Gender and Women's Studies/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies N1B

Reading and Composition: Read Less [-]

GWS R1B Reading and Composition 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Spring 2023, Summer 2018 First 6 Week Session Training and instruction in expository writing in conjunction with reading literature. The readings and assignments will focus on themes and issues in gender and women's studies. This course satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition requirement. Reading and Composition: Read More [+]

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 7.5 hours of lecture and 2.5 hours of discussion per week

Additional Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Seven and one-half hours of lecture and two and one-half hours of discussion per week for 6 weeks.

GWS 10 Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2024 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2024, Fall 2023 Introduction to questions and concepts in gender and women's studies. Critical study of the formation of gender and its intersections with other relations of power, such as sexuality, racialization, class, religion, and age. Questions will be addressed within the context of a transnational world. Emphasis of the course will change depending on the instructor. Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2-4 hours of lecture and 1-1 hours of discussion per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 5-10 hours of lecture and 2-2 hours of discussion per week 8 weeks - 4-5 hours of lecture and 2-2 hours of discussion per week

Additional Format: Four hours of lecture/discussion per week. Seven and one-half hours of lecture/discussion per week for eight weeks.

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies: Read Less [-]

GWS 14 Gender, Sexuality, and Race in Global Political Issues 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Spring 2023, Spring 2022 The production of gender, sexuality, and processes of racialization in contemporary global political issues. Topics and geographical foci may vary. Examples: the post-9-11 situation in the U.S. and U.S. wars in Afghanistan and Iraq; Hindu-Muslim conflict in India; the wars in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda; the Israel/Palestine situation; global right-wing movements; state and social movement terrorisms and transnational "security" measures. Gender, Sexuality, and Race in Global Political Issues: Read More [+]

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit with instructor consent.

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 14

Gender, Sexuality, and Race in Global Political Issues: Read Less [-]

GWS 20 Introduction to Feminist Theory 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Spring 2023, Spring 2022 Why study theory? How, and from where, does the desire to theorize gender emerge? What does theory do? What forms does theory take? What is the relationship between theory and social movements? This course will introduce students to one of the most exciting and dynamic areas of contemporary inquiry. Introduction to Feminist Theory: Read More [+]

Summer: 8 weeks - 7.5 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week

Additional Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Seven and one-half hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week for 8 weeks.

Introduction to Feminist Theory: Read Less [-]

GWS 24 Freshman Seminars 1 Unit

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Fall 2022, Fall 2020 The Freshman and Sophomore Seminars program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to fifteen freshmen. Freshman Seminars: Read More [+]

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

Fall and/or spring: 8 weeks - 2 hours of seminar per week 10 weeks - 1.5 hours of seminar per week 15 weeks - 1 hour of seminar per week

Additional Format: One hour of seminar per week. One and one-half hours of seminar per week for ten weeks. Two hours of seminar per week for eight weeks.

Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered. Final exam required.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 24

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GWS 39A Freshman Sophomore Seminar 2 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2020 Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25. Freshman Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of seminar per week

Additional Format: One hour of seminar per week per unit.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 39

Freshman Sophomore Seminar: Read Less [-]

GWS 40 Special Topics 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2021 Second 6 Week Session, Fall 2016, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session The findings of feminist scholarship as they apply to a particular problem, field, or existing discipline. Designed primarily for lower division students and non-majors. Topics vary from semester to semester. Students should consult the Women's Studies announcement of courses for specific semester topics. Special Topics: Read More [+]

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 7.5 hours of lecture per week

Additional Format: Three hours of lecture per week. Seven and one-half hours of lecture per week for 6 weeks.

Special Topics: Read Less [-]

GWS 50AC Gender in American Culture 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2023, Fall 2022, Fall 2021 A multi-disciplinary course designed to provide students with an opportunity to work with faculty investigating the topic gender in American culture. Gender in American Culture: Read More [+]

Requirements this course satisfies: Satisfies the American Cultures requirement

Additional Format: Three hours of Lecture per week for 15 weeks. Seven and one-half hours of Lecture per week for 6 weeks.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 50AC

Gender in American Culture: Read Less [-]

GWS 84 Sophomore Seminar 1 or 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Spring 2021, Spring 2020 Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores. Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor

Fall and/or spring: 5 weeks - 3-6 hours of seminar per week 10 weeks - 1.5-3 hours of seminar per week 15 weeks - 1-2 hours of seminar per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 2.5-5 hours of seminar per week 8 weeks - 2-4 hours of seminar per week

Additional Format: unit(s):one hour of seminar per week; 2 unit(s):two hours of seminar per week. unit(s):one and one-half hours of seminar per week; 2 unit(s):three hours of seminar per week for 10 weeks. unit(s):two hours of seminar per week; 2 unit(s):four hours of seminar per week for 8 weeks. unit(s):two and one-half hours of seminar per week; 2 unit(s):five hours of seminar per week for 6 weeks. unit(s):three hours of seminar per week; 2 unit(s):six hours of seminar per week for five weeks.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 84

Sophomore Seminar: Read Less [-]

GWS 97 Internship 2 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2020, Fall 2019, Fall 2018 Internship Program: Field work in an organization concerned with women's issues plus individual conferences with faculty. Students must present a written scope of work to the supervising faculty members before enrolling. Credit earned depends on the amount of written work completed by students that interprets the experience through diaries, historical reports, and creative work done for the organization. Faculty supervisor and student must agree on assignments. Internship: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 10 hours of internship per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 10 hours of internship per week 8 weeks - 10 hours of internship per week 10 weeks - 10 hours of internship per week

Additional Format: Individual conferences and 10 hours of internship required per week. Individual conferences and 10 hours of internship per week for six, eight, and 10 weeks.

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Internship: Read Less [-]

GWS 98 Directed Group Study for Undergraduates 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2022, Fall 2021, Fall 2020 Seminars for the group study of selected topics not covered by regularly scheduled courses. Topics will vary from year to year. Directed Group Study for Undergraduates: Read More [+]

Credit Restrictions: Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-4 hours of directed group study per week

Additional Format: One to Four hour of Directed group study per week for 15 weeks.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 98

Directed Group Study for Undergraduates: Read Less [-]

GWS 99 Supervised Independent Study and Research 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2020 Individual research by lower division students only. Supervised Independent Study and Research: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: Freshmen or sophomores only

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-4 hours of independent study per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 2.5-10 hours of independent study per week

Additional Format: One to four hours of independent study per week. Two and one-half to ten hours of independent study per week for 6 weeks.

Supervised Independent Study and Research: Read Less [-]

GWS 100AC Women in American Culture 3 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2024 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2024, Spring 2023 This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to work with faculty investigating the topic women in American culture. Women in American Culture: Read More [+]

Women in American Culture: Read Less [-]

GWS 101 Doing Feminist Research 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Spring 2023, Spring 2022 In this course, students will learn to do feminist research using techniques from the arts, humanities, social sciences, and sciences. The teaching of interdisciplinary research skills will focus on practices of gender in a particular domain such as labor, love, science, aesthetics, film, religion, politics, or kinship. Topics will vary depending on the instructor. Doing Feminist Research: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: 10 and 20

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2-4 hours of lecture and 1-0 hours of discussion per week

Additional Format: Two to four hours of lecture and one to zero hours of discussion per week.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 101

Doing Feminist Research: Read Less [-]

GWS 102 Transnational Feminism 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2023, Fall 2022, Fall 2021 An overview of transnational feminist theories and practices, which address the workings of power that shape our world, and women's practices of resistance within and beyond the U.S. The course engages with genealogies of transnational feminist theories, including analyses of women, gender, sexuality, "race," racism, ethnicity, class, nation; postcoloniality; international relations; post-"development"; globalization; area studies; and cultural studies. Transnational Feminism: Read More [+]

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 4 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Format: Four hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 102

Transnational Feminism: Read Less [-]

GWS 103 Identities Across Difference 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2015 The course studies identity as a product of articulation and investigation of self and other, rather than an inherited marking. Emphasis, for example, may be placed on the complexities of the lived experiences of women of color in the United States and in diverse parts of the world. Identities Across Difference: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: 10

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 4 hours of lecture per week

Additional Format: Four hours of lecture/discussion per week.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 103

Identities Across Difference: Read Less [-]

GWS 104 Feminist Theory 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Fall 2022, Fall 2021 Feminist theory examines the basic categories that structure social life and that condition dominant modes of thought. Feminist theory engages with many currents of thought such as liberalism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, postcolonial theory, and transnational feminist theory. In this course, students will gain a working knowledge of the range and uses of feminist theory. Feminist Theory: Read More [+]

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3-4 hours of lecture and 1-0 hours of discussion per week

Additional Format: Three to four hours of lecture and one to zero hours of discussion per week.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 104

Feminist Theory: Read Less [-]

GWS 111 Special Topics 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2024 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2024 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2024 This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to work closely with Gender and Women's Studies faculty, investigating a topic of mutual interest in great depth. Emphasis in on student discussion and collaboration. Topics will vary from semester to semester. Number of units will vary depending on specific course, format, and requirements. Special Topics: Read More [+]

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-3 hours of lecture per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 2.5-7.5 hours of lecture per week 8 weeks - 1.5-6 hours of lecture per week

Additional Format: One to three hours of lecture/discussion per week.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 111

GWS 115 Engaged Scholarship in Women and Gender 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2011, Spring 2010 This class provides students the opportunity to do supervised community service with an organization that relates to women and gender. Students will be placed in an organization and complete an internship throughout the course of the semester. Students will also spend time reflecting on their internship experiences, connecting their service with concepts learned in gender and women's studies classes, and meeting as a group to evaluate and assess issues such as volunteer/unpaid labor, activism and the academy, and the political economy of gender and women's services. Engaged Scholarship in Women and Gender: Read More [+]

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 3 hours of internship per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 5 hours of lecture and 5.5 hours of internship per week

Additional Format: Two hours of lecture/discussion and three hours of internship per week. Five hours of lecture/discussion and five and one-half hours of internship per week for six weeks.

Engaged Scholarship in Women and Gender: Read Less [-]

GWS 116AC Queer Theories: Activist Practices 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011 This class will examine various forms of activist practices and create possibilities for students to participate in community projects that allow them to explore their own definitions of activism, community engagement, and social transformation. As a class, we will consider different types of interventions -- art, law, advocacy, and direct action -- and examine the limits and possibilities of these different forms of social engagement. Queer Theories: Activist Practices: Read More [+]

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 1 hour of internship per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 5 hours of lecture and 2.5 hours of internship per week

Additional Format: Two hours of Lecture and One hour of Internship per week for 15 weeks. Five hours of Lecture and Two and one-half hours of Internship per week for 6 weeks.

Queer Theories: Activist Practices: Read Less [-]

GWS 120 The History of American Women 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Spring 2011, Fall 2009 This course will survey the history of women in the United States from approximately 1890 to the present, a century of dramatic and fundamental change in the meaning of gender difference. We will examine such topics as work, the family, sexuality, and politics and be attentive to variations in the structure and experience of gender based on race, ethnicity, and class. The History of American Women: Read More [+]

Additional Format: Three hours of Lecture per week for 15 weeks.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 120

The History of American Women: Read Less [-]

GWS 125 Women and Film 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Spring 2022, Fall 2012 This course explores the role of women both in front of and behind the camera. It examines the socially constructed nature of gender representations in film and analizes the position of women as related to the production and reception of films. Emphasis is on feminist aproaches that challenge and expose the underlying working of patriarchy in cinema. Women and Film: Read More [+]

Additional Format: Three hours of lecture and two hours of screening per week. Seven and one-half hours of lecture and five hours of screening per week for six weeks.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 125

Women and Film: Read Less [-]

GWS 126 Film, Feminism, and the Avant-Garde 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2022, Spring 2018, Fall 2016 Focusing on the creative process while engaging in critical debates on politics, ethics, and aesthetics, the course explores the site where feminist film-making practice meets with and challenges the avant-garde tradition. It emphasizes works that question conventional notions of subjectivity, audience, and interpretation in relation to film making, film viewing, and the cinematic apparatus. Film, Feminism, and the Avant-Garde: Read More [+]

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 126

Film, Feminism, and the Avant-Garde: Read Less [-]

GWS 129 Bodies and Boundaries 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2023, Fall 2022, Summer 2022 First 6 Week Session Examines gender and embodiment in interdisciplinary transnational perspective. The human body as both a source of pleasure and as a site of coercion, which expresses individuality and reflects social worlds. Looks at bodies as gendered, raced, disabled/able-bodied, young or old, rich or poor, fat or thin, commodity or inalienable. Considers masculinity, women's bodies, sexuality, sports, clothing, bodies constrained, in leisure , at work, in nation-building, at war, and as feminist theory. Bodies and Boundaries: Read More [+]

Additional Format: Seven and one-half hours of lecture/discussion per week for six weeks.Three hours of lecture/discussion per week.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 129

Bodies and Boundaries: Read Less [-]

GWS 130AC Gender, Race, Nation, and Health 4 Units

Terms offered: Summer 2024 8 Week Session, Fall 2023, Spring 2023 Examines the role of gender in health care status, in definitions and experiences of health, and in practices of medicine. Feminist perspectives on health care disparities, the medicalization of society, and transnational processes relating to health. Gender will be considered in dynamic interaction with race, ethnicity, sexuality, immigration status, religion, nation, age, and disability, and in both urban and rural setting s. Gender, Race, Nation, and Health: Read More [+]

Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture per week

Additional Format: Three hours of lecture per week. Six hours of lecture per week for 8 weeks.

Formerly known as: 130

Gender, Race, Nation, and Health: Read Less [-]

GWS 131 Gender and Science 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2021, Fall 2017, Spring 2014 Examines historical and contemporary scientific studies of gender, sexuality, class, nation, and race from late 18th century racial and gender classifications through the heyday of eugenics to today's genomics. Explores the embedding of the scientific study of gender and sexuality and race in different political, economic, and social contexts. Considers different theories for the historical underrepresentation of women and minorities in science , as well as potential solutions. Introduces students to feminist science studies, and discusses technologies of production, reproduction, and destruction that draw on as well as remake gender locally and globally. Gender and Science: Read More [+]

Additional Format: Three hours of lecture per week.

Gender and Science: Read Less [-]

GWS 132AC Gender, Race, and Law 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015 Focusing on the interconnected ways that race, gender, and sexuality are constructed through the law, this course will examine a wide range of historical texts, legal documents, literature, and critical theory. Throughout our course readings, we will be focusing on how these categories of difference inform legal constructions of nation, citizenship, immigration, masculinity, femininity, childhood, the public sphere, and everyday life. Throughout the course, we will be making connections between historical events and the contemporary moment through a consideration of interpretation and implications of legal arguments. Gender, Race, and Law: Read More [+]

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit up to a total of 1 time.

Summer: 6 weeks - 10 hours of lecture per week

Additional Format: Three hours of lecture per week. Ten hours of lecture per week for 6 weeks.

Gender, Race, and Law: Read Less [-]

GWS 133AC Women, Men, and Other Animals: Human Animality in American Cultures 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2022, Fall 2019, Spring 2018 Explores various ways that human groups and interests, particularly in the United States, have both attached and divorced themselves from other animals, with particular focus on gender, race, ability, and sexuality as the definitional foils for human engagements with animality. Women, Men, and Other Animals: Human Animality in American Cultures: Read More [+]

Women, Men, and Other Animals: Human Animality in American Cultures: Read Less [-]

GWS 134 Gender and the Politics of Childhood 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2021, Spring 2017, Spring 2016 Explores gender and age as interrelated dimensions of social structure, meaning, identity, and embodiment. Emphasis on the gendered politics of childhood--for example, in the social regulation of reproduction; child-rearing, motherhood, fatherhood, care, and rights; the changing global political economy of childhoods and varied constructions of "the child"; child laborers, soldiers, street children; consumption by and for children; growing up in schools, neighborhoods, and families. Gender and the Politics of Childhood: Read More [+]

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 134

Gender and the Politics of Childhood: Read Less [-]

GWS C138 Gender and Capitalism 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Fall 2021, Spring 2020 The 21st century has seen powerful critiques of both growing economic inequality and the troubling persistence of domination based on gender, race and other categorical differences. Gender has a distinctive role here for many reasons: the centrality of gender to social reproduction; the historical coproduction of male domination and capitalism; and the way gender operates in the constitution of selves. Insofar as capitalism is organized and distributes power and profits through gendered structures, and gendered meanings and identities are shaped by their emergence within capitalist logics, it behooves us to think gender and capitalism in tandem. Figuring out how to do that, and sorting out the consequences, is our project in this class. Gender and Capitalism: Read More [+]

Summer: 6 weeks - 7.5 hours of lecture and 0 hours of discussion per week

Additional Format: Two to four hours of lecture and one to zero hours of discussion per week. Seven and one-half hours of lecture and zero hour of discussion per week for 6 weeks.

Also listed as: POLECON C138

Gender and Capitalism: Read Less [-]

GWS 139 Why Work? Gender and Labor Under Capitalism 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2022, Spring 2021, Fall 2017 This course uses gender as a lens to examine the nature, meaning, and organization of work. Students learn varied conceptual approaches with which to probe such issues as gender and race divisions of labor, the economic significance of caring and other forms of unpaid labor, earnings disparities between men and women, race and class differences in women's work, transnational labor immigration, and worker resistance and organizing. Why Work? Gender and Labor Under Capitalism: Read More [+]

Why Work? Gender and Labor Under Capitalism: Read Less [-]

GWS 140 Feminist Cultural Studies 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2018 This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of feminist cultural studies. Drawing upon contemporary theories of representational politics, the specific focus of the course will vary, but the emphasis will remain on the intersections of gender, race, nation, sexuality, and class in particular cultural and critical practices. Feminist Cultural Studies: Read More [+]

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 140

Feminist Cultural Studies: Read Less [-]

GWS 141 Interrogating Global Economic "Development" 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2010, Spring 2009 An introduction to women and gender in "development." Addresses theories of "development" (modernization, demographic transition, dependency, world systems, post-development, postcolonial, and transnational feminist): productions and representations of "underdevelopment"; national and international "development" apparatuses; "development" practices about labor, population, resources, environment , literacy, technologies, media; and women's resistance and alternatives. Interrogating Global Economic "Development": Read More [+]

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 141

Interrogating Global Economic "Development": Read Less [-]

GWS 142 Women in the Muslim and Arab Worlds 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Fall 2017, Spring 2016 Examines differences and similarities in women's lives in the Muslim/Arab worlds, including diasporas in Europe and North America. Analysis of issues of gender in relation to "race," ethnicity, nation, religion, and culture. Women in the Muslim and Arab Worlds: Read More [+]

Women in the Muslim and Arab Worlds: Read Less [-]

GWS 143 Women, Proverty, and Globalization 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010, Fall 2009 This course examines new patterns of inequality as they relate to the feminization of poverty in a global and transnational context. It will give students the opportunity to enhance their critical knowledge of new forms of globalization and their impact on the least-privileged group of women locally and globally. It also provides an opportunity for students to work with a local or global non-governmental or community organization with a focus on gender and poverty, and to engage in a systematic analysis of the strategies and practices of these organizations. Women, Proverty, and Globalization: Read More [+]

Additional Format: Three hours of lecture/discussion per week.

Women, Proverty, and Globalization: Read Less [-]

GWS 144 Alternate Sexualities in a Transnational World 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2016 This course engages with contemporary narrations produced by and about lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transsexual postcolonial subjects through genres such as autobiography, fiction, academic writing, film, journalism, and poetry. Each semester the focus is geopolitically limited to no more than two countries to allow students to consider the conditions out of which the narrations are produced. Sites and subjects may vary from semester to s emester. Alternate Sexualities in a Transnational World: Read More [+]

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 144

Alternate Sexualities in a Transnational World: Read Less [-]

GWS C146A Cultural Representations of Sexualities: Queer Literary Culture 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2023, Spring 2022, Fall 2018 Cultural Representations of Sexuality: Queer Literary Culture explores a variety of twentieth-century literary texts (poetry, fiction, drama) produced at key moments in the “queer past.” Using sound recordings, visual art, and documentary film to enhance our encounter with literary texts, this course seeks to amplify the aesthetic dimensions of queer politics, sociality, culture and counter-culture, through sound and moving image. Over the course of the semester, students will learn to situate literary and text-based modes of expression and circulation within a broader field of cultural production. Cultural Representations of Sexualities: Queer Literary Culture: Read More [+]

Also listed as: LGBT C146A

Cultural Representations of Sexualities: Queer Literary Culture: Read Less [-]

GWS C146B Cultural Representations of Sexualities: Queer Visual Culture 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Fall 2022, Spring 2020 This course examines modern visual cultures that construct ways of seeing diverse sexualities. Considering Western conventions of representation during the modern period, we will investigate film, television, and video. How and when do "normative" and "queer" sexualities become visually defined? Cultural Representations of Sexualities: Queer Visual Culture: Read More [+]

Formerly known as: Women's Studies C146

Also listed as: LGBT C146B

Cultural Representations of Sexualities: Queer Visual Culture: Read Less [-]

GWS 155 Gender and Transnational Migration 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2023, Fall 2011 What economic, social, and cultural forces impel women to migrate and shape their experiences as immigrants? How does gender, together with race/ethnicity and class, affect processes of settlement, community building, and incorporation into labor markets? This course examines gender structures and relations as they are reconfigured and maintained through immigration. It emphasizes the agency of immigrant women as they cope with change and claim their rights as citizens. Gender and Transnational Migration: Read More [+]

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 155

Gender and Transnational Migration: Read Less [-]

GWS C180Y Gender, Sex and Power 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2023, Spring 2023, Fall 2022, Spring 2022, Fall 2020 Gender, sex, and power shape and influence our cultural and social world in obvious and in hidden ways. Bay Area artists and activists focus on illuminating, shifting, redefining, and making use of the juncture of gender, sex, and power to bring about new opportunities and new futures. We will first explore the terrain of academic definitions of gender, sex, power and the connections among them, emphasizing how gender/sex/power is interlinked with racism, classism, colonialism, and dis/ablism. Topics addressed will include: labor, migration and belonging; food, shelter, and land; health and health care; sexuality and love; and politics and political action. Gender, Sex and Power: Read More [+]

Additional Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

Also listed as: L & S C180Y

Gender, Sex and Power: Read Less [-]

GWS 194A Unity Theme Program Seminar 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020 This course is designed to provide students with an introductory exploration of issues of sexuality and gender through community-centered praxis, democratic education, and dialogue. In a culturally and socially diverse society, discussion of differences is needed to facilitate understanding and build relationships among people, as well as to bring awareness to and address social inequities. Through this course, students will explore their own and others’ narratives in various social and institutional contexts, while learning from each other’s perspectives in community. Students will also explore ways of taking action to engage in social justice work and create social change at the interpersonal, community, and institutional levels. Unity Theme Program Seminar: Read More [+]

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of seminar per week

Additional Format: Two hours of seminar per week.

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. This is part one of a year long series course. A provisional grade of IP (in progress) will be applied and later replaced with the final grade after completing part two of the series. Final exam not required.

Unity Theme Program Seminar: Read Less [-]

GWS 194B UNITY THEME PROGRAM SEMINAR 2 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2021 This course is designed to provide students with an introductory exploration of queer theory and its intersections with leadership development. Students will engage in a multifaceted approach of learning through discussions in the academic seminar integrated with contextual education taking place in the community. By integrating knowledge of and experiences with issues affecting queer and trans communities, students will explore the importance of challenging dominant leadership paradigms as they develop their own identities as leaders. Students will also explore ways to turn social justice knowledge and conversation into tangible actions and work to create social change at the interpersonal, community, and institutional levels. UNITY THEME PROGRAM SEMINAR: Read More [+]

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. This is part two of a year long series course. Upon completion, the final grade will be applied to both parts of the series. Final exam not required.

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GWS 195 Gender and Women's Studies Senior Seminar 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2023, Fall 2022, Spring 2022 This seminar is required of all seniors majoring in gender and women’s studies, with the exception of seniors enrolled in GWS H195 . Students will engage in intensive seminar-style study of a topic determined by the faculty leader. Gender and Women's Studies Senior Seminar: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: 101

Additional Format: Three hours of seminar per week.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 195

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GWS H195 Gender and Women's Studies Senior Honors Thesis 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Spring 2022, Spring 2018 Entails writing a bachelor's honors thesis pertaining to the student's major in gender and women's studies. Each student will work under the guidance of a faculty adviser who will read and grade the thesis. Gender and Women's Studies Senior Honors Thesis: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: 15 upper division units in Gender and Women's Studies; 3.3 GPA in all University work and 3.3 GPA in courses in the major

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 0 hours of independent study per week

Additional Format: Individual conferences.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies H195

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GWS H195A Honor's Thesis A 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2023 This seminar is required of seniors in majoring in gender and women’s studies who have qualified for and elected to pursue honors in the major. Entails writing a bachelor's honors thesis pertaining to the student's major in gender and women's studies. Each student will work under the guidance of a faculty adviser who will read and grade the work. In the first semester, students will be expected to establish a research plan and undertake original research on a focused topic. In the second semester, students will be expected to complete the writing of the honors thesis. Honor's Thesis A: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: GWS 101 is a prerequisite

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 4 hours of seminar per week

Additional Format: Four hours of seminar per week.

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. This is part one of a year long series course. A provisional grade of IP (in progress) will be applied and later replaced with the final grade after completing part two of the series. Alternative to final exam.

Honor's Thesis A: Read Less [-]

GWS H195B Honor's Thesis 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024 This seminar is required of seniors in majoring in gender and women’s studies who have qualified for and elected to pursue honors in the major. Entails writing a bachelor's honors thesis pertaining to the student's major in gender and women's studies. Each student will work under the guidance of a faculty adviser who will read and grade the work. In the first semester ( GWS H195A ), students will be expected to establish a research plan and undertake original research on a focused topic. In the second semester ( GWS H195B ), students will be expected to complete the writing of the honors thesis. Honor's Thesis: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: GWS H195A is a prerequisite

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. This is part two of a year long series course. Upon completion, the final grade will be applied to both parts of the series. Alternative to final exam.

Honor's Thesis: Read Less [-]

GWS C196A UCDC Core Seminar 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Fall 2023, Spring 2023, Fall 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Fall 2012, Spring 2012 This course is the UCDC letter-graded core seminar for 4 units that complements the P/NP credited internship course UGIS C196B . Core seminars are designed to enhance the experience of and provide an intellectual framework for the student's internship. UCDC core seminars are taught in sections that cover various tracks such as the Congress, media, bureaucratic organizations and the Executive Branch, international relations, public policy and general un-themed original research. UCDC Core Seminar: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: C196B (must be taken concurrently)

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Students may enroll in multiple sections of this course within the same semester.

Summer: 10 weeks - 4.5 hours of seminar per week

Additional Format: Three hours of seminar per week. Four and one-half hours of seminar per week for 10 weeks.

Also listed as: HISTART C196A/HISTORY C196A/MEDIAST C196A/POL SCI C196A/POLECON C196A/SOCIOL C196A/UGIS C196A

UCDC Core Seminar: Read Less [-]

GWS C196B UCDC Internship 6.5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Fall 2023, Spring 2023, Fall 2022, Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2018, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013 This course provides a credited internship for all students enrolled in the UCDC and Cal in the Capital Programs. It must be taken in conjunction with the required academic core course C196A. C196B requires that students work 3-4 days per week as interns in settings selected to provide them with exposure to and experienc in government, public policy, international affairs, media, the arts or other areas or relevance to their major fields of study. UCDC Internship: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: C196A (must be taken concurrently)

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 20 hours of internship per week

Additional Format: Twenty hours of internship per week.

Also listed as: HISTART C196B/HISTORY C196B/MEDIAST C196B/POL SCI C196B/POLECON C196B/SOCIOL C196B/UGIS C196B

UCDC Internship: Read Less [-]

GWS C196W Special Field Research 10.5 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Spring 2023, Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020, Spring 2019, Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014, Spring 2014, Spring 2013 Students work in selected internship programs approved in advance by the faculty coordinator and for which written contracts have been established between the sponsoring organization and the student. Students will be expected to produce two progress reports for their faculty coordinator during the course of the internship , as well as a final paper for the course consisting of at least 35 pages. Other restrictions apply; see faculty adviser. Special Field Research: Read More [+]

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit up to a total of 12 units.

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of seminar and 25 hours of internship per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 7.5 hours of seminar and 60 hours of internship per week 8 weeks - 6 hours of seminar and 50 hours of internship per week

Additional Format: 240-300 hours of work per semester plus regular meetings with the faculty supervisor.

Formerly known as: 196W

Also listed as: HISTART C196W/HISTORY C196W/MEDIAST C196W/POL SCI C196W/POLECON C196W/SOCIOL C196W/UGIS C196W

Special Field Research: Read Less [-]

GWS 197 Internship 2 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Spring 2022, Fall 2017 Internship Program: Field work in an organization concerned with women's issues plus individual conferences with faculty. Students must present a written scope of work to the supervising faculty members before enrolling. Credit earned depends on the amount of written work completed by students that interprets the experience through diaries, historical reports, and creative work done for the organization. Faculty supervisor and student must agree on assignments. Internship: Read More [+]

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 197

GWS 198 Directed Group Study for Advanced Undergraduates 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017 Seminars for group study of selected topics not covered by regularly scheduled courses. Topics will vary from year to year. Directed Group Study for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: Gender and women's studies major

Summer: 8 weeks - 1-4 hours of directed group study per week

Additional Format: One to Four hour of Directed group study per week for 15 weeks. One to Four hour of Directed group study per week for 8 weeks.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 198

Directed Group Study for Advanced Undergraduates: Read Less [-]

GWS 199 Supervised Independent Study for Advanced Undergraduates 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2020, Fall 2019, Fall 2018 Reading and conference with the instructor in a field that does not coincide with that of any regular course and is specific enough to enable students to write an essay based upon their studies. Supervised Independent Study for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

Summer: 6 weeks - 1-5 hours of independent study per week 8 weeks - 1-4 hours of independent study per week

Additional Format: Zero hours of Independent study per week for 15 weeks. One to Four hour of Independent study per week for 8 weeks. One to Five hour of Independent study per week for 6 weeks.

Formerly known as: Women's Studies 199

Supervised Independent Study for Advanced Undergraduates: Read Less [-]

LGBT 20AC Sexual Politics and Queer Organzing in the US 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Fall 2023, Spring 2023 An introduction to varied dimensions of alternative sexual identities in the contemporary United States, with a focus ranging from individuals to communities. This course will use historical, sociological, ethnographic, political-scientific, psychological, psychoanalytical, legal, medical, literary, and filmic materials to chart trends and movements from the turn of the century to the present. Sexual Politics and Queer Organzing in the US: Read More [+]

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for 20AC after taking Undergraduate Interdisciplinary Studies 20AC.

Summer: 6 weeks - 7 hours of lecture and 3 hours of discussion per week

Additional Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Seven hours of lecture and three hours of discussion per week for 6 weeks.

Subject/Course Level: Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender St/Undergraduate

Sexual Politics and Queer Organzing in the US: Read Less [-]

LGBT 98 Directed Group Study for Advanced Undergraduates 1 - 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013 Seminars for group study of selected topics not covered by regularly scheduled courses. Topics will vary from year to year. Directed Group Study for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

Additional Format: Three hours of Seminar per week for 15 weeks.

LGBT 100 Special Topics 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Fall 2021, Fall 2016 This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to work closely with LGBT faculty, investigating a topic of mutual interest in great depth. Emphasis in on student discussion and collaboration. Topics will vary from semester to semester. Number of units will vary depending on specific course, format, and requirements. Special Topics: Read More [+]

Summer: 6 weeks - 1-3 hours of lecture per week

LGBT 145 Interpreting the Queer Past: Methods and Problems in the History of Sexuality 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2023, Spring 2023, Spring 2021 This course examines interpretive issues in studying the history of sexuality and the formation of sexual identities and communities. Considering primary documents, secondary literature, and theoretical essays, we investigate specific historiographical concerns and raise questions about historical methodology and practice. Interpreting the Queer Past: Methods and Problems in the History of Sexuality: Read More [+]

Formerly known as: Undergraduate Interdisciplinary Studies C145

Interpreting the Queer Past: Methods and Problems in the History of Sexuality: Read Less [-]

LGBT 146 Cultural Representations of Sexuality 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2021, Spring 2018, Spring 2017 This course will draw upon a wide range of critical theory, film, music, literature, popular culture, ethnography, theater, and visual art to explore the relationship between cultural forms of representation and individual and collective forms of expression. Central questions for mutual consideration will include: Who/what constitutes the subject of queer cultural production? How are queer theories relevant (or irrelevant) to queer cultural and political practices? Cultural Representations of Sexuality: Read More [+]

Additional Format: Seven and one-half hours of lecture and discussion per week for six weeks.

Cultural Representations of Sexuality: Read Less [-]

LGBT C146A Cultural Representations of Sexualities: Queer Literary Culture 4 Units

Also listed as: GWS C146A

LGBT C146B Cultural Representations of Sexualities: Queer Visual Culture 4 Units

Also listed as: GWS C146B

LGBT C147B Sexuality, Culture, and Colonialism 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Spring 2023, Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Spring 2019 An introduction to social theory and ethnographic methodology in the cross-cultural study of sexuality, particularly sexual orientation and gender identity. The course will stress the relationships between culture, international and local political economy, and the representation and experience of what we will provisionally call homosexual and transgendered desires or identities. Sexuality, Culture, and Colonialism: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: 3 or Sociology 3

Summer: 6 weeks - 8 hours of lecture per week 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture per week

Additional Format: Three hours of Lecture per week for 15 weeks. Six hours of Lecture per week for 8 weeks. Eight hours of Lecture per week for 6 weeks.

Also listed as: ANTHRO C147B

Sexuality, Culture, and Colonialism: Read Less [-]

LGBT C148 Ethnicity, Gender, and Sexuality 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2011 Course focuses on the production of sexualities, sexual identification, and gender differentiation across multiple discourses and locations. Ethnicity, Gender, and Sexuality: Read More [+]

Summer: 8 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Format: Three hours of Lecture and One hour of Discussion per week for 15 weeks. Three hours of Lecture and One hour of Discussion per week for 8 weeks.

Formerly known as: 126

Also listed as: ETH STD C126

Ethnicity, Gender, and Sexuality: Read Less [-]

LGBT 198 Directed Group Study for Advanced Undergraduates 1 - 4 Units

Contact information, department of gender and women's studies.

608 Social Sciences Building

Phone: 510-642-2767

Fax: 510-642-0246

Department Chair

Leslie Salzinger, PhD

616 Social Sciences Building

[email protected]

Vice Chair for Research

Paola Bacchetta, PhD

626 Social Sciences Building

[email protected]

Vice Chair for Pedagogy

Laura Nelson, PhD

618 Social Sciences Building

[email protected]

Student Services Advisor

Eric Cheatham

608C Social Sciences Building

Phone: 510-642-8513

[email protected]

Department Manager

Sandra Richmond

622 Social Sciences Building

Phone: 510-642-7084

[email protected]

Print Options

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Scholarship @ Claremont

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Home > SCRIPPS > SCRIPPS_STUDENT > SCRIPPS_THESES > 653

Scripps Senior Theses

Online feminisms: feminist community building and activism in a digital age.

Taryn Riera , Scripps College Follow

Graduation Year

Document type.

Open Access Senior Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts

Anthropology

Seo Young Park

Mary Ann Davis

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Rights Information

© 2015 Taryn Riera

This thesis explores both what feminism looks like in a digital age, as well as how the Internet and technology inform the ways in which feminists interact, build communities, and form identities. I found that online feminist spaces are built as communities of validation and support, education and empowerment, as well as spaces of radicalization and contention. Ultimately my thesis leads toward a new understanding of feminist activism that incorporates the unique characteristics and abilities of online feminism.

Recommended Citation

Riera, Taryn, "Online Feminisms: Feminist Community Building and Activism in a Digital Age" (2015). Scripps Senior Theses . 653. https://scholarship.claremont.edu/scripps_theses/653

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  • Bibliography
  • More Referencing guides Blog Automated transliteration Relevant bibliographies by topics
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Dissertations / Theses on the topic 'Women and literature Feminism and literature'

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Consult the top 50 dissertations / theses for your research on the topic 'Women and literature Feminism and literature.'

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Fish, Tamara Lynn. "Feminist traces : women and feminism in college composition and communication, 1963-1992 /." Digital version accessible at:, 1998. http://wwwlib.umi.com/cr/utexas/main.

Tai, Yu-Chen. "(W)holistic Feminism: Decolonial Healing in Women of Color Literature." The Ohio State University, 2016. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1459357822.

Bosch, Marta (Bosch Vilarrubias). "Post-9/11 Representations of Arab Men by Arab American Women Writers: Affirmation and Resistance." Doctoral thesis, Universitat de Barcelona, 2016. http://hdl.handle.net/10803/392705.

Kastelein, Barbara. "Popular/post-feminism and popular literature." Thesis, University of Warwick, 1994. http://wrap.warwick.ac.uk/36104/.

Ioannou, Maria. "Beautiful stranger : the function of the coquette in Victorian literature." Thesis, University of Exeter, 2009. http://hdl.handle.net/10036/72193.

Hare, Nicola Tracy. "The goddess, the witch and the bitch : three studies in the perception of women." Thesis, University of Port Elizabeth, 2001. http://hdl.handle.net/10948/278.

Ip, Sui-lin Stella, and 葉瑞蓮. "Novels of chivalrous women in the magazine Saturday." Thesis, The University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong), 1994. http://hub.hku.hk/bib/B44569683.

Trainor, Kim. "Feminist poetics from écriture féminine to The pink guitar." Thesis, McGill University, 2003. http://digitool.Library.McGill.CA:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=84683.

Chui, Siu Shan Remy. "Reading 'Third World' women's autobiography /." Hong Kong : University of Hong Kong, 2000. http://sunzi.lib.hku.hk/hkuto/record.jsp?B22763491.

Dunn, Angela Frances. "The continental drift : Anglo-American and French theories of tradition and feminism." Thesis, McGill University, 1987. http://digitool.Library.McGill.CA:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=63972.

Mohanram, Radhika Thiruvalam. "Narrative techniques and subversion in the novels of Edith Wharton." Diss., The University of Arizona, 1992. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185791.

Ainsworth, Diann Elizabeth Smith. ""Strangely tangled threads" American women writers negotiating naturalism, 1850-1900 /." Fort Worth, Tex. : Texas Christian University, 2007. http://etd.tcu.edu/etdfiles/available/etd-12072007-113413/unrestricted/ainsworth.pdf.

Barsby, Tina. "Olive Schreiner : women, nature, culture." Master's thesis, University of Cape Town, 1988. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20138.

Brennan, Zoe. "Representations of older women in contemporary literature." Thesis, University of the West of England, Bristol, 2003. http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.271040.

Schorn, Susan Elizabeth. ""The merciful construction of good women" : actresses in the marriage-plot novel /." Full text (PDF) from UMI/Dissertation Abstracts International, 2000. http://wwwlib.umi.com/cr/utexas/fullcit?p3004374.

Allen-Johnstone, Claire. "Dress, feminism, and British New Woman novels." Thesis, University of Oxford, 2018. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:dd38da33-efbb-463f-86fd-9fcc1c4f707e.

Rossigali, Rossana. "O lugar do sujeito feminino na revista curitibana A Sempre-Viva (1924-1925)." reponame:Repositório Institucional da UCS, 2017. https://repositorio.ucs.br/handle/11338/3433.

Fraiberg, Allison M. "Beyond indiscretion : agency, comedy, and contemporary American women's writing and performance /." Thesis, Connect to this title online; UW restricted, 1993. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/9476.

Aramand, Anne. "Can women have it all?| Hesitant feminism in American women's popular writing." Thesis, University of Massachusetts Boston, 2014. http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=1550547.

Twilight by Stephenie Meyer and The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins are two of the bestselling series of our generation. These series are meeting widespread popularity just as the contemporary feminist debate of: "Can women have it all?" is occurring around the country. Although Twilight and The Hunger Games are not considered overtly feminist texts, they have emerged in a time when women are reexamining the possibility of empowering themselves both in the public and the domestic sphere. Meyer and Collins have introduced female protagonists that deal with precisely this issue.

First, I will be outlining why cultural studies are important to discussions of popular literature, as argued by both Jane Tompkins and Cathy N. Davidson, especially in terms of female readers and writers. I will also be exploring the bestselling works of Louisa May Alcott's Little Women and Jacqueline Susann's Valley of the Dolls which emerged during the first and second waves of feminism and how they expressed a hesitation to give women a happy ending outside domesticity within their respective historical contexts. Next, I will review the current "lean in" culture of the third wave of feminism. I will also show how both Twilight and The Hunger Games continue the pattern of female protagonists that cannot be empowered unless they are wives and mothers. Finally, I will analyze how my own creative writing has been affected by cultural debates involving women's roles. Popular women's writing that emerges in the context of major feminist moments in American history shows ambivalence towards empowering women outside the home. This ambivalence is also reflected in my own writing through poetry. By first examining the work of best-selling women writers in the last two centuries and then analyzing my own writing in concurrence with the evolution of feminist ideals, I will show that women writers display a hesitant feminism despite emerging alongside progressive cultural moments in American history.

Gabel, Joanne E. "Awakening desire and Charlotte Bronte's Heroines the feminist voice /." Instructions for remote access. Click here to access this electronic resource. Access available to Kutztown University faculty, staff, and students only, 1999. http://www.kutztown.edu/library/services/remote_access.asp.

Craddock, Jade. "Women poets, feminism and the sonnet in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries : an American narrative." Thesis, University of Birmingham, 2013. http://etheses.bham.ac.uk//id/eprint/4158/.

Flaherty, Patricia. ""Poor girl!" feminism, disability and the other in Ulysses /." Diss., Connect to the thesis, 2006. http://hdl.handle.net/10066/634.

Barlow, Jenna Elizabeth. "Womens historical fiction after feminism : discursive reconstructions of the Tudors in contemporary literature." Thesis, Stellenbosch : Stellenbosch University, 2014. http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/86303.

Omberg, Katie. "The liberation of God : women writing a new theology /." South Hadley, Mass. : [s.n.], 2008. http://ada.mtholyoke.edu/setr/websrc/pdfs/www/2008/259.pdf.

Khoury, Nicole Michelle. "Hybrid identity and Arab/American feminism in Diana Abu-Jaber's Arabian Jazz." CSUSB ScholarWorks, 2005. https://scholarworks.lib.csusb.edu/etd-project/2862.

Keith, Anne Slay. "The Motif of the Fairy-Tale Princess in the Novels of Shelby Hearon." Thesis, North Texas State University, 1986. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc500688/.

Brennan, Karen Morley. "Hysteria and the scene of feminine representation." Diss., The University of Arizona, 1990. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185047.

Rahija, Robin L. "House of Women." UKnowledge, 2016. http://uknowledge.uky.edu/english_etds/43.

Huston-Findley, Shirley A. "Subverting the dramatic text : folklore, feminism, and the images of women in three canonical American plays /." free to MU campus, to others for purchase, 1998. http://wwwlib.umi.com/cr/mo/fullcit?p9901243.

Springer, Stephanie M. ""Taming" Feminism: Tracing Women and Culture Through Adaptation." Bowling Green State University / OhioLINK, 2013. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1363353110.

Petty, Sue. "Working-class women and contemporary British literature." Thesis, Loughborough University, 2009. https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/5441.

Nicol, Rhonda M. Harris Charles B. "The spaces between feminism and postmodernism in contemporary women's fiction /." Normal, Ill. Illinois State University, 2004. http://wwwlib.umi.com/cr/ilstu/fullcit?p3196671.

Defrancis, Theresa M. "Women-writing-women : three American responses to the woman question /." Saarbrucken, Germany : Verlag Dr. Muller, 2005. http://0-wwwlib.umi.com.helin.uri.edu/dissertations/dlnow/3186902.

Garayta, Isabel. ""Womanhandling" the text : feminism, rewriting, and translation /." Digital version accessible at:, 1998. http://wwwlib.umi.com/cr/utexas/main.

Evoy, Karen. "Jane Austen : women and power." Thesis, McGill University, 1986. http://digitool.Library.McGill.CA:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=66161.

Spriggs, Bianca L. "Women of the Apocalypse: Afrospeculative Feminist Novelists." UKnowledge, 2017. http://uknowledge.uky.edu/english_etds/56.

徐少珊 and Siu Shan Remy Chui. "Reading 'Third World' women's autobiography." Thesis, The University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong), 2000. http://hub.hku.hk/bib/B31222547.

Hassan, Saman Salah. "Women and literature : a feminist reading of Kurdish women's poetry." Thesis, University of Exeter, 2013. http://hdl.handle.net/10871/13903.

Žemaitytė, Erika. "The Image of Writing Women: the Comparative Aspect on Women’s Literature in English." Bachelor's thesis, Lithuanian Academic Libraries Network (LABT), 2012. http://vddb.laba.lt/obj/LT-eLABa-0001:E.02~2012~D_20120831_092347-18443.

Arosteguy, Katie O'Donnell. "The clothes do make the woman : the politics of fashioning femininity in contemporary American Chick lit." Pullman, Wash. : Washington State University, 2009. http://www.dissertations.wsu.edu/Dissertations/Spring2009/k_arosteguy_040109.pdf.

Balic, Iva Foertsch Jacqueline. "Always painting the future utopian desire and the women's movement in selected works by United States female writers at the turn of the twentieth century /." [Denton, Tex.] : University of North Texas, 2009. http://digital.library.unt.edu/permalink/meta-dc-11060.

Schmidt, Bonnie Ann. "Print and protest: a study of the women's suffrage movement in nineteenth-century English periodical literature /." Burnaby B.C. : Simon Fraser University, 2005. http://ir.lib.sfu.ca/handle/1892/2409.

Kempen, Laura Charlotte. "Words of deliverance : the (re)constitution of the disenfranchised feminine subject in selected works of West African and Latin American women writers /." Thesis, Connect to this title online; UW restricted, 1998. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/6694.

Mostert, Linda Ann. "Feminist appropriations of Hans Christian Andersen's "The little mermaid" and the ways in which stereotypes of women are subverted or sustained in selected works." Thesis, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, 2011. http://hdl.handle.net/10948/1371.

Brum, Gabriela Eltz. "Sexual blinging of women : Alice Walker's african character tashi and issue of female genital cutting." reponame:Biblioteca Digital de Teses e Dissertações da UFRGS, 2005. http://hdl.handle.net/10183/4506.

Shaw, Debra Benita. "The feminist perspective : women writing science fiction." Thesis, University of East Anglia, 1994. http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.386254.

Bretag, Tracey. "Subversive mothers : contemporary women writers challenge motherhood ideology /." Title page, contents and abstract only, 1999. http://web4.library.adelaide.edu.au/theses/09ARM/09armb844.pdf.

Marchant, Jennifer Esther Robertson Susina Jan. "Beauty and the beast the relationships between female protagonists and animals in children's and adolescent novels written by women /." Normal, Ill. Illinois State University, 2003. http://wwwlib.umi.com/cr/ilstu/fullcit?p3106758.

González, María Carmen. "Toward a feminist identity : contemporary Mexican-American women novelists /." The Ohio State University, 1991. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu148769438939502.

Wambi, Bruno. "La Greve des battu : la femme au pluriel /." free to MU campus, to others for purchase, 1999. http://wwwlib.umi.com/cr/mo/fullcit?p9964007.

ExploreDegrees Archive, 2011-12

Explore courses, alphabetical index, bulletin archive.

This archived information is dated to the 2011-12 academic year only and may no longer be current.

For currently applicable policies and information, see the current Stanford Bulletin .

Bachelor of Arts in Feminist Studies

The major in Feminist Studies requires 63 units and may be taken as a single major, as one of multiple majors, or as a secondary major. If taken as one of multiple majors, none of the 63 units counted toward the major in Feminist Studies may overlap with units counted toward the major in another department or program. If taken as a secondary major, up to 30 of the units counted toward the Feminist Studies major may also be counted as fulfilling the major requirements in another department or program if that department or program consents. A maximum of 10 of the 63 units for the major may be taken on a credit/no credit or satisfactory/no credit basis; a maximum of 10 units may be taken as independent study or directed reading. FEMST core courses must be taken for a letter grade.

The major should be declared before the beginning of the junior year. Students declare the major by developing a proposal with the help of the program mentor and a faculty adviser from the list of resource faculty. The proposal describes the student's thematic focus and outlines a course of study. The proposal must be approved by the student's adviser and the Program Director.

The major in Feminist Studies includes a total of at least 12 courses at the 100 level or above for 63 units. The courses are divided among the core, the focus, and electives to reach the total course requirement.

  • FEMST 101. Introduction to Feminist Studies. This course must be taken before FEMST 103.
  • Designated feminist theory course. The Feminist Studies web site lists courses that fulfill the theory requirement this year.
  • FEMST 103. Feminist Theories and Methods Across the Disciplines. Prerequisite: FEMST 101.
  • FEMST 104A,B. Practicum.
  • One Feminist Studies or cognate course in the social sciences. (e.g. Anthropology, Communication, Education, History, Human Biology, Law, Medicine, Political Science, Psychology, or Sociology).
  • One Feminist Studies or cognate course in the humanities (e.g. English, Linguistics, Philosophy, Religious Studies, the arts, and languages).

The practicum (FEMST 104A, B) brings together theory and practical experience. The practicum should involve field research, community service, or other relevant experience such as a public service internship. Students plan their practicum during Winter Quarter of the junior year in FEMST 104A, Junior Seminar and Practicum (1 unit). The practicum is normally done over the summer between junior and senior year, and may be taken for additional units. It is followed by FEMST 104B, Senior Seminar and Practicum (2 units), in Autumn Quarter of the senior year.

Every student designs a thematic focus consisting of at least five courses in addition to the core. The thematic focus isnot declared on Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma.

  • Chicana Feminisms
  • Crosscultural Perspectives on Gender
  • Feminist Perspectives on Science and Technologies
  • Gender and Education
  • Gender, Race, and Nation/Transnational Feminisms
  • Gender Justice and Human Rights
  • Masculinities
  • Queer/LGBT Studies
  • Race, Class and Gender
  • Women, Creativity, and the Arts
  • Gender, Health and Medicine
  • Gender, Spirituality and Religion
  • At least three of the focus courses should be Feminist Studies or cognate courses.
  • At least one course should be a major survey, methodology, or theory course offered by a department or interdepartmental program as an initiation into the practice of study in the field.
  • At least one course within the thematic focus should address race/ethnicity and/or global perspectives.

Students are encouraged to take electives that provide intellectual breadth and contribute to the 63-unit requirement..

WRITING IN THE MAJOR (WIM)

Majors in Feminist Studies may satisfy the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement by taking FEMST 153, Women and the Creative Imagination, or one of the approved WIM cognate courses. Honors students satisfy the WIM requirement through their honors work.

HONORS CERTIFICATION

Feminist studies majors/minors.

Admission— The honors program offers an opportunity to do independent research for a senior thesis. It is open to students with a grade point average (GPA) of 3.3 or better in course work in Feminist Studies. Students must begin the application process for honors certification by meeting with the program mentor by May 1 of their junior year, but are encouraged to apply earlier. During the application process, students will design a project in consultation with their proposed thesis adviser and the Feminist Studies staff. A proposal describing the project and the number of units to be taken toward the honors directed project must be submitted to the director of the program for final approval. All projects must have a primary focus on gender or sexuality. See the Feminist Studies web site for details.

Requirements—

  • In addition to the normal requirements for the major, students enroll in FEMST 105 with their honors thesis adviser for 10-15 units towards the preparation of the honors thesis. These units may be distributed throughout the academic year.
  • Throughout the senior year, students work with faculty advisers and meet quarterly as a group. The final thesis must be submitted by the last day of classes in the Spring of their senior year. The completed thesis must carry the adviser's signature of approval. Creative projects must include a section of critical analysis. For guidelines, see http//feminist.stanford.edu .

MAJORS IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Honors certification in Feminist Studies for majors in other departments or programs, as distinguished from honors for students pursuing a major in Feminist Studies, is intended to complement study in any major.

Admission— Honors certification is open to students majoring in any field with a GPA of 3.3 or better.

As a prerequisite, students must complete the following courses with a grade of (B+) or better:

  • FEMST 101 and a designated feminist theory course
  • or three Feminist Studies courses and/or cognate courses related to the topic of their proposed honors research.

Students must begin the application process for honors by meeting with the program staff by May 1st of their junior year, but are encouraged to begin earlier. During the application process, students outline a plan for course work and design an honors project in consultation with their proposed thesis adviser. The final proposal describing the project and the number of units to be taken toward the honors directed project must be submitted to the Director of the program for final approval. See the Feminist Studies web site for more details.

  • Students enroll in FEMST 105 with their honors thesis adviser for 10-15 units towards the preparation of the honors thesis. These units may be distributed throughout the academic year.
  • Throughout the senior year, students work with faculty advisers and meet quarterly as a group. The final thesis must be submitted by the last day of classes in the Spring of their senior year. The completed thesis must carry the adviser's signature of approval. Creative projects must include a section of critical analysis. For more information, see http//feminist.stanford.edu .

COGNATE COURSES

The following is a partial list of cognate courses for Feminist Studies. Please refer to the program web site for updated lists throughout the year. See department listings for course descriptions and General Education Requirements (GER) information. See degree requirements above or the program mentor for applicability of these courses to a major or minor program.

  • AFRICAAM 144. African Women Writers
  • AFRICAAM 255. Racial Identity in the American Imagination
  • AMSTUD 156H. History of Women and Medicine in the United States
  • ANTHRO 111. Archaeology of Sex, Sexuality, and Gender
  • ANTHRO 151. Women, Fertility, and Work
  • ANTHRO 180. Science, Technology, and Gender
  • ANTHRO 218. Literature, Politics, and Gender in Africa
  • BIO 185. Evolution of Reproductive Social Behavior
  • CHICANST 122. Introduction to Latina Literature
  • CHICANST 160N. Salt of the Earth: Docudrama in America
  • CHICANST 165A. Chicana/o History
  • CHICANST 197. The Rite to Remember: Performance and Chicana Indigenous Thought
  • CHINGEN 235. Chinese Bodies, Chinese Selves
  • CLASSGEN 119. Gender and Power in Ancient Rome
  • COMPLIT 141. Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean
  • CSRE 145A. Poetics and Politics of Caribbean Women's Literature
  • CSRE 177. Writing for Performance: The Fundamentals
  • CSRE 183. Border Crossings and American Identities
  • DANCE 160. Performance, Dance, and History: The Ballerina
  • DRAMA 163. Performance and America
  • DRAMA 177. Writing for Performance: The Fundamentals
  • DRAMA 189Q. Mapping and Wrapping the Body
  • ECON 144. Family Economics
  • EDUC 113X. Gender and Sexuality in Schools
  • EDUC 197. Education, Gender, and Development
  • EDUC 201. History of Education in the United States
  • EDUC 201B. Education for Liberation
  • EDUC 273. Gender and Higher Education: National and International Perspectives
  • ENGLISH 139B. American Women Writers, 1850-1920
  • ENGLISH 145. Another Way to be: Writings by Women of Color
  • FRENLIT 133. Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean
  • HISTORY 134A. The European Witch Hunts
  • HISTORY 161. U.S. Women's History, 1890s-1990s
  • HISTORY 208. Private Lives, Public Stories: Autobiography in Women's History
  • HISTORY 208B. Women Activists' Response to War
  • HISTORY 221B. The Woman Question in Modern Russia
  • HISTORY 227. East European Women and War in the 20th Century
  • HISTORY 233B. Early Modern Sexualities
  • HISTORY 244C. The History of the Body in Science, Medicine, and Culture
  • HISTORY 255D. Racial Identity in the American Imagination
  • HISTORY 258. History of Sexuality in the U.S.
  • HISTORY 261. Race, Gender, and Class in Jim Crow America
  • HISTORY 293B. Homosexuality in Historical and Comparative Perspective
  • HISTORY 295J. Chinese Women's History
  • HUMBIO 125. Current Controversies in Women's Health
  • HUMBIO 129. Critical Issues in International Women's Health
  • ILAC 117N. Film, Nation, Latinidad
  • ILAC 193. The Cinema of Pedro Almodóvar
  • ILAC 272E. Clarice Lispector: the Style of Ecstasy
  • ILAC 280. Latina/o Literature
  • ILAC 326. Philosophies of Otherness: Aesthetics of Difference
  • ILAC 380E. Critical Concepts in Chicana/o Literature
  • ILAC 389E. Race, Gender and Sexuality in Cultural Representations
  • INDE 245. Women and Health Care
  • LINGUIST 156. Language and Gender
  • MED 108Q. Human Rights and Health
  • MED 240. Sex Differences in Human Physiology and Disease
  • OBGYN 240. Sex Differences in Human Physiology and Disease
  • OBGYN 256. Current Controversies in Women's Health
  • POLISCI 141. The Global Politics of Human Rights
  • RELIGST 112. Handmaids and Harlots: Biblical Women in Jewish and Christian Traditions
  • RELIGST 156. Goddesses and Gender in Hinduism
  • RELIGST 172. Sex, Body, and Gender in Medieval Religion
  • RELIGST 263. Judaism and the Body
  • SOC 123. Sex and Love in Modern Society
  • SOC 134. Education, Gender, and Development
  • SOC 142. Sociology of Gender
  • SOC 273. Gender and Higher Education: National and International Perspectives
  • SOC 323. Sociology of the Family
  • SOC 339. Gender Meanings and Processes

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