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Synthesis Essay Writing

Synthesis Essay Examples

Barbara P

13+ Winning Synthesis Essay Examples For Your Inspiration

Synthesis Essay Example

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Learn How to Write a Synthesis Essay Step by Step

Best Synthesis Essay Topics and Prompt Ideas

Synthesis Essay Outline - Template and Examples

Are you struggling to make sense of synthesis essays, unsure where to begin, or how to enhance your writing?

Many students face the challenge of feeling overwhelmed when trying to blend diverse ideas and sources seamlessly. It can be challenging to create a cohesive piece that draws from various perspectives.

But fear not! 

In this blog, we will provide you with winning synthesis essay examples and valuable insights to enhance your essay writing skills.

So, let’s get started. 

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  • 1. Understanding What A Synthesis Essay Is
  • 2. Synthesis Essay Examples
  • 3. Synthesis Essay Topics - Examples
  • 4. Tips for Writing an Effective Synthesis Essay

Understanding What A Synthesis Essay Is

A synthesis essay is a special kind of academic writing where writers blend ideas and information from various sources to create a clear and organized argument.

Unlike other types of essays , a synthesis essay demands the integration of various perspectives to form a new understanding or insight. 

It involves critically examining different sources, and synthesizing them to develop a comprehensive viewpoint on a particular topic. 

Looking at synthesis essay examples can really help you write a great essay. Here's an example of a synthesis essay to inspire you in your own writing:

In the contemporary era, technology has become an integral part of our daily lives, transforming the way we connect and interact with one another. The impact of technology on human relationships is a subject of great debate, with proponents highlighting its ability to facilitate communication and opponents expressing concerns about its potential to erode genuine human connections. This synthesis essay will explore various perspectives on the evolving nature of human relationships in the digital age, drawing from a range of sources to provide a comprehensive understanding of this complex phenomenon.

One positive aspect of technology's influence on human relationships is its role in enhancing communication. In a study by Smith and Johnson (2019), it was found that social media platforms and messaging apps have allowed individuals to stay connected across geographical distances, fostering a sense of closeness that was once impossible. Video calls, for instance, enable face-to-face interactions even when physical proximity is unattainable. This suggests that technology can strengthen relationships by overcoming barriers imposed by space and time.

On the flip side, critics argue that the prevalence of digital communication may lead to a decline in face-to-face interaction, impacting the depth and authenticity of human connections. Turkle (2017) contends that constant connectivity through smartphones and social media can result in shallow relationships, as individuals prioritize online interactions over meaningful in-person conversations. This viewpoint raises important questions about the potential consequences of relying too heavily on technology for social connection.

Another dimension to consider is the impact of technology on emotional intimacy within relationships. Johnson and Lee (2020) suggest that the digital age has given rise to a paradox—while people may feel more connected through virtual communication, the depth of emotional intimacy may suffer. The absence of non-verbal cues in digital exchanges may hinder the expression and interpretation of emotions, potentially affecting the quality of personal relationships.

In conclusion, the impact of technology on human relationships is a multifaceted phenomenon. While it undeniably enhances communication and facilitates connections, concerns persist about its potential to diminish face-to-face interaction and compromise emotional intimacy. The challenge lies in finding a balance that harnesses the benefits of technology without sacrificing the depth and authenticity of human connections. As society continues to navigate the digital landscape, a nuanced understanding of the interplay between technology and relationships is crucial to shaping a future where technology complements, rather than replaces, the essence of human connection.

Synthesis Essay Outline Example

An outline is just like a table of content sections on a page. It consists of categories and subcategories of a given topic that the writer plans to cover in the essay. Below is a synthesis essay outline template that explains the synthesis essay outline in detail. Have a look at it.

Thesis For Synthesis Essay Example

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How to Write a Synthesis Essay - Example

In order to write a good synthesis paper, you need to follow the format and proper procedure. The synthesis essay has an introduction paragraph, three body paragraphs with supportive evidence to back up the topic, and a thesis statement.

And a conclusion paragraph where you answer all the questions while referring back to the main thesis.

Check out this sample template; it will help you learn the basics of synthesis essay structure. 

AP English Language and Composition Synthesis Essay Example

The ap lang synthesis essay requires students to analyze information from various sources to discuss the topic of their essay. Refer to the sample AP language synthesis essay to learn how you can write a perfect synthesis essay.

Synthesis Essay Example Ap Lang

2022 Ap Lang Synthesis Essay Example

Synthesis Essay Examples for Different Formats

Knowing how to write synthesis essays in different styles is important. Given below are some examples of synthesis essays in different formats.

APA Format Synthesis Essay Example

APA (American Psychological Association) is a citation style that provides formatting conventions for student and professional papers. Below is a sample example of an APA-style synthesis essay.

MLA Format Synthesis Essay Example

MLA (Modern Language Association) is another referencing style that allows us to cite the sources in a proper format. Here is an MLA-style synthesis essay example to help you learn the basics of this style.

Different Types of Synthesis Essay Examples

Synthesis essays come in various types, each requiring a unique approach. Explore the following synthesis essay examples tailored to different types, offering a comprehensive overview of how to tackle diverse writing tasks:

College Synthesis Essay Example

This sample PDF is to help the college students to learn the outline, format, and structure of the synthesis essay. You can easily download it and save it with you for further usage.

Explanatory Synthesis Essay Example

The explanatory synthesis is intended to explain a particular subject in detail to make it easy to understand for people. Refer to the sample essay given below and see what makes it different from a simple synthesis essay.

Argumentative Synthesis Essay Example

The argumentative synthesis is another type of synthesis essay that is intended to present an argument. The writer presents his claim and supports it with facts and evidence to prove it right. Check out the sample essay given below to understand how it is different from a general argumentative essay.

Eminent Domain Synthesis Essay Example

An eminent domain synthesis essay explores the concept of eminent domain, which is the government's authority to take private property for public use. This type of synthesis essay delves into various aspects of eminent domain, considering legal, ethical, and social perspectives. 

Here’s an example:

Synthesis Essay Example About Social Media

This type of synthesis essay explores the impact of social media on individuals and society. It aims to analyze and synthesize information to construct a well-rounded understanding of the role of social media in our lives. Here’s an example of it:

Synthesis Essay Topics - Examples

Choosing a compelling topic is crucial when writing a synthesis essay. Here are some thought-provoking synthesis essay topics that can inspire your writing:

  • The Impact of Technology on Human Interaction
  • Climate Change and Global Sustainability
  • The Role of Social Media in Modern Society
  • The Intersection of Artificial Intelligence and Ethics
  • Education Reform: Challenges and Opportunities
  • Impact of Social Movements on Policy Change
  • Healthcare Access: A Global Perspective
  • Cultural Diversity in the Workplace
  • The Influence of Literature on Society
  • The Future of Work: Remote vs. Traditional

Looking for more topics? Check out this blog on synthesis essay topics for inspiration.

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Tips for Writing an Effective Synthesis Essay

Crafting a compelling synthesis essay goes beyond the writing process; it requires strategic planning and meticulous execution. Here are key tips to ensure your synthesis essay stands out:

  • Select Credible Sources

Begin by choosing reliable and credible sources. Ensure that the information you gather is from reputable authors, organizations, or publications to strengthen the foundation of your essay.

  • Background Information is Key

Provide sufficient background information on your chosen topic. Help your readers understand the context and significance of the subject matter before delving into your argument.

  • Develop a Coherent Argument

Focus on building a clear and coherent argument throughout your essay. Ensure that each paragraph contributes to the overall flow and supports your thesis effectively.

  • Support Your with Evidence

A strong synthesis essay requires a well-supported argument. Back up your claims with evidence from your chosen sources, demonstrating a thorough understanding of the topic.

  • Utilize Sources to Support Each Other

Instead of treating sources in isolation, highlight their relationships. Demonstrate how each source complements or contrasts with others, emphasizing the interconnectedness of your information.

  • Synthesis Essay Requires Critical Analysis

Go beyond summarizing your sources; engage in critical analysis. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each source and consider their implications for your argument.

  • Ensure a Supported Argument:

Throughout your essay, consistently reinforce your central argument. Every piece of information should contribute to and reinforce the main thesis, creating a cohesive and persuasive narrative.

In conclusion , tackling synthesis essays is easier than it seems when armed with the right knowledge. Use the tips and examples provided to boost your skills and approach these essays with confidence.

But if you ever feel stuck, MyPerfectWords.com is here to help. Whether you are looking for an essay writing service for college or university our team of experts is just a click away. They ensure your essays not only meet standards but stand out for their clarity and depth.

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Dr. Barbara is a highly experienced writer and author who holds a Ph.D. degree in public health from an Ivy League school. She has worked in the medical field for many years, conducting extensive research on various health topics. Her writing has been featured in several top-tier publications.

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Synthesis Essay

Synthesis Essay Materials

The two synthesis essay questions below are examples of the question type that has been one of the three free-response questions on the AP English Language and Composition Exam as of the May 2007 exam. The synthesis question asks students to synthesize information from a variety of sources to inform their own discussion of a topic. Students are given a 15-minute reading period to accommodate the additional reading required for the question.

Below is a sample synthesis essay question, sample scoring guidelines, comments from the Chief Reader about the sample student essays, seven sample student responses, and scoring commentary for each sample.

Approximately 300 AP English Language and Composition students from eight schools in New York, Maine, Texas, Tennessee, Washington, Florida, and New Mexico wrote responses to this synthesis topic. Students from these schools were given a 15-minute reading period followed by a 40-minute writing period in which to complete the sample synthesis assignment.

  • AP English Language and Composition Synthesis Essay #1 (.pdf/84KB)
  • Sample Scoring Guidelines (.pdf/43KB)
  • Comments from the Chief Reader (.pdf/47KB)
  • Sample Student Responses (.pdf/3.65MB)
  • Scoring Commentary (.pdf/50KB)

An additional sample synthesis essay question is provided here.

  • AP English Language and Composition Synthesis Essay #2 (.pdf/338KB)

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synthesis essay examples

How to Write the AP Lang Synthesis Essay + Example

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AP English Language and Composition, commonly known as AP Lang, is one of the most engaging and popular AP classes offered at most high schools, with over 535,000 students taking the class . AP Lang tests your ability to analyze written pieces, synthesize information, write rhetorical essays, and create cohesive and concrete arguments. However, the class is rather challenging as only 62% of students were able to score a three or higher on the exam. 

The AP Lang exam has two sections. The first consists of 45 multiple choice questions which need to be completed in an hour. This portion counts for around 45% of your total score. These questions ask students to analyze written pieces and answer questions related to each respective passage.  All possible answer choices can be found within the text, and no prior knowledge of literature is needed to understand the passages.

The second section contains three free-response questions to be finished in under two hours and 15 minutes. This section counts for 55% of your score and includes the synthesis essay, the rhetorical essay, and the argumentative essay.

  • The synthesis essay requires you to read 6-7 sources and create an argument using at least three sources.
  • The rhetorical analysis essay requires you to describe how a piece of writing evokes specific meanings and symbolism.
  • The argumentative essay requires you to pick a perspective of a debate and create an argument based on the evidence provided.

In this post, we will take a look at the AP Lang synthesis essay and discuss tips and tricks to master this part of the exam. We will also provide an example of a well-written essay for review.  

The AP Lang synthesis essay is the first of three essays included in the Free Response section of the AP Lang exam. The exam presents 6-7 sources that are organized around a specific topic, with two of those sources purely visual, including a single quantitative source (like a graph or pie chart). The remaining 4-5 sources are text-based, containing around 500 words each. It’s recommended that students spend an hour on this essay—15 minute reading period, 40 minutes writing, and 5 minutes of spare time to check over work.

Each synthesis essay has a topic that all the sources will relate to. A prompt will explaining the topic and provide some background, although the topics are usually broad so you will probably know something related to the issue. It will also present a claim that students will respond to in an essay format using information from at least three of the provided sources. You will need to take a stance, either agreeing or disagreeing with the position provided in the claim. 

According to the CollegeBoard, they are looking for essays that “combine different perspectives from sources to form a support of a coherent position.” This means that you must state your claim on the topic and highlight relationships between several sources that support your specific position on the topic. Additionally, you’ll need to cite clear evidence from your sources to prove your point.

The synthesis essay counts for six points on the AP Lang exam. Students can receive 0-1 points for writing a thesis statement, 0-4 based on the incorporation of evidence and commentary, and 0-1 points based on the sophistication of thought and demonstration of complex understanding.

While this essay seems extremely overwhelming, considering there are a total of three free-response essays to complete, with proper time management and practiced skills, this essay is manageable and straightforward. In order to enhance the time management aspect of the test to the best of your ability, it is essential to divide the essay up into five key steps.

Step 1: Analyze the Prompt

As soon as the clock starts, carefully read and analyze what the prompt asks from you. It might be helpful to markup the text to identify the most critical details. You should only spend around 2 minutes reading the prompt so you have enough time to read all the sources and figure out your argument. Don’t feel like you need to immediately pick your stance on the claim right after reading the prompt. You should read the sources before you commit to your argument.

Step 2: Read the Sources Carefully

Although you are only required to use 3 of the 6-7 sources provides, make sure you read ALL of the sources. This will allow you to better understand the topic and make the most educated decision of which sources to use in your essay. Since there are a lot of sources to get through, you will need to read quickly and carefully.

Annotating will be your best friend during the reading period. Highlight and mark important concepts or lines from each passage that would be helpful in your essay. Your argument will probably begin forming in your head as you go through the passages, so you will save yourself a lot of time later on if you take a few seconds to write down notes in the margins. After you’ve finished reading a source, reflect on whether the source defends, challenges, or qualifies your argument.

You will have around 13 minutes to read through all the sources, but it’s very possible you will finish earlier if you are a fast reader. Take the leftover time to start developing your thesis and organizing your thoughts into an outline so you have more time to write. 

Step 3: Write a Strong Thesis Statement 

In order to write a good thesis statement, all you have to do is decide your stance on the claim provided in the prompt and give an overview of your evidence. You essentially have three choices on how to frame your thesis statement: You can defend, challenge or qualify a claim that’s been provided by the prompt. 

  • If you are defending the claim, your job will be to prove that the claim is correct .
  • If you are challenging the claim, your job will be to prove that the claim is incorrect .
  • If you choose to qualify the claim, your job will be to agree to a part of the claim and disagree with another part of the claim. 

A strong thesis statement will clearly state your stance without summarizing the issue or regurgitating the claim. The CollegeBoard is looking for a thesis statement that “states a defensible position and establishes a line of reasoning on the issue provided in the prompt.”

Step 4: Create a Minimal Essay Outline

Developing an outline might seem like a waste of time when you are up against the clock, but believe us, taking 5-10 minutes to outline your essay will be much more useful in the long run than jumping right into the essay.

Your outline should include your thesis statement and three main pieces of evidence that will constitute each body paragraph. Under each piece of evidence should be 2-3 details from the sources that you will use to back up your claim and some commentary on how that evidence proves your thesis.

Step 5: Write your Essay

Use the remaining 30-35 minutes to write your essay. This should be relatively easy if you took the time to mark up the sources and have a detailed outline.  Remember to add special consideration and emphasis to the commentary sections of the supporting arguments outlined in your thesis. These sentences are critical to the overall flow of the essay and where you will be explaining how the evidence supports or undermines the claim in the prompt.

Also, when referencing your sources, write the in-text citations as follows: “Source 1,” “Source 2,” “Source 3,” etc. Make sure to pay attention to which source is which in order to not incorrectly cite your sources. In-text citations will impact your score on the essay and are an integral part of the process.

After you finish writing, read through your essay for any grammatical errors or mistakes before you move onto the next essay.

Here are six must-have tips and tricks to get a good score on the synthesis essay:

  • Cite at least four sources , even though the minimum requirement is three. Remember not to plagiarize and cite everything you use in your arguments.
  • Make sure to develop a solid and clear thesis . Develop a stable stance for the claim and stick with it throughout the entire paper.
  • Don’t summarize the sources. The summary of the sources does not count as an argument. 
  • You don’t necessarily have to agree with the sources in order to cite them. Using a source to support a counterargument is still a good use of a source.
  • Cite the sources that you understand entirely . If you don’t, it could come back to bite you in the end. 
  • Use small quotes , do not quote entire paragraphs. Make sure the quote does not disrupt the flow or grammar of the sentence you write. 

synthesis essay examples

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Here is an example prompt and essay from 2019 that received 5 of the 6 total points available:

In response to our society’s increasing demand for energy, large-scale wind power has drawn attention from governments and consumers as a potential alternative to traditional materials that fuel our power grids, such as coal, oil, natural gas, water, or even newer sources such as nuclear or solar power. Yet the establishment of large-scale, commercial-grade wind farms is often the subject of controversy for a variety of reasons.

Carefully read the six sources, found on the AP English Language and Composition 2019 Exam (Question 1), including the introductory information for each source. Write an essay that synthesizes material from at least three of the sources and develops your position on the most important factors that an individual or agency should consider when deciding whether to establish a wind farm.

Source A (photo)

Source B (Layton)

Source C (Seltenrich)

Source D (Brown)

Source E (Rule)

Source F (Molla)

In your response you should do the following:

  • Respond to the prompt with a thesis presents a defensible position.
  • Select and use evidence from at least 3 of the provided sources to support your line of reasoning. Indicate clearly the sources used through direct quotation, paraphrase, or summary. Sources may be cited as Source A, Source B, etc., or by using the description in parentheses.
  • Explain how the evidence supports your line of reasoning.
  • Use appropriate grammar and punctuation in communicating your argument.

[1] The situation has been known for years, and still very little is being done: alternative power is the only way to reliably power the changing world. The draw of power coming from industry and private life is overwhelming current sources of non-renewable power, and with dwindling supplies of fossil fuels, it is merely a matter of time before coal and gas fuel plants are no longer in operation. So one viable alternative is wind power. But as with all things, there are pros and cons. The main factors for power companies to consider when building wind farms are environmental boon, aesthetic, and economic factors.

[2] The environmental benefits of using wind power are well-known and proven. Wind power is, as qualified by Source B, undeniably clean and renewable. From their production requiring very little in the way of dangerous materials to their lack of fuel, besides that which occurs naturally, wind power is by far one of the least environmentally impactful sources of power available. In addition, wind power by way of gearbox and advanced blade materials, has the highest percentage of energy retention. According to Source F, wind power retains 1,164% of the energy put into the system – meaning that it increases the energy converted from fuel (wind) to electricity 10 times! No other method of electricity production is even half that efficient. The efficiency and clean nature of wind power are important to consider, especially because they contribute back to power companies economically.

[3] Economically, wind power is both a boon and a bone to electric companies and other users. For consumers, wind power is very cheap, leading to lower bills than from any other source. Consumers also get an indirect reimbursement by way of taxes (Source D). In one Texan town, McCamey, tax revenue increased 30% from a wind farm being erected in the town. This helps to finance improvements to the town. But, there is no doubt that wind power is also hurting the power companies. Although, as renewable power goes, wind is incredibly cheap, it is still significantly more expensive than fossil fuels. So, while it is helping to cut down on emissions, it costs electric companies more than traditional fossil fuel plants. While the general economic trend is positive, there are some setbacks which must be overcome before wind power can take over as truly more effective than fossil fuels.

[4] Aesthetics may be the greatest setback for power companies. Although there may be significant economic and environmental benefit to wind power, people will always fight to preserve pure, unspoiled land. Unfortunately, not much can be done to improve the visual aesthetics of the turbines. White paint is the most common choice because it “[is] associated with cleanliness.” (Source E). But, this can make it stand out like a sore thumb, and make the gargantuan machines seem more out of place. The site can also not be altered because it affects generating capacity. Sound is almost worse of a concern because it interrupts personal productivity by interrupting people’s sleep patterns. One thing for power companies to consider is working with turbine manufacturing to make the machines less aesthetically impactful, so as to garner greater public support.

[5] As with most things, wind power has no easy answer. It is the responsibility of the companies building them to weigh the benefits and the consequences. But, by balancing economics, efficiency, and aesthetics, power companies can create a solution which balances human impact with environmental preservation.

More examples can be found here at College Board.

While AP Scores help to boost your weighted GPA, or give you the option to get college credit, AP Scores don’t have a strong effect on your admissions chances . However, colleges can still see your self-reported scores, so you might not want to automatically send scores to colleges if they are lower than a 3. That being said, admissions officers care far more about your grade in an AP class than your score on the exam.

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synthesis essay examples

synthesis essay examples

How to Write a Synthesis Essay: Your Guide From Start to Finish

synthesis essay examples

Today, we're swamped with information, like reading 174 newspapers every day. It comes from all over—news, social media, science, and more. This flood might make you feel overwhelmed and lost in a sea of facts and opinions. But being able to make sense of it all is crucial.

This guide isn't just about handling all that info; it's about using it to write awesome essays. We'll show you step by step how to pick a topic and organize your essay. Let's dive in and learn how to turn scattered facts into powerful essays that really stand out.

What Is a Synthesis Essay

The synthesis essay is a powerful tool in writing. It's not just about gathering facts but about connecting them to make a clear and strong argument.

Writing a synthesis essay allows you to dive deep into ideas. You have to find similarities between different sources—like articles, studies, or arguments—and use them to tell a convincing story.

In today's world, where we're bombarded with information, synthesis essays are more important than ever. They let us explore how different ideas fit together and help us express our thoughts on complex topics. Whether you're writing about literature, science, history, or current events, a synthesis essay shows off your ability to analyze and understand a topic from all angles. And if you're struggling with this task, just ask us to ' write paper for me ,' and we'll handle your assignment for you.

Explanatory vs. Argumentative Synthesis Essays

In synthesis writing, there are two main types: explanatory and argumentative. Understanding these categories is key because they shape how you approach your essay.

Explanatory:

An explanatory synthesis essay does just what it says—it explains. These essays aim to give a balanced view of a topic by gathering information from different sources and presenting it clearly. They don't try to persuade; instead, they focus on providing information and making things easier to understand. They're like comprehensive summaries, breaking down complex ideas for a broader audience. These essays rely heavily on facts and expert opinions, avoiding personal bias.

Argumentative:

On the flip side, argumentative synthesis essays are all about persuasion. Their main goal is to take a stance on an issue and convince the reader. They gather information from various sources not only to present different views but also to build a strong argument. Argumentative essays aim to sway the reader's opinion by using gathered information as evidence. These essays express opinions and use rhetorical strategies to persuade.

And if you're keen on knowing how to write an informative essay , we've got you covered on that, too!

Synthesis Essay Structure

To craft a strong synthesis essay, you need a solid foundation. Here's a structured approach to help you nail it:

Introductory Paragraph:

  • To kick things off, grab your reader's attention with a catchy hook or interesting fact. Give a bit of background info about your topic and the sources you'll be using, as it can help readers understand your topic better! Then, lay out your main argument in a clear thesis statement.

Body Paragraphs:

  • Each paragraph should focus on a different aspect of your topic or source. Start with a topic sentence that links back to your thesis. Introduce the source you're discussing and highlight its main points. Also, using quotes, paraphrases, or summaries from your sources can make your arguments stronger.

Synthesis :

  • This part is where your essay comes together. Look for common themes or differences among your sources. Use your analysis to build a strong argument. Don't forget to address any opposing viewpoints if they're relevant!

Conclusion :

  • Wrap things up by restating your thesis and summarizing your main points. Explain why your argument is important and what it means in the bigger picture. End with a thought-provoking statement to leave a lasting impression.

References :

  • Finally, don't forget to list all your sources properly using the right citation style, like MLA or APA. Do you know that different citation styles have different rules? So, make sure you follow the right one!

Choosing a Synthesis Essay Topic

Picking essay topics is just the beginning. To write a great synthesis essay, you need to carefully evaluate and connect different sources to build a strong argument or viewpoint. Here's a step-by-step infographic guide to help you choose the right synthesis essay topics wisely.

choosing a synthesis essay topic

How to Write a Synthesis Essay with Easy Steps

Writing a synthesis essay is similar to a compare and contrast essay . It requires a methodical approach to blend information from different sources into a strong and persuasive argument. Here are some crucial steps and tips to help you along the way.

  • Clarify Your Purpose: First, decide if you're writing an explanatory or argumentative synthesis essay. This choice will set the tone and direction for your essay.
  • Source Selection and Analysis: Choose credible and relevant sources for your topic, balancing different types like articles, books, and websites. Analyze each source carefully, noting the main ideas and evidence presented.
  • Formulate a Strong Thesis Statement: Create a clear and concise thesis statement that guides your essay. It should express your main argument or perspective.
  • Structure Your Essay: Organize your essay with a clear synthesis essay outline, including an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. Each body paragraph should focus on a specific aspect of your topic.
  • Employ Effective Transition Sentences: Use transition sentences to connect your ideas and paragraphs smoothly, ensuring a cohesive flow in your essay.
  • Synthesize Information: Blend information from your sources within your paragraphs. Discuss how each source contributes to your thesis and highlight common themes or differences.
  • Avoid Simple Summarization: Don't just summarize your sources—analyze them critically and use them to build your argument.
  • Address Counterarguments (if applicable): Acknowledge opposing viewpoints and counter them with well-supported arguments, showing a deep understanding of the topic.
  • Craft a Resolute Conclusion: Summarize your main points and restate your thesis in the conclusion. Emphasize the importance of your argument or insights, and end with a thought-provoking statement or call to action. ‍
  • Revise and Proofread: Check your essay for clarity, coherence, and grammar mistakes. Ensure your citations are correct and follow the chosen citation style, like MLA or APA.

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Synthesis Essay Format

Choosing the right citation style can enhance the credibility and professionalism of your paper. The format of your synthesis paper depends on the specific guidelines given by your instructor. They usually fall into one of the popular styles: MLA, APA, or Chicago, each used in different academic fields.

synthesis essay format

1. MLA (Modern Language Association):

  • Uses in-text citations with the author's last name and page number.
  • Includes a 'Works Cited' page at the end listing all sources.
  • Focuses on the author and publication date.
  • Often used in humanities essays, research papers, and literary analyses.

2. APA (American Psychological Association):

  • Uses in-text citations with the author's last name and publication date in parentheses.
  • Includes a 'References' page listing all sources alphabetically.
  • Emphasizes the publication date and scientific precision.
  • Commonly used in research papers, scholarly articles, and scientific studies.

3. Chicago Style:

  • Offers two documentation styles: Notes-Bibliography and Author-Date.
  • Notes-Bibliography uses footnotes or endnotes for citations, while Author-Date uses in-text citations with a reference list.
  • Suitable for various academic writing, including research papers and historical studies.
  • Provides flexibility in formatting and citation methods, making it adaptable to different disciplines.

Synthesis Essay Example

Here are two examples of synthesis essays that demonstrate how to apply the synthesis process in real life. They explore interesting topics and offer practical guidance for mastering the art of writing this type of paper.

Synthesis Essay Tips

Crafting a strong synthesis essay requires careful planning and effective techniques. Here are five essential tips to help you write your best paper:

  • Diverse Source Selection : Choose a range of reliable sources that offer different viewpoints on your topic. Make sure they're recent and relevant to your subject.
  • Seamless Source Integration : Avoid just summarizing your sources. Instead, blend them into your essay by analyzing and comparing their ideas. Show how they connect to build your argument.
  • Balanced Tone : Maintain an impartial tone in your writing, even if you have personal opinions. Synthesis essays require objectivity, so they present different viewpoints without bias.
  • Focus on Synthesis : Remember, synthesis essays are about linking ideas, not just summarizing sources. Explore how your sources relate to each other to create a cohesive argument.
  • Address Counterarguments : Like in persuasive essays topics , acknowledge opposing viewpoints and explain why your perspective is stronger. This demonstrates your understanding of the topic and adds depth to your argument.

Concluding Thoughts

When writing a synthesis essay, it's essential to pick trustworthy sources, blend them effectively to build your argument and stay objective. Use smooth transitions, address counterarguments thoughtfully, and focus on analyzing rather than just summarizing. By following these steps, you'll create essays that inform, persuade, and engage your readers!

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How Should You Conclude a Synthesis Essay?

Daniel Parker

Daniel Parker

is a seasoned educational writer focusing on scholarship guidance, research papers, and various forms of academic essays including reflective and narrative essays. His expertise also extends to detailed case studies. A scholar with a background in English Literature and Education, Daniel’s work on EssayPro blog aims to support students in achieving academic excellence and securing scholarships. His hobbies include reading classic literature and participating in academic forums.

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How to Write the AP Lang Synthesis Essay with Example

September 5, 2023

If you’re highly interested in learning more about writing analysis, then chances are you enrolled in AP Lang. Essentially, AP Lang is an advanced course for high schoolers that combines interest and knowledge in English with critical thinking. In the class, students learn how to analyze and synthesize a variety of texts to construct well-reasoned arguments. If you take AP Lang, then you can opt to take the AP test at the conclusion of the school year. On the exam, students write the AP Lang synthesis essay to demonstrate their learned abilities. In this article, we’ll look at what the AP Lang synthesis essay requires and show an example to provide better understanding of what to expect on the exam.

AP Lang Exam Basics

The AP Lang exam is separated into two sections. In the first section, students have one hour to answer a series of 45 multiple-choice questions. Here, about half of the questions are based on passages students read. The other half are focused on the best revision techniques. Essentially, the answers for the latter 20-22 questions are geared toward revising mock essays.

In this article, however, we’ll focus mainly on the second part of the exam: the AP Lang synthesis essay.

In this second section, students have two hours and 15 minutes to write three essays of their own design. The three open-ended questions in this section are intended to be free-response and allow for a variety of approaches. Each question is intended to allow up to 40 minutes to complete.

For the AP Lang synthesis essay, students are presented with a scenario of the College Board’s design. The scenario will provide its own thesis statement. Usually, scenarios relate to real-world problems like environmental concerns, media, or government policies.

For each scenario, students are provided with 6-7 outside sources. These sources could be in the form of an image, visual graph, or written paragraph. For written paragraphs, the sources are usually no more than 500 words.

Students are then expected to incorporate at least 3-4 of these outside sources into their essay response. The outside sources are intended to be used as supporting evidence for the student’s chosen stance or argument. Students are able to either agree with or disagree with the thesis presented in the original scenario.

AP Lang Exam – Scoring

In the second part of the AP Lang exam, students can earn a possible 6 points on each essay. 1 point is earned for the development of a thesis. Up to 4 points can be earned for evidence and commentary. The final 1 point is earned for sophistication of thought.

AP Lang Exam – Takeaways

Ultimately, the goal of the AP Lang synthesis essay is not whether the student is “right” or “wrong” in their argument. The key is that students are able to reasonably and clearly support their argument using the provided sources as evidence .

The College Board looks for your ability to identify relationships between texts , form a coherent argument , and interpret external sources .

Synthesis Essay AP Lang Examples

If you’re not sure how the questions will look on the AP Lang synthesis essay section, we’ll provide an example. After the example, we’ll break down the strengths and weaknesses of the response. That way, you’ll have a better idea of what the College Board is looking for.

Additionally, the College Board has released previous AP Lang synthesis essay examples you can review. They even have essay questions as recent as 2022 . For further support, a scoring commentary and comments from the Chief Reader are also available to view. Additionally, there are other examples you can view from earlier years .

Note: A good strategy to study for the synthesis essay AP Lang exam is to review your rhetorical devices and literary devices . Understanding how these devices function can be essential in constructing a cohesive essay.

Synthesis Essay AP Lang Examples – Sample Question

Below is a sample question from the AP Lang synthesis essay and a response to the prompt. This question was taken directly from a 2022 exam . However, the response to the question will be originally crafted for the purpose of this newsletter. As well, all supporting evidence will be originally created and does not correspond to any previous test.

The Question

Since the early 2000s, the United States government and a number of corporations have sponsored initiatives to improve education in the STEM disciplines: science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The emphasis on STEM subjects in elementary, secondary, and higher education reflects concerns that United States students are less proficient in these areas than are students in other countries. Additionally, there is a belief that mastery in STEM fields is now essential in order to join a highly technical and specialized workforce. However, not everyone is convinced that a STEM-focused curriculum is necessary and/or effective.

In your response you should do the following:

  • Respond to the prompt with a thesis that presents a defensible
  • Select and use evidence from at least three of the provided sources to support your line of Indicate clearly the sources used through direct quotation, paraphrase, or summary. Sources may be cited as Source A, Source B, etc., or by using the description in parentheses.
  • Explain how the evidence supports your line of
  • Use appropriate grammar and punctuation in communicating your

How to Approach the Question

Maybe your first thought upon seeing this block of text is to feel overwhelmed. But don’t panic. There are effective ways to approach the question so you will be more prepared in your response.

It’s a good strategy to first isolate the thesis . What is the main idea of the text, and what is its argument?

Try it out. Reread the prompt and see if you can identify what the statement is asking you to develop an opinion on.

Think you’ve got it? In this example, we will be focusing on whether or not a STEM-focused curriculum in K-12 education is necessary and/or effective. In short, we will be arguing either for (highlighting the benefits) or against (highlighting the pitfalls) a STEM-focused curriculum.

How do we know what this statement is asking us?

Well, the statement provides a lot of background information. For example, we receive a definition of what STEM stands for. As well, we know that since 2000, there has been a greater initiative for STEM-focused classes.

When you read the prompt for the first time, it’s a great strategy to learn how to differentiate between background and contextual information from the heart of the argument .

A good way to learn how to isolate the argument is to look for transition words. Usually, these appear near the end of the question. Words like “however” and “yet” are signals that the statement is offering a differing opinion. Typically, the statement will tell you which two positions it’s offering for argument. These opinions are usually signaled by contrasting transition words.

So, now that we know what the question is asking us, what is the best way to respond?

Synthesis Essay AP Lang Examples – Sample Answer

The following is an essay response I crafted to the above question. After reading the sample, I will break down what it does well and what areas can be improved.

A STEM-focused curriculum is not as essential to providing a meaningful K-12 education. Because the majority of high school students are not proficient in STEM-focused classes, prioritizing these classes causes harm to student’s mental health and academic performance.

As seen in Source A, 60% of high school seniors in the Midwest only scored a C average in math and science-based classes (Langston). This statistic suggests that the majority of students do not resonate with STEM classes and therefore perform poorly. Earning a low score in any class does not bode well for students’ mental health.

When looking at the primary argument in Source C, it’s clear that most high schoolers prefer creative outlets to fact-based research (Kohler). Allowing students the opportunity to be more creative and initiate conversations about coursework lets students be more active in their learning. When students can discuss the nuance in their opinions, more personal growth happens. These conversations are not always easy to have in STEM-focused classes.

As well, when looking back to Source A, it’s clear that high school students in the Midwest earned higher grades, on average, in their English and art classes (Langston). This figure suggests that students perform better in these classes because they relate more to the source material. When relating to what they learn, they perform better in class.

In conclusion, STEM-focused curriculum is not as essential in K-12 education because most high school students do not relate to their STEM classes. When students do not earn satisfactory grades in these classes, it negatively affects their future college applications and job prospects.

Synthesis Essay AP Lang Examples – Answer Breakdown

So, what does this essay response get right, and where can it be improved? Let’s start with what the response does well.

First, the response establishes its thesis right away. Usually, it’s a good idea to clearly state your argument within the first paragraph. Not only is this a good practice because a reader can easily identify your stance, but also you can refer to your thesis as you write to make you stay on track.

With your thesis, it’s also a good idea to include one to two supporting sentences with the reasons why the thesis is concluded . Like in this example, I wrote that STEM-focused classes should not be prioritized because they can negatively affect both mental health and academic performance.

Another positive aspect of this response is that it is sure to not only reference but also cites its sources . It’s important that the reader understand where your information is coming from. That way, the readers can ensure you are interpreting the sources correctly.

AP Lang Synthesis Essay (Continued)

However, when rereading the instructions, it’s clear that this response fails the basic requirement of referring to at least three sources. Always make sure to reread the instructions to ensure you meet the standard requirements for incorporating source material.

Further, this AP Lang synthesis essay does not fully support its arguments . Ideas are simply stated and are not expanded upon.

For example, I mentioned a few times that earning low grades in STEM classes leads to negative mental health for high school students. However, there is no source referenced that either confirms or denies this claim. Therefore, there is no sufficient evidence to support my argument. It relies purely on inference.

Additionally, this AP Lang synthesis essay does not arrive at a sufficient level of sophistication of thought . Basically, sophistication of thought means avoiding broad generalizations and vague claims. The more specific you can be, the better your argument will sound.

Synthesis Essay AP Lang – In Conclusion

In the end, it’s always helpful to read the prompt thoroughly before writing. As well, making notes while you read could be a good strategy to pinpoint main ideas both in the prompt and the sources. That way, you can reread the material quickly. Similarly, sketching an outline may also be helpful. In addition, you should always carefully read the instructions to ensure all guidelines are followed.

As long as you avoid broad generalizations and use enough supporting evidence for your claim, you will be on the right path!

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Meghan Dairaghi

With a BA in English and an MFA in Creative Writing, Meghan has served as a writing tutor at the University of Missouri St. Louis and Maryville University. Additionally, Meghan has held editorial roles at River Styx and Boulevard, and was a prose reader at Farside Review . Most recently, her work has been featured in Belle Ombre , Flypaper Lit , and Mag 20/20 , among others, and she was nominated for the Mary Troy Prize in Fiction. 

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Advanced Placement (AP)

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If you're planning to take the AP Language (or AP Lang) exam , you might already know that 55% of your overall exam score will be based on three essays. The first of the three essays you'll have to write on the AP Language exam is called the "synthesis essay." If you want to earn full points on this portion of the AP Lang Exam, you need to know what a synthesis essay is and what skills are assessed by the AP Lang synthesis essay.

In this article, we'll explain the different aspects of the AP Lang synthesis essay, including what skills you need to demonstrate in your synthesis essay response in order to achieve a good score. We'll also give you a full breakdown of a real AP Lang Synthesis Essay prompt, provide an analysis of an AP Lang synthesis essay example, and give you four tips for how to write a synthesis essay.

Let's get started by taking a closer look at how the AP Lang synthesis essay works!

Synthesis Essay AP Lang: What It Is and How It Works

The AP Lang synthesis essay is the first of three essays included in the Free Response section of the AP Lang exam.

The AP Lang synthesis essay portion of the Free Response section lasts for one hour total . This hour consists of a recommended 15 minute reading period and a 40 minute writing period. Keep in mind that these time allotments are merely recommendations, and that exam takers can parse out the allotted 60 minutes to complete the synthesis essay however they choose.

Now, here's what the structure of the AP Lang synthesis essay looks like. The exam presents six to seven sources that are organized around a specific topic (like alternative energy or eminent domain, which are both past synthesis exam topics).

Of these six to seven sources, at least two are visual , including at least one quantitative source (like a graph or pie chart, for example). The remaining four to five sources are print text-based, and each one contains approximately 500 words.

In addition to six to seven sources, the AP Lang exam provides a written prompt that consists of three paragraphs. The prompt will briefly explain the essay topic, then present a claim that students will respond to in an essay that synthesizes material from at least three of the sources provided.

Here's an example prompt provided by the College Board:

Directions : The following prompt is based on the accompanying six sources.

This question requires you to integrate a variety of sources into a coherent, well-written essay. Refer to the sources to support your position; avoid mere paraphrase or summary. Your argument should be central; the sources should support this argument .

Remember to attribute both direct and indirect citations.

Introduction

Television has been influential in United States presidential elections since the 1960's. But just what is this influence, and how has it affected who is elected? Has it made elections fairer and more accessible, or has it moved candidates from pursuing issues to pursuing image?

Read the following sources (including any introductory information) carefully. Then, in an essay that synthesizes at least three of the sources for support, take a position that defends, challenges, or qualifies the claim that television has had a positive impact on presidential elections.

Refer to the sources as Source A, Source B, etc.; titles are included for your convenience.

Source A (Campbell) Source B (Hart and Triece) Source C (Menand) Source D (Chart) Source E (Ranney) Source F (Koppel)

Like we mentioned earlier, this prompt gives you a topic — which it briefly explains — then asks you to take a position. In this case, you'll have to choose a stance on whether television has positively or negatively affected U.S. elections. You're also given six sources to evaluate and use in your response. Now that you have everything you need, now your job is to write an amazing synthesis essay.

But what does "synthesize" mean, exactly? According to the CollegeBoard, when an essay prompt asks you to synthesize, it means that you should "combine different perspectives from sources to form a support of a coherent position" in writing. In other words, a synthesis essay asks you to state your claim on a topic, then highlight the relationships between several sources that support your claim on that topic. Additionally, you'll need to cite specific evidence from your sources to prove your point.

The synthesis essay counts for six of the total points on the AP Lang exam . Students can receive 0-1 points for writing a thesis statement in the essay, 0-4 based on incorporation of evidence and commentary, and 0-1 points based on sophistication of thought and demonstrated complex understanding of the topic.

You'll be evaluated based on how effectively you do the following in your AP Lang synthesis essay:

Write a thesis that responds to the exam prompt with a defensible position

Provide specific evidence that to support all claims in your line of reasoning from at least three of the sources provided, and clearly and consistently explain how the evidence you include supports your line of reasoning

Demonstrate sophistication of thought by either crafting a thoughtful argument, situating the argument in a broader context, explaining the limitations of an argument

Make rhetorical choices that strengthen your argument and/or employ a vivid and persuasive style throughout your essay.

If your synthesis essay meets the criteria above, then there's a good chance you'll score well on this portion of the AP Lang exam!

If you're looking for even more information on scoring, the College Board has posted the AP Lang Free Response grading rubric on its website. ( You can find it here. ) We recommend taking a close look at it since it includes additional details about the synthesis essay scoring.

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Don't be intimidated...we're going to teach you how to break down even the hardest AP synthesis essay prompt.

Full Breakdown of a Real AP Lang Synthesis Essay Prompt

In this section, we'll teach you how to analyze and respond to a synthesis essay prompt in five easy steps, including suggested time frames for each step of the process.

Step 1: Analyze the Prompt

The very first thing to do when the clock starts running is read and analyze the prompt. To demonstrate how to do this, we'll look at the sample AP Lang synthesis essay prompt below. This prompt comes straight from the 2018 AP Lang exam:

Eminent domain is the power governments have to acquire property from private owners for public use. The rationale behind eminent domain is that governments have greater legal authority over lands within their dominion than do private owners. Eminent domain has been instituted in one way or another throughout the world for hundreds of years.

Carefully read the following six sources, including the introductory information for each source. Then synthesize material from at least three of the sources and incorporate it into a coherent, well-developed essay that defends, challenges, or qualifies the notion that eminent domain is productive and beneficial.

Your argument should be the focus of your essay. Use the sources to develop your argument and explain the reasoning for it. Avoid merely summarizing the sources. Indicate clearly which sources you are drawing from, whether through direct quotation, paraphrase, or summary. You may cite the sources as Source A, Source B, etc., or by using the descriptions in parentheses.

On first read, you might be nervous about how to answer this prompt...especially if you don't know what eminent domain is! But if you break the prompt down into chunks, you'll be able to figure out what the prompt is asking you to do in no time flat.

To get a full understanding of what this prompt wants you to do, you need to identify the most important details in this prompt, paragraph by paragraph. Here's what each paragraph is asking you to do:

  • Paragraph 1: The prompt presents and briefly explains the topic that you'll be writing your synthesis essay about. That topic is the concept of eminent domain.
  • Paragraph 2: The prompt presents a specific claim about the concept of eminent domain in this paragraph: Eminent domain is productive and beneficial. This paragraph instructs you to decide whether you want to defend, challenge, or qualify that claim in your synthesis essay , and use material from at least three of the sources provided in order to do so.
  • Paragraph 3: In the last paragraph of the prompt, the exam gives you clear instructions about how to approach writing your synthesis essay . First, make your argument the focus of the essay. Second, use material from at least three of the sources to develop and explain your argument. Third, provide commentary on the material you include, and provide proper citations when you incorporate quotations, paraphrases, or summaries from the sources provided.

So basically, you'll have to agree with, disagree with, or qualify the claim stated in the prompt, then use at least three sources substantiate your answer. Since you probably don't know much about eminent domain, you'll probably decide on your position after you read the provided sources.

To make good use of your time on the exam, you should spend around 2 minutes reading the prompt and making note of what it's asking you to do. That will leave you plenty of time to read the sources provided, which is the next step to writing a synthesis essay.

Step 2: Read the Sources Carefully

After you closely read the prompt and make note of the most important details, you need to read all of the sources provided. It's tempting to skip one or two sources to save time--but we recommend you don't do this. That's because you'll need a thorough understanding of the topic before you can accurately address the prompt!

For the sample exam prompt included above, there are six sources provided. We're not going to include all of the sources in this article, but you can view the six sources from this question on the 2018 AP Lang exam here . The sources include five print-text sources and one visual source, which is a cartoon.

As you read the sources, it's important to read quickly and carefully. Don't rush! Keep your pencil in hand to quickly mark important passages that you might want to use as evidence in your synthesis. While you're reading the sources and marking passages, you want to think about how the information you're reading influences your stance on the issue (in this case, eminent domain).

When you finish reading, take a few seconds to summarize, in a phrase or sentence, whether the source defends, challenges, or qualifies whether eminent domain is beneficial (which is the claim in the prompt) . Though it might not feel like you have time for this, it's important to give yourself these notes about each source so you know how you can use each one as evidence in your essay.

Here's what we mean: say you want to challenge the idea that eminent domain is useful. If you've jotted down notes about each source and what it's saying, it will be easier for you to pull the relevant information into your outline and your essay.

So how much time should you spend reading the provided sources? The AP Lang exam recommends taking 15 minutes to read the sources . If you spend around two of those minutes reading and breaking down the essay prompt, it makes sense to spend the remaining 13 minutes reading and annotating the sources.

If you finish reading and annotating early, you can always move on to drafting your synthesis essay. But make sure you're taking your time and reading carefully! It's better to use a little extra time reading and understanding the sources now so that you don't have to go back and re-read the sources later.

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A strong thesis will do a lot of heavy lifting in your essay. (See what we did there?)

Step 3: Write a Strong Thesis Statement

After you've analyzed the prompt and thoroughly read the sources, the next thing you need to do in order to write a good synthesis essay is write a strong thesis statement .

The great news about writing a thesis statement for this synthesis essay is that you have all the tools you need to do it at your fingertips. All you have to do in order to write your thesis statement is decide what your stance is in relationship to the topic provided.

In the example prompt provided earlier, you're essentially given three choices for how to frame your thesis statement: you can either defend, challenge, or qualify a claim that's been provided by the prompt, that eminent domain is productive and beneficial . Here's what that means for each option:

If you choose to defend the claim, your job will be to prove that the claim is correct . In this case, you'll have to show that eminent domain is a good thing.

If you choose to challenge the claim, you'll argue that the claim is incorrect. In other words, you'll argue that eminent domain isn't productive or beneficial.

If you choose to qualify, that means you'll agree with part of the claim, but disagree with another part of the claim. For instance, you may argue that eminent domain can be a productive tool for governments, but it's not beneficial for property owners. Or maybe you argue that eminent domain is useful in certain circumstances, but not in others.

When you decide whether you want your synthesis essay to defend, challenge, or qualify that claim, you need to convey that stance clearly in your thesis statement. You want to avoid simply restating the claim provided in the prompt, summarizing the issue without making a coherent claim, or writing a thesis that doesn't respond to the prompt.

Here's an example of a thesis statement that received full points on the eminent domain synthesis essay:

Although eminent domain can be misused to benefit private interests at the expense of citizens, it is a vital tool of any government that intends to have any influence on the land it governs beyond that of written law.

This thesis statement received full points because it states a defensible position and establishes a line of reasoning on the issue of eminent domain. It states the author's position (that some parts of eminent domain are good, but others are bad), then goes on to explain why the author thinks that (it's good because it allows the government to do its job, but it's bad because the government can misuse its power.)

Because this example thesis statement states a defensible position and establishes a line of reasoning, it can be elaborated upon in the body of the essay through sub-claims, supporting evidence, and commentary. And a solid argument is key to getting a six on your synthesis essay for AP Lang!

Looking for help studying for your AP exam? Our one-on-one online AP tutoring services can help you prepare for your AP exams. Get matched with a top tutor who got a high score on the exam you're studying for!

Step 4: Create a Bare-Bones Essay Outline

Once you've got your thesis statement drafted, you have the foundation you need to develop a bare bones outline for your synthesis essay. Developing an outline might seem like it's a waste of your precious time, but if you develop your outline well, it will actually save you time when you start writing your essay.

With that in mind, we recommend spending 5 to 10 minutes outlining your synthesis essay . If you use a bare-bones outline like the one below, labeling each piece of content that you need to include in your essay draft, you should be able to develop out the most important pieces of the synthesis before you even draft the actual essay.

To help you see how this can work on test day, we've created a sample outline for you. You can even memorize this outline to help you out on test day! In the outline below, you'll find places to fill in a thesis statement, body paragraph topic sentences, evidence from the sources provided, and commentary :

  • Present the context surrounding the essay topic in a couple of sentences (this is a good place to use what you learned about the major opinions or controversies about the topic from reading your sources).
  • Write a straightforward, clear, and concise thesis statement that presents your stance on the topic
  • Topic sentence presenting first supporting point or claim
  • Evidence #1
  • Commentary on Evidence #1
  • Evidence #2 (if needed)
  • Commentary on Evidence #2 (if needed)
  • Topic sentence presenting second supporting point or claim
  • Topic sentence presenting three supporting point or claim
  • Sums up the main line of reasoning that you developed and defended throughout the essay
  • Reiterates the thesis statement

Taking the time to develop these crucial pieces of the synthesis in a bare-bones outline will give you a map for your final essay. Once you have a map, writing the essay will be much easier.

Step 5: Draft Your Essay Response

The great thing about taking a few minutes to develop an outline is that you can develop it out into your essay draft. After you take about 5 to 10 minutes to outline your synthesis essay, you can use the remaining 30 to 35 minutes to draft your essay and review it.

Since you'll outline your essay before you start drafting, writing the essay should be pretty straightforward. You'll already know how many paragraphs you're going to write, what the topic of each paragraph will be, and what quotations, paraphrases, or summaries you're going to include in each paragraph from the sources provided. You'll just have to fill in one of the most important parts of your synthesis—your commentary.

Commentaries are your explanation of why your evidence supports the argument you've outlined in your thesis. Your commentary is where you actually make your argument, which is why it's such a critical part of your synthesis essay.

When thinking about what to say in your commentary, remember one thing the AP Lang synthesis essay prompt specifies: don't just summarize the sources. Instead, as you provide commentary on the evidence you incorporate, you need to explain how that evidence supports or undermines your thesis statement . You should include commentary that offers a thoughtful or novel perspective on the evidence from your sources to develop your argument.

One very important thing to remember as you draft out your essay is to cite your sources. The AP Lang exam synthesis essay prompt indicates that you can use generic labels for the sources provided (e.g. "Source 1," "Source 2," "Source 3," etc.). The exam prompt will indicate which label corresponds with which source, so you'll need to make sure you pay attention and cite sources accurately. You can cite your sources in the sentence where you introduce a quote, summary, or paraphrase, or you can use a parenthetical citation. Citing your sources affects your score on the synthesis essay, so remembering to do this is important.

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Keep reading for a real-life example of a great AP synthesis essay response!

Real-Life AP Synthesis Essay Example and Analysis

If you're still wondering how to write a synthesis essay, examples of real essays from past AP Lang exams can make things clearer. These real-life student AP synthesis essay responses can be great for helping you understand how to write a synthesis essay that will knock the graders' socks off .

While there are multiple essay examples online, we've chosen one to take a closer look at. We're going to give you a brief analysis of one of these example student synthesis essays from the 2019 AP Lang Exam below!

Example Synthesis Essay AP Lang Response

To get started, let's look at the official prompt for the 2019 synthesis essay:

In response to our society's increasing demand for energy, large-scale wind power has drawn attention from governments and consumers as a potential alternative to traditional materials that fuel our power grids, such as coal, oil, natural gas, water, or even newer sources such as nuclear or solar power. Yet the establishment of large-scale, commercial-grade wind farms is often the subject of controversy for a variety of reasons.

Carefully read the six sources, found on the AP English Language and Composition 2019 Exam (Question 1), including the introductory information for each source. Write an essay that synthesizes material from at least three of the sources and develops your position on the most important factors that an individual or agency should consider when deciding whether to establish a wind farm.

Source A (photo) Source B (Layton) Source C (Seltenrich) Source D (Brown) Source E (Rule) Source F (Molla)

In your response you should do the following:

  • Respond to the prompt with a thesis presents a defensible position.
  • Select and use evidence from at least 3 of the provided sources to support your line of reasoning. Indicate clearly the sources used through direct quotation, paraphrase, or summary. Sources may be cited as Source A, Source B, etc., or by using the description in parentheses.
  • Explain how the evidence supports your line of reasoning.
  • Use appropriate grammar and punctuation in communicating your argument.

Now that you know exactly what the prompt asked students to do on the 2019 AP Lang synthesis essay, here's an AP Lang synthesis essay example, written by a real student on the AP Lang exam in 2019:

[1] The situation has been known for years, and still very little is being done: alternative power is the only way to reliably power the changing world. The draw of power coming from industry and private life is overwhelming current sources of non-renewable power, and with dwindling supplies of fossil fuels, it is merely a matter of time before coal and gas fuel plants are no longer in operation. So one viable alternative is wind power. But as with all things, there are pros and cons. The main factors for power companies to consider when building wind farms are environmental boon, aesthetic, and economic factors.

[2] The environmental benefits of using wind power are well-known and proven. Wind power is, as qualified by Source B, undeniably clean and renewable. From their production requiring very little in the way of dangerous materials to their lack of fuel, besides that which occurs naturally, wind power is by far one of the least environmentally impactful sources of power available. In addition, wind power by way of gearbox and advanced blade materials, has the highest percentage of energy retention. According to Source F, wind power retains 1,164% of the energy put into the system – meaning that it increases the energy converted from fuel (wind) to electricity 10 times! No other method of electricity production is even half that efficient. The efficiency and clean nature of wind power are important to consider, especially because they contribute back to power companies economically.

[3] Economically, wind power is both a boon and a bone to electric companies and other users. For consumers, wind power is very cheap, leading to lower bills than from any other source. Consumers also get an indirect reimbursement by way of taxes (Source D). In one Texan town, McCamey, tax revenue increased 30% from a wind farm being erected in the town. This helps to finance improvements to the town. But, there is no doubt that wind power is also hurting the power companies. Although, as renewable power goes, wind is incredibly cheap, it is still significantly more expensive than fossil fuels. So, while it is helping to cut down on emissions, it costs electric companies more than traditional fossil fuel plants. While the general economic trend is positive, there are some setbacks which must be overcome before wind power can take over as truly more effective than fossil fuels.

[4] Aesthetics may be the greatest setback for power companies. Although there may be significant economic and environmental benefit to wind power, people will always fight to preserve pure, unspoiled land. Unfortunately, not much can be done to improve the visual aesthetics of the turbines. White paint is the most common choice because it "[is] associated with cleanliness." (Source E). But, this can make it stand out like a sore thumb, and make the gargantuan machines seem more out of place. The site can also not be altered because it affects generating capacity. Sound is almost worse of a concern because it interrupts personal productivity by interrupting people's sleep patterns. One thing for power companies to consider is working with turbine manufacturing to make the machines less aesthetically impactful, so as to garner greater public support.

[5] As with most things, wind power has no easy answer. It is the responsibility of the companies building them to weigh the benefits and the consequences. But, by balancing economics, efficiency, and aesthetics, power companies can create a solution which balances human impact with environmental preservation.

And that's an entire AP Lang synthesis essay example, written in response to a real AP Lang exam prompt! It's important to remember AP Lang exam synthesis essay prompts are always similarly structured and worded, and students often respond in around the same number of paragraphs as what you see in the example essay response above.

Next, let's analyze this example essay and talk about what it does effectively, where it could be improved upon, and what score past exam scorers awarded it.

To get started on an analysis of the sample synthesis essay, let's look at the scoring commentary provided by the College Board:

  • For development of thesis, the essay received 1 out of 1 possible points
  • For evidence and commentary, the essay received 4 out of 4 possible points
  • For sophistication of thought, the essay received 0 out of 1 possible points.

This means that the final score for this example essay was a 5 out of 6 possible points . Let's look more closely at the content of the example essay to figure out why it received this score breakdown.

Thesis Development

The thesis statement is one of the three main categories that is taken into consideration when you're awarded points on this portion of the exam. This sample essay received 1 out of 1 total points.

Now, here's why: the thesis statement clearly and concisely conveys a position on the topic presented in the prompt--alternative energy and wind power--and defines the most important factors that power companies should consider when deciding whether to establish a wind farm.

Evidence and Commentary

The second key category taken into consideration when synthesis exams are evaluated is incorporation of evidence and commentary. This sample received 4 out of 4 possible points for this portion of the synthesis essay. At bare minimum, this sample essay meets the requirement mentioned in the prompt that the writer incorporate evidence from at least three of the sources provided.

On top of that, the writer does a good job of connecting the incorporated evidence back to the claim made in the thesis statement through effective commentary. The commentary in this sample essay is effective because it goes beyond just summarizing what the provided sources say. Instead, it explains and analyzes the evidence presented in the selected sources and connects them back to supporting points the writer makes in each body paragraph.

Finally, the writer of the essay also received points for evidence and commentary because the writer developed and supported a consistent line of reasoning throughout the essay . This line of reasoning is summed up in the fourth paragraph in the following sentence: "One thing for power companies to consider is working with turbine manufacturing to make the machines less aesthetically impactful, so as to garner greater public support."

Because the writer did a good job consistently developing their argument and incorporating evidence, they received full marks in this category. So far, so good!

Sophistication of Thought

Now, we know that this essay received a score of 5 out of 6 total points, and the place where the writer lost a point was on the basis of sophistication of thought, for which the writer received 0 out of 1 points. That's because this sample essay makes several generalizations and vague claims where it could have instead made specific claims that support a more balanced argument.

For example, in the following sentence from the 5th paragraph of the sample essay, the writer misses the opportunity to state specific possibilities that power companies should consider for wind energy . Instead, the writer is ambiguous and non-committal, saying, "As with most things, wind power has no easy answer. It is the responsibility of the companies building them to weigh the benefits and consequences."

If the writer of this essay was interested in trying to get that 6th point on the synthesis essay response, they could consider making more specific claims. For instance, they could state the specific benefits and consequences power companies should consider when deciding whether to establish a wind farm. These could include things like environmental impacts, economic impacts, or even population density!

Despite losing one point in the last category, this example synthesis essay is a strong one. It's well-developed, thoughtfully written, and advances an argument on the exam topic using evidence and support throughout.

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4 Tips for How to Write a Synthesis Essay

AP Lang is a timed exam, so you have to pick and choose what you want to focus on in the limited time you're given to write the synthesis essay. Keep reading to get our expert advice on what you should focus on during your exam.

Tip 1: Read the Prompt First

It may sound obvious, but when you're pressed for time, it's easy to get flustered. Just remember: when it comes time to write the synthesis essay, read the prompt first !

Why is it so important to read the prompt before you read the sources? Because when you're aware of what kind of question you're trying to answer, you'll be able to read the sources more strategically. The prompt will help give you a sense of what claims, points, facts, or opinions to be looking for as you read the sources.

Reading the sources without having read the prompt first is kind of like trying to drive while wearing a blindfold: you can probably do it, but it's likely not going to end well!

Tip 2: Make Notes While You Read

During the 15-minute reading period at the beginning of the synthesis essay, you'll be reading through the sources as quickly as you can. After all, you're probably anxious to start writing!

While it's definitely important to make good use of your time, it's also important to read closely enough that you understand your sources. Careful reading will allow you to identify parts of the sources that will help you support your thesis statement in your essay, too.

As you read the sources, consider marking helpful passages with a star or check mark in the margins of the exam so you know which parts of the text to quickly re-read as you form your synthesis essay. You might also consider summing up the key points or position of each source in a sentence or a few words when you finish reading each source during the reading period. Doing so will help you know where each source stands on the topic given and help you pick the three (or more!) that will bolster your synthesis argument.

Tip 3: Start With the Thesis Statement

If you don't start your synthesis essay with a strong thesis statement, it's going to be tough to write an effective synthesis essay. As soon as you finish reading and annotating the provided sources, the thing you want to do next is write a strong thesis statement.

According to the CollegeBoard grading guidelines for the AP Lang synthesis essay, a strong thesis statement will respond to the prompt— not restate or rephrase the prompt. A good thesis will take a clear, defensible position on the topic presented in the prompt and the sources.

In other words, to write a solid thesis statement to guide the rest of your synthesis essay, you need to think about your position on the topic at hand and then make a claim about the topic based on your position. This position will either be defending, challenging, or qualifying the claim made in the essay's prompt.

The defensible position that you establish in your thesis statement will guide your argument in the rest of the essay, so it's important to do this first. Once you have a strong thesis statement, you can begin outlining your essay.

Tip 4: Focus on Your Commentary

Writing thoughtful, original commentary that explains your argument and your sources is important. In fact, doing this well will earn you four points (out of a total of six)!

AP Lang provides six to seven sources for you on the exam, and you'll be expected to incorporate quotations, paraphrases, or summaries from at least three of those sources into your synthesis essay and interpret that evidence for the reader.

While incorporating evidence is very important, in order to get the extra point for "sophistication of thought" on the synthesis essay, it's important to spend more time thinking about your commentary on the evidence you choose to incorporate. The commentary is your chance to show original thinking, strong rhetorical skills, and clearly explain how the evidence you've included supports the stance you laid out in your thesis statement.

To earn the 6th possible point on the synthesis essay, make sure your commentary demonstrates a nuanced understanding of the source material, explains this nuanced understanding, and places the evidence incorporated from the sources in conversation with each other. To do this, make sure you're avoiding vague language. Be specific when you can, and always tie your commentary back to your thesis!

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What's Next?

There's a lot more to the AP Language exam than just the synthesis essay. Be sure to check out our expert guide to the entire exam , then learn more about the tricky multiple choice section .

Is the AP Lang exam hard...or is it easy? See how it stacks up to other AP tests on our list of the hardest AP exams .

Did you know there are technically two English AP exams? You can learn more about the second English AP test, the AP Literature exam, in this article . And if you're confused about whether you should take the AP Lang or AP Lit test , we can help you make that decision, too.

Want to improve your SAT score by 160 points or your ACT score by 4 points?   We've written a guide for each test about the top 5 strategies you must be using to have a shot at improving your score. Download them for free now:

Ashley Sufflé Robinson has a Ph.D. in 19th Century English Literature. As a content writer for PrepScholar, Ashley is passionate about giving college-bound students the in-depth information they need to get into the school of their dreams.

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Synthesis Essay Examples

A synthesis essay aims to create insightful connections between relatively distinct sources that tackle the same problem. This method is widely used in the introductory part of a research paper to cover all the approaches without criticizing them. In a word, you shall choose the best ideas from the referenced texts to support your thesis statement.

The below synthesis essay examples are an excellent source of ideas for analysis and reflection. Besides, many of them contain a bibliography list. Thus, if your task matches some of the synthesis essay titles, you can use their references for your preliminary research.

103 Best Synthesis Essay Examples

Experimental studies on williams syndrome disease.

  • Subjects: Genetics Sciences

Teenage Depression: Psychology-Based Treatment

  • Subjects: Psychological Issues Psychology

Book Search on Research Design

  • Subjects: Education Educational Resources

The Complexity of Management

  • Subjects: Business Decision Making
  • Words: 2615

Victor Lipman, a Forbes Magazine contributor talks about the management practices

  • Subjects: Business Management

Under-age Criminals in the New York Times Archives

  • Subjects: Terrorism Prevention Warfare

Alan Taylor: American Colonies

  • Subjects: History United States
  • Words: 1181

Obsessive Branding Disorder: The Business of Illusion and the Illusion of Business

  • Subjects: Business Marketing

Metacognition and Neuropsychology

Do all languages have word accent.

  • Subjects: Linguistics Stylistics
  • Words: 1679

Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do?

  • Subjects: Politics & Government Social & Political Theory

“Nelson Mandela, Autobiography” Book

  • Subjects: Historical Figures History
  • Words: 1132

Analysis of Qualitative Nursing Research Study

  • Subjects: Health & Medicine Healthcare Research
  • Words: 1968

How Technology Is Changing the Health Care Field

  • Subjects: Health & Medicine Health IT

Significance of Shifts Fostering Lifelong Learning and Human Capital Formation

  • Subjects: Curriculum Development Education
  • Words: 1416

John Lewis Gaddis: Surprise, Security and the American Experience

  • Subjects: Historical Literature Literature

Corporate Sustainability by Jonathan Atwood

  • Subjects: Environment Environmental Studies
  • Words: 1791

Hegemony Theories: Leadership and Governance

Legal issues in the traditional workplace.

  • Subjects: Labor Law Law
  • Words: 4079

Foreign Trade Zone: Legal Issues and Implications

  • Subjects: Economics International Trade Policy

Mary Wollstonecraft’s Achievements in Struggles for Gender Equality

  • Subjects: History Women Studies

American Foundational Values

  • Subjects: Government Politics & Government
  • Words: 1378

Workplace Issues in the Tourism Industry

  • Subjects: Tourism World Tourism
  • Words: 1833

Culture as a Means of Managing Employees

  • Words: 1219

Propaganda Movement in Mass Media

  • Subjects: Entertainment & Media Journalism
  • Words: 1485

Role of the Woman During the Spanish Civil War

  • Words: 2770

“The House on Mango Street” by Sandra Cisneros

  • Subjects: American Novels Influences Literature
  • Words: 1120

An Analysis of Music Theory

  • Subjects: Art Musical Compositions

Value and need as organizing factors in perception

  • Subjects: Psychology Social Psychology Deviations

“Black Citymakers” by Marcus Anthony Hunter

  • Subjects: American Literature Literature
  • Words: 1134

Ethics and Clinical Trials

Role of wealthy countries in international development.

  • Subjects: International Relations Politics & Government
  • Words: 1371

The Construction of Brazilian Identity in Japan

  • Subjects: Immigration Sociology

Gluttony in the Merchant of Four Seasons

  • Words: 1931

The French Wars of Religion, 1562-1598

  • Subjects: History Western Europe

Amusing Ourselves to Death Thesis

  • Subjects: Sociological Issues Sociology

Role of the Press in Civil Rights

  • Subjects: African American Studies History

Political and Social Conflicts and Ling-Ling’s Perception of Life in Shanghai

“pity the children” by taylor phil, the prime objective of marketing strategies or techniques.

  • Words: 1375

Modern Marketing Strategy

  • Words: 1595

The Dragon’s Village Response Paper

  • Subjects: Asia History

Cooperative Exporters: The Enhancement of the International Assistance

  • Subjects: Economics Trade

Native American Multicultural Literature

  • Words: 2867

Globalization and Culture: Possibilities and Anxieties

  • Subjects: Economics Globalization
  • Words: 1376

Employee Motivation as a Component of Performance Management

  • Subjects: Behavior Management Psychology
  • Words: 3611

Gathering Current Market Information

  • Words: 2852

On Change Models Developed by Scholars

  • Words: 1174

Summarizing of articles by Catherine Rampell, Lacey Johnson and Paul Krugman

  • Subjects: Education Education System

Wireless Technology in Health Monitoring

  • Words: 4103

Equity Investment: Decision Making – Business Valuation

Medical ethics in treatment of animals.

  • Subjects: Health & Medicine Medical Ethics
  • Words: 1657

Attorney General in Charter of Rights and Freedoms Cases

The us military experience in films.

  • Words: 5330

“Capital Moves: RCA’s Seventy-Year Quest for Cheap Labor” a Book by Jefferson R. Cowie

  • Words: 1560

Assassination of Osama Bin Laden Influence

  • Words: 1231

Leadership Styles in Organisations

  • Words: 2883

Models and Concepts of Quality

Life culture in london south bank university.

  • Subjects: Cultural Diversity Culture
  • Words: 1352

The Intersubjective View of Narcissism

  • Words: 3415

What do Lonergan, Loewe, and Miller Say About the Mysteries of God and the Human Person

  • Subjects: Religion Theology

Innovative Technologies and Modern Communication

  • Subjects: Communications Sociology
  • Words: 1109

Best Interventions for Convicted Sexual Offenders and Integration into Society

  • Subjects: Criminology Law
  • Words: 2204

Stephen Taylor and Emma Perry on Online Recruitment

  • Words: 2370

Relate Gender, Ethnicity and Identity

  • Subjects: Gender Identity Sociology

Factors and Mechanisms behind the Collusive Behaviours of Firms in an Oligopolistic Market Structure

  • Subjects: Economics Financial Reporting

The Role of Supply Chain Risk Management in Ensuring Smooth Functioning

  • Subjects: Business Logistics
  • Words: 2217

DDT Exposure and Neurodevelopment

  • Subjects: Chemistry Sciences

Principal Ways of Financing the Welfare State

  • Subjects: Law Taxation Law
  • Words: 3109

“Safety, Accidents, and Investigations: Be Prepared for the Unexpected” by Robert Battles

The relationship between color vision and high altitude.

  • Subjects: Health & Medicine Physiology
  • Words: 6928

“The Populist Vision” by Charles Postel

Critical thinking in health care, “the future of life” by edward o. wilson.

  • Subjects: Environment Planet Protection

Oral Arguments and Decision-Making on the Supreme Court

  • Subjects: Law Law Practice Management
  • Words: 1783

“Eco-Warriors” by Rik Scarce

  • Subjects: Environment Environmental Processes

Cross-Cultural Leadership: China, Britain, and Nigeria

  • Subjects: Business Managerial Duties
  • Words: 1506

Importance of Early Childhood Education

  • Subjects: Education Pedagogy
  • Words: 2265

The Demographics Impact of Black Death and the Standard of Living Controversies in the Late Medieval

  • Subjects: History Medieval History

Collective Invention During Industrial Revolution

Predicting premature termination from counseling using the butcher treatment planning inventory, similes conceptualization in education.

  • Subjects: Education Learning Specifics
  • Words: 3281

Qualitative research design and methods

  • Subjects: Math Sciences

Consumer Protection: European and UK Regulation

  • Subjects: Consumer Law Law
  • Words: 4444

Student Engagement and Student Motivation in a Reading Classroom for the Kindergarten Level

Motivational theories and organizational performance relations.

  • Words: 2176

Regional Strategies for Global Leadership

  • Subjects: Business Strategy
  • Words: 2124

‘Belief in Action: The Salvation Army, a Global Not-for-Profit Organization’

  • Words: 3517

Adulthood Learning Determining Factors

  • Subjects: Adult Education Education
  • Words: 1742

Geography, its Evolution and Future

  • Subjects: Geography Sciences
  • Words: 1653

Comparing a TQM Implementation in Toyota Motor Company and Emirates Airlines

  • Subjects: Business Case Study
  • Words: 1112

Benchmarking Method in Practice

Dance education and culture.

  • Subjects: Art Dance
  • Words: 4956

Tackling the Issue of Human Trafficking

  • Subjects: Criminal Law Law
  • Words: 1417

Piaget and Vygotsky’s Theories

Literature review on organic food and healthy diet.

  • Subjects: Diet & Nutrition Healthy Food

Influence of the Fashion Attributes on the Social Status and Personal Identity

  • Subjects: Identity Sociology
  • Words: 2019

Victorian Art’s Evaluation

  • Subjects: Design Design Trends

Conflict in The Age of Innocence and Manhattan Transfer

Chinese landscape painting.

  • Subjects: Art Artists

Cross-Media Communication in Advertising: Exploring Multimodal Connections

  • Subjects: Entertainment & Media Theories of Advertising
  • Words: 1502

Team Turnarounds: A Playbook for Transforming Underperforming Teams

  • Subjects: Business Global Scale Management

Weapons of Mass Destruction: The Terrorist Threat

  • Subjects: Terrorism Warfare
  • Words: 4149

How to write a synthesis essay

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  • January 1, 2024

Synthesis essay is a challenging form of academic writing in which you combine multiple sources into a coherent and persuasive argument.

When writing one, better follow a series of basic steps that we will explain in the next paragraphs to write a great essay.

So let’s quickly start learning how to write a great synthesis essay.

Quick summary

  • Take the time to understand the essay prompt to grasp the requirements of the assignment.
  • Engage in extensive research and gather information from a variety of reputable sources.
  • Develop a strong thesis statement and outline.
  • Start writing your introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion. Make sure to include smooth transitions between these paragraphs.
  • Use the proper citation or formatting (APA, MLA, etc.) and make sure you proofread your essay.

Synthesis essay definition

What is a synthesis essay?

Your primary goal with a synthesis essay is to provide a unique perspective, supported by evidence. For example, suppose you have two distinct essays or research papers on “excessive social media usage” and “the effects of social media on psychology.”

In your synthesis essay, you can blend these two sources into a cohesive argument like “the psychological impacts of excessive social media usage on individuals.”

Synthesis essay introduction

The introduction is the opening paragraph of a synthesis essay, where you present the topic and provide background information. Like a usual introduction , it should not be more than 10% of your essay.

  • It should include a clear and concise thesis statement that states the main argument or viewpoint of the essay.
  • It should reflect the synthesis of information from multiple sources.

Now let’s have a look at the introduction example below. 

Synthesis essay introduction example

Introduction, body paragraphs.

The body paragraphs form the core of the synthesis essay. Each paragraph should focus on a specific aspect of the argument and present evidence and analysis from the sources to support the thesis statement. When writing body paragraphs: 

  • Use topic sentences to introduce the main idea of each paragraph
  • Make use of transition words to create a smooth flow between paragraphs.

Let’s have a look at a body paragraph example.

Synthesis essay body paragraph example

Synthesis essay conclusion.

The conclusion is the final paragraph of your essay. A compelling conclusion leaves a lasting impact on the reader, reinforcing the essay’s main message. 

  • Restate the thesis statement slightly different.
  • Summarize the main points discussed in the body paragraphs and emphasize the significance of the overall synthesis 

Let’s have a look at the components of a conclusion paragraph below. 

Synthesis essay conclusion example

Now that we’ve seen a short example of synthesis essay, let’s continue with the steps to write a great one.

Steps on writing a synthesis essay

In this section, we’ll guide you through the writing process with each steps explained in detail and examples. 

steps of synthesis essay

Step 1 - Understand your assignment

  • Depending on your field of study, you may need to adhere to standard formatting styles such as MLA , APA , or Chicago.
  • Consider that formatting expectations may be different. Pay attention to certain guidelines provided by your instructor.

Example of a synthesis essay assignment

  • Investigate the impact of artificial intelligence on the job market and society.
  • Synthesize at least three different sources, including academic articles, news reports, and opinion pieces, to discuss the benefits and challenges posed by AI's integration into various industries.
  • Consider the ethical implications, potential job displacement, and the role of policymakers in addressing these changes.
  • Use correct APA 7 citation format and make sure the essay is at least 1000 words.

So you see an example above, take some time to carefully review the prompt, and give particular attention to the formatting requirements. 

Step 2 - Read and annotate the sources

After finding relevant sources, read each one critically by highlighting key ideas and arguments. Annotating sources with concise summaries and evaluative comments helps in later stages of the essay writing process.

  • Academic Journals and Research Papers: These are scholarly articles written by experts in a particular field.
  • Books: Books: written by reputable authors and published by well-known publishers can be valuable sources of information.
  • Government Publications: Reports, statistics, and studies published by government agencies can be reliable sources of data.
  • Newspapers and Magazines: Articles from reputable newspapers and magazines can offer current and relevant information on various topics.

Step 3 - Draft a thesis statement

A well-crafted thesis statement forms the basis of any synthesis paper. It serves as the central argument, summarizing the synthesis of information gathered from selected sources. 

A compelling thesis statement should be clear, concise, and debatable as it sets the tone for the entire paper. 

Synthesis essay thesis statement example

....(introduction starts) ....(introduction continues) ....(introduction continues) The pursuit of space exploration has had profound effects on scientific advancement, global cooperation, and technological innovation, and has also raised ethical considerations. Thesis statement, which is usually the last sentence of your introduction

Step 4 - Create an outline

Creating an outline helps to organize the structure of the essay systematically. Using a formal approach with Roman numerals allows for an orderly arrangement of topics and supporting details.

With an outline , you can use subcategories to cite specific points and integrate references to various sources. Or simply structure your whole essay before you start. 

Synthesis essay outline example

Outline sample

  • Hook sentence
  • Background information
  • Thesis statement (Your argument & claim)
  • Topic sentene
  • Supporting detail 1
  • Supporting detail 2
  • Supporting evidence
  • Topic sentence
  • Counterpoint
  • Restatement of thesis
  • Summarize main points
  • Closing sentence

Step 5 - Start writing your essay

essay outline structure

With the outline, structure your essay into introduction , body paragraphs , and conclusion .  

First draft won’t be perfect, no worries. Here you simply start writing your essay from intro to the conclusion. 

Refer to our Introduction-Body-Conclusion examples above to complete this step!

Step 6 - Proofread your essay

  • Make sure your grammar is accurate and clear. If possible, use tools like Grammarly .
  • Read aloud your essay to notice details and mistakes.
  • Let your essay sit for a couple days and make someone else read it. They may notice the mistakes you've overseen.
  • Utilize an AI paraphrasing tool to check for any potential improvements in sentence structure and wording.

5-Paragraph Synthesis Essay Example

So now that you’ve seen all steps of writing a synthesis essay, it’s time to analyze a 5-paragraph example to have practical information. Simply see the essay example below and analyze how each sentence contributes to overall structure of essay. 

The Rise of Telecommuting: A Blessing or a Curse?

And that’s all for today. If you want to keep learning more about academic writing, feel free to visit our extensive Learning Center or YouTube Channel . 

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Synthesis Essays: A Step-by-Step How-To Guide

A synthesis essay is generally a short essay which brings two or more sources (or perspectives) into conversation with each other.

The word “synthesis” confuses every student a little bit. Fortunately, this step-by-step how-to guide will see you through to success!

Here’s a step-by-step how-to guide, with examples, that will help you write yours.

Before drafting your essay:

After reading the sources and before writing your essay, ask yourself these questions:

  • What is the debate or issue that concerns all of the writers? In other words, what is the question they are trying to answer?
  • On what points do they agree?
  • On what points do they disagree?
  • If they were having a verbal discussion, how would writer number one respond to the arguments of writer number two?

In a way, writing a synthesis essay is similar to composing a summary. But a synthesis essay requires you to read more than one source and to identify the way the writers’ ideas and points of view are related.

Sometimes several sources will reach the same conclusion even though each source approaches the subject from a different point of view.

Other times, sources will discuss the same aspects of the problem/issue/debate but will reach different conclusions.

And sometimes, sources will simply repeat ideas you have read in other sources; however, this is unlikely in a high school or AP situation.

To better organize your thoughts about what you’ve read, do this:

  • Identify each writer’s thesis/claim/main idea
  • List the writers supporting ideas (think topic sentences or substantiating ideas)
  • List the types of support used by the writers that seem important. For example, if the writer uses a lot of statistics to support a claim, note this. If a writer uses historical facts, note this.

There’s one more thing to do before writing: You need to articulate for yourself the relationships and connections among these ideas.

Sometimes the relationships are easy to find. For example, after reading several articles about censorship in newspapers, you may notice that most of the writers refer to or in some way use the First Amendment to help support their arguments and help persuade readers. In this case, you would want to describe the different ways the writers use the First Amendment in their arguments. To do this, ask yourself, “How does this writer exploit the value of the First Amendment/use the First Amendment to help persuade or manipulate the readers into thinking that she is right?

Sometimes articulating the relationships between ideas is not as easy. If you have trouble articulating clear relationships among the shared ideas you have noted, ask yourself these questions:

  • Do the ideas of one writer support the ideas of another? If so, how?
  • Do the writers who reach the same conclusion use the same ideas in their writing? If not, is there a different persuasive value to the ideas used by one writer than by the other?
  • Do the writers who disagree discuss similar points or did they approach the subject from a completely different angle and therefore use different points and different kinds of evidence to support their arguments?
  • Review your list of ideas. Are any of the ideas you have listed actually the same idea, just written in different words?

synthesis essay examples

Essay Papers Writing Online

Mastering the art of crafting a stellar synthesis essay – top tips, techniques, and examples to boost your writing skills and academic success.

How to write a good synthesis essay

Are you ready to embark on a journey of discovery, where you meld ideas, thoughts, and arguments into a seamless tapestry? The synthesis essay offers you a unique opportunity to showcase your ability to synthesize various sources and present your ideas in a coherent and convincing manner. In this article, we will explore some tried-and-true strategies to help you master the art of crafting a compelling synthesis essay that will leave a lasting impression on your readers.

First and foremost, it is essential to develop a strong grasp of the central theme or topic of your essay. This theme serves as the thread that will tie all the different sources and ideas together. By understanding the underlying essence of your essay, you can better navigate through the vast sea of information and select the most relevant and persuasive sources to support your arguments.

Once you have identified the central theme, it is crucial to critically analyze the various sources at your disposal. Remember, the key is not just to summarize these sources but to analyze them in relation to your thesis statement. Look for patterns, contradictions, and connections between the different sources. Highlight the key arguments and evidence that are relevant to your essay’s central theme, and be prepared to present counterarguments that address opposing viewpoints.

Understand the Prompt

In order to write an effective synthesis essay, it is crucial to fully understand the prompt provided. The prompt serves as a guide, outlining the specific topic or issue that needs to be addressed in the essay.

When analyzing the prompt, it is important to carefully examine the keywords and phrases used. These words may provide valuable insight into the expectations of the essay and the specific elements that should be included. It is also crucial to identify any limitations or guidelines outlined in the prompt.

Understanding the prompt also involves determining the purpose of the essay. Is it meant to inform, persuade, or argue a specific point? By grasping the purpose, you can tailor your writing style and arguments to best meet the objectives of the prompt.

Additionally, it is essential to consider the context and audience of the essay. Who will be reading your essay? What are their expectations and knowledge on the topic? By considering these factors, you can better adjust your writing style and tone to effectively communicate your ideas.

Overall, understanding the prompt is the first step towards writing an effective synthesis essay. By carefully analyzing the prompt, identifying key elements, and considering the purpose and audience, you can ensure that your essay is well-focused, coherent, and meets the requirements of the assignment.

Conduct Thorough Research

When it comes to crafting a compelling and well-supported synthesis essay, conducting thorough research is crucial. A successful essay requires a deep understanding of the topic at hand, as well as a comprehensive exploration of different perspectives and sources. Simply put, conducting thorough research means digging deep and gathering a wide range of relevant and reliable information that will enrich your synthesis essay and make it more convincing.

Research is the foundation on which your essay will be built. It allows you to gather facts, statistics, and expert opinions that support your thesis and strengthen your arguments. By conducting thorough research, you can demonstrate your knowledge and expertise on the topic, as well as present a well-rounded perspective that takes into account different viewpoints and evidence.

It is essential to use a variety of sources during your research process. This includes academic journals, books, reputable websites, and studies conducted by experts in the field. By consulting a diverse range of sources, you can ensure that your synthesis essay is well-informed and comprehensive.

When conducting research, it is important to critically evaluate the sources you come across. Not all sources are created equal, and it is your responsibility as an essay writer to determine their credibility and reliability. Look for sources that are peer-reviewed, published by reputable scholars or organizations, and have a track record of accuracy and reliability.

In addition to gathering information from various sources, you should also take notes and organize your research in a systematic and structured manner. This will make it easier to refer back to specific information when writing your essay and ensure that you include all relevant facts and data in your synthesis.

In conclusion, conducting thorough research is a critical step in writing an effective synthesis essay. It enables you to gather a wealth of relevant information, evaluate its credibility, and present a well-informed and comprehensive perspective on the topic. By investing time and effort into research, you can ensure that your essay is well-supported, convincing, and showcases your knowledge and understanding of the subject matter.

Create a Strong Thesis Statement

One of the most essential elements for writing a successful synthesis essay is the creation of a strong thesis statement. A thesis statement serves as the guiding principle and main argument of your essay, offering a clear and focused direction for your synthesis. This statement should be concise and powerful, encapsulating the main idea or theme that you will explore throughout your essay.

To create a strong thesis statement, it is important to consider the main points or ideas that you want to convey in your essay. Think about the connections and relationships between these points, and how they contribute to the overall theme or argument of your synthesis. Your thesis statement should reflect these connections and provide a clear stance or perspective on the topic.

Additionally, your thesis statement should be specific and avoid vague or general language. It should clearly state your main argument or position, and highlight the unique perspective or insights that you will bring to the topic. Avoid using clichés or common phrases, as they can weaken the impact of your thesis statement.

Lastly, make sure that your thesis statement is arguable. A strong thesis statement should invite discussion and debate, rather than stating an obvious or universally agreed-upon fact. It should be a statement that can be supported or refuted through evidence and logical reasoning.

By creating a strong thesis statement, you lay the foundation for a compelling and cohesive synthesis essay. It will guide your writing process and help you maintain a clear focus throughout your essay. Take the time to craft a thesis statement that is powerful, specific, and arguable, and you will set yourself up for success in writing an effective synthesis essay.

Organize Your Ideas

Organize Your Ideas

When it comes to crafting a compelling synthesis essay, one of the most important steps is organizing your ideas. Effective organization ensures that your thoughts flow smoothly and cohesively, allowing your readers to easily follow your argument. By structuring your essay in a logical and coherent manner, you can effectively convey your message and make a strong impact.

A key aspect of organizing your ideas involves creating an outline. This serves as a roadmap for your essay, helping you to visualize the overall structure and flow of your argument. Start by brainstorming your main ideas and supporting evidence, then arrange them in a logical order. This can be done using a variety of methods, such as creating a mind map or a hierarchical list.

Once you have established your outline, it’s important to consider the most effective way to present your ideas. One option is to use a chronological or sequential order, where you present your arguments in a logical progression. Another option is to use a thematic approach, grouping related ideas together to create a cohesive narrative. Whichever approach you choose, make sure to clearly introduce each main point and provide sufficient evidence to support your claims.

In addition to organizing your ideas structurally, it’s also important to consider the cohesiveness of your writing. Use transitional words and phrases to guide your readers through your argument, signaling shifts in ideas or providing connections between different points. This will help your essay to flow smoothly and prevent any misunderstandings.

Lastly, don’t forget to revise and refine your organization as you go. After completing a first draft, take the time to review your essay and make any necessary adjustments. This may involve reordering paragraphs, adding or deleting sections, or rephrasing sentences for clarity. By continuously revising and refining your organization, you can ensure that your essay is well-structured and easy to follow.

By organizing your ideas effectively, you can elevate your synthesis essay and make a strong impression on your readers. Take the time to carefully plan and structure your argument, and you’ll be well on your way to writing an impactful and persuasive essay.

Use Evidence and Examples from Various Sources

One crucial aspect of writing a synthesis essay is the use of evidence and examples from different sources to support your claims and arguments. By drawing from a variety of sources, such as scholarly articles, books, interviews, and research studies, you can strengthen the validity and credibility of your essay.

When selecting evidence and examples, it’s important to consider the diversity of viewpoints and perspectives. Including evidence from multiple sources allows you to present a well-rounded argument and demonstrate that you have considered various opinions on the topic.

Moreover, using evidence and examples from different sources helps to avoid biases and ensure that your essay is objective and comprehensive. By incorporating a variety of sources, you can present a more balanced and informed analysis.

Additionally, when using evidence and examples, be sure to provide proper citations and references. This not only gives credit to the original authors but also strengthens the credibility of your essay. Make sure to follow the appropriate citation style, such as APA or MLA, and include in-text citations and a reference list or bibliography.

In conclusion, by utilizing evidence and examples from various sources, you can enhance the effectiveness of your synthesis essay. By incorporating different viewpoints and perspectives, avoiding biases, and providing proper citations, you can create a well-supported and persuasive argument.

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How to write a good AP synthesis essay

Published September 27, 2020. Updated June 7, 2022.

Synthesis Essay Definition

A synthesis essay uses information from multiple sources to support an argument or explanation.

Overview of Synthesis Essay Writing

First, take some time to develop a thorough understanding of what you will be writing about. Take notes as you go, keeping track of points you want to make and evidence you want to include in the essay. While you read, you can begin to brainstorm a thesis statement and outline for the essay. Writing an outline will help structure your essay and keep you on track. The standard synthesis essay outline includes an introduction, body, and conclusion. Spend adequate time reviewing the instructions, sources, and prompts.

The AP English Language and Composition (also known as AP Lang) exam is composed of two sections: a Multiple Choice section and a Free Response section. It’s normal to be nervous before an exam, especially an AP exam. If you’re not sure what to expect from the AP Lang synthesis essay, never fear. Here you can read about everything you need to know before exam day, including:

  • the purpose of the synthesis essay
  • what to expect from the sources and prompt
  • a sample prompt and response
  • how the synthesis essay is scored
  • how to write a high-scoring synthesis essay

Worried about your writing? Submit your paper for a Chegg Writing essay check , or for an Expert Check proofreading . Both can help you find and fix potential writing issues.

Synthesis essay

The College Board describes the synthesis essay this way:

“After reading 6–7 texts about a topic (including visual and quantitative sources), students will compose an argument that combines and cites at least 3 of the sources to support their thesis.”

You will have 45 minutes to complete the synthesis essay. How you use this time is up to you, but below we’ve included a timeline for how you might choose to use your 45 minutes.

What will the sources and prompt be like?

The six to seven sources will all be centered on a specific topic. In past exams, the prompt has been focused on subjects like alternative energy and eminent domain. At least two of the sources will be visual, and at least one will be numerical (a chart or graph). The others will be text passages of roughly 500 words.

Before the sources, you’ll be given directions and a writing prompt. The prompt will explain the topic, then present a claim for you to respond to. Your response should synthesize material from at least three of the sources, forming a full-fledged essay.

See a sample synthesis essay prompt directly from the College Board linked here.

Following the directions in this sample prompt, you’ll find Sources A-F. Click here to view sample student responses.

How will my synthesis essay be scored?

Synthesis essays will be scored on a range from 0 to 6 based on an analytic rubric. This score will be the total of three scores based on three categories: your thesis, your evidence and commentary, and your sophistication.

Click here to review the complete free-response scoring guidelines for the 2020 AP Lang exam. As a quick summary, we’ll provide the College Board’s descriptions for what warrants the highest and lowest points in each category.

According to the AP English Language Scoring Rubrics, 0 points in the thesis category will be given “for any of the following”:

  • There is no defensible thesis.
  • The intended thesis only restates the prompt.
  • The intended thesis provides a summary of the issue with no apparent or coherent claim.
  • There is a thesis, but it does not respond to the prompt.

1 point in the thesis category will be given to essays that respond “to the prompt with a thesis that presents a defensible position.”

0 points will be given in the evidence and commentary section to any essay that “Simply restates thesis (if present), repeats provided information, or references fewer than two of the provided sources.”

4 points will be given in the evidence and commentary section to an essay that “Provides specific evidence from at least three of the provided sources to support all claims in a line of reasoning” and “Consistently explains how the evidence supports a line of reasoning.”

Finally, in the sophistication category , 1 point will be given to an essay that demonstrates “sophistication of thought and/or develops a complex understanding of the rhetorical situation.” 0 points will be given to essays that do not meet that criteria.

While it’s natural to worry about your score, keep in mind that your scorers know you have less than an hour to complete your synthesis essay. They know it is essentially a first draft, and they will pay more mind to what you do right than what you do wrong. Even the highest-scoring essays will contain occasional errors, so worry less about perfection than your holistic argument and synthesis.

How to write a high-scoring synthesis essay

Before we dive into what makes a high-scoring synthesis essay, let’s cover the basics. What is a synthesis essay?

Basically, a synthesis essay uses information from multiple sources to support an argument or explanation. However, when it comes to the AP Lang exam, you will be writing an argumentative synthesis essay.

You’ll take an argumentative stance, which you will express via your thesis statement, and argue in favor of that stance using evidence from multiple sources.

Outstanding AP Lang synthesis essays tend to do the following things very well. They:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the topic at hand.
  • express understanding of the topic’s importance.
  • make the writer’s opinion on the topic clear early on.
  • frequently cite examples from the sources, such as statistics and quotes.
  • conclude with a strong “so what” point.

To write an essay that succeeds in all of these areas, you should use a few strategies on exam day.

Read, read, and read again

One of the worst mistakes you can make is to jump into outlining and writing before you’ve read and analyzed the directions, prompt, and sources. Though you have limited time, it’s worth taking some time to develop a thorough understanding about what you’ll be writing about.

Take notes as you go, keeping track of points you want to make and evidence you want to include in your essay. While you read, you can begin to brainstorm a thesis statement and outline for your essay.

Follow an outline

Even if you’re more of a “fly by the seat of your pants” type, an outline will help structure your essay and keep you on track.

Below is a standard synthesis essay outline to keep in mind. However, this is only an example, and your argument may not fit this outline exactly.

  • Give a bit of context on the subject, demonstrating the knowledge you gained from reviewing the sources.
  • Give a clear and concise thesis statement that presents your argument.
  • Topic sentence
  • Evidence #1
  • Evidence #2
  • Sum up the main points made in the essay.
  • Restate the thesis statement
  • End on a “so what?” statement.

Don’t lose track of time

While it’s vital you spend adequate time reviewing the instructions, sources, and prompt, it’s a lost cause if you don’t leave yourself enough time to outline and write!

Here’s a handy timeline to keep in mind during the 55-minute-long synthesis essay portion of the AP Lang exam:

  • Reading the directions, sources, and prompt: 15 minutes
  • Analyzing the sources and outlining your response: 10 minutes
  • Drafting your response: 25 minutes
  • Reviewing and revising your response: 5 minutes

Before you turn in that paper, don’t forget to cite your sources in APA format , MLA format , or a style of your choice.

Sample synthesis essay

Although you cannot know what your prompt and sources will be before exam day, you can prepare beforehand by reading sample synthesis essays  and writing practice essays from past questions .

AP synthesis example essay

Based on the 2020 prompt : 

The impact of television on political matters has been  under  debate for years. Television provides a low-cost method to  stay informed  about policy changes  and receive  important announcements, and  it  often  offers  a path to learn more about political figures and their plans for the United States. However, critics of television believe that there is a strong psychological and marketing strategy in play,  which  presents  false images of personalities and  is  commonly used as a tool to sway public opinion. While there are drawbacks to  broadcasting debates and politics ,  it  positively influences presidential elections by providing accessible information to viewers ,  shar ing  the candidate s’  personali ties , plans, and ideals during  their  potential role as president,  and  ultimately assisting citizens in casting their vot e.  

The  primary benefit of televising politics is t hat it provides  accessible information . Television, as s ource A explains , provides an opportunity for citizens to be more involved in political matters than ever before, specifically  by adding to  their  knowledge. With public speeches and political events televised, viewers can learn about the structure of the U.S. political system and build a better understanding  of  how legislation is created, in addition to their representative s’  contribution s  to political matters.  The reach of television is clear, as shown in Source D, where millions of viewers tune in every four years for the presidential debates.  T he data reports  that  80.6 million people view ed  the debates in 1980,  and even  in 1996, the chart’s lowest year of ratings, 46.1 million viewers tuned in — all who may have been influenced to vote !  The data shows that television is unmatched in  its  ability to reach voters , proving that it is a beneficial tool for providing information  to help  citizens  make their choices .  

Television also works as a trust-building tool between the viewer and the presidential candidate s . Although the criticism from Source C — which  claim s  that televised debates  are  largely  focused  on image instead of content — is noteworthy,  we  must also consider the relationship development that occurs between the constituent and the politician.  For example, consider  the story of Walter Cronkite, who performed investigat ive  journalism on-site in Vietnam to deliver a message about his opinion of the war. In doing so, he was able to shift the support for the ongoing war into a national call for closure, resulting in the end of the United States ’  presence in Vietnam and potentially saving thousands  of  live s  (Source E) . For presidents, their arguments, vision, and speeches can establish trust with the viewers, raising  citizens’  confidence  in their  ability  to  do the job successfully.  Though  televised appearances do result in investment in public relation campaigns and sometimes  support  an inauthentic view  of their subjects , at the same time, television serves as an important tool to connect citizens with their  president and  candidates .  

Perhaps the most  troubling   element of  televisi ng  presidential elections  is the threat  of commercialism. With the variety of issues and complaints regarding legislation and public policy, presidential candidates may use their live airtime to tackle only the most popular economic and social issues. T ed Koppel  analyzed  this phenomenon  during a past presidential debate,  in which  the television station structured the debate to limit responses from the candidates (Source F) .  This approach is somewhat deceptive, forcing the candidates to come up with quick answers  while  masking other issues.  For example,  only the most popular social issues may have been brought up, sidelining  complex political matters and policy problems  that may have been ongoing for years.  However, while this  format  surely limits candidates ’ ability  to share their opinions on a wide variety of issues, television does allow  the candidates to connect with the masses, which may not be possible through other forms of communication.  I f necessary , the format  of future debates  could be restructured to create  more  space for complex  argumentation   without sacrificing the benefits of televised  communication.  

In summary, t he  influence of television is unprecedented, allowing presidential candidates and other politicians to connect with viewers from across the nation. The critics are justified in  remarking   that  televised debates  may mislead  citizens through their  emphasis on  public image. However,  if audiences  analyz e  the debates, announcements, and other  such  matters with a critical approach,  this highly accessible form of communication  encourages people to build trust with presidential candidates, enhance their worldview, and feel more involved in political matters.  

Works cited

“AP English Language.” AP Central , 13 Aug. 2020, apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses/ap-english-language-and-composition/exam.

“AP English Language and Composition Free-Response Questions Scoring Rubrics, Effective Fall 2019.” The College Board, 2019, https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/pdf/ap-english-language-and-composition-frqs-1-2-3-scoring-rubrics.pdf

“AP English Language and Composition 2020 Free-Response Scoring Guidelines Applied to the 2019 Exam Questions.” The College Board, 2019, https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/pdf/ap-english-language-and-composition-2020-frq-scoring-guidelines-2019-exam-questions-0.pdf

Published September 8, 2020.

By Jolee McManus. Jolee earned a BA in English from the University of Georgia. She has several years of experience as a writing tutor and freelance copywriter and editor.

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How to Write a Synthesis Essay: Examples, Topics, & Outline

A synthesis essay requires you to work with multiple sources. You combine the information gathered from them to present a well-rounded argument on a topic. Are you looking for the ultimate guide on synthesis essay writing? You’ve come to the right place!

In this guide by our custom writing team, you will find:

  • a step-by-step writing guide;
  • a list of 34 synthesis essay topics;
  • a full essay sample in MLA format.
  • 📚 Synthesis Essay Definition
  • 📝 Essay Types
  • ✅ Step-by-Step Guide
  • ✍️ Topics & Prompts
  • 📑 Example & Formatting Tips

📚 What Is a Synthesis Essay?

A synthesis essay is an assignment that requires a unique interpretation of a particular topic using several reliable sources. To write it, you need to understand, analyze, and synthesize information. That is why this type of essay is used in the AP Lang exam to assess students’ reasoning skills.

The key features of the synthesis essay are:

  • Debatable topic . If your goal is to write a good synthesis essay, it’s necessary to choose an arguable topic. It’s best to choose something that people have different opinions about. This will allow you to use many sources with various viewpoints for your synthesis.
  • Clear thesis statement. It’s a sentence that briefly describes the main idea of your essay.
  • Reliable sources to prove your thesis . For a synthesis essay, your opinion is not enough. You also need to find the evidence. Keep in mind that simply reading an online encyclopedia won’t do; make sure to choose only reliable sources.

What Does It Mean to Synthesize Information?

Synthesis is a process that has huge importance in nature, science, and our everyday life. The word stems from Ancient Greek “synthesis,” which means “putting together.” In general, synthesis is the combination of components to form a connected whole.

The picture shows examples of synthesis usage in various spheres: biochemistry, physics, and sound creation.

In everyday life, we usually resort to it to synthesize information . This means taking the data from different sources and bringing it together. This process is the opposite of analyzing:

  • For an analysis , you break problems into pieces,
  • For a synthesis , you combine separate elements into a whole.

We use synthesis for analysis papers, research papers, argument papers, and business reports.

What Does Synthesis Mean in Writing?

Synthesis in writing means summarizing and connecting different sources considering a particular topic. Although synthesis and analysis are two opposite things, they usually go together in synthesis essays. The process consists of 2 stages:

  • Conduct the analysis. For that, you break down a problem into parts and analyze the sources. It’s helpful to highlight everything regarding your topic while reading.
  • Carry out the synthesis. The next step is to formulate an opinion and combine the highlighted information from the sources.

Synthesis is not only used in writing but also in reading comprehension . It’s useful to do this kind of reading while studying your sources. There are three reading comprehension stages:

  • Your previous knowledge about the topic.
  • Expansion of your knowledge while you are reading.
  • Understanding of the problem when you have finished reading.

So, synthesized reading comprehension means combining three stages in one and formulating one statement.

Synthesis vs Summary: What Is the Difference?

A summary is a paraphrasing of the written source in your own words. For a good summary, it’s necessary to include all of the text’s key elements. Meanwhile, synthesis means combining different ideas from different sources. You don’t have to include all the key points; just choose everything related to your topic.

The picture explains the difference between a synthesis and a summary.

Both of these techniques are used for the synthesis essay:

  • The summary goes in the conclusion. You briefly sum up your paper’s main ideas.
  • Synthesis goes in the body paragraphs. Here, you combine multiple sources to prove a point.

📝 Synthesis Essay Types

There are two main types of a synthesis essay: argument and explanatory synthesis.

Both of them require working with multiple reliable sources and analyzing information. The only difference is that an argument synthesis essay requires your own opinion, while an explanatory synthesis essay does not.

Argument Synthesis Essay: Outline and Definition

As you already know, an argument synthesis essay requires you to state your own opinion about the given topic and back it up with several reliable sources. The purpose of such an essay is to persuade the reader that your point is correct.

Here’s what an argument synthesis essay consists of:

Explanatory Synthesis Essay: Definition and How to Write

An explanatory informative synthesis essay requires you to stay neutral towards the problem you are discussing. This means you cannot express your own opinion considering the given question or a problem. Your task is just to inform the reader. That’s why this essay type is also called informative synthesis.

Check out this explanatory essay outline:

✅ How to Write a Synthesis Essay Step by Step

When it comes to the synthesis essay outline, it’s not too different from other assignments. Have a look at this template:

The picture shows a synthesis essay outline: introduction, main body, and conclusion.

How to Synthesize: Working with Sources

After you’ve decided on your topic, it’s time to figure out how to synthesize articles into one text. This is how you do it:

  • Choose reliable sources: the ones printed in journals or published on academic websites.
  • Become familiar with them and see if they fit into your essay.
  • Try to find a few sources for each point. It will increase your essay’s reliability.
  • Relate each source to your arguments and see similarities between them.
  • Don’t forget to list every source in the references.

When you are done with a comprehensive analysis of related literature, try to step back and imagine a person who has a different opinion on this topic. Think of some arguments that they can provide to prove their opinion. After you have the list of arguments, find the written evidence of why they are wrong and put them in your essay.

Analyzing and organizing sources is the first and very important step for the synthesis essay. So make sure you do understand what the text means before using it as a reference.

Synthesis Essay Outline: How to Write

For structuring your essay, it’s useful to try mapping . This technique means combining the information from different sources and rearranging it to create a new direction. To do it, you need to analyze the authors’ ideas and come up with your own conclusions.

The best way to do that is called synthesis matrix or graphic organizer. It’s a chart that you can make when you start working on your essay. Here you have a horizontal column that states the main ideas and a few vertical columns that present sources. Your task is to take sources you have chosen and write down the main ideas from them.

Here’s an example of a matrix chart:

Topic: The influence of technologies on teenagers

While doing that, you will see how many sources contain the same ideas. When you analyze them, you will be able to formulate your thesis backed up with evidence. The synthesis matrix also helps to see new arguments you can cover in your synthesis paper.

How to Write an Introduction for a Synthesis Essay

Now it’s time to start writing the paper. In the introductory part of the essay, you can include:

  • A short yet catchy sentence or a quotation that would present the topic. The start of your essay should make people interested. It’s best to make the first sentence not only informative but also easy to understand.
  • The texts that are used for the essay. Provide the titles and the authors’ names (use the appropriate guidelines depending on the writing style.)
  • The background information which is needed to understand your essay. Definitions of terms or unknown words considering the topic can be included in this part. Otherwise, people may find it hard to understand what they are reading about.

How to Write a Thesis for a Synthesis Essay

A thesis statement is a point of view on a certain problem that you will defend in your essay. It should contain the key points that you want to include in your paper. Here’s how to create a perfect thesis statement:

  • Find several central ideas in the chart.
  • Choose the ones that are repeated the most often and the ones that you feel need to be in your essay.
  • Combine them, and you have a thesis statement with all the key points.
  • Make a draft of the thesis statement. Try to formulate the main idea you want to present in your essay.
  • Elaborate on this idea. Add some details and expand it a bit further.

If the whole picture is coherent, and it conveys exactly what you wanted, then this is your perfect thesis statement. See the example below:

Gender inequality still exists at the workplace: women are less likely to get the most responsible positions, easily lose careers due to maternity leave, and often receive less pay for the same amount of work.

How to Write Synthesis Paragraphs for the Main Body

Your essay’s main body consists of a few paragraphs. Each of them presents a different argument considering the topic. When you start a paragraph, make sure to begin with a topic sentence, which informs the reader about the paragraph’s main idea. Then, include the synthesized sources and elaborate on them.

Here’s what you should and shouldn’t do when writing the main body:

✔️ Dos❌ Don’ts
Make sure you make the essay as informative as possible. Try to show various opinions of the authors. Avoid shuffling unrelated information into it. Try to make smooth transitions from one paragraph to another. Instead, show your understanding and present the conclusions you’ve drawn from the texts. If you do that, you are involved in plagiarism. This would damage your credibility.

You can use the following words to present the ideas from your sources. They will help you reflect the authors’ tone:

Talking about argumentsTalking about researchAdding emphasis
The author: The author: The author:

How to Conclude a Synthesis Essay

There are quite a few ways to conclude the synthesis paper. Have a look at some of the options:

  • Paraphrase the thesis. As you remember, the thesis is the main idea of your essay. The conclusion is a good place to remind your readers about it. When they are done with the reading, they remember the most important thing from your essay.
  • Synthesize the arguments. There is no need to repeat everything you wrote in your essay. Just briefly summarize the most crucial points.
  • Answer the “So what” question. Tell the readers why this topic matters, why you’ve chosen it, and why it’s valuable for the reader.
  • Provide a closure. It’s an effective strategy when you want to make the reader think. Leave them with a strong statement at the end of your essay.

Synthesis Paper Proofreading Tips

When you have finally written your paper, there is still one important thing left to do. You need to check your paper for any grammatical and contextual mistakes. You certainly can do it yourself, but it would be perfect if you could ask somebody else to read it.

The first thing you need to check grammar-wise is the tense you are using. There is no single tense you need to use for the synthesis essay. It depends on the format:

  • If you’re writing in MLA format, use the present tense;
  • For APA essays, you use the past tense.

The next step is to check whether your synthesis essay has everything that’s required. For that, we have prepared the checklist of questions you can ask yourself to proofread your essays.

  • Is there a clear thesis statement?
  • Did you include all of the key points from the synthesis?
  • Are there clear transitions between paragraphs?
  • Did you organize a paragraph around a single idea?
  • Did you use reliable and up-to-date sources?
  • Did you analyze sources rather than just summarize them?
  • Did you mention every source you’ve used?

If you’ve answered “yes” to all the questions—congratulations, you are done with the essay! Otherwise, you need to come back and fix everything that you’ve answered “no” to.

✍️ Synthesis Essay Topics and Prompts

Sometimes, when you don’t have a topic , it is tough to come up with a suitable idea. That is why we have prepared two lists of topics that you can use for any synthesis essay type.

Explanatory Synthesis Essay Topics

The topics below are suitable for an explanatory synthesis essay:

  • The beginning of Hollywood cinema. Cinema is a huge industry in the USA. Tell the readers about its history. Describe what it was like in the beginning, which movie was the first one, and who started this industry.
  • Tactics on dealing with noisy children. Sometimes kids can be very loud, especially in public places. Write about different tactics that can help with this issue.
  • The effects of climate change on the water cycle.  Climate change has affected the water cycle significantly. Your task is to explain how.
  • The best American cities to live in. Provide the list of the best cities and explain why you’ve included them.
  • The importance of a healthy diet . Keeping a healthy diet is beneficial in many ways. Write about all the advantages it brings.
  • Who can become an entrepreneur? Entrepreneurship is not for everybody. In this essay, you can describe the qualities needed for having your own business.
  • The correlation between overpopulation and poverty . Describe how overpopulation leads to poverty and vice versa.
  • The advantages of taking an active vacation.
  • Cultural shock as a part of moving to a different country.
  • The consequences of the first wave of feminism.
  • Synthesis of Tan and Rodriguez’ essays ideas. 
  • Difficulties you may encounter during the job interview.
  • How does reading prevent Alzheimer’s disease?
  • The effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on businesses.
  • The connection between religion and politics in ruling the country.
  • What can non-verbal signals tell you about a person?
  • The psychology of leadership .
  • The origins of the most common  stereotypes  about Americans.
  • Role of social media in business communication.
  • The synthesis of personal nursing philosophy concept. 
  • Behavioral components of schizophrenia and psychosis.
  • Main components of successful entrepreneurship.
  • Critical components of scientific research.
  • Change in religion and human beliefs throughout history.
  • The effect of global warming on modern life.

Argument Synthesis Paper Topics

The list of topics for the Argument Synthesis Essay:

  • Vaping is better than smoking. People are starting to exchange cigarettes for vapes and e-cigarettes. In what ways are they less harmful?
  • Rich people should pay higher taxes. The same percentage of money doesn’t equal for rich and poor people. Explain why the ones who can afford more should share with others.
  • Depression is a disease. Prove that psychological problems must be recognized as real health issues that should be cured and not ignored.
  • Social media affects young people’s lives. Social media has a massive influence on people. In this essay, you can discuss which life spheres are the most affected.
  • Beauty pageants should be banned. Provide the reasons why they should be banned and tell the reader about psychological problems they can cause.
  • People should cut meat from their diet to stop global warming. Describe how the meat industry influences climate change.
  • The voting age should be 25+. Your task is to show the reasons why the votes of people under 25 should not be taken into account during elections.
  • A healthy lifestyle requires a lot of money.
  • Each healthy man should serve in the military.
  • School bullying should be punished by immediate exclusion.
  • Does friendship exist between men and women?
  • Drinking coffee is a bad habit.
  • Working hard is more important than being talented.
  • Everybody should visit a therapist at least once.
  • Should universities be free?
  • Artificial intelligence will cause huge unemployment rates.
  • Gaming should not be allowed to children under 18.
  • Components and strategies of social responsibility
  • Integration of relevant ethical theory and conceptual principles in health care 
  • Children under 10 should be banned from gadgets.  
  • Social media platforms facilitate cyberbullying.
  • Issues of distance education.
  • Social media addiction is a serious disease.
  • Deforestation critically contributes to global warming.
  • Healthcare should be free for everyone.

📑 Synthesis Essay Example & Synthesis Essay Format Tips

Now let’s talk about formatting. There are two writing styles you can use for a synthesis essay: APA or MLA. You need to choose the one that is required for your assignment.

We will start with the paper in APA format. It is usually used in science and education.

Format
Title page
In-text citations Example: The artworks from the past are entirely different from the modern ones (Benjamin, 1935) Example: According to Benjamin (1935), “Mechanical reproduction of a work of art…” (p.7)
References Example: Benjamin, W. (1935). The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. Random House

And these are MLA formatting rules:

Format
Title page
In-text citations Example: The artworks from the past are entirely different from the modern ones (Benjamin 7)
References Example: Benjamin, Walter. Random House, 1935

Finally, we’ve prepared a synthesis essay sample for you to check out. Feel free to download the PDF file below:

First introduced in the Civil Rights Act of 1964, affirmative action policies aim to mitigate the discrepancy in opportunities available for underrepresented social groups by taking into account one’s minority background. The policies have become a pressing public issue that obstructs previously marginalized individuals, particularly in the educational environment.

Thank you for reading the ultimate guide on synthesis essay writing. We hope you found it helpful. Don’t forget to share it with your friends. Good luck with your assignments!

🔍 References

  • Writing a Synthesis Essay: Bowling Green State University
  • What Is Synthesis: University of Manitoba
  • Synthesis: Biology Online
  • Reading Strategies: Difference Summarizing and Synthesizing: WordPress
  • Summary, Analysis, Synthesis Definitions: University of Utah
  • Argumentative Synthesis: University of Arkansas
  • How to Synthesize Written Information: Simply Psychology
  • Mapping of Synthesis Essay: University of Nevada, Reno
  • Writing a Literature Review and Using a Synthesis Matrix: Florida International University
  • Synthesis Essay: Cleveland State University
  • Literature Review: Synthesizing Multiple Sources: Louisiana State University
  • Writing a Conclusion: Texas Women’s University
  • General APA Guidelines: Purdue University
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  • Synthesizing Sources | Examples & Synthesis Matrix

Synthesizing Sources | Examples & Synthesis Matrix

Published on July 4, 2022 by Eoghan Ryan . Revised on May 31, 2023.

Synthesizing sources involves combining the work of other scholars to provide new insights. It’s a way of integrating sources that helps situate your work in relation to existing research.

Synthesizing sources involves more than just summarizing . You must emphasize how each source contributes to current debates, highlighting points of (dis)agreement and putting the sources in conversation with each other.

You might synthesize sources in your literature review to give an overview of the field or throughout your research paper when you want to position your work in relation to existing research.

Table of contents

Example of synthesizing sources, how to synthesize sources, synthesis matrix, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about synthesizing sources.

Let’s take a look at an example where sources are not properly synthesized, and then see what can be done to improve it.

This paragraph provides no context for the information and does not explain the relationships between the sources described. It also doesn’t analyze the sources or consider gaps in existing research.

Research on the barriers to second language acquisition has primarily focused on age-related difficulties. Building on Lenneberg’s (1967) theory of a critical period of language acquisition, Johnson and Newport (1988) tested Lenneberg’s idea in the context of second language acquisition. Their research seemed to confirm that young learners acquire a second language more easily than older learners. Recent research has considered other potential barriers to language acquisition. Schepens, van Hout, and van der Slik (2022) have revealed that the difficulties of learning a second language at an older age are compounded by dissimilarity between a learner’s first language and the language they aim to acquire. Further research needs to be carried out to determine whether the difficulty faced by adult monoglot speakers is also faced by adults who acquired a second language during the “critical period.”

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To synthesize sources, group them around a specific theme or point of contention.

As you read sources, ask:

  • What questions or ideas recur? Do the sources focus on the same points, or do they look at the issue from different angles?
  • How does each source relate to others? Does it confirm or challenge the findings of past research?
  • Where do the sources agree or disagree?

Once you have a clear idea of how each source positions itself, put them in conversation with each other. Analyze and interpret their points of agreement and disagreement. This displays the relationships among sources and creates a sense of coherence.

Consider both implicit and explicit (dis)agreements. Whether one source specifically refutes another or just happens to come to different conclusions without specifically engaging with it, you can mention it in your synthesis either way.

Synthesize your sources using:

  • Topic sentences to introduce the relationship between the sources
  • Signal phrases to attribute ideas to their authors
  • Transition words and phrases to link together different ideas

To more easily determine the similarities and dissimilarities among your sources, you can create a visual representation of their main ideas with a synthesis matrix . This is a tool that you can use when researching and writing your paper, not a part of the final text.

In a synthesis matrix, each column represents one source, and each row represents a common theme or idea among the sources. In the relevant rows, fill in a short summary of how the source treats each theme or topic.

This helps you to clearly see the commonalities or points of divergence among your sources. You can then synthesize these sources in your work by explaining their relationship.

Example: Synthesis matrix
Lenneberg (1967) Johnson and Newport (1988) Schepens, van Hout, and van der Slik (2022)
Approach Primarily theoretical, due to the ethical implications of delaying the age at which humans are exposed to language Testing the English grammar proficiency of 46 native Korean or Chinese speakers who moved to the US between the ages of 3 and 39 (all participants had lived in the US for at least 3 years at the time of testing) Analyzing the results of 56,024 adult immigrants to the Netherlands from 50 different language backgrounds
Enabling factors in language acquisition A critical period between early infancy and puberty after which language acquisition capabilities decline A critical period (following Lenneberg) General age effects (outside of a contested critical period), as well as the similarity between a learner’s first language and target language
Barriers to language acquisition Aging Aging (following Lenneberg) Aging as well as the dissimilarity between a learner’s first language and target language

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Synthesizing sources means comparing and contrasting the work of other scholars to provide new insights.

It involves analyzing and interpreting the points of agreement and disagreement among sources.

You might synthesize sources in your literature review to give an overview of the field of research or throughout your paper when you want to contribute something new to existing research.

A literature review is a survey of scholarly sources (such as books, journal articles, and theses) related to a specific topic or research question .

It is often written as part of a thesis, dissertation , or research paper , in order to situate your work in relation to existing knowledge.

Topic sentences help keep your writing focused and guide the reader through your argument.

In an essay or paper , each paragraph should focus on a single idea. By stating the main idea in the topic sentence, you clarify what the paragraph is about for both yourself and your reader.

At college level, you must properly cite your sources in all essays , research papers , and other academic texts (except exams and in-class exercises).

Add a citation whenever you quote , paraphrase , or summarize information or ideas from a source. You should also give full source details in a bibliography or reference list at the end of your text.

The exact format of your citations depends on which citation style you are instructed to use. The most common styles are APA , MLA , and Chicago .

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

Ryan, E. (2023, May 31). Synthesizing Sources | Examples & Synthesis Matrix. Scribbr. Retrieved June 24, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/working-with-sources/synthesizing-sources/

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How to Write a Synthesis Essay

Synthesis essays are not as popular as argumentative or analytical essays. Still, you can be assigned to write this type of essay when you study at high school, college, or university. Writing a synthesis essay is also a part of an exam that you have to pass in order to complete the AP English Language and Composition course. As this essay type is uncommon, we will provide you with a detailed and simple guide on how to write a synthesis essay.

What is a synthesis essay?

A synthesis essay is a type of writing that offers a unique viewpoint on a chosen topic backed up with information from multiple sources. It is similar to research papers but has a few limitations.

Firstly, when you write an AP synthesis essay, you don’t have to look for the necessary sources by yourself, as they’re provided in the text of your assignment. The only thing you need to do is pick three or four sources in order to argue the topic. Secondly, you’ll have certain time limitations during the exam. You will have to complete three writing tasks (argument, analysis, and synthesis) in two hours. Finally, topics for synthesis essays are usually broader than ones for research papers.

The AP English Language and Composition exam is not aimed at evaluating students’ knowledge of a specific discipline. Its main purpose is to examine your writing and rhetorical skills, so all topics are debatable and understandable, as they don’t require reading specialized literature.

In general, a synthesis essay has to demonstrate your language competence, not your analytical thinking skills. Still, you should follow a particular logic to make your text readable and to get a higher score.

Main types of synthesis essays

Synthesis essay types

Synthesis essay writing steps

When you compose a synthesis essay, especially for the AP exam, you don’t have much time. Therefore, you need perfect planning. Below, we offer you writing steps divided into three stages for your comfort.

Preparatory work

1. Read instructions thoroughly

Understanding the prompt is crucial for providing a brilliant synthesis essay. Make sure that you take into account all the aspects of the topic.

2. Think about the topic

Sure, you won’t have much time for a full-scale brainstorming session during the exam. Still, you have to look at the suggested theme from different perspectives in order to formulate your unique and interesting viewpoint.

3. Compose a preliminary thesis statement

Write down the first clear idea that will come to your mind after you read the prompt. It doesn’t need to be perfect, as you’ll have a chance to make changes later. The main purpose of this step is to create a base for the further writing process. A good thesis statement is a sentence that answers three questions about your essay at the same time: what, how, and why.

4. Choose sources

When taking an exam, this step is easier than when doing an academic assignment, as all the sources are specified. You have to pick three or four sources of various formats that will enforce your point of view. If you are preparing a synthesis essay for a university, you can use more than four sources, but make sure that you analyze and present properly the ideas of each author.

4. Read the chosen sources thoroughly

Remember that you don’t have much time when you take the exam, so don’t waste it for reading all the provided sources. Only after picking several texts will you begin a detailed reading. You can make short annotations and take notes in order to summarize the main ideas of the chosen sources.

5. Find connections between the sources and your claim

This is the main aspect of any synthesis essay. If you don’t succeed in finding out and explaining to your readers how the chosen sources are related to your thesis, you won’t get a high score for your essay. The sources that you choose shouldn’t necessarily prove your point of view. They can even be contradictory, but links between them have to be clear.

Drafting your essay

To simplify the writing process, we suggest you to use a standard five-paragraph structure: one paragraph for your introduction, three paragraphs for the main body, and one more for your conclusion.

Synthesis essay outline

Let’s take a closer look at each part of a synthesis essay.

1. Introduction

An introduction is an extremely important part of your essay, as it has three crucial functions. First of all, you introduce your topic and provide some background information that is necessary for understanding the theme. The next task is to present your sources, as they provide the base for your synthesis essay. Finally, you include your thesis statement in your introduction. Don’t forget that your claim should be relevant to your body paragraphs. As a rule, an introductory section is about 10% of the whole text and consists only of one paragraph.

2. The main body

This part covers about 80% of your synthesis essay. Each paragraph should include a focal point and several quotes that serve as arguments. You should follow the rule of one paragraph, one idea. However, don’t omit the logical connections between parts of the main body and different sources. Your main purpose is to show how you can synthesize multiple sources in order to prove your personal point of view.

3. Conclusion

When you write the concluding part of your essay, the main thing is to show confidence. A confident tone will persuade your readers that your viewpoint is correct and your argumentation is immaculate. Restate your thesis statement and summarize connections between your initial claim and cited sources. Be concise and avoid long phrases: your conclusion should be only 10% of the whole text.

Final touches

1. Reread your essay

It is hard to do everything perfectly on the first try. In order to notice all the mistakes and inaccuracies, reread your writing thoroughly.

2. Write a final thesis statement

Make sure that your thesis statement is relevant to the main body. If not, rewrite it to create a smooth connection between your claim and argumentation.

3. Edit your text

If you’re sure that everything is fine with the content of your synthesis essay, it’s time to get rid of grammatical mistakes, poor wording, spelling mistakes, and incorrect punctuation. Remember that even the most eloquent text will look like the work of an amateur if there are dozens of mistakes.

Strategies of organizing synthesis essay

AP lang synthesis essay

On the AP Language and Composition exam, you will need to write a synthesis essay as part of the free-response section. For this essay, you will be provided with prompts and several sources to support your argument. To prepare for this essay, it is important to read through each source carefully, take notes, and create an outline before starting to write. Remember to include at least three sources in your essay and to cite them properly. Here are some important facts to keep in mind about the AP Lang Synthesis Essay:

  • Purpose . The synthesis essay is a type of exam paper that students write to show their analytical skills and ability to work with sources and write essays based on them.
  • Time limit . The work time is 55 minutes.
  • Organization . Composition of the synthesis essay is the following:
  • Introduction with a thesis statement.
  • Argument from the source No. 1.
  • Argument from the source No. 2.
  • Argument from the source No. 3.
  • Conclusion.
  • Compliance with the topic . You should stay on topic and support the chosen quote or question.
  • Argumentation using several sources . The point of a synthesis essay is to confirm your statements, using as examples the sources you have given.
  • Composition and logic of reasoning . The criterion implies adherence to semantic division into paragraphs, logical sequence of presentation of thoughts, as well as constructive proof of one’s opinion.
  • Quality of writing style . In the synthesis essay, use diverse speech structures, but ones that are correct  grammatically, syntactically and lexically.

Synthesis essay topics

How to choose an exciting topic for a synthesis essay.

A synthesis essay is an opportunity to share your opinion on two or more texts. You will need to analyze a particular issue and support your point of view with evidence. This type of essay is common in high school and college English courses.

When choosing a topic for your synthesis essay, you need to find a way to connect the sources. Connecting different sources to support your point to make a perfect essay can be done by finding a common theme or providing a critical analysis of each source. If you are still looking for a connection, try looking for a common thread that ties the sources together.

Once you have found a connection, you must decide what direction you want your essay to take.

  • Do you agree with the sources?
  • Do you disagree?
  • Do you see a different perspective?

Your position will be the basis for your synthesis essay.

20 creative topics for a synthesis essay

  • The American Dream: Is it still achievable?
  • Technology has made our world a better place
  • Social media is a positive or negative force in our world
  • The media is responsible for the way we see the world
  • The definition of success: What does it mean to be successful?
  • The role of the government: Should it be more involved
  • The importance of a college education
  • The challenges of being a first-generation college student
  • The pros and cons of genetic engineering
  • The implications of climate change
  • Agree or disagree: The only way to be a successful student is to get good grades
  • Reality television is harmful to our society
  • The importance of failure
  • The impact of social media on relationships
  • Fake News: Is the spread of fake news a problem?
  • Technology: What will be the next significant innovation?
  • Social Media: Is social media a form of addiction?
  • The pros and cons of technology in the classroom
  • Family: How has the traditional family structure changed?
  • Religion: How has faith changed over time?

Why do you need to explore expert samples

As you know, a synthesis essay is about drawing information from various sources and piecing it together to create a cohesive whole. The process can be tricky and one that can be made much easier with the help of expert samples.

1. It can be difficult to identify all the necessary elements independently

When looking at a blank page, it can be challenging to know where to start. It, therefore, becomes more challenging when tasked with writing a synthesis essay since you need to include so many elements that can be difficult to identify without the help of an expert. Thus, this is where expert samples come in handy. By reading through a few examples, you can better understand what’s required and what’s optional.

2. You’ll be able to see how different writers approach the same topic

One of the great things about exploring expert samples is that you’ll be able to see how other writers approach the same issue. Subsequently, this can give you valuable insights into how you might want to approach your essay.

3. You can learn from the mistakes of others

While reading through expert samples, you’ll inevitably come across some that are better than others. Consequently, this is an excellent opportunity to learn from the mistakes of others and make sure that you don’t make the same mistakes in your essay.

4. You’ll get a better sense of what the professor expects

If you need clarification on what your teacher or professor is looking for, expert samples can be a great way to give a better experience of what the professor expects. Reading through a few expert examples gives you a clearer idea of the professors’ expectations, and you can formulate your thoughts.

5. You can find inspiration for your essay

Finally, one of the best reasons to explore expert samples is that they can provide much-needed inspiration. If you’re stuck, a few well-written examples can jumpstart your creative process and help you develop great ideas for your essay.

5 helpful tips to write a synthesis essay

1. Acceptable number of sources

If you need to take the AP exam, you have to use at least three sources (you can use a maximum of four sources). If you must write a synthesis essay as an academic assignment, you may use more sources. However, we don’t recommend you to exceed the limit of six sources, as it can be very hard to present a greater number of works in a proper way. You can cite the same source several times, and it will still be considered as one source.

2. Proper citation

When you include a quote in your essay, introduce, punctuate, and cite it properly. Mention the author’s name and use quotation marks if necessary. In parentheses, write the title of your source.

3. Counter-argument

Addressing a counter-argument is a helpful argumentation strategy. In such a way, you demonstrate that your point of view on this particular topic is not unique. However, you can show that the counter-argument is weak, and this will convince your readers that your claim is more valid.

4. Language skills

This tip is mostly accurate for the AP exam. The free-response writing section, which includes a synthesis essay, is aimed at evaluating your language performance. Don’t hesitate to use fancy wording, terms, complex grammar structures, linking words, and figures of speech that will demonstrate your language skills.

5. Importance of the form

The main purpose of the synthesis essay is to show how you can use multiple sources and create connections between them and demonstrate your writing skills. Your top priority is not offering a unique point of view that will amaze your readers. Of course, a bit of novelty won’t hurt. Still, your primary task is to be eloquent and logical, not creative.

We hope that you’ve learned more about a synthesis essay thanks to our guide. Practice your writing regularly in order to achieve great results and get higher scores!

If you need help with writing, or other types of assignments, you can count on us. For example, reqest do my math homework help, or write my essay for me, and get qualified assistance.

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How to Write a Synthesis Essay

Last Updated: April 7, 2024 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Christopher Taylor, PhD . Christopher Taylor is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of English at Austin Community College in Texas. He received his PhD in English Literature and Medieval Studies from the University of Texas at Austin in 2014. There are 11 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 1,124,849 times.

Writing a synthesis essay requires the ability to digest information and present it in an organized fashion. While this skill is developed in high school and college classes, it translates to the business and advertising world as well. Scroll down to Step 1 to begin learning how to write a synthesis essay.

Examining Your Topic

Step 1 Understand the concept of a synthesis essay.

  • Argument synthesis: This type of essay has a strong thesis statement that presents the writer's point of view. It organizes relevant information gathered from research in a logical manner to support the thesis' point of view. Business white papers known as position papers often take this form. This is the type of synthesis essay that students will write during the AP test.
  • Review: Often written as a preliminary essay to an argument synthesis, a review essay is a discussion of what has been written previously on a topic, with a critical analysis of the sources covered. Its unstated thesis is usually that more research needs to be done in that area or that the topic problem has not been adequately addressed. This type of paper is common in social science classes and in medicine.
  • Explanatory/background synthesis: This type of essay helps readers understand a topic by categorizing facts and presenting them to further the reader's understanding. It does not advocate a particular point of view, and if it has a thesis statement, the thesis is a weak one. Some business white papers take this form, although they are more likely to have a point of view, if understated.

Step 2 Choose a topic suitable for a synthesis essay.

  • Example of a broad topic narrowed down into a reasonable synthesis essay topic: Instead of the broad topic of Social Media, you could discuss your view on the effects texting has had on the English language.
  • If you've been assigned a topic as part of a class, make sure you read the prompt carefully and fully understand it.

Step 3 Choose and read your sources carefully.

  • Keep in mind that it's better to do three sources well than to do five sources incompletely.
  • Annotate each source by writing notes in the margins. This allows you to keep track of your train of thought, developing ideas, etc.

Step 4 Develop a thesis...

  • Example: Texting has had a positive impact on the English language as it has helped the millennial generation create their own form of the language.

Step 5 Re-read your source material for items to support your thesis.

  • If you wish to take on a claim by an opponent of your idea, and to poke holes in it, you should also find some ideas or quotes that go against your thesis statement, and plan ways to disprove them. This is called a concession, refutation, or rebuttal, which can strengthen your argument if you do it well.
  • Example : For the thesis statement listed above, excellent sources would include quotes from linguists discussing the new words that have developed through 'text-speak', statistics that show the English language has evolved with almost every generation, and facts that show students still have the ability to write with the use of grammar and spelling (which your opponents would bring up as the main reason texting has had a negative effect on the English language).

Outlining Your Essay

Step 1 Outline the structure of your thesis.

  • The introductory paragraph: 1. An introductory sentence that acts as a hook, capturing the reader's interest. 2. Identification of the issue you will be discussing. 3. Your thesis statement.
  • The body paragraphs: 1. Topic sentence that gives one reason to support your thesis. 2. Your explanation and opinion of the topic sentence. 3. Support from your sources that backs up the claim you just made. 4. Explanation of the significance of the source(s).
  • The conclusion paragraph: 1. State further significance of your topic from the evidence and reasons you discussed in the essay. 2. A profound thought or thoughtful ending for your paper.

Step 2 Use a more creative structure to present your thesis.

  • Example/illustration. This may be a detailed recount, summary, or direct quote from your source material that provides major support for your point of view. You may use more than one example or illustration, if your paper calls for it. You should not, however, make your paper a series of examples at the expense of supporting your thesis.
  • Straw man. With this technique, you present an argument opposed to the argument stated in your thesis, then show the weaknesses and flaws of the counter-argument. This format shows your awareness of the opposition and your readiness to answer it. You present the counter-argument right after your thesis, followed by the evidence to refute it, and end with a positive argument that supports your thesis. [5] X Research source
  • Concession. Essays with concessions are structured similar to those using the straw man technique, but they acknowledge the validity of the counter-argument while showing that the original argument is stronger. This structure is good for presenting papers to readers who hold the opposing viewpoint.
  • Comparison and contrast. This structure compares similarities and contrasts differences between two subjects or sources to show the facets of both. Writing an essay with this structure requires a careful reading of your source material to find both subtle and major points of similarity and difference. This kind of essay can present its arguments source-by-source or by points of similarity or difference.

Step 3 Create an outline appropriate for a background or review synthesis essay.

  • Summary. This structure presents summaries of each of your relevant sources, making a progressively stronger argument for your thesis. It provides specific evidence to support your point of view, but usually omits presenting your own opinions. It's most commonly used for background and review essays.
  • List of reasons. This is a series of sub-points that flow from the main point of your paper as stated in its thesis. Each reason is supported with evidence. As with the summary method, reasons should become progressively more important, with the most important reason last.

Writing Your Essay

Step 1 Write your first draft according to your outline.

  • Your essay should have an introductory paragraph that includes your thesis , a body to present evidence that supports your thesis, and a conclusion that summarizes your point of view.

Step 2 Write in the third person.

  • Lengthy quotes of three lines or more should generally be set off as block quotes to better call attention to them. [7] X Trustworthy Source Purdue Online Writing Lab Trusted resource for writing and citation guidelines Go to source

Finalizing Your Essay

Step 1 Revise your essay.

  • Ask someone else to proofread your paper. The saying “two heads are better than one” still holds true. Ask a friend or colleague what would they add or remove from the paper. Most importantly, does your argument make sense, and is it clearly supported by your sources?

Step 2 Proofread your paper.

  • Read the paper aloud to guarantee that you don't accidentally add in or take out words when reading in your head.
  • If you can, get a friend or classmate to proofread your essay as well.

Step 3  Cite your...

  • Example of citing in an AP synthesis essay: McPherson claims “texting has changed the English language in a positive way--it has given a new generation their own unique way to communicate” (Source E).
  • For college essays, you'll most likely use MLA format. Whichever format you use, be consistent in its use. You may also be asked to use APA or Chicago style.

Step 4 Title your essay.

  • Example title: : English and the iPhone: Exploring the Benefits of 'Text-Speak'

Outline Template

synthesis essay examples

Community Q&A

Community Answer

  • Just as your title should fit your essay instead of writing your essay to fit the title, your thesis, once chosen, should direct your subsequent research instead of subsequent research altering your thesis � unless you find you've adopted an unsupportable thesis. Thanks Helpful 21 Not Helpful 8

synthesis essay examples

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  • ↑ https://success.uark.edu/get-help/student-resources/synthesis-paper.php
  • ↑ https://www.unr.edu/writing-speaking-center/student-resources/writing-speaking-resources/mapping-a-synthesis-essay
  • ↑ https://www.bgsu.edu/content/dam/BGSU/learning-commons/documents/writing/synthesis/planning-synthesis-essay.pdf
  • ↑ https://writingcenterofprinceton.com/synthesis-essays-a-step-by-step-how-to-guide/
  • ↑ https://owl.excelsior.edu/argument-and-critical-thinking/logical-fallacies/logical-fallacies-straw-man/
  • ↑ https://writingcommons.org/section/rhetoric/rhetorical-stance/point-of-view/third-person-point-of-view/
  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_formatting_quotations.html
  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/the_writing_process/proofreading/steps_for_revising.html
  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/the_writing_process/proofreading/proofreading_suggestions.html
  • ↑ https://www.edhs.org/ourpages/auto/2010/5/17/41759867/Synthesis%20Essay%20Introduction.pdf
  • ↑ https://writing.umn.edu/sws/assets/pdf/quicktips/titles.pdf

About This Article

Christopher Taylor, PhD

To write a synthesis essay, start by coming up with a thesis statement that you can support using all of the sources you've read for your essay. For example, your thesis statement could be "Texting has had a positive impact on the English language." Once you've got your thesis, go through your sources to find specific quotes, facts, and statistics that back up your claim. Structure your essay so it has an introduction that includes your thesis statement, a body that includes your arguments and evidence, and a conclusion that wraps everything up. For more tips on structuring your synthesis essay, read on! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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Synthesis Essay

Synthesis Essay Example

Caleb S.

Synthesis Essay Examples: Learn From Powerful Example

Published on: Jun 13, 2023

Last updated on: Jan 31, 2024

Synthesis Essay Example

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Writing a Perfect Synthesis Essay: Definition & Examples

Interesting Synthesis Essay Topics You Must Consider

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Are you feeling overwhelmed by the challenge of writing a compelling synthesis essay?

As a student, it can be frustrating to craft brilliant arguments that captivate readers and secure high marks. But fret not! We have the perfect solution to alleviate your writing woes. 

In this blog, we present a collection of synthesis essay examples that will provide practical insights to overcome your writing hurdles. We will also discuss some synthesis essay topics and tips to write a good synthesis essay. 

So, say goodbye to confusion and embrace the clarity that comes from learning through real-life examples. 

Without further ado, let's start with the blog!

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What is Synthesis Essay?

A synthesis essay is defined as: 

A type of academic writing that involves combining information from multiple sources to create a coherent argument on a specific topic. 

The goal of a synthesis essay is to:

  • Analyze the sources
  • Draw connections between sources
  • Present a unique perspective that integrates the information from the sources.

Synthesis Essay Examples

In this section, we will explore different examples of synthesis essays. Examples are a valuable tool for learning complicated concepts and understanding the format of a synthesis essay. 

By examining these examples, you can see how the information from multiple sources is effectively utilized to build a cohesive argument.

Let's take a look at the sample synthesis essays below:

Synthesis Essay Introduction Example

Synthesis Essay Thesis Statement Example

Synthesis Essay Example Outline

AP High School Synthesis Essay Example

Argumentative Synthesis Essay Example

Explanatory Synthesis Essay Example

Poetry Synthesis Essay Sample

Technology Synthesis Essay

AP English Language and Composition Synthesis Essay

Synthesis Essay Example College Board

Synthesis Essay Example Ap Lang

Synthesis Essay Example MLA

Synthesis Essay Example APA

How to Write a Synthesis Essay?

Writing a synthesis essay can be an engaging and challenging task. It requires you to bring together information from multiple sources, analyze different viewpoints, and form a cohesive argument. 

To help you navigate the writing process and create a well-structured synthesis paper, here are some essential steps:

Step#1 Understand the Assignment and Gather Relevant Sources

Before you begin writing, carefully read and understand the assignment prompt. Identify the main theme or topic and the sources you need to analyze and synthesize. 

It's crucial to gather a variety of sources, such as scholarly articles, books, and reputable websites. By doing so you can ensure a comprehensive understanding of the subject matter.

Step#2 Create a Synthesis Essay Outline

A well-structured essay is essential for a good synthesis essay. Create an outline that organizes your thoughts and arguments logically. 

Your synthesis essay outline should include an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. Each section should be clear and concise, providing a roadmap for your essay.

Synthesis Essay Outline - CollegeEssay.org

Step#3 Develop a Strong Thesis Statement

Your thesis statement is the central argument of your synthesis essay. It should be concise and clearly state your stance on the topic. A good thesis statement guides the direction of your essay and provides a framework for your synthesis.

Step#4 Evaluate and Analyze Sources

Thoroughly evaluate and analyze each source you've gathered. Identify the main ideas, key arguments, and supporting evidence presented in the sources. Look for common themes, patterns, or conflicts among the sources. This analysis will serve as the foundation for synthesizing the information in your essay.

Step#5 Synthesize Information

In the body paragraphs of your essay, synthesize the information from your sources. Do not summarize each source individually. Instead, aim to present a coherent analysis of the information by integrating different viewpoints and supporting evidence. 

Make sure to attribute the ideas to the appropriate sources through in-text citations.

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Step#6 Organize Your Synthesis

Organize your synthesis logically within each paragraph. You can structure your paragraphs based on themes, conflicting viewpoints, or supporting evidence. Ensure a smooth flow of ideas and transitions between paragraphs to maintain coherence and clarity.

Step#7 Craft a Strong Conclusion

In your conclusion, summarize the main points discussed in your essay and restate your thesis statement. Emphasize the significance of your findings and provide a thoughtful reflection on the topic. Leave your readers with a lasting impression and a sense of closure.

Check out this informative video to learn more about synthesis essays!

Synthesis Essay Format

Let’s take a look at the basic synthesis essay format:

  • Introduction : Introduce the topic and provide background information. Present your thesis statement.
  • Body paragraphs: Analyze and synthesize the information from your sources, supporting your thesis statement.
  • Conclusion : Summarize your main points and restate your thesis. Provide a thoughtful reflection on the topic.

Synthesis Essay Topics

Here are synthesis essay example topics in different subject domains:

  • The impact of technology on climate change mitigation efforts.
  • Synthesis of renewable energy sources for a sustainable future.
  • The ethical implications of genetic engineering and synthetic biology.
  • Synthesizing scientific research to understand the effects of sleep on human health.
  • Exploring the potential benefits and risks of artificial intelligence in healthcare.

Social Sciences:

  • Synthesizing theories of social inequality to understand its impact on marginalized communities.
  • The role of media in shaping public opinion and political discourse.
  • Synthesizing psychological and sociological perspectives on addiction and substance abuse.
  • Analyzing the impact of globalization on cultural diversity and identity.
  • Synthesizing different approaches to criminal justice reform for reducing recidivism rates.

Literature:

  • The portrayal of gender roles and stereotypes in classic and contemporary literature.
  • Synthesizing different literary techniques used to convey the theme of love in poetry.
  • Comparing and contrasting the themes of justice and revenge in various Shakespearean plays.
  • Synthesizing the works of different postcolonial authors to understand the impact of colonialism on identity.
  • Exploring the use of symbolism in dystopian literature to critique societal norms.
  • Synthesizing different historical perspectives on the causes of World War II.
  • The impact of the Enlightenment on the American and French Revolutions.
  • Synthesizing primary sources to understand the experiences of enslaved individuals during the transatlantic slave trade.
  • Analyzing the effects of the Industrial Revolution on social and economic conditions in 19th-century Europe.
  • Comparing and contrasting the approaches to decolonization in Africa and Asia.

Technology:

  • Synthesizing different perspectives on the ethical implications of autonomous vehicles.
  • The impact of social media on communication and interpersonal relationships.
  • Synthesizing the benefits and risks of data mining in the era of big data.
  • Analyzing the role of technology in addressing global challenges such as poverty and climate change.
  • Exploring the potential applications of blockchain technology in various industries.

These topics should provide you with a starting point for your synthesis essay in different subject domains. Remember to conduct thorough research and present a balanced synthesis of different sources and perspectives.

Need more topics? Check out our synthesis essay topics blog and get plenty of ideas!

Tips for a Good Synthesis Essay

Here are some tips to write an outstanding synthesis essay: 

Synthesis Essay Writing Tips - CollegeEssay.org

  • Choose a topic that is broad enough to have sufficient sources but narrow enough to focus your analysis effectively.
  • Take notes while reading and analyzing your sources to keep track of key points and ideas.
  • Use in-text citations and include works cited page to give credit to the original authors and avoid plagiarism.
  • Maintain a balanced approach by presenting different viewpoints and addressing counterarguments.
  • Edit and revise your essay for clarity , coherence, and grammar mistakes.

In conclusion, writing a good synthesis essay requires careful planning, thorough research, and effective organization. By following a proper synthesis essay structure and employing proper writing techniques, you can write a strong synthesis essay.

Start writing your essay early to allow ample time for the writing process, revisions, and edits. With practice and persistence, you can develop your skills in crafting compelling synthesis essays.

Still do not know how to start with your synthesis essay? Don't worry! CollegeEssay.org is here to help.

Our dedicated synthesis essay writing service is readily available to help you with your writing tasks. We guarantee 100% plagiarism-free papers tailored to your needs.

Don't hesitate to reach out to our professional essay writing service today!

Caleb S. (Literature, Marketing)

Caleb S. has extensive experience in writing and holds a Masters from Oxford University. He takes great satisfaction in helping students exceed their academic goals. Caleb always puts the needs of his clients first and is dedicated to providing quality service.

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Mar 23, 2023

Synthesis Essay Examples | Tips to Write a Winning Synthesis Essay

Are you tired of sifting through countless articles on how to write a synthesis essay? Look no further! Our comprehensive guide will help you master the art of synthesis writing!

One of the more interesting assignments you could get is writing a synthesis essay. College and university students write these papers to show that they can conduct extensive research, analyze complex ideas, and present an argument's essential building blocks.

The ideal synthesis paper will synthesize the information from multiple sources and advocate for a unique central thesis. Finding the synthesis statement will allow you to integrate it with other theses, leading to a more well-organized synthesis essay. 

Jenni.ai is an AI-powered application that can assist you in writing a synthesis essay if you've ever pondered how to do so. In just a few minutes, this artificial intelligence can compose a full thesis. In other words, if you want your essay to look and read just like it was written by a person, this is the service to use.

What is a Synthesis Essay?

A synthesis essay is a type of academic writing that requires the student to combine different ideas, arguments, or information from various sources into a coherent and well-supported essay.

The goal of a synthesis essay is to demonstrate the writer's ability to critically analyze and evaluate a variety of sources , draw connections between them, and present a well-reasoned argument that supports a particular thesis statement.

The sources used in a synthesis essay can come from a variety of places, including academic journals, books, newspapers, magazines, and websites. The writer must analyze each source carefully and determine how it relates to the topic at hand. They must also evaluate the credibility of each source and decide which ones are most relevant and useful for their argument.

To write a successful synthesis essay, the writer must follow a specific format. The essay should have an introduction that includes a clear thesis statement that outlines the main argument of the essay. 

The body paragraphs should each focus on a different aspect of the argument, using evidence and examples from the sources to support the writer's claims. The essay should also include a counterargument that addresses potential criticisms of the writer's position.

One of the most challenging aspects of writing a synthesis essay is organizing the information from the sources into a coherent argument. The writer must determine which sources are most relevant and useful for their argument and then decide how to incorporate them into the essay. They must also be able to synthesize the information from the sources in a way that is clear and easy to follow.

Another challenge of writing a synthesis essay is avoiding plagiarism. Because the writer is using information and ideas from other sources, they must be careful to give credit to the original authors. 

They must also be careful not to copy and paste information directly from the sources without proper citation. Writing a successful synthesis essay requires critical thinking, careful organization of information, and proper citation to avoid plagiarism.

Different Types of Synthesis Essay

There are generally two types of synthesis essays: explanatory synthesis essays and argumentative synthesis essays.

Explanatory Synthesis Essays: 

This type of essay aims to explain a topic or issue to the reader. The writer collects information from different sources and presents it in a clear and organized way, highlighting the key points and explaining how they relate to the topic. The goal is to provide a comprehensive understanding of the subject matter, without taking a particular stance or arguing a specific point of view.

Argumentative Synthesis Essays: 

This type of essay aims to persuade the reader to adopt a specific point of view or take a particular action. The writer collects information from different sources and uses it to build a case for their argument. The goal is to present a well-supported argument that convinces the reader to agree with the writer's position.

Both types of synthesis essays require the writer to critically analyze and evaluate different sources, draw connections between them, and present a well-reasoned argument. However, the key difference between the two types is the writer's goal: to explain in the explanatory synthesis essay and to persuade in the argumentative synthesis essay.

Things to Consider When Writing a Synthesis Essay

A successful synthesis essay should contain several key elements that work together to create a well-supported argument. Here are some of the most important elements that a writer should include in their synthesis essay:

A Clear Thesis Statement: The thesis statement is the central argument of the essay. It should be clear, concise, and specific, outlining the main point that the writer is trying to make.

Well-Organized Paragraphs: The body paragraphs of the essay should be well-organized and easy to follow. Each paragraph should focus on a single idea or point, and the information presented should be relevant to the thesis statement.

Evidence from Sources: The writer should use evidence from a variety of sources to support their argument. They should be careful to use only credible sources and to properly cite all of their sources using the appropriate citation style.

Analysis and Interpretation: The writer should not simply summarize the sources they are using. They should also analyze and interpret the information presented , highlighting key points and drawing connections between different sources.

Counterarguments: The writer should acknowledge potential counterarguments to their position and address them in their essay. This shows that the writer has considered multiple perspectives and is able to make a strong case for their position.

Transition Words and Phrases: The writer should use transition words and phrases to help the reader follow the logical flow of their argument. These words and phrases help to connect different ideas and make the essay easier to read and understand.

Conclusion: The conclusion should summarize the main points of the essay and restate the thesis statement in a new way. It should also provide a final thought or call to action that leaves a lasting impression on the reader.

A successful synthesis essay should have a clear thesis statement, well-organized paragraphs, evidence from sources, analysis and interpretation of the information presented, acknowledgement of counterarguments, use of transition words and phrases, and a conclusion that summarizes the main points and provides a final thought or call to action.

By including these elements in their essay, the writer can create a well-supported argument that is easy to follow and understand.

How Can You Write a Synthesis Essay?

Writing a synthesis essay requires careful planning, research, and organization. Here are the steps to follow when writing a synthesis essay:

Choose a Topic: The first step is to choose a topic for the essay. This topic should be broad enough to allow for multiple perspectives and sources, but specific enough to be manageable. Once the topic has been chosen, the writer should develop a clear thesis statement that outlines the main argument of the essay.

Conduct Research: The next step is to conduct research on the topic. This research should include a variety of sources, such as academic journals, books, newspapers, magazines, and websites. The writer should be sure to evaluate the credibility of each source and determine which ones are most relevant and useful for their argument.

Create an Outline: With the research in hand, the writer should create an outline for the essay. This outline should include the thesis statement, main points, and evidence from sources that support each point. The writer should also consider potential counterarguments and how to address them in the essay.

Write the Essay: Using the outline as a guide, the writer should begin writing the essay. Each paragraph should focus on a single idea or point, with evidence from sources to support the argument. The writer should be sure to properly cite all sources using the appropriate citation style.

Revise and Edit: Once the first draft of the essay is complete, the writer should revise and edit it carefully. This includes checking for spelling and grammar errors, as well as ensuring that the essay flows logically and is easy to follow. The writer should also consider the feedback of others, such as peers or professors, and make any necessary revisions based on that feedback.

Finalize the Essay: After revising and editing the essay, the writer should finalize it by formatting it according to the appropriate guidelines and double-checking all citations and references.

In conclusion, writing a synthesis essay requires careful planning, research, and organization. By following these steps, the writer can create a well-supported argument that is easy to follow and understand.

Tips for Writing A Synthesis Essay

Here are some tips you can use when writing a synthesis essay:

Draft freely: When drafting the essay itself, try not to be too judgmental of your work too early on. You can get your thoughts down on paper this way, and then edit your writing later.

Read thoroughly: Interpreting texts and drawing new conclusions from what you've read is the backbone of a synthesis essay. You can improve the clarity of your writing by reading extensively, taking notes, and looking up any words or ideas you don't understand.

Take a printout:  If you want to double-check the structure of your essay before turning it in, printing it out is a good idea. You could verify consistency in formatting by comparing it to a template or sample.

Read it aloud: If you read your essay aloud to yourself, you can pick up on any sections that are confusing or need to be revised. You should think about doing this in order to catch any stray language or spelling errors.

What is the Structure of a Synthesis Essay?

The structure of a synthesis essay is similar to that of any other essay. It includes an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. However, there are some specific elements that are unique to a synthesis essay.

Introduction: The introduction should provide background information on the topic and end with a clear thesis statement that outlines the main argument of the essay.

Body paragraphs: The body paragraphs should be organized around different aspects of the argument, with each paragraph focusing on a single idea or point. Each paragraph should include evidence from sources to support the argument and include a proper citation. It is important to smoothly transition between paragraphs and to address potential counterarguments.

Synthesis: The synthesis part of the essay is where the writer brings together information from different sources to support their argument. This means summarizing and analyzing the information from different sources and showing how they support the thesis statement.

Conclusion: The conclusion should summarize the argument and restate the thesis statement in a way that brings the essay to a satisfying close. It should not introduce any new information, but rather, provide a final perspective on the topic.

Bibliography: Include a source list at the conclusion of your paper to correctly credit your research materials, whether you're using the APA, MLA, AP, or Chicago Manual of Style guidelines. This section, which includes a summary of in-text citations, can occupy up to two pages of your work.

Overall, a synthesis essay should have a clear and logical structure that effectively presents the writer's argument and supports it with evidence from multiple sources.

2 Examples of Synthesis Essays

Never forget who you are and what is essential for you

Introduction

The idea of "never forget who you are and what is essential for you" is a powerful reminder to stay true to oneself, to one's values, and to one's goals in life. It is easy to lose track of what is important when we are bombarded with distractions, societal expectations, and peer pressure.

However, staying focused on what truly matters can help us navigate life's challenges and find fulfillment and happiness. In this essay, I will synthesize the importance of knowing oneself and what is essential in life.

Knowing Yourself

The first step in never forgetting who you are is to know yourself. This means understanding your values, beliefs, strengths, weaknesses, and passions. Self-awareness is crucial in personal growth and development. When we know ourselves, we can make better decisions, set realistic goals, and communicate effectively with others.

It is essential to take time to reflect on our thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. This can be done through journaling, meditation, or therapy. By knowing ourselves, we can avoid getting lost in the noise of the world and stay grounded in our truth.

What is Essential?

Knowing what is essential in life is subjective and varies from person to person. However, there are a few universal essentials that can guide us in our journey. These include health, relationships, purpose, and personal growth. Our physical and mental well-being is vital for us to function at our best.

Building and maintaining positive relationships with our family, friends, and community can bring joy and support to our lives. Having a sense of purpose, whether it is through work, hobbies, or volunteering, gives us a reason to wake up in the morning. Finally, personal growth and learning are essential for us to evolve as individuals and reach our potential.

Staying True to Yourself

Staying true to oneself requires a strong sense of self-awareness, confidence, and courage. It means not compromising one's values or beliefs to please others or fit in with societal norms. It is easy to get caught up in the pressure of conforming to what is expected of us.

However, staying true to oneself is the key to authenticity and happiness. It is important to trust one's intuition, voice, and choices. It may not always be easy, but it is necessary to honor oneself and live a fulfilling life.

Challenges in Staying True

Staying true to oneself is not always easy, and there are various challenges that can arise. Peer pressure, societal expectations, and fear of rejection can make it challenging to stay true to oneself. It can be tempting to compromise one's beliefs to fit in or avoid conflict.

However, it is important to remember that staying true to oneself is the only way to live a fulfilling life. It may require courage, vulnerability, and resilience, but it is worth it in the end.

In conclusion, never forgetting who you are and what is essential for you is crucial for personal growth, fulfilment, and happiness. Knowing oneself, understanding what is essential, and staying true to oneself are the key ingredients to living an authentic life. 

It may not always be easy, but it is worth the effort. We all have the power to shape our lives and create the reality we want. By staying true to ourselves, we can navigate life's challenges and find purpose and meaning in our journey.

Bibliography

Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly. Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience. Harper Collins, 1990.

Goleman, Daniel. Emotional Intelligence: Why it Can Matter More than IQ. Bantam Books, 1995.

Tolle, Eckhart. The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment. New World Library, 1999.

Pink, Daniel H. Drive: The Surprising Truth About Overthinking About Life Distracts You From It

As human beings, it is natural to contemplate our purpose and existence, but overthinking about life can be detrimental. Overthinking can lead to anxiety, stress, and a loss of focus on the present moment. Instead of living in the moment, we get caught up in hypothetical scenarios and worst-case scenarios that distract us from reality.

In this essay, we will explore how overthinking about life distracts us from living it and what we can do to break free from this cycle.

The Negative Effects of Overthinking

Overthinking can be paralyzing and can prevent us from taking action. It can cause us to doubt ourselves and our abilities, leading to inaction and missed opportunities. Additionally, overthinking can lead to anxiety, which can affect our physical health, sleep patterns, and overall well-being.

When we focus too much on what could happen or what we could have done differently, we lose sight of the present moment, which can lead to a lack of enjoyment and appreciation for life.

Overthinking and Decision-Making

Overthinking can also have a negative impact on decision-making. When we overthink, we can become indecisive and take longer to make decisions. We may also struggle to weigh the pros and cons effectively, leading to poor decision-making. This can lead to regret and dissatisfaction with the outcome, which can further fuel the cycle of overthinking.

Breaking Free from Overthinking

Breaking free from overthinking requires a conscious effort to focus on the present moment. Mindfulness techniques, such as meditation and deep breathing exercises, can help us become more aware of our thoughts and feelings. These techniques can help us observe our thoughts without judgment and bring us back to the present moment.

Another technique is to set aside a specific time each day to reflect on our thoughts and feelings. This can be done through journaling, talking to a friend or therapist, or simply taking a few minutes to reflect. By setting aside a specific time to reflect, we can avoid getting caught up in overthinking throughout the day.

Finally, it is important to take action and make decisions, even if they are not perfect. By taking action, we can break the cycle of overthinking and move forward. We can also learn from our mistakes and adjust our approach in the future.

In conclusion, overthinking life can distract us from living it. It can lead to anxiety, stress, and indecision, which can prevent us from taking action and enjoying life. By practising mindfulness techniques, setting aside time for reflection, and taking action, we can break free from the cycle of overthinking and live in the present moment.

Brach, T. (2003). Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life with the Heart of a Buddha. Random House.

Harris, S. (2014). 10% Happier: How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found Self-Help That Actually Works--A True Story. It Books.

Kross, E., & Ayduk, O. (2017). Self-Distancing: Theory, Research, and Current Directions. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 55, 81-136.

Segerstrom, S. C. (2018). Optimism and Resources: Effects on Each Other and on Health over Time. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 115(1), 107-126.

Singh, N. N., Lancioni, G. E., Winton, A. S. W., Karazsia, B. T., Myers, R. E., Latham, L. L., & Singh, J. (2007). Mindful Parenting Decreases Aggression, Noncompliance, and Parenting

Final Words

Of course, synthesis essays can be daunting because they are so different from the essays you've written before. This task may seem daunting at first, but with these pointers in mind, you should be able to take on the research, analysis, and writing necessary to earn a passing grade.

However, if you find yourself stuck and in need of assistance with your synthesis essay, you can use Jenni.ai to quickly and convincingly compose an essay on any subject in the style of a human writer. This AI-powered tool can help you quickly craft a thesis statement on any given subject. If you're a student who often finds yourself stuck when trying to complete writing assignments, Jenni.ai can be a lifesaver.

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Examples

Academic Writing

Ai generator.

synthesis essay examples

An analytical essay dissects a subject, evaluates its components, and presents a well-reasoned analysis. This type of essay requires critical thinking and a clear argument, supported by evidence. It involves examining themes, motifs, and various elements to understand the work deeply. Writing an analytical essay involves interpreting facts rather than summarizing them, making it essential for students to hone their analytical skills. Understanding the structure and purpose of an analytical essay is crucial for academic success.

What Is Academic Writing?

Academic writing is a formal style of writing used in universities and scholarly publications. It is characterized by clear, concise, and evidence-based arguments. This type of writing follows specific conventions, including proper citation and a structured format, to communicate complex ideas effectively.

Academic Writing Examples

synthesis essay examples

  • Research Paper – In-depth study presenting original research and analysis.
  • Essay – A structured argument on a specific topic is essential in an analytical essay. This type of essay requires presenting a clear thesis and supporting it with well-organized evidence and analysis.
  • Dissertation – Extensive research project for a doctoral degree.
  • Thesis – Research paper for a master’s degree.
  • Case Study – Detailed examination of a particular case.
  • Lab Report – Documentation of an experiment and its results.
  • Literature Review – Summary and evaluation of existing research.
  • Annotated Bibliography – List of sources with summaries and evaluations.
  • Book Review – Critical assessment of a book.
  • Conference Paper – Presentation of research at a conference.
  • Journal Article – Scholarly article published in an academic journal.
  • Position Paper – Argument supporting a particular viewpoint.
  • Reflection Paper – Personal response to a specific experience.
  • Critique – Detailed analysis of a text or work.
  • Report – Structured document presenting information on a specific topic.
  • White Paper – Authoritative report providing information or proposals.
  • Proposal – Plan or suggestion put forward for consideration.
  • Memo – Brief communication within an organization.
  • Review Article – Summary and synthesis of research on a topic.
  • Personal Statement – Essay outlining an individual’s qualifications and goals.

Types of Academic Writing

  • Article Writing: Crafting informative, engaging, and well-researched article writing for journals, magazines, or online platforms.
  • Ghost Writing: Crafting content as a ghostwriting on behalf of someone else, often for books, articles, or speeches.
  • Formal Writing: Formal writing is structured and professional writing used in academic, business, or official contexts.
  • APA Writing: Writing style adhering to the American Psychological Association guidelines, commonly known as APA Writing , is used in social sciences.
  • Descriptive Writing: Vividly detailing subjects to create a clear picture for the reader.
  • Analytical Writing: Breaking down complex ideas or arguments to evaluate and interpret them.
  • Persuasive Writing: Convincing the reader of a particular viewpoint or argument.
  • Critical Writing: Evaluating and analyzing texts or ideas to form a reasoned judgment.

Academic Writing Skills

  • Critical Thinking : Analyze and evaluate information to form reasoned judgments and arguments.
  • Research Skills : Locate, evaluate, and synthesize information from various sources to support your writing.
  • Planning and Organization : Structure your writing logically with clear introductions, body paragraphs, and conclusions.
  • Clarity and Precision : Express ideas clearly and accurately to avoid ambiguity and confusion.
  • Grammar and Punctuation : Use correct grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure to enhance readability.
  • Referencing and Citation : Properly cite sources to give credit and avoid plagiarism.
  • Argument Development : Construct well-supported arguments with evidence and logical reasoning.
  • Editing and Proofreading : Review and refine your writing to correct errors and improve clarity and style.

Characteristics of Academic Writing

  • Formal Tone: Academic writing uses a serious and formal tone, avoiding slang and colloquialisms.
  • Clear and Concise: Ideas are expressed clearly and concisely, eliminating unnecessary words and complexity.
  • Evidence-Based: Arguments are supported by credible evidence, including data, research, and citations.
  • Objective: Writing maintains an objective stance, avoiding personal bias and subjective opinions.
  • Structured: Follows a structured format with a clear introduction, body, and conclusion.
  • Technical Vocabulary: Utilizes specific terminology relevant to the academic discipline being discussed.

7 Categories of Academic Writing

  • Descriptive Writing – Describes concepts, events, or objects, providing detailed information in an academic essay .
  • Analytical Writing – Breaks down information into components, examining and interpreting them.
  • Persuasive Writing – Presents arguments to convince the reader of a particular viewpoint.
  • Critical Writing – Evaluates and analyzes texts or theories, often comparing different viewpoints.
  • Reflective Writing – Explores personal experiences and insights related to academic topics.
  • Expository Writing – Explains or informs about a topic, providing clear and factual information.
  • Creative Writing – Uses imaginative narrative techniques to explore academic topics creatively.

Importance of Academic Writing

  • Communication of Ideas: Academic writing effectively communicates complex ideas and research findings clearly and precisely.
  • Critical Thinking: It encourages critical thinking by requiring analysis, evaluation, and synthesis of reference information.
  • Knowledge Dissemination: Facilitates the spread of knowledge and advancements in various fields through published research and papers.
  • Academic Success: Essential for academic success, contributing to better grades and scholarly recognition.
  • Professional Development: Enhances professional development by improving writing, research, and analytical skills.
  • Standardization: Provides a standardized method for presenting research, ensuring consistency and credibility.

Academic Writing Tips

  • Plan Your Work – Outline your main points and structure before writing.
  • Understand Your Audience – Tailor your language and arguments to the intended readers.
  • Use Clear and Concise Language – Avoid unnecessary jargon and complex sentences.
  • Develop a Strong Thesis – Make sure your central argument is clear and well-defined.
  • Support Arguments with Evidence – Use credible sources to back up your claims.
  • Cite Sources Properly – Follow the required citation style to avoid plagiarism.
  • Stay Objective – Focus on facts and logical reasoning rather than personal opinions.
  • Revise and Edit – Review your work for clarity, coherence, and grammatical accuracy.
  • Use Topic Sentences – Start each paragraph with a clear main idea.
  • Seek Feedback – Have peers or mentors review your work for additional insights.

Why is academic writing important?

It helps develop critical thinking, clear communication, and strong argumentation skills.

What are common types of academic writing?

Common types include essays, research papers, theses, and dissertations.

What is the purpose of academic writing?

The purpose is to inform, argue, and contribute to scholarly conversations.

How is academic writing different from other writing styles?

It is more structured, formal, and evidence-based compared to other styles.

What is APA writing?

APA writing adheres to the guidelines of the American Psychological Association, used mainly in social sciences.

What should be avoided in academic writing?

Avoid informal language, unsupported claims, and plagiarism.

How do you cite sources in academic writing?

Sources are cited using specific formats like APA, MLA, or Chicago style.

What is the structure of an academic essay?

An academic essay typically includes an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

What are the characteristics of a good thesis statement?

A good thesis statement is clear, concise, and presents a strong argument.

How can one improve their academic writing skills?

Practice regularly, seek feedback, and read extensively in your field.

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The Crucial Events of the G1 Phase in the Cell Cycle

This essay about the G1 phase of the cellular cycle explains its critical role in preparing a cell for DNA replication. It highlights the phase’s key activities, including cellular growth, organelle duplication, and protein synthesis. The essay also discusses the importance of checkpoints and regulatory proteins, such as cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases, in ensuring cells are ready to progress to the S phase, emphasizing the G1 phase’s significance in maintaining cellular function and health.

How it works

Cellular cycle is vital maintenance of process for an increase and development of all living organisms, consisting of a few expressive phases with specific roles and regulative mechanisms. Among them, G1 a phase (Admission a 1 phase) is especially critical, as then prepares a cell for the copy of DNA. Understanding of G1 of phase is key to understanding of cellular function, increase, and ecological answers.

Immediately next cellular separation (mitosis) and preceded to the phase of S (phase of synthesis), where a copy DNA takes place, G1 a phase is characterized by a substantial cellular increase and metabolic activity.

Primary aim during this phase – to prepare a cell for the copy of DNA, including sprat of substantial processes for example RNA and necessary proteins of synthesis for a cellular increase and synthesis of DNA. During this time, a cell also tests series checks, to guarantee, that then – in a corresponding condition moved forward to the next phase.

Key event in G1 to the phase is an increase according to a cellular size, critical for support of copy of DNA and later separation in two branch cells. At the same time, organoids of cell, by the way mitochondria and ribosomes, recur, to guarantee, that every branch cell is equipped, to function independently. Synthesis of proteins and enzymes vital, because copy of DNA is main activity during this phase, by the way necessary polymerases of DNA for new DNA go aground synthesis, also as well as proteins brought over to untwisting of spiral of DNA and stabilizing.

Adjusting of cellular cycle by specific check-points is the second critical aspect of G1 of phase. These check-points serve as the mechanisms of quality control, to guarantee, that a cell is ready to enter to the phase of S. G1 the check-point also known how restriction exactly, estimates, whether has a cell attained sufficient size, backlogs of energy, and unharmed DNA. If these criteria are met, a cell signaled, to enter to the phase of S; differently, a cell can enter the immobile state known how G0 to terms do not improve.

Regulators of cellular cycle, for example cyclins and cyclin-dependent of kinazy (Cdks), central in the rule of progression through G1 phase. Cyclins are proteins, whose levels hesitate during a cellular cycle, at Cdks are enzymes, that, on activating of cyclins, proteins of aim of phosphorylate, to manage progression of cellular cycle. In G1 to the phase, cyclin of D-CDK4/6 a complex is especially important, as then phosphorylates protein of retinoblastoma (Rb), suppressor of tumour that prevents cellular cycle, when unphosphorylated. Phosphorylating of Rb frees braking on the factor of transcription of E2F, facilitating transcription of necessary genes for the copy of DNA.

Thus, G1 phase is a period of intensive preparation and adjusting that guarantees, that cells are DNA prepared for a copy and later separation. This phase includes a substantial increase, synthesis of substantial proteins, and strict quality control through check-points. Understanding of G1 of phase provides the valuable penetrating in cellular biology and mechanisms that support cellular totality and function, with important values for illnesses for example cancer, where adjusting of cellular cycle collapses often.

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A green synthesis of 3-selanyl-isoflavones via lipase mediated selenylation/cyclization of enaminones.

synthesis essay examples

Share and Cite

Kan, W.; Piao, Y.; Song, W.; Chen, X.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Wang, L. A Green Synthesis of 3-Selanyl-Isoflavones via Lipase Mediated Selenylation/Cyclization of Enaminones. Catalysts 2024 , 14 , 413. https://doi.org/10.3390/catal14070413

Kan W, Piao Y, Song W, Chen X, Wang C, Wang Z, Wang L. A Green Synthesis of 3-Selanyl-Isoflavones via Lipase Mediated Selenylation/Cyclization of Enaminones. Catalysts . 2024; 14(7):413. https://doi.org/10.3390/catal14070413

Kan, Wenbo, Yuming Piao, Wenning Song, Xiaoxuan Chen, Chunyu Wang, Zhi Wang, and Lei Wang. 2024. "A Green Synthesis of 3-Selanyl-Isoflavones via Lipase Mediated Selenylation/Cyclization of Enaminones" Catalysts 14, no. 7: 413. https://doi.org/10.3390/catal14070413

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IMAGES

  1. Synthesis Essay

    synthesis essay examples

  2. Synthesis Essay

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  3. Synthesis Essay

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  4. 4 Synthesis Essay Examples Which Will Inspire You

    synthesis essay examples

  5. How to write a Synthesis Essay

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  6. Synthesis Essays: New Way of Writing

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COMMENTS

  1. 13+ Synthesis Essay Examples: Tips & Expert Guidance

    Learn how to write a synthesis essay by exploring various examples, outlines, formats, and topics. A synthesis essay is a special kind of academic writing that blends ideas and information from different sources to create a clear and organized argument.

  2. Well-Written Synthesis Essay Examples

    Learn how to write a synthesis essay with examples on various topics, such as homeschooling, sexism, and social media. Find out how to create a thesis, an introduction, and an outline for your essay.

  3. Synthesis Essay Materials

    Learn how to write a synthesis essay by examining two sample questions and responses from the AP English Language and Composition Exam. See how to synthesize information from multiple sources and express your own ideas.

  4. Guide to Synthesis Essays: How to Write a Synthesis Essay

    Learn how to write a synthesis essay that argues a point or explores an idea by synthesizing different sources. See examples of synthesis essays and tips on structure, research, and writing.

  5. How to Write the AP Lang Synthesis Essay + Example

    Learn how to write a synthesis essay for the AP Lang exam by reading and analyzing 6-7 sources on a topic. Follow five steps to create a strong thesis, outline, and argument using evidence from the sources.

  6. How to Write a Synthesis Essay: The Ultimate Handbook

    Learn how to write a synthesis essay by choosing a topic, analyzing sources, and structuring your argument. See examples of explanatory and argumentative synthesis essays and tips for formatting and citing.

  7. How to Write the AP Lang Synthesis Essay with Example

    Note: A good strategy to study for the synthesis essay AP Lang exam is to review your rhetorical devices and literary devices. Understanding how these devices function can be essential in constructing a cohesive essay. Synthesis Essay AP Lang Examples - Sample Question . Below is a sample question from the AP Lang synthesis essay and a ...

  8. How to Write a Perfect Synthesis Essay for the AP Language Exam

    Learn what a synthesis essay is, how to write one for the AP Language exam, and how to analyze a real prompt with an example. Find out the skills, structure, and scoring criteria for this essay type.

  9. Synthesis Essay Examples

    Synthesis Essay Examples. A synthesis essay aims to create insightful connections between relatively distinct sources that tackle the same problem. This method is widely used in the introductory part of a research paper to cover all the approaches without criticizing them.

  10. How to Write a Synthesis Essay (Steps & Examples)

    Your primary goal with a synthesis essay is to provide a unique perspective, supported by evidence. For example, suppose you have two distinct essays or research papers on "excessive social media usage" and "the effects of social media on psychology.". In your synthesis essay, you can blend these two sources into a cohesive argument like "the psychological impacts of excessive social ...

  11. Synthesis Essays: A Step-by-Step How- To Guide

    How to write body paragraphs for synthesis essays: 1.Pick three points to write about from your list of points about which the writers agreed or disagreed. When picking three to write about, pick the three that offer you ample evidence. 2.Decide the order of the three points to be written about in your body paragraphs.

  12. Tips for Writing an Effective Synthesis Essay

    The synthesis essay offers you a unique opportunity to showcase your ability to synthesize various sources and present your ideas in a coherent and convincing manner. ... One crucial aspect of writing a synthesis essay is the use of evidence and examples from different sources to support your claims and arguments. By drawing from a variety of ...

  13. PDF STEPS FOR WRITING A SYNTHESIS ESSAY

    A synthesis essay uses a variety of sources to form a new idea, answer a question, or defend an argumentative thesis statement. A synthesis does not summarize but shows the connections among the different sources and the writers' ideas. A successful synthesis essay overviews research on the chosen topic, highlights the connections among ...

  14. How to Write a Synthesis Essay

    AP synthesis example essay. Based on the 2020 prompt: . The impact of television on political matters has been under debate for years. Television provides a low-cost method to stay informed about policy changes and receive important announcements, and it often offers a path to learn more about political figures and their plans for the United States.

  15. Synthesis Essay

    A Synthesis Essay is a sophisticated form of writing that requires the integration of various sources and perspectives. Our resource provides a comprehensive look into this writing style, complete with insightful essay examples.These examples demonstrate how to effectively combine information from different texts, crafting a cohesive and well-argued narrative.

  16. How to Write a Synthesis Essay: Examples, Topics, & Outline

    A synthesis matrix will help you with that: Find several central ideas in the chart. Choose the ones that are repeated the most often and the ones that you feel need to be in your essay. Combine them, and you have a thesis statement with all the key points. Make a draft of the thesis statement.

  17. Synthesis Essay

    Learn how to write a synthesis essay that combines information from multiple sources to support your claim. See examples of explanatory, expository, and argumentative synthesis essays and learn the key steps and structure.

  18. Synthesizing Sources

    Learn how to synthesize sources by combining and analyzing them to provide new insights. See examples of effective and poor synthesis, and use a synthesis matrix to organize your sources.

  19. How to Write a Synthesis Essay

    5 helpful tips to write a synthesis essay. 1. Acceptable number of sources. If you need to take the AP exam, you have to use at least three sources (you can use a maximum of four sources). If you must write a synthesis essay as an academic assignment, you may use more sources.

  20. How to Write a Synthesis Essay

    Your essay should have an introductory paragraph that includes your thesis, a body to present evidence that supports your thesis, and a conclusion that summarizes your point of view. 2. Write in the third person. Writing in the third person means using "he," "she," "it", and using complete, unambiguous sentences.

  21. 12+ Synthesis Essay Examples to Inspire You

    Synthesis Essay Examples. In this section, we will explore different examples of synthesis essays. Examples are a valuable tool for learning complicated concepts and understanding the format of a synthesis essay. By examining these examples, you can see how the information from multiple sources is effectively utilized to build a cohesive argument.

  22. Synthesis Essay Examples

    Writing a synthesis essay requires careful planning, research, and organization. Here are the steps to follow when writing a synthesis essay: Choose a Topic: The first step is to choose a topic for the essay. This topic should be broad enough to allow for multiple perspectives and sources, but specific enough to be manageable.

  23. Academic Writing

    Review Article - Summary and synthesis of research on a topic. Personal Statement - Essay outlining an individual's qualifications and goals. Types of Academic Writing. Article Writing: Crafting informative, engaging, and well-researched article writing for journals, magazines, or online platforms.

  24. The Crucial Events of the G1 Phase in the Cell Cycle

    Essay Example: Cellular cycle is vital maintenance of process for an increase and development of all living organisms, consisting of a few expressive phases with specific roles and regulative mechanisms. ... Synthesis of proteins and enzymes vital, because copy of DNA is main activity during this phase, by the way necessary polymerases of DNA ...

  25. A Green Synthesis of 3-Selanyl-Isoflavones via Lipase Mediated ...

    The environmentally friendly method reached high yields of 87-95% in a short time at 30 °C, with 17 examples of 3-selanyl-isoflavones successfully prepared. Furthermore, we have investigated the possible mechanisms underlying this reaction.