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105 Best Words To Start A Paragraph

words to start a paragraph, explained below

The first words of a paragraph are crucial as they set the tone and inform the reader about the content that follows.

Known as the ‘topic’ sentence, the first sentence of the paragraph should clearly convey the paragraph’s main idea. 

This article presents a comprehensive list of the best words to start a paragraph, be it the first, second, third, or concluding paragraph.

Words to Start an Introduction Paragraph

The words you choose for starting an essay should establish the context, importance, or conflict of your topic.

The purpose of an introduction is to provide the reader with a clear understanding of the topic, its significance, and the structure of the ensuing discussion or argument.

Students often struggle to think of ways to start introductions because they may feel overwhelmed by the need to effectively summarize and contextualize their topic, capture the reader’s interest, and provide a roadmap for the rest of the paper, all while trying to create a strong first impression.

Choose one of these example words to start an introduction to get yourself started:

  • The debate surrounding [topic]…
  • [Topic] has garnered attention due to…
  • Exploring the complexities of [topic]…
  • The significance of [topic] lies in…
  • Over the past decade, [topic] has…
  • The critical question of [topic]…
  • As society grapples with [topic]…
  • The rapidly evolving landscape of [topic]…
  • A closer examination of [topic] reveals…
  • The ongoing conversation around [topic]…
Don’t Miss my Article: 33 Words to Avoid in an Essay

Words to Start a Body Paragraph

The purpose of a body paragraph in an essay is to develop and support the main argument, presenting evidence, examples, and analysis that contribute to the overall thesis.

Students may struggle to think of ways to start body paragraphs because they need to find appropriate transition words or phrases that seamlessly connect the paragraphs, while also introducing a new idea or evidence that builds on the previous points.

This can be challenging, as students must carefully balance the need for continuity and logical flow with the introduction of fresh perspectives.

Try some of these paragraph starters if you’re stuck:

  • Building upon previous research…
  • As [source] suggests, [topic]…
  • Analyzing [topic] through [theory]…
  • Considering the impact of [policy]…
  • Delving deeper into [topic]…
  • Drawing from [author]’s findings…
  • [Topic] intersects with [related topic]…
  • Contrary to popular belief, [topic]…
  • The historical context of [topic]…
  • Addressing the challenges of [topic]…

Words to Start a Conclusion Paragraph

The conclusion paragraph wraps up your essay and leaves a lasting impression on the reader.

It should convincingly summarize your thesis and main points. For more tips on writing a compelling conclusion, consider the following examples of ways to say “in conclusion”:

  • In summary, [topic] demonstrates…
  • The evidence overwhelmingly suggests…
  • Taking all factors into account…
  • In light of the analysis, [topic]…
  • Ultimately, [topic] plays a crucial role…
  • In light of these findings…
  • Weighing the pros and cons of [topic]…
  • By synthesizing the key points…
  • The interplay of factors in [topic]…
  • [Topic] leaves us with important implications…

Complete List of Transition Words

Above, I’ve provided 30 different examples of phrases you can copy and paste to get started on your paragraphs.

Let’s finish strong with a comprehensive list of transition words you can mix and match to start any paragraph you want:

  • Secondly, …
  • In addition, …
  • Furthermore, …
  • Moreover, …
  • On the other hand, …
  • In contrast, …
  • Conversely, …
  • Despite this, …
  • Nevertheless, …
  • Although, …
  • As a result, …
  • Consequently, …
  • Therefore, …
  • Additionally, …
  • Simultaneously, …
  • Meanwhile, …
  • In comparison, …
  • Comparatively, …
  • As previously mentioned, …
  • For instance, …
  • For example, …
  • Specifically, …
  • In particular, …
  • Significantly, …
  • Interestingly, …
  • Surprisingly, …
  • Importantly, …
  • According to [source], …
  • As [source] states, …
  • As [source] suggests, …
  • In the context of, …
  • In light of, …
  • Taking into consideration, …
  • Given that, …
  • Considering the fact that, …
  • Bearing in mind, …
  • To illustrate, …
  • To demonstrate, …
  • To clarify, …
  • To put it simply, …
  • In other words, …
  • To reiterate, …
  • As a matter of fact, …
  • Undoubtedly, …
  • Unquestionably, …
  • Without a doubt, …
  • It is worth noting that, …
  • One could argue that, …
  • It is essential to highlight, …
  • It is important to emphasize, …
  • It is crucial to mention, …
  • When examining, …
  • In terms of, …
  • With regards to, …
  • In relation to, …
  • As a consequence, …
  • As an illustration, …
  • As evidence, …
  • Based on [source], …
  • Building upon, …
  • By the same token, …
  • In the same vein, …
  • In support of this, …
  • In line with, …
  • To further support, …
  • To substantiate, …
  • To provide context, …
  • To put this into perspective, …

Tip: Use Right-Branching Sentences to Start your Paragraphs

Sentences should have the key information front-loaded. This makes them easier to read. So, start your sentence with the key information!

To understand this, you need to understand two contrasting types of sentences:

  • Left-branching sentences , also known as front-loaded sentences, begin with the main subject and verb, followed by modifiers, additional information, or clauses.
  • Right-branching sentences , or back-loaded sentences, start with modifiers, introductory phrases, or clauses, leading to the main subject and verb later in the sentence.

In academic writing, left-branching or front-loaded sentences are generally considered easier to read and more authoritative.

This is because they present the core information—the subject and the verb—at the beginning, making it easier for readers to understand the main point of the sentence.

Front-loading also creates a clear and straightforward sentence structure, which is preferred in academic writing for its clarity and conciseness.

Right-branching or back-loaded sentences, with their more complex and sometimes convoluted structure, can be more challenging for readers to follow and may lead to confusion or misinterpretation.

Take these examples where I’ve highlighted the subject of the sentence in bold. Note that in the right-branching sentences, the topic is front-loaded.

  • Right Branching: Researchers found a strong correlation between sleep and cognitive function after analyzing the data from various studies.
  • Left-Branching: After analyzing the data from various studies, a strong correlation between sleep and cognitive function was found by researchers.
  • The novel was filled with vivid imagery and thought-provoking themes , which captivated the audience from the very first chapter.
  • Captivating the audience from the very first chapter, the novel was filled with vivid imagery and thought-provoking themes.

The words you choose to start a paragraph are crucial for setting the tone, establishing context, and ensuring a smooth flow throughout your essay.

By carefully selecting the best words for each type of paragraph, you can create a coherent, engaging, and persuasive piece of writing.

Chris

Chris Drew (PhD)

Dr. Chris Drew is the founder of the Helpful Professor. He holds a PhD in education and has published over 20 articles in scholarly journals. He is the former editor of the Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education. [Image Descriptor: Photo of Chris]

  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 50 Durable Goods Examples
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  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 30 Globalization Pros and Cons
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Exam Study Expert

How To Start A Paragraph: 200+ Important Words And Phrases

by Kerri-Anne Edinburgh | Aug 3, 2022

There’s a lot to get right when you’re writing an essay. And a particularly important skill is knowing how to start a paragraph effectively. That first sentence counts!

Luckily for you, we’ve compiled HEAPS of advice, example phrases and top connective words to help you transition between paragraphs and guide your reader with ease.

So read on for a pick ’n’ mix of how to start a paragraph examples!

Paragraphs: the lowdown

So why exactly are paragraphs such an important tool for writing effectively ? Well:

  • They’re an important part of keeping your reader captivated
  • They help your reader to follow your argument or narrative
  • And they keep your writing in easily digestible chunks of information!

And an important part of all that is nailing the start of your paragraphs . Honestly!

Start off strong and your reader will know exactly what you’re going to do next and how your information interrelates. Top marks here you come – and for the low, low cost of some clever vocab!

Start your paragraphs off weakly however, without setting up effective signposting and transitions , and they’ll get lost and ( horror !) might have to re-read your essay to make sense of it. Ugh.

how to write a paragraph

What should your paragraphs contain?

If you’re writing an academic essay, there are a lot of popular conventions and guides about what a paragraph should include.

Academic writing guides favour well-developed paragraphs that are unified, coherent, contain a topic sentence, and provide adequate development of your idea. They should be long enough to fully discuss and analyse your idea and evidence.

And remember – you should ALWAYS start a new paragraph for each new idea or point .

You can read more about paragraph break guidelines in our helpful what is a paragraph article! If you’re wondering how long your paragraphs should be , check out our guideline article.

Paragraph structure (the PEEL method)

Academic paragraphs often follow a common structure , designed to guide your reader through your argument – although not all the time ! It goes like this:

  • Start with a “topic sentence”
  • Give 1-2 sentences of supporting evidence for (or against) your argument
  • Next, write a sentence analysing this evidence with respect to your argument or topic sentence
  • Finally, conclude by explaining the significance of this stance, or providing a transition to the next paragraph

(A quick definition: A “topic sentence” introduces the idea your paragraph will focus upon and makes summarising easy. It can occur anywhere but placing it at the start increases readability for your audience. )

One popular acronym for creating well-developed academic paragraphs is PEEL . This stands for Point, Evidence, Explanation, Link . Using this method makes it easy to remember what your paragraph should include.

  • I.e. your point (the topic sentence), some evidence and analysis of how it supports your point, and a transitional link back to your essay question or forwards to your next paragraph.

NOTE : You shouldn’t start all your paragraphs the same way OR start every sentence in your paragraph with the same word – it’s distracting and won’t earn you good marks from your reader.

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phrases to start a new paragraph in an essay

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How to create clarity for your readers

Paragraphs are awesome tools for increasing clarity and readability in your writing. They provide visual markers for our eyes and box written content into easily digestible chunks.

But you still need to start them off strongly . Do this job well, and you can seamlessly guide your readers through the narrative or argument of your writing.

The first sentence of your paragraph is an important tool for creating that clarity . You can create links with the surrounding paragraphs and signal the purpose of this paragraph for your reader.

  • Transitions show the links and relationships between the ideas you’re presenting: addition, contrast, sequential, conclusion, emphasis, example/citation
  • Connective words help you to join together multiple paragraphs in a sequence
  • Note: there is quite a lot of overlap in vocabulary! Some transitions are also great signposts etc.

Tip : Don’t overuse them! These techniques can make your writing sounds more professional and less like spoken language by smoothing over jarring jumps between topics. But using too many will make your writing stilted.

A common term that encompasses these three tools is “ sentence starter ”. They are typically set apart from the body of your sentence by a comma.

You can learn more about these key skills in our two helpful articles linked above – or explore a range of other writing skills advice, such as how to start an essay , structure an essay , and proofread an essay effectively!

Picking the right tone

It is important that the paragraph-starting phrases and connective words you choose complement the style of your writing and the conventions of the subject you are writing for .

For example, scientific papers usually have much clearer and expected structure and signposting conventions than arts and humanities papers.

If you’re unsure, it’s best to check some of the sources you’ve researched for your essay, explore the relevant academic style guide, or get help from a teacher – ask them for some examples!

Getting your grammar right

Grammatical conventions can be a minefield, but they’re worth remembering if you want to get top marks!

If you’re looking to increase the clarity of your writing and paragraphs, make sure you pick the right spot for your commas and colons .

For example, when you’re starting a new paragraph, many of the common signposting words and phrases require a comma. These include: however, therefore, moreover, what’s more, firstly, secondly, finally, likewise, for example, in general … (and more!).

These phrases should always be followed by a comma if it’s at the start of a sentence, or separated with a comma before and after like this if placed mid-sentence:

However, we cannot say for sure what happened here. We know, for example, that X claims to have lost the icon.

A word about “ this ” (a tip for really great writing)

As you start writing your paragraphs (and even sentences), you might be tempted to kick off with the word “ this” – as in the classic “ this shows that … ”.

But that’s not a great idea.

Why ? Academic essays aim should aim for maximum clarity, and “ this ” is just vague !

What’s important is that the connections that are clear to you , the writer (who is – hopefully – intimately familiar with your argument), are ALSO clear to your reader , who has probably never read your essay before.

Just imagine, your reader might be muttering “this what??” as they read, and then having to re-read the paragraph and the paragraph before to check … which is not ideal for getting good marks.

In complex documents (especially essays and theses) where a lot of information is presented at once, the points you’re referencing might be spread across several paragraphs of evidence and argument-building. So, unless your sentence/paragraph-starting “this” follows on immediately from the point it references, it’s best to try a different phrase.

And all it really takes is a little signposting and clarification to avoid the vagueness of “ this shows that ”. Ask yourself “ this WHAT shows that? ” And just point out what you’re referencing – and be obvious ! 

Here’s some examples:

phrases to start a new paragraph in an essay

You can also do a similar exercise with “ they ” and other demonstrative pronouns (that, these, those).

Specifying what your pronouns refer to will great help to increase the clarity of your (topic) sentences . And as an added bonus, your writing will also sound more sophisticated!

What type of paragraph are you starting?

When it comes to essay writing, there’s usually an expected structure: introduction, body (evidence and analysis) and conclusion .

With other genres of writing your paragraphs might not conform to such

Consider the structure of your paragraph. What do you want it to do? What is the topic? Do you want to open with your topic sentence?

How to start an introductory paragraph

Nailing the introduction of your essay is simultaneously one of the most important and hardest sections to write . A great introduction should set up your topic and explain why it’s significant.

One of the primary goals of an effective introduction is to clearly state your “ thesis statement ” (what your essay is about, and what you are setting out to achieve with your argument).

A popular (and easy) technique to start an introduction is to begin your first paragraph by immediately stating your thesis statement .

Here’s some examples of how to start a paragraph with your thesis statement:

  • This paper discusses …
  • In this paper, you will find …
  • This essay argues that …
  • This thesis will evaluate …
  • This article will explore the complex socio-political factors that contributed to the decline of the Roman Empire between the reign of Constantine (312-337AD) and the fall of Rome in 476AD .

However, starting your introductory paragraph effectively is not all about immediately stating your thesis!

So head over to our great article on how to start an essay , for lots of more advice and examples on how to kick off your introductions and capture your reader’s attention with style!

how long is a paragraph

How to start a body paragraph

Unless you’re writing an introduction or conclusion, you’ll be writing a “body paragraph”. Body paragraphs make up the majority of your essay, and should include all of your main points, data, evidence, analysis, deductions and arguments.

Each paragraph should have a particular purpose and be centred around one idea . Your body paragraphs might be analytical, evidential, persuasive, descriptive etc.

To help your reader make sense of the body of your essay, it’s important to guide them with signposts and transitions. These usually occur at the start of your paragraphs to demonstrate their relationship to preceding information.

However, that means there are LOTS of different techniques for starting your body paragraphs! So for 200+ words and phrases for effectively starting a body paragraph, simply keep reading!

How to start a concluding paragraph

Concluding paragraphs are a little different to other paragraphs because they shouldn’t be presenting new evidence or arguments . Instead, you’re aiming to draw your arguments together neatly, and tie up loose ends.

You might find them as part of a smaller sub-section within a longer academic dissertation or thesis. Or as part of the conclusion of your essay.

When starting your conclusion it’s always a great idea to let your reader know they’ve arrived by signposting its purpose . This is especially true if your essay doesn’t contain any headers!

Here are some examples of how to kick off your concluding paragraph:

  • In conclusion, this paper has shown that …
  • In summary, we have found that …
  • A review of these analyses indicates that …
  • To conclude, this essay has demonstrated that we must act immediately if we want to halt the drastic dwindling of our global bee population.

How to start a paragraph: 200+ top words and phrases for a winning first sentence

Choosing the best start for your paragraph is all about understanding the purpose of this paragraph within the wider context of the preceding (and following) paragraphs and your essay as a whole.

Where does it fit into the structure of your essay? Is it:

  • Opening a new topic or theme?
  • Providing explanations or descriptions?
  • Continuing a list or sequence?
  • Providing evidence?
  • Presenting a different opinion or counter-argument?
  • Beginning an analysis?
  • Highlighting consequences?
  • Drawing a conclusion?

It’s important to be direct in how you start each paragraph – especially if you’re struggling to get your point across!

The best way to craft a killer first sentence is to be clear on what you want it to do . We’ve covered 12 options below, packed with vocab and examples to get you started …

And don’t forget to consider when you should start a new paragraph , and how long you want your paragraphs to be . Where you place your paragraph breaks will have a big effect on the kind of starting sentence you need !

Finally – remember that the best time to craft effective opening sentences is after you’ve written your first draft and decided on your paragraph breaks! You should already have all your ideas arranged into a logical order.

Showing structure and presenting concepts

This first type of paragraphs are commonly found throughout your essay, whether you’re introducing your ideas, providing evidence and data, or presenting results.

There a lots of useful types of connective words and phrases to help you kick off your paragraphs with clarity:

how to start a paragraph

Most notable are the sequential signposting words , which you can use throughout your essay to guide your reader through the steps of your argument, or a list of related evidence, for example.

If you’re looking for something a little more specific, read on for four sets of example academic phrases to use to start a paragraph!

1.       Starting or continuing a sequence

One of the most important types of transitional phrases to help you start a paragraph is a sequential transition . These signposting transitions are great for academic arguments because they help you to present your points in order, without the reader getting lost along the way.

Sequential connectives and transitions create order within your narrative by highlighting the temporal relationship between your paragraphs. Think lists of events or evidence , or setting out the steps in your narrative .

You’ll often find them in combination with other paragraph-starting phrases ( have a look at the examples below to spot them !)

Why not try out some of these examples to help guide the readers of your essay?

  • Before considering X, it is important to note that …
  • Following on from Y, we should also consider …
  • The first notion to discuss is …
  • The next point to consider is …
  • Thirdly, we know that Y is also an important feature of …
  • As outlined in the previous paragraph, the next steps are to …
  • Having considered X, it is also necessary to explore Y …

2.       Providing evidence, examples or citations

Once you’ve made your claims or set out your ideas, it’s important to properly back them up. You’ll probably need to give evidence, quote experts and provide references throughout your essay .

If you’ve got more than one piece of evidence, it’s best to separate them out into individual paragraphs . Sequential signposting can be a helpful tool to help you and your reader keep track of your examples.

If your paragraph is all about giving evidence for a preceding statement, why not start with one of these phrases:

  • For example, X often …
  • This stance is clearly illustrated by …
  • Consider the example of Y, which …
  • This concept is well supported by …

If you want to quote or paraphrase a source or expert, a great way to start your paragraph is by introducing their views. You can also use phrases like these to help you clearly show their role in your essay:

  • [Author], in particular, has argued that …
  • According to [source], Y is heavily influenced by …
  • [Source] for example, demonstrates the validity of this assertion by …
  • This [counter-] argument is supported by evidence from X, which shows that …

Always remember to provide references for your sources in the manner most appropriate for your field ( i.e. footnotes, and author-date methods ).

3.       Giving emphasis to your point

Not all points and paragraphs in an essay are made equal. It’s natural you’ll want to highlight ideas and evidence for your reader to make sure they’re persuaded by your argument !

So, if you want to give emphasis to what you’re about to discuss, be obvious ! In fact, you may need to be more direct than you think:

  • This detail is significant because …
  • Undoubtedly, this experience was …
  • Certainly, there are ramifications for …
  • The last chapters, in particular, are revealing of X …

4.       Acknowledging uncertainty

In academia it’s common to find a little uncertainty in your evidence or results, or within the knowledge of your field . That’s true whether you’re a historian exploring artefacts from Ancient Greece, or a social scientist whose questionnaire results haven’t produced a clear answer.

Don’t hide from this uncertainty – it’s a great way to point ahead to future research that needs to be done. In fact, you might be doing it in your essay!

Why not try one of these examples to highlight the gaps in your academic field or experiment?

  • Whether X is actually the case remains a matter of debate, as current explorations cannot …
  • Although not proven, it is commonly understood that X …
  • Whilst the likelihood of X is debateable …
  • Given the age of the artifacts, it is impossible to say with accuracy whether Y …
  • Although we cannot know for sure, the findings above suggest that …
  • Untangling the causes of X is a complex matter and it is impossible to say for sure whether …

Showing the relationships between your points

As your essay progresses you will need to guide your reader through a succession of points, ideas and arguments by creating a narrative for them to follow. And important part of this task is the use of signposting to demonstrate the relationship between your paragraphs . Do they support each other? Do they present opposite sides of a debate?

Luckily there are lots of agreement , opposition and contextual connectives to help you increase your clarity:

how to start a paragraph

Read on for four more sets of example academic phrases to help you present your ideas!

5.       Making a new point

If there’s no connection between your new paragraph and the preceding material, you’re probably starting a new topic, point or idea.

That means it’s less likely ( although not impossible ) that you’ll need transitional phrases . However, it’s still important to signpost the purpose and position of this new paragraph clearly for your reader.

  • We know that X …
  • This section of the essay discusses …
  • We should now turn to an exploration of Y …
  • We should begin with an overview of the situation for X …
  • Before exploring the two sides of the debate, it is important to consider …

You can find some great ideas and examples for starting a new topic in our how to start an essay article. Whilst they’re definitely applicable to introductions, these strategies can also work well for kicking off any new idea!

6.       Presenting accepted concepts

If you’re aiming to take a new stance or question an accepted understanding with your essay, a great way to start a paragraph is by clearly setting out the concepts you want to challenge .

These phrases are also an effective way to establish the context of your essay within your field:

  • It is commonly believed that …
  • The accepted interpretation of X is …
  • Until recently, it was thought that …
  • Historically, X has been treated as a case of …
  • Over the past two decades, scholars have approached X as an example of …
  • The most common interpretation of Y is …

7.       Adding similar points

Agreement connectives are an important tool in your arsenal for clearly indicating the continuation or positive relationship between similar ideas or evidence you’re presenting.

If you’re looking to continue your essay with a similar point, why not try one of these examples:

  • Another aspect of X is …
  • Another important point is …
  • By the same token, Y should be explored with equal retrospection for …
  • Moreover, an equally significant factor of X is …
  • We should also consider …
  • Proponents of Y frequently also suggested that …

8.       Demonstrating contrast

In contrast, if you’re looking to present a counter-argument, opposite side of a debate, or critique of the ideas, evidence or results in your preceding paragraph(s), you’ll need to turn to contradiction and opposition connectives.

These phrases will help you to clearly link your paragraphs whilst setting them in contrast within your narrative:

  • A contrary explanation is that …
  • On the other side of this debate,  X suggests that …
  • Given this understanding of X, it is surprising that Y …
  • On the other hand, critics of X point to …
  • Despite these criticisms, proponents of X continue to …
  • Whilst the discussion in the previous paragraph suggests X to be true, it fails to take into consideration Y …

Note : some paragraph-opening sentences can be modified using connective words to show either agreement or contrast! Here are some examples:

  • It could also be said that X does [not] …
  • It is [also] important to note that X … OR It is important, however, to note that X …
  • There is [also/however], a further point to be considered …

Presenting analyses, arguments and results

An important stage of any essay is the analysis – that’s when you bring your own arguments to the table, based on your data and results.

Signalling this clearly, therefore, is pretty important! Happily, there are plenty of connective words and phrases that can help you out:

paragraph starters

Read on for four sets of example academic phrases to use to start your analysis, results and summary paragraphs!

9.       Conducting an analysis and constructing your argument

Once you’ve set out your evidence or data, it’s time to point out the connections within them. Or to analyse how they support the argument you want to make.

With humanities essays it is common to analyse the impact of your evidence as you present it. In contrast, sciences essays often contain a dedicated analysis section after the data has been presented.

You’ll probably need several analytical paragraphs to address each of your points. So, a great way to get started is to dive straight in by signposting the connections you want to make in each one:

  • Each of these arguments make an important contribution to X because …
  • In order to fully understand Y, we need to analyse the findings from …
  • Each model of X and Y changed throughout the experiment because …
  • Exploring this dataset reveals that, in fact, X is not as common as hypothesised …
  • Notwithstanding such limitations, this data still shows that …
  • Of central concern to Y, therefore, is the evidence that …
  • This interpretation of X is …
  • This critique implies that …
  • This approach is similar to that of Y, who, as we have seen above, argues that …
  • The resulting graphs suggest that …
  • Whilst conducting the survey, it was discovered that …

10.   Presenting results

Having completed your analyses of any evidence (and hopefully persuaded your reader of your argument), you may need to present your results. This is especially relevant for essays that examine a specific dataset after a survey or experiment .

If you want to signpost this section of your essay clearly, start your paragraph with a phrase like these:

  • The arguments presented above show that …
  • In this last analysis, we can see that X has shown …
  • As we have seen, the data gathered demonstrates that …
  • As demonstrated above, our understanding of X primarily stems from …

11.   Demonstrating cause and effect

When writing an academic essay you may often need to demonstrate the cause and effect relationship between your evidence or data, and your theories or results . Choosing the right connective phrases can be important for showing this relationship clearly to your reader.

Try one of these phrases to start your paragraph to clearly explain the consequences:

  • As a consequence, X cannot be said to …
  • Therefore, we can posit that …
  • Provided that X is indeed true, it has been shown that Y …
  • As such, it is necessary to note that …
  • For this reason, the decision was made to …
  • The evidence show that the primary cause of X was …
  • As a result of Y, it was found that …

12.   Summarising a topic or analysis

In general, summary paragraphs should not present any new evidence or arguments. Instead, they act as a reminder of the path your essay has taken so far.

Of course, these concluding paragraphs commonly occur at the end of an essay as part of your conclusion. However, they are also used to draw one point or stage of your argument to a close before the next begins .

Within a larger essay or dissertation, these interludes can be useful reminders for your reader as you transition between providing context, giving evidence, suggesting new approaches etc.

It’s worth noting that concluding your topic or analysis isn’t always the same as presenting results, although there can be some similarities in vocabulary.

Connect your arguments into summaries with clear linking phrases such as:

  • Altogether, these arguments demonstrate that …
  • Each of these arguments make an important contribution to our understanding of X …
  • From this overview of X and Y, we can conclude that …
  • We can therefore see that …
  • It was hypothesised that X, however, as we have seen …
  • Therefore, we can [clearly] see that …

Time to get writing your paragraphs!

And that’s it! You should now have a much-improved understanding of how to start a paragraph.

Whether you we’re worried about how to start your introductions or conclusions, or were wondering about specific types of body paragraphs, hopefully you’ve found what you need in the examples above .

If you need more writing advice to help you nail top marks for your essay, we’ve got a whole series of articles designed to improve your writing skills – perfect ! Have a read for top tips to for capturing easy marks 😊

You can learn:

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  • about the ideal length(s) for your paragraphs
  • how to start an essay AND how to structure an essay
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  • 40 Useful Words and Phrases for Top-Notch Essays

phrases to start a new paragraph in an essay

To be truly brilliant, an essay needs to utilise the right language. You could make a great point, but if it’s not intelligently articulated, you almost needn’t have bothered.

Developing the language skills to build an argument and to write persuasively is crucial if you’re to write outstanding essays every time. In this article, we’re going to equip you with the words and phrases you need to write a top-notch essay, along with examples of how to utilise them.

It’s by no means an exhaustive list, and there will often be other ways of using the words and phrases we describe that we won’t have room to include, but there should be more than enough below to help you make an instant improvement to your essay-writing skills.

This article is suitable for native English speakers and those who are  learning English at our Oxford Summer School or San Francisco Summer School and are just taking their first steps into essay writing.

General explaining

Let’s start by looking at language for general explanations of complex points.

1. In order to

Usage: “In order to” can be used to introduce an explanation for the purpose of an argument. Example: “In order to understand X, we need first to understand Y.”

2. In other words

Usage: Use “in other words” when you want to express something in a different way (more simply), to make it easier to understand, or to emphasise or expand on a point. Example: “Frogs are amphibians. In other words, they live on the land and in the water.”

3. To put it another way

Usage: This phrase is another way of saying “in other words”, and can be used in particularly complex points, when you feel that an alternative way of wording a problem may help the reader achieve a better understanding of its significance. Example: “Plants rely on photosynthesis. To put it another way, they will die without the sun.”

4. That is to say

Usage: “That is” and “that is to say” can be used to add further detail to your explanation, or to be more precise. Example: “Whales are mammals. That is to say, they must breathe air.”

5. To that end

Usage: Use “to that end” or “to this end” in a similar way to “in order to” or “so”. Example: “Zoologists have long sought to understand how animals communicate with each other. To that end, a new study has been launched that looks at elephant sounds and their possible meanings.”

Adding additional information to support a point

Students often make the mistake of using synonyms of “and” each time they want to add further information in support of a point they’re making, or to build an argument . Here are some cleverer ways of doing this.

6. Moreover

Usage: Employ “moreover” at the start of a sentence to add extra information in support of a point you’re making. Example: “Moreover, the results of a recent piece of research provide compelling evidence in support of…”

7. Furthermore

Usage:This is also generally used at the start of a sentence, to add extra information. Example: “Furthermore, there is evidence to suggest that…”

8. What’s more

Usage: This is used in the same way as “moreover” and “furthermore”. Example: “What’s more, this isn’t the only evidence that supports this hypothesis.”

9. Likewise

Usage: Use “likewise” when you want to talk about something that agrees with what you’ve just mentioned. Example: “Scholar A believes X. Likewise, Scholar B argues compellingly in favour of this point of view.”

10. Similarly

Usage: Use “similarly” in the same way as “likewise”. Example: “Audiences at the time reacted with shock to Beethoven’s new work, because it was very different to what they were used to. Similarly, we have a tendency to react with surprise to the unfamiliar.”

11. Another key thing to remember

Usage: Use the phrase “another key point to remember” or “another key fact to remember” to introduce additional facts without using the word “also”. Example: “As a Romantic, Blake was a proponent of a closer relationship between humans and nature. Another key point to remember is that Blake was writing during the Industrial Revolution, which had a major impact on the world around him.”

12. As well as

Usage: Use “as well as” instead of “also” or “and”. Example: “Scholar A argued that this was due to X, as well as Y.”

13. Not only… but also

Usage: This wording is used to add an extra piece of information, often something that’s in some way more surprising or unexpected than the first piece of information. Example: “Not only did Edmund Hillary have the honour of being the first to reach the summit of Everest, but he was also appointed Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire.”

14. Coupled with

Usage: Used when considering two or more arguments at a time. Example: “Coupled with the literary evidence, the statistics paint a compelling view of…”

15. Firstly, secondly, thirdly…

Usage: This can be used to structure an argument, presenting facts clearly one after the other. Example: “There are many points in support of this view. Firstly, X. Secondly, Y. And thirdly, Z.

16. Not to mention/to say nothing of

Usage: “Not to mention” and “to say nothing of” can be used to add extra information with a bit of emphasis. Example: “The war caused unprecedented suffering to millions of people, not to mention its impact on the country’s economy.”

Words and phrases for demonstrating contrast

When you’re developing an argument, you will often need to present contrasting or opposing opinions or evidence – “it could show this, but it could also show this”, or “X says this, but Y disagrees”. This section covers words you can use instead of the “but” in these examples, to make your writing sound more intelligent and interesting.

17. However

Usage: Use “however” to introduce a point that disagrees with what you’ve just said. Example: “Scholar A thinks this. However, Scholar B reached a different conclusion.”

18. On the other hand

Usage: Usage of this phrase includes introducing a contrasting interpretation of the same piece of evidence, a different piece of evidence that suggests something else, or an opposing opinion. Example: “The historical evidence appears to suggest a clear-cut situation. On the other hand, the archaeological evidence presents a somewhat less straightforward picture of what happened that day.”

19. Having said that

Usage: Used in a similar manner to “on the other hand” or “but”. Example: “The historians are unanimous in telling us X, an agreement that suggests that this version of events must be an accurate account. Having said that, the archaeology tells a different story.”

20. By contrast/in comparison

Usage: Use “by contrast” or “in comparison” when you’re comparing and contrasting pieces of evidence. Example: “Scholar A’s opinion, then, is based on insufficient evidence. By contrast, Scholar B’s opinion seems more plausible.”

21. Then again

Usage: Use this to cast doubt on an assertion. Example: “Writer A asserts that this was the reason for what happened. Then again, it’s possible that he was being paid to say this.”

22. That said

Usage: This is used in the same way as “then again”. Example: “The evidence ostensibly appears to point to this conclusion. That said, much of the evidence is unreliable at best.”

Usage: Use this when you want to introduce a contrasting idea. Example: “Much of scholarship has focused on this evidence. Yet not everyone agrees that this is the most important aspect of the situation.”

Adding a proviso or acknowledging reservations

Sometimes, you may need to acknowledge a shortfalling in a piece of evidence, or add a proviso. Here are some ways of doing so.

24. Despite this

Usage: Use “despite this” or “in spite of this” when you want to outline a point that stands regardless of a shortfalling in the evidence. Example: “The sample size was small, but the results were important despite this.”

25. With this in mind

Usage: Use this when you want your reader to consider a point in the knowledge of something else. Example: “We’ve seen that the methods used in the 19th century study did not always live up to the rigorous standards expected in scientific research today, which makes it difficult to draw definite conclusions. With this in mind, let’s look at a more recent study to see how the results compare.”

26. Provided that

Usage: This means “on condition that”. You can also say “providing that” or just “providing” to mean the same thing. Example: “We may use this as evidence to support our argument, provided that we bear in mind the limitations of the methods used to obtain it.”

27. In view of/in light of

Usage: These phrases are used when something has shed light on something else. Example: “In light of the evidence from the 2013 study, we have a better understanding of…”

28. Nonetheless

Usage: This is similar to “despite this”. Example: “The study had its limitations, but it was nonetheless groundbreaking for its day.”

29. Nevertheless

Usage: This is the same as “nonetheless”. Example: “The study was flawed, but it was important nevertheless.”

30. Notwithstanding

Usage: This is another way of saying “nonetheless”. Example: “Notwithstanding the limitations of the methodology used, it was an important study in the development of how we view the workings of the human mind.”

Giving examples

Good essays always back up points with examples, but it’s going to get boring if you use the expression “for example” every time. Here are a couple of other ways of saying the same thing.

31. For instance

Example: “Some birds migrate to avoid harsher winter climates. Swallows, for instance, leave the UK in early winter and fly south…”

32. To give an illustration

Example: “To give an illustration of what I mean, let’s look at the case of…”

Signifying importance

When you want to demonstrate that a point is particularly important, there are several ways of highlighting it as such.

33. Significantly

Usage: Used to introduce a point that is loaded with meaning that might not be immediately apparent. Example: “Significantly, Tacitus omits to tell us the kind of gossip prevalent in Suetonius’ accounts of the same period.”

34. Notably

Usage: This can be used to mean “significantly” (as above), and it can also be used interchangeably with “in particular” (the example below demonstrates the first of these ways of using it). Example: “Actual figures are notably absent from Scholar A’s analysis.”

35. Importantly

Usage: Use “importantly” interchangeably with “significantly”. Example: “Importantly, Scholar A was being employed by X when he wrote this work, and was presumably therefore under pressure to portray the situation more favourably than he perhaps might otherwise have done.”

Summarising

You’ve almost made it to the end of the essay, but your work isn’t over yet. You need to end by wrapping up everything you’ve talked about, showing that you’ve considered the arguments on both sides and reached the most likely conclusion. Here are some words and phrases to help you.

36. In conclusion

Usage: Typically used to introduce the concluding paragraph or sentence of an essay, summarising what you’ve discussed in a broad overview. Example: “In conclusion, the evidence points almost exclusively to Argument A.”

37. Above all

Usage: Used to signify what you believe to be the most significant point, and the main takeaway from the essay. Example: “Above all, it seems pertinent to remember that…”

38. Persuasive

Usage: This is a useful word to use when summarising which argument you find most convincing. Example: “Scholar A’s point – that Constanze Mozart was motivated by financial gain – seems to me to be the most persuasive argument for her actions following Mozart’s death.”

39. Compelling

Usage: Use in the same way as “persuasive” above. Example: “The most compelling argument is presented by Scholar A.”

40. All things considered

Usage: This means “taking everything into account”. Example: “All things considered, it seems reasonable to assume that…”

How many of these words and phrases will you get into your next essay? And are any of your favourite essay terms missing from our list? Let us know in the comments below, or get in touch here to find out more about courses that can help you with your essays.

At Oxford Royale Academy, we offer a number of  summer school courses for young people who are keen to improve their essay writing skills. Click here to apply for one of our courses today, including law , business , medicine  and engineering .

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Transitional Words and Phrases

One of your primary goals as a writer is to present ideas in a clear and understandable way. To help readers move through your complex ideas, you want to be intentional about how you structure your paper as a whole as well as how you form the individual paragraphs that comprise it. In order to think through the challenges of presenting your ideas articulately, logically, and in ways that seem natural to your readers, check out some of these resources: Developing a Thesis Statement , Paragraphing , and Developing Strategic Transitions: Writing that Establishes Relationships and Connections Between Ideas.

While clear writing is mostly achieved through the deliberate sequencing of your ideas across your entire paper, you can guide readers through the connections you’re making by using transitional words in individual sentences. Transitional words and phrases can create powerful links between your ideas and can help your reader understand your paper’s logic.

In what follows, we’ve included a list of frequently used transitional words and phrases that can help you establish how your various ideas relate to each other. We’ve divided these words and phrases into categories based on the common kinds of relationships writers establish between ideas.

Two recommendations: Use these transitions strategically by making sure that the word or phrase you’re choosing matches the logic of the relationship you’re emphasizing or the connection you’re making. All of these words and phrases have different meanings, nuances, and connotations, so before using a particular transitional word in your paper, be sure you understand its meaning and usage completely, and be sure that it’s the right match for your paper’s logic. Use these transitional words and phrases sparingly because if you use too many of them, your readers might feel like you are overexplaining connections that are already clear.

Categories of Transition Words and Phrases

Causation Chronology Combinations Contrast Example

Importance Location Similarity Clarification Concession

Conclusion Intensification Purpose Summary

Transitions to help establish some of the most common kinds of relationships

Causation– Connecting instigator(s) to consequence(s).

accordingly as a result and so because

consequently for that reason hence on account of

since therefore thus

Chronology– Connecting what issues in regard to when they occur.

after afterwards always at length during earlier following immediately in the meantime

later never next now once simultaneously so far sometimes

soon subsequently then this time until now when whenever while

Combinations Lists– Connecting numerous events. Part/Whole– Connecting numerous elements that make up something bigger.

additionally again also and, or, not as a result besides even more

finally first, firstly further furthermore in addition in the first place in the second place

last, lastly moreover next second, secondly, etc. too

Contrast– Connecting two things by focusing on their differences.

after all although and yet at the same time but

despite however in contrast nevertheless nonetheless notwithstanding

on the contrary on the other hand otherwise though yet

Example– Connecting a general idea to a particular instance of this idea.

as an illustration e.g., (from a Latin abbreviation for “for example”)

for example for instance specifically that is

to demonstrate to illustrate

Importance– Connecting what is critical to what is more inconsequential.

chiefly critically

foundationally most importantly

of less importance primarily

Location– Connecting elements according to where they are placed in relationship to each other.

above adjacent to below beyond

centrally here nearby neighboring on

opposite to peripherally there wherever

Similarity– Connecting to things by suggesting that they are in some way alike.

by the same token in like manner

in similar fashion here in the same way

likewise wherever

Other kinds of transitional words and phrases Clarification

i.e., (from a Latin abbreviation for “that is”) in other words

that is that is to say to clarify to explain

to put it another way to rephrase it

granted it is true

naturally of course

finally lastly

in conclusion in the end

to conclude

Intensification

in fact indeed no

of course surely to repeat

undoubtedly without doubt yes

for this purpose in order that

so that to that end

to this end

in brief in sum

in summary in short

to sum up to summarize

phrases to start a new paragraph in an essay

Improving Your Writing Style

This is an accordion element with a series of buttons that open and close related content panels.

Clear, Concise Sentences

Use the active voice

Put the action in the verb

Tidy up wordy phrases

Reduce wordy verbs

Reduce prepositional phrases

Reduce expletive constructions

Avoid using vague nouns

Avoid unneccessarily inflated words

Avoid noun strings

Connecting Ideas Through Transitions

Using Transitional Words and Phrases

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Home > Essay writing and study advice

  • How to begin a new paragraph. Useful linking words and phrases.

It is a good idea to occasionally use linking words and phrases at the start of a new paragraph. They can help to link what you have said in the previous paragraph to what you are about to say in your new paragraph.

These link words and phrases are often referred to as signposts. This is because they help to indicate to the reader when one point ends and other begins, as well as the relationship between each point.

Used with care, they can help to guide examiners and tutors through your essay. As well as bolster the impression of a coherent, flowing and logical piece of work.

Useful linking words and phrases that can be used at the start of new paragraphs:

A contrary explanation is that, …

Although, …

As a consequence, …

As a result, …

As we have seen, …

At the same time, …

Accordingly, …

An equally significant aspect of…

Another, significant factor in…

Before considering X it is important to note Y

By the same token, …

But we should also consider, …

Despite these criticisms, …it’s popularity remains high.

Certainly, there is no shortage of disagreement within…

Consequently, …

Correspondingly, …

Conversely, …

Chaytor, … in particular, has focused on the

Despite this, …

Despite these criticisms, … the popularity of X remains largely undiminished.

Each of these theoretical positions make an important contribution to our understanding of, …

Evidence for in support of this position, can be found in…,

For this reason, …

For these reasons, …

Furthermore, …

Given, the current high profile debate with regard to, …it is quite surprising that …

Given, the advantages of … outlined in the previous paragraph, …it is quite predictable that …

Having considered X, it is also reasonable to look at …

In addition to, …

In contrast, …

In this way, …

In this manner, …

In the final analysis, …

In short, …

It can be seen from the above analysis that, …

It could also be said that, …

It is however, important to note the limitations of…

It is important to note however, that …

It is important however not to assume the applicability of, …in all cases.

It is important however not to overemphasis the strengths of …

In the face of such criticism, proponents of, …have responded in a number of ways.

Moreover, …

Notwithstanding such criticism, ….it’s popularity remains largely undiminished.

Notwithstanding these limitations, ….it worth remains in a number of situations.

Noting the compelling nature of this new evidence, …has suggested that.

Nevertheless, …remains a growing problem.

Nonetheless, the number of, …has continued to expand at an exponential rate.

On the other hand, critics of, …point to its blindness, with respect to.

Of central concern therefore to, …sociologists is explaining how societal processes and institutions…

Proponents of…, have also suggested that…

Subsequently, …

Similarly, …

The sentiment expressed in the quotation, embodies the view that, …

This interpretation of, … has not been without it’s detractors however.

This approach is similar to the, …. position

This critique, unfortunately, implies a singular cause of, …

This point is also sustained by the work of, …

This counter argument is supported by evidence from, …

The use of the term, …

Therefore, …

There appears then to be an acceleration in the growth of

There is also, however, a further point to be considered.

These technological developments have greatly increased the growth in, …

To be able to understand, …

Undoubtedly, …

While such failures must not be discounted, … there were in comparison small, when compared

Whilst the discussion in the preceding paragraph, …

Whether crime rates were actually lower at this time continues to be a matter of debate. Evidence from…

There are an almost limitless number of linking phrases and words one can use. What is important is that they complement the style of your writing.

Use these examples to arouse your creativity.

Remember that you don’t have to use them all the time. Using words like, ‘therefore’ ‘subsequently’ ‘moreover’ etc. for every new paragraph would probably become repetitive and detract from the key component of most academic work – critical analysis.

Finally, remember to succinctly, identify the key paragraphs and/or sections of your essay during your introductory paragraph. Then restate them along side an unambiguous position in your concluding paragraph. Again this will help to communicate a clear and understandable progression and structure, to those who read or mark your essay.

Best wishes. S J Tonge.

144 Responses to “How to begin a new paragraph. Useful linking words and phrases.”

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There are many ways to introduce an academic essay or short paper. Most academic writers, however, appear to do one or more of the following in their introductions:

  • establish the context, background and/or importance of the topic
  • present an issue, problem, or controversy in the field of study
  • define the topic and/or key terms used in the paper
  • state the purpose of the essay or short paper
  • provide an overview of the coverage and/or structure of the writing

Slightly less complex introductions may simply inform the reader: what the topic is, why it is important, and how the writing is organised. In very short assignments, it is not uncommon for a writer to commence simply by stating the purpose of their writing.

Introductions to research dissertations and theses tend to be relatively short compared to the other sections of the text but quite complex in terms of their functional elements. Some of the more common elements include:

  • establishing the context, background and/or importance of the topic
  • giving a brief review of the relevant academic literature
  • identifying a problem, controversy or a knowledge gap in the field of study
  • stating the aim(s) of the research and the research questions or hypotheses
  • providing a synopsis of the research design and method(s)
  • explaining the significance or value of the study
  • defining certain key terms
  • providing an overview of the dissertation or report structure

Examples of phrases which are commonly employed to realise these functions can be seen by clicking on the headings listed below. Note that there may be a certain amount of overlap between some of the categories under which the phrases are listed. Also, the order in which the different categories of phrases are shown reflects a typical order but this is far from fixed or rigid, and not all the elements are present in all introductions.

A number of analysts have identified common patterns in the introductions of research articles. One of the best known patterns is the CARS model (create a research space) first described by John Swales (1990). This model, which utilises an ecological metaphor, has, in its simplest form, three elements or moves:

  • Establishing the territory (establishing importance of the topic, reviewing previous work)
  • Identifying a niche (indicating a gap in knowledge)
  • Occupying the niche (listing purpose of new research, listing questions, stating the value of the work, indicating the structure of the writing)

Establishing the importance of the topic for the world or society

X is a major contributor to … X plays a critical role in the maintenance of … Xs have emerged as powerful platforms for … X is essential for a wide range of technologies. X can play an important role in addressing the issue of … There is evidence that X plays a pivotal role in regulating … In the new global economy, X has become a central issue for … Evidence suggests that X is among the most important factors for … Xs are one of the most widely used groups of antibacterial agents and … There is a growing body of literature that recognises the importance of … X is an important component in the climate system, and plays a key role in Y. Xs are one of the most widely used groups of Y and have been extensively used for …

Establishing the importance of the topic for the discipline

X is of interest because … X is a classic problem in … X is an important aspect of … X is a fundamental property of … X is an increasingly important area in … The concepts of X and Y are central to … X is at the heart of our understanding of … Investigating X is a continuing concern within … X is a major area of interest within the field of … X has been an object of research since the 1960s. X has been the subject of many classic studies in … X has been instrumental in our understanding of … The theory of X provides a useful account of how … Central to the entire discipline of X is the concept of … The issue of X has received considerable critical attention. X has long been a question of great interest in a wide range of fields.

Establishing the importance of the topic (time frame given)

Recently, there has been renewed interest in … Traditionally, Xs have subscribed to the belief that … One of the most important events of the 1970s was … In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in … Recent developments in X have heightened the need for … The last two decades have seen a growing trend towards … Recently, researchers have shown an increased interest in … Recent trends in X have led to a proliferation of studies that … Over the past century, there has been a dramatic increase in … The past decade has seen the rapid development of X in many … Since it was reported in 2015, X has been attracting considerable interest. Recent developments in the field of X have led to a renewed interest in … The past thirty years have seen increasingly rapid advances in the field of …

Establishing the importance of the topic as a problem to be addressed

X is a major problem in … Of particular concern is … One of the main obstacles … One of the greatest challenges … A key issue is the safe disposal of … The main disadvantage of X is that … X impacts negatively upon a range of … It is now well established that X can impair … X has led to the decline in the population of … The main challenge faced by many researchers is the … Lack of X has existed as a health problem for many years. Xs are one of the most rapidly declining groups of insects in … Exposure to X has been shown to be related to adverse effects in … There is an urgent need to address the safety problems caused by …

Referring to previous work to establish what is already known

Recent evidence suggests that … Extensive research has shown that … Studies of X show the importance of … It has previously been observed that … Several attempts have been made to … Previous research has established that … Data from several studies suggest that … Recent research comparing X and Y has found … The existing body of research on X suggests that … There is a growing body of literature that recognises … Several theories on the origin of X have been proposed. Existing research recognises the critical role played by … It is now well established from a variety of studies, that … Recently investigators have examined the effects of X on Y. Surveys such as that conducted by Smith (2015) have shown that … Factors found to be influencing X have been explored in several studies. A number of cross-sectional studies suggest an association between X and Y… Studies over the past two decades have provided important information on …

Identifying a controversy within the field of study

A much debated question is whether … One major issue in early X research concerned … To date there has been little agreement on what … The issue has grown in importance in light of recent … One of the most significant current discussions in X is … In the literature on X, the relative importance of Y is debated. One observer has already drawn attention to the paradox in … Questions have been raised about the use of animal subjects in … In many Xs, a debate is taking place between Ys and Zs concerning … Debate continues about the best strategies for the management of … This concept has recently been challenged by X studies demonstrating … The debate about X has gained fresh prominence with many arguing that … Scholars have long debated the impact of X on the creation and diffusion of … More recently, literature has emerged that offers contradictory findings about … One major theoretical issue that has dominated the field for many years concerns … The controversy about scientific evidence for X has raged unabated for over a century. The issue of X has been a controversial and much disputed subject within the field of … The causes of X have been the subject of intense debate within the scientific community. In the literature on X, the relative importance of Y has been subject to considerable discussion.

Explaining the inadequacies of previous studies

Previous studies of X have not dealt with … Researchers have not treated X in much detail. Such expositions are unsatisfactory because they … Most studies in the field of X have only focused on … Such approaches, however, have failed to address … Previous published studies are limited to local surveys. Half of the studies evaluated failed to specify whether … The research to date has tended to focus on X rather than Y. Previously published studies on the effect of X are not consistent. Smith’s analysis does not take account of …, nor does she examine … The existing accounts fail to resolve the contradiction between X and Y. Most studies in X have only been carried out in a small number of areas.

However, much of the research up to now has been descriptive in nature … The generalisability of much published research on this issue is problematic. Research on the subject has been mostly restricted to limited comparisons of … However, few writers have been able to draw on any systematic research into … Short-term studies such as these do not necessarily show subtle changes over time … Although extensive research has been carried out on X, no single study exists which … However, these results were based upon data from over 30 years ago and it is unclear if … The experimental data are rather controversial, and there is no general agreement about …

Identifying the paucity or lack of previous research

There is little published data on … No previous study has investigated X. The use of X has not been investigated. Data about the efficacy and safety of X are limited. Up to now, far too little attention has been paid to … A search of the literature revealed few studies which … The impact of X on Y is understudied, particularly for … Few studies have investigated X in any systematic way … In addition, no research has been found that surveyed … So far, very little attention has been paid to the role of X. Surprisingly, the effects of X have not been closely examined. In contrast to X, there is much less information about effects of … A systematic understanding of how X contributes to Y is still lacking. Despite the importance of X, there remains a paucity of evidence on … To date, the problem has received scant attention in the research literature.

Identifying a knowledge gap in the field of study

It is still not known whether … … much less is known about X. The nature of X remains unclear. Currently, there are no data on … What is less clear is the nature of … Very little is currently known about X in … Research to date has not yet determined … What is not yet clear is the impact of X on … There is still uncertainty, however, whether … The response of X to Y is not fully understood. Causal factors leading to X remain speculative. The neurobiological basis of X is poorly understood. Little is known about X and it is not clear what factors … To date, only a limited number of Xs have been identified. The mechanisms that underpin X are not fully understood. Much uncertainty still exists about the relationship between … This indicates a need to understand the various perceptions of X that exist among … It is now well established that … However, the influence of X on Y has remained unclear.

Stating the focus, aim, or argument of a short paper

In this paper, I argue that … This paper attempts to show that … The central thesis of this paper is that … In the pages that follow, it will be argued that … In this essay, I attempt to defend the view that … The aim of this essay is to explore the relationship between … The purpose of this paper is to review recent research into the …

Stating the purpose of the current research

The specific objective of this study was to … An objective of this study was to investigate … This thesis will examine the way in which the … This study set out to investigate the usefulness of … This dissertation seeks to explain the development of … This case study seeks to examine the changing nature of … The objectives of this research are to determine whether … This prospective study was designed to investigate the use of … This research examines the emerging role of X in the context of … This study systematically reviews the data for…, aiming to provide … Drawing upon two strands of research into X, this study attempts to … This thesis intends to determine the extent to which … and whether … This dissertation aims to unravel some of the mysteries surrounding … This study therefore set out to assess the effect of X …, and the effect of … The main aim of this study is to investigate the differences between X and Y. Part of the aim of this project is to develop software that is compatible with … There are two primary aims of this study: 1. To investigate … 2. To ascertain … This study seeks to obtain data which will help to address these research gaps. One purpose of this study was to assess the extent to which these factors were … The purpose of this investigation is to explore the relationship between X and Y.

Describing the research design and the methods used

Data for this study were collected using … Five works will be examined, all of which … This investigation takes the form of a case-study of the … This study was exploratory and interpretative in nature. This study uses a qualitative case study approach to investigate … The research data in this thesis is drawn from four main sources: … The approach to empirical research adopted for this study was one of … This dissertation follows a case-study design, with in-depth analysis of … By employing qualitative modes of enquiry, I attempt to illuminate the … Qualitative and quantitative research designs were adopted to provide … Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used in this investigation. A holistic approach is utilised, integrating X, Y and Z material to establish … The study was conducted in the form of a survey, with data being gathered via … The methodological approach taken in this study is a mixed methodology based on … A combination of quantitative and qualitative approaches was used in the data analysis.

Explaining the significance of the current study

This is the first study to … This study provides new insights into … This work will generate fresh insight into … The study offers some important insights into … Understanding the link between X and Y will help … This is the first study to undertake a longitudinal analysis of … The present research explores, for the first time, the effects of … The importance and originality of this study are that it explores … The findings should make an important contribution to the field of …. Characterisation of X is important for our increased understanding of … It is hoped that this research will contribute to a deeper understanding of … This study aims to contribute to this growing area of research by exploring … This project provided an important opportunity to advance the understanding of … Therefore, this study makes a major contribution to research on X by demonstrating … There are several important areas where this study makes an original contribution to … The experimental work presented here provides one of the first investigations into how …

Describing the limitations of the current study

The thesis does not engage with … It is not the task of this paper to examine … This study is unable to encompass the entire … Establishing X is beyond the scope of this study. It is beyond the scope of this study to examine the … The analysis of X presented here is based solely on … A full discussion of X lies beyond the scope of this study. The reader should bear in mind that the study is based on … Another potential problem is that the scope of my thesis may be too broad. Due to practical constraints, this paper cannot provide a comprehensive review of…

Giving reasons for personal interest in the research*

I became interested in Xs after reading … My interest in this area developed while I was … I have worked closely with X for many years and … My personal experience of X has prompted this research. My main reason for choosing this topic is personal interest. It is my experience of working with X that has driven this research. This project was conceived during my time working for X. As a medical advisor, I witnessed …

* sometimes found in the humanities, and the applied human sciences

Outlining the structure of the paper or dissertation

The first section of this paper will examine… This paper begins by … It will then go on to … My thesis is composed of four themed chapters. The essay has been organised in the following way. The remaining part of the paper proceeds as follows: … The main issues addressed in this paper are: a), b) and c). This paper first gives a brief overview of the recent history of X. This paper has been divided into four parts. The first part deals with … The third chapter is concerned with the methodology used for this study. The overall structure of the study takes the form of six chapters, including … Chapter Four analyses the results of interviews and focus group discussions undertaken during … Chapter Two begins by laying out the theoretical dimensions of the research, and looks at how … The fourth section presents the findings of the research, focusing on the three key themes that …

Explaining key terms used in the current work

(also refer to  Defining terms )

Throughout this paper, the term ‘X’ will refer to … The term ‘X’ will be used in this thesis to refer to … Historically, the term ‘X’ has been used to describe … It is necessary here to clarify exactly what is meant by … The phrase ‘X’ will be used in this study to describe the … According to Smith (2002), X can be defined as follows: ‘ … ’ In this article, the abbreviation XYZ will be used to refer to … Throughout this dissertation, the term ‘X’ will be used to refer to … The term ‘X’ is a relatively new name for …, commonly referred to as … In this essay, the term ‘X’ will be used in its broadest sense to refer to all … In this dissertation, the terms ‘X’ and ‘Y’ are used interchangeably to mean … While a variety of definitions of the term X have been suggested, this paper will use the definition first suggested by Smith (1968) who saw it as …

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Transition Sentences | Tips & Examples for Clear Writing

Published on June 9, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

Clear transitions are crucial to clear writing: They show the reader how different parts of your essay, paper, or thesis are connected. Transition sentences can be used to structure your text and link together paragraphs or sections.

… In this case, the researchers concluded that the method was unreliable.

However , evidence from a more recent study points to a different conclusion . …

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Table of contents

Transitioning between paragraphs, transitioning to a new section, transitions within a paragraph, other interesting articles.

When you start a new paragraph , the first sentence should clearly express:

  • What this paragraph will discuss
  • How it relates to the previous paragraph

The examples below show some examples of transition sentences between paragraphs and what they express.

Placement of transition sentences

The beginning of a new paragraph is generally the right place for a transition sentence. Each paragraph should focus on one topic, so avoid spending time at the end of a paragraph explaining the theme of the next one.

The first dissenter to consider is …

However, several scholars dissent from this consensus. The first one to consider is …

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While transitions between paragraphs are generally a single sentence, when you start a new section in a longer text, you may need an entire transition paragraph. Transitioning to a new section involves summarizing the content of the previous section and expressing how the new one will build upon or depart from it.

For example, the following sentences might be an effective transition for a new section in a literary analysis essay.

Having established that the subjective experience of time is one of Mann’s key concerns in The Magic Mountain , it is now possible to explore how this theme facilitates the novel’s connection with World War I. The war itself is not narrated in the book, but rather hinted at as something awaiting Castorp beyond the final pages. In this way, Mann links his protagonist’s subjective experience of time to more than just his illness; it is also used to explore the period leading up to the outbreak of war.

As in academic writing generally, aim to be as concise as you can while maintaining clarity: If you can transition to a new section clearly with a single sentence, do so, but use more when necessary.

It’s also important to use effective transitions within each paragraph you write, leading the reader through your arguments efficiently and avoiding ambiguity.

The known-new contract

The order of information within each of your sentences is important to the cohesion of your text. The known-new contract , a useful writing concept, states that a new sentence should generally begin with some reference to information from the previous sentence, and then go on to connect it to new information.

In the following example, the second sentence doesn’t follow very clearly from the first. The connection only becomes clear when we reach the end.

By reordering the information in the second sentence so that it begins with a reference to the first, we can help the reader follow our argument more smoothly.

Note that the known-new contract is just a general guideline. Not every sentence needs to be structured this way, but it’s a useful technique if you’re struggling to make your sentences cohere.

Transition words and phrases

Using appropriate transition words helps show your reader connections within and between sentences. Transition words and phrases come in four main types:

  • Additive transitions, which introduce new information or examples
  • Adversative transitions, which signal a contrast or departure from the previous text
  • Causal transitions, which are used to describe cause and effect
  • Sequential transitions, which indicate a sequence

The table below gives a few examples for each type:

Grouping similar information

While transition words and phrases are essential, and every essay will contain at least some of them, it’s also important to avoid overusing them. One way to do this is by grouping similar information together so that fewer transitions are needed.

For example, the following text uses three transition words and jumps back and forth between ideas. This makes it repetitive and difficult to follow.

Rewriting it to group similar information allows us to use just one transition, making the text more concise and readable.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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Transitions help your readers move between ideas within a paragraph, between paragraphs, or between sections of your argument. When you are deciding how to transition from one idea to the next, your goal should be to help readers see how your ideas are connected—and how those ideas connect to the big picture.

One useful way to do this is to start with old information and then introduce new information. When you begin a sentence or a paragraph with information that is familiar to your readers, you help your readers make connections between your ideas. For example, consider the difference between these two pairs of sentences below:  

Sentence pair #1: Ineffective Transition

Some experts argue that focusing on individual actions to combat climate change takes the focus away from the collective action required to keep carbon levels from rising. Change will not be effected, say some others, unless individual actions raise the necessary awareness.

While a reader can see the connection between the sentences above, it’s not immediately clear that the second sentence is providing a counterargument to the first. In the example below, key “old information” is repeated in the second sentence to help readers quickly see the connection. This makes the sequence of ideas easier to follow.  

Sentence pair #2: Effective Transition

Some experts argue that focusing on individual actions to combat climate change takes the focus away from the collective action required to keep carbon levels from rising. Other experts argue that individual actions are key to raising the awareness necessary to effect change.

You can use this same technique to create clear transitions between paragraphs. Here’s an example:

Some experts argue that focusing on individual actions to combat climate change takes the focus away from the collective action required to keep carbon levels from rising. Other experts argue that individual actions are key to raising the awareness necessary to effect change. According to Annie Lowery, individual actions are important to making social change because when individuals take action, they can change values, which can lead to more people becoming invested in fighting climate change. She writes, “Researchers believe that these kinds of household-led trends can help avert climate catastrophe, even if government and corporate actions are far more important” (Lowery).

So, what’s an individual household supposed to do?

The repetition of the word “household” in the new paragraph helps readers see the connection between what has come before (a discussion of whether household actions matter) and what is about to come (a proposal for what types of actions households can take to combat climate change).

Sometimes, transitional words can help readers see how ideas are connected. But it’s not enough to just include a “therefore,” “moreover,” “also,” or “in addition.” You should choose these words carefully to show your readers what kind of connection you are making between your ideas.

To decide which transitional word to use, start by identifying the relationship between your ideas. For example, you might be

  • making a comparison or showing a contrast Transitional words that compare and contrast include also, in the same way, similarly, in contrast, yet, on the one hand, on the other hand. But before you signal comparison, ask these questions: Do your readers need another example of the same thing? Is there a new nuance in this next point that distinguishes it from the previous example? For those relationships between ideas, you might try this type of transition: While x may appear the same, it actually raises a new question in a slightly different way. 
  • expressing agreement or disagreement When you are making an argument, you need to signal to readers where you stand in relation to other scholars and critics. You may agree with another person’s claim, you may want to concede some part of the argument even if you don’t agree with everything, or you may disagree. Transitional words that signal agreement, concession, and disagreement include however, nevertheless, actually, still, despite, admittedly, still, on the contrary, nonetheless .
  • showing cause and effect Transitional phrases that show cause and effect include therefore, hence, consequently, thus, so. Before you choose one of these words, make sure that what you are about to illustrate is really a causal link. Novice writers tend to add therefore and hence when they aren’t sure how to transition; you should reserve these words for when they accurately signal the progression of your ideas.
  • explaining or elaborating Transitions can signal to readers that you are going to expand on a point that you have just made or explain something further. Transitional words that signal explanation or elaboration include in other words, for example, for instance, in particular, that is, to illustrate, moreover .
  • drawing conclusions You can use transitions to signal to readers that you are moving from the body of your argument to your conclusions. Before you use transitional words to signal conclusions, consider whether you can write a stronger conclusion by creating a transition that shows the relationship between your ideas rather than by flagging the paragraph simply as a conclusion. Transitional words that signal a conclusion include in conclusion , as a result, ultimately, overall— but strong conclusions do not necessarily have to include those phrases.

If you’re not sure which transitional words to use—or whether to use one at all—see if you can explain the connection between your paragraphs or sentence either out loud or in the margins of your draft.

For example, if you write a paragraph in which you summarize physician Atul Gawande’s argument about the value of incremental care, and then you move on to a paragraph that challenges those ideas, you might write down something like this next to the first paragraph: “In this paragraph I summarize Gawande’s main claim.” Then, next to the second paragraph, you might write, “In this paragraph I present a challenge to Gawande’s main claim.” Now that you have identified the relationship between those two paragraphs, you can choose the most effective transition between them. Since the second paragraph in this example challenges the ideas in the first, you might begin with something like “but,” or “however,” to signal that shift for your readers.  

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Phrasal Verbs and Idioms for English Speaking | Lesson 1 – Elementary Level

Phrasal verbs and idioms for english speaking | lesson 2 – elementary level, phrasal verbs and idioms for english speaking | lesson 3 – elementary level, phrasal verbs and idioms for english speaking | lesson 4 – elementary level.

Helena Daily English

At the beginning of each paragraph, you should aim to provide a clear topic sentence that tells the reader the subject of the paragraph and also connects the paragraph with the previous paragraph or the main topic of the assignment. The following words and expressions are frequently used as paragraph openers and linking expressions. Read through the list and see if  you can find useful ones for your own writing. Otherwise, you can get your paper written for you by professional essay writers

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100+ Useful Words and Phrases to Write a Great Essay

By: Author Sophia

Posted on Last updated: October 25, 2023

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How to Write a Great Essay in English! This lesson provides 100+ useful words, transition words and expressions used in writing an essay. Let’s take a look!

The secret to a successful essay doesn’t just lie in the clever things you talk about and the way you structure your points.

Useful Words and Phrases to Write a Great Essay

Overview of an essay.

100+ Useful Words and Phrases to Write a Great Essay

Useful Phrases for Proficiency Essays

Developing the argument

  • The first aspect to point out is that…
  • Let us start by considering the facts.
  • The novel portrays, deals with, revolves around…
  • Central to the novel is…
  • The character of xxx embodies/ epitomizes…

The other side of the argument

  • It would also be interesting to see…
  • One should, nevertheless, consider the problem from another angle.
  • Equally relevant to the issue are the questions of…
  • The arguments we have presented… suggest that…/ prove that…/ would indicate that…
  • From these arguments one must…/ could…/ might… conclude that…
  • All of this points to the conclusion that…
  • To conclude…

Ordering elements

  • Firstly,…/ Secondly,…/ Finally,… (note the comma after all these introductory words.)
  • As a final point…
  • On the one hand, …. on the other hand…
  • If on the one hand it can be said that… the same is not true for…
  • The first argument suggests that… whilst the second suggests that…
  • There are at least xxx points to highlight.

Adding elements

  • Furthermore, one should not forget that…
  • In addition to…
  • Moreover…
  • It is important to add that…

Accepting other points of view

  • Nevertheless, one should accept that…
  • However, we also agree that…

Personal opinion

  • We/I personally believe that…
  • Our/My own point of view is that…
  • It is my contention that…
  • I am convinced that…
  • My own opinion is…

Others’ opinions

  • According to some critics… Critics:
  • believe that
  • suggest that
  • are convinced that
  • point out that
  • emphasize that
  • contend that
  • go as far as to say that
  • argue for this

Introducing examples

  • For example…
  • For instance…
  • To illustrate this point…

Introducing facts

  • It is… true that…/ clear that…/ noticeable that…
  • One should note here that…

Saying what you think is true

  • This leads us to believe that…
  • It is very possible that…
  • In view of these facts, it is quite likely that…
  • Doubtless,…
  • One cannot deny that…
  • It is (very) clear from these observations that…
  • All the same, it is possible that…
  • It is difficult to believe that…

Accepting other points to a certain degree

  • One can agree up to a certain point with…
  • Certainly,… However,…
  • It cannot be denied that…

Emphasizing particular points

  • The last example highlights the fact that…
  • Not only… but also…
  • We would even go so far as to say that…

Moderating, agreeing, disagreeing

  • By and large…
  • Perhaps we should also point out the fact that…
  • It would be unfair not to mention the fact that…
  • One must admit that…
  • We cannot ignore the fact that…
  • One cannot possibly accept the fact that…

Consequences

  • From these facts, one may conclude that…
  • That is why, in our opinion, …
  • Which seems to confirm the idea that…
  • Thus,…/ Therefore,…
  • Some critics suggest…, whereas others…
  • Compared to…
  • On the one hand, there is the firm belief that… On the other hand, many people are convinced that…

How to Write a Great Essay | Image 1

100+ Useful Words and Phrases to Write a Great Essay 1

How to Write a Great Essay | Image 2

100+ Useful Words and Phrases to Write a Great Essay 2

Phrases For Balanced Arguments

Introduction

  • It is often said that…
  • It is undeniable that…
  • It is a well-known fact that…
  • One of the most striking features of this text is…
  • The first thing that needs to be said is…
  • First of all, let us try to analyze…
  • One argument in support of…
  • We must distinguish carefully between…
  • The second reason for…
  • An important aspect of the text is…
  • It is worth stating at this point that…
  • On the other hand, we can observe that…
  • The other side of the coin is, however, that…
  • Another way of looking at this question is to…
  • What conclusions can be drawn from all this?
  • The most satisfactory conclusion that we can come to is…
  • To sum up… we are convinced that…/ …we believe that…/ …we have to accept that…

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100+ Useful Words and Phrases to Write a Great Essay 3

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Purdue Online Writing Lab Purdue OWL® College of Liberal Arts

On Paragraphs

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The purpose of this handout is to give some basic instruction and advice regarding the creation of understandable and coherent paragraphs.

What is a paragraph?

A paragraph is a collection of related sentences dealing with a single topic. Learning to write good paragraphs will help you as a writer stay on track during your drafting and revision stages. Good paragraphing also greatly assists your readers in following a piece of writing. You can have fantastic ideas, but if those ideas aren't presented in an organized fashion, you will lose your readers (and fail to achieve your goals in writing).

The Basic Rule: Keep one idea to one paragraph

The basic rule of thumb with paragraphing is to keep one idea to one paragraph. If you begin to transition into a new idea, it belongs in a new paragraph. There are some simple ways to tell if you are on the same topic or a new one. You can have one idea and several bits of supporting evidence within a single paragraph. You can also have several points in a single paragraph as long as they relate to the overall topic of the paragraph. If the single points start to get long, then perhaps elaborating on each of them and placing them in their own paragraphs is the route to go.

Elements of a paragraph

To be as effective as possible, a paragraph should contain each of the following: Unity, Coherence, A Topic Sentence, and Adequate Development. As you will see, all of these traits overlap. Using and adapting them to your individual purposes will help you construct effective paragraphs.

The entire paragraph should concern itself with a single focus. If it begins with one focus or major point of discussion, it should not end with another or wander within different ideas.

Coherence is the trait that makes the paragraph easily understandable to a reader. You can help create coherence in your paragraphs by creating logical bridges and verbal bridges.

Logical bridges

  • The same idea of a topic is carried over from sentence to sentence
  • Successive sentences can be constructed in parallel form

Verbal bridges

  • Key words can be repeated in several sentences
  • Synonymous words can be repeated in several sentences
  • Pronouns can refer to nouns in previous sentences
  • Transition words can be used to link ideas from different sentences

A topic sentence

A topic sentence is a sentence that indicates in a general way what idea or thesis the paragraph is going to deal with. Although not all paragraphs have clear-cut topic sentences, and despite the fact that topic sentences can occur anywhere in the paragraph (as the first sentence, the last sentence, or somewhere in the middle), an easy way to make sure your reader understands the topic of the paragraph is to put your topic sentence near the beginning of the paragraph. (This is a good general rule for less experienced writers, although it is not the only way to do it). Regardless of whether you include an explicit topic sentence or not, you should be able to easily summarize what the paragraph is about.

Adequate development

The topic (which is introduced by the topic sentence) should be discussed fully and adequately. Again, this varies from paragraph to paragraph, depending on the author's purpose, but writers should be wary of paragraphs that only have two or three sentences. It's a pretty good bet that the paragraph is not fully developed if it is that short.

Some methods to make sure your paragraph is well-developed:

  • Use examples and illustrations
  • Cite data (facts, statistics, evidence, details, and others)
  • Examine testimony (what other people say such as quotes and paraphrases)
  • Use an anecdote or story
  • Define terms in the paragraph
  • Compare and contrast
  • Evaluate causes and reasons
  • Examine effects and consequences
  • Analyze the topic
  • Describe the topic
  • Offer a chronology of an event (time segments)

How do I know when to start a new paragraph?

You should start a new paragraph when:

  • When you begin a new idea or point. New ideas should always start in new paragraphs. If you have an extended idea that spans multiple paragraphs, each new point within that idea should have its own paragraph.
  • To contrast information or ideas. Separate paragraphs can serve to contrast sides in a debate, different points in an argument, or any other difference.
  • When your readers need a pause. Breaks between paragraphs function as a short "break" for your readers—adding these in will help your writing be more readable. You would create a break if the paragraph becomes too long or the material is complex.
  • When you are ending your introduction or starting your conclusion. Your introductory and concluding material should always be in a new paragraph. Many introductions and conclusions have multiple paragraphs depending on their content, length, and the writer's purpose.

Transitions and signposts

Two very important elements of paragraphing are signposts and transitions. Signposts are internal aids to assist readers; they usually consist of several sentences or a paragraph outlining what the article has covered and where the article will be going.

Transitions are usually one or several sentences that "transition" from one idea to the next. Transitions can be used at the end of most paragraphs to help the paragraphs flow one into the next.

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When to Start a New Paragraph in an Essay

You will be able to keep on track during the composition and editing stages of your writing if you learn how to compose effective paragraphs. Additionally, effective paragraphing substantially aids readers in tracking a piece of writing. Even if you have brilliant ideas, you will lose readers if you don’t systematically convey them.

Even if you are aware of the basic elements of a paragraph, such as a topic sentence, coherence, unity, and adequate development, when to start a paragraph in an essay is pretty vital too. Therefore, this article discusses this pertinent issue and others related to effective ways of starting paragraphs in essays.

A fresh paragraph signals the reader a change in subject, setting, tense, or speaker. Additionally, they aid in breaking up long paragraphs of material on a page. This makes sure readers aren’t put off by your writing. When do you begin a new paragraph, then? Here are some situations in which you ought to begin a new paragraph.

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When writing the introduction or conclusion..

Always start a fresh paragraph for your introduction and conclusion in an essay. Based on their length, substance, and intended audience, introductions and conclusions can frequently have many paragraphs.

When introducing a new idea, focus, or point.

A new concept must always begin with a fresh paragraph. Each new point within a lengthy thought or focus that spans several paragraphs should be assigned a separate paragraph. Some transition words to introduce such paragraphs include furthermore, next, in addition, first, second, third, and more, similarly, etc.

Also see: How to write a good 5 paragraph opinion essay 

When Contrasting ideas or information.

You can employ different paragraphs to contrast opposing viewpoints in an essay, especially argumentative essays or other writing pieces. Some of the transitions that introduce such paragraphs are, however, in contrast, nevertheless, on the contrary, on the other hand, etc.

When giving your readers a break.

Adding paragraph breaks will make your work more legible because they serve as brief “breaks” for your audience. If a paragraph becomes too long or the subject matter is complicated, inserting a break is a good idea.

How to Start Your First Body Paragraph in an Essay

It is worth noting that the first body paragraph offers your essay’s strongest argument and, therefore, is extremely essential. Therefore, a ponent needs to start the paragraph in the best way possible. There are several effective methods to begin the first body paragraph, and each one aims to support the paper’s main thesis. These methods include;

  • A Transition Sentence

Transitional phrases create logical connections between various ideas. Using such a phrase develops a transition between the introduction and the first body paragraph, making it flow naturally from the thesis statement.

  • A Key Example

You could utilize the first body paragraph of an essay based on a case study to provide a summary of the particular situation. For instance, if your essay is based on a crime report, you would outline the case’s details in the opening paragraph.

  • A Definition

A decent location to define important words used in the article is in the first body paragraph. If your article, for instance, is on a technical subject like economics, you could begin the first body paragraph by defining the term.

How to Start the Second Body Paragraph in an Essay

The second body paragraph in an essay helps to prove your thesis further, like the first and the other body paragraphs. You can start the paragraph with a topic sentence that introduces the main point in the paragraph or one that relates to the thesis statement. After this, you can fill the paragraph with supporting evidence of well-organized examples and facts.

Similarly, if the second body paragraph is a continuation of the first, you can start the paragraph with a transition phrase to connect the two. Such a paragraph should end by concluding the first main idea of the essay.

Can You Start a Paragraph with However?

You can start a fresh paragraph with, however. This is a transitional word that you can employ to start a paragraph that differs from the preceding paragraphs or offers choices at the very least. Moreover, you can use however when shifting focus from one idea or point to another.

However, keep in mind to use a semicolon if it starts a new independent paragraph while still being connected to the preceding paragraph. Nevertheless, it is worth noting that you cannot start a fresh paragraph with a however when there is no preceding paragraph.

Can You Start a Body Paragraph with a Question?

You can definitely start a body paragraph with a question. You can draw readers in and establish your thesis by posing a question in the first sentence of a body paragraph. Making your argument with a quick, concise response that emphasizes your confidence in your position shows that you are adamant in your thoughts. They are best used in an informative, persuasive, or descriptive essay.

Questions engage readers in the writing by allowing them to feel like they are a part of the discussion, whether you answer the question directly or indirectly. However, there is a thin line on the appropriate questions to start with because some may make your paragraph appear disconnected.

Can You Start a Paragraph with Although?

You can start a sentence or a paragraph with although without breaking any grammar rules. This is mainly a matter of presentational style, and how you want to frame the language or narrative you’re utilizing.

The subordinate clause “although” at the start of a paragraph or a sentence indicates that something contradictory is occurring despite other information. It is used as a part of a dependent clause to discuss how two items or ideas appear to conflict or counteract one another.

Can You Start a Paragraph with Because?

Using because at the beginning of a paragraph is okay if done correctly. This is as long as the sentence it is used in is a whole sentence that represents a complete notion. If you want to make a point, it can make the initial line a little more powerful.

One of the main objections to the use of because at the start of a sentence is that it is not “correct” grammar. It is frequently misused by writers, leading to unfinished sentences and awkward reading flow. Normally, the word should be used to join two paragraphs dependent on one another.

Can You Start a Paragraph with “For Example?”

You can definitely start a paragraph with “for example.” It is a transitional phrase that connects paragraphs in your writing to make it easier to read and flow more naturally. You can use the phrase anywhere in your work unless writing your introduction or introducing a new topic.

When introducing and emphasizing a point that demonstrates something is true, you use “for example” at the beginning of a paragraph. You can also use the phrase when you want to make a detailed illustration of the points in your previous paragraph.

Can You Start a Paragraph with I?

You can start a paragraph with the word I. This is unavoidable when you are writing a paper in the first person. The word is mostly used when giving one’s opinion or describing events that involve them.

However, you should avoid excessive use of the word at the beginning of every paragraph. Starting too many paragraphs or sentences with the word I will make you seem egotistical, which is a turn-off for many readers.

Do You Start a Paragraph after a Quote?

It is not advisable to start a paragraph after a quote. Remember, a paragraph, in many instances, represent a single concept. Therefore, it is necessary to include all related information in a single paragraph, even if the information follows the quote directly.

However, you can start a fresh paragraph after a quote if the quotation signifies the end of a particular idea and, therefore, the end of that paragraph. In addition, you can start a new paragraph after a quote if the quote represents the end of a dialogue.

After reading this article, there is no doubt that you are better positioned to know when to start a new paragraph in an essay. Furthermore, you are better placed to introduce fresh paragraphs and transitional words and phrases to employ.

Therefore, please use the information to better your writing skills, whether writing academic papers or articles on the internet.

Smart English Notes

Useful Transition Words and Phrases For Writing Essays

Table of Contents

Transition Words and Phrases

Transition words are the words that provide connection, unity and coherence between ideas, sentences and paragraph. They increase the logical organisation of the text and readability by enhancing the connection between thoughts. They  indicate  the relations within the text in a sentence, paragraph or article. In this way, they help the readers to read the text more smoothly and simultaneously make the reader flow more smoothly from one point to the next. They turn disconnected fragments of ideas into a unified whole and help a reader in understanding the needed knowledge in an easier way.

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Transitions are essential elements in written and spoken communication as they help to clarify and emphasize the connections between ideas, sentences, and paragraphs. They also help to guide the reader or listener through the content, making it easier to follow and understand.

There are different types of transitions that can be used in different contexts depending on the purpose and meaning of the content. Some common types of transitions include:

Additive transitions : These transitions are used to add information or ideas to what has already been discussed. Examples include: “in addition,” “furthermore,” “also,” “besides,” etc.

Comparative transitions : These transitions are used to compare or contrast two or more ideas or points. Examples include: “similarly,” “on the other hand,” “in contrast,” “conversely,” etc.

Temporal transitions : These transitions are used to indicate a change in time or order. Examples include: “first,” “next,” “then,” “finally,” etc.

Causal transitions : These transitions are used to indicate a cause-and-effect relationship between two or more ideas. Examples include: “because,” “therefore,” “thus,” “as a result,” etc.

Conditional transitions : These transitions are used to introduce a condition or possibility. Examples include: “if,” “as long as,” “provided that,” “in case,” etc.

Illustrative transitions : These transitions are used to provide examples or illustrate a point. Examples include: “for instance,” “for example,” “such as,” “as an illustration,” etc.

Summarizing transitions : These transitions are used to summarize or conclude a point. Examples include: “in summary,” “in conclusion,” “to sum up,” “finally,” etc.

Using a variety of transitions can help to make written and spoken communication more dynamic and engaging, and help the reader or listener better understand the connections between different ideas and points.

It is important to use transitions appropriately and effectively in written and spoken communication. Using too many transitions can make the content sound choppy and disjointed, while using too few can make it difficult to follow the flow of the content.

To use transitions effectively, it is important to consider the purpose and meaning of the content and choose transitions that are appropriate and meaningful. It is also important to use transitions consistently and smoothly, and to vary the types of transitions used to keep the content interesting and engaging.

In addition to using transitions within a piece of writing or speech, it is also important to consider the transitions between different sections or topics. Using transitions between sections can help to clearly signal a change in direction or focus, and help the reader or listener understand the connections between different ideas and points.

Another important aspect of using transitions effectively is to ensure that they are used correctly and appropriately in the context of the content. This means using transitions that are grammatically correct and that fit smoothly within the sentence or paragraph.

For example, it is important to use transitional phrases and words correctly, such as “however” versus “although,” and to use them in the correct part of the sentence. It is also important to ensure that the transition fits naturally within the sentence, rather than feeling forced or awkward.

Using transitions correctly can help to improve the overall clarity and coherence of the content, and make it more effective and engaging for the reader or listener. It is also important to proofread and edit the content to ensure that transitions are used consistently and effectively throughout.

It is also important to consider the tone and style of the content when using transitions. Different transitions can convey different tones and moods, and it is important to choose transitions that are appropriate for the overall tone and style of the content.

For example, using more formal or serious transitions like “therefore” or “hence” may be more appropriate for a business report or academic paper, while using more casual or conversational transitions like “anyway” or “so” may be more appropriate for a casual conversation or social media post.

Using transitions that are appropriate for the tone and style of the content can help to make the content more engaging and effective for the reader or listener, and can help to convey the intended message more effectively.

In addition to considering the tone and style of the content, it is also important to consider the audience when using transitions. Different audiences may respond better to different types of transitions, and it is important to choose transitions that are appropriate for the intended audience.

For example, using more technical or specialized transitions may be more appropriate for an audience with a higher level of knowledge or expertise, while using more general or simplified transitions may be more appropriate for a general or unfamiliar audience.

By considering the audience and tailoring the transitions accordingly, it is possible to create more effective and engaging communication that resonates with the reader or listener.

It is also important to use transitions appropriately in relation to the structure and organization of the content. In a well-organized piece of writing or speech, transitions should help to guide the reader or listener through the content, highlighting the connections and relationships between different ideas and points.

For example, in a longer piece of writing, such as a research paper or essay, it is important to use transitions to link the different sections and paragraphs together, and to clearly signal the transitions between different ideas and points. This can help to improve the overall coherence and clarity of the content, and make it easier for the reader or listener to follow and understand.

Here is an exclusive classification of transitions for you. Read and add your own ideas:

Exemplification : For instance, in this case, namely, to illustrate this, in fact, for example, chiefly, markedly, that is, indeed, of course, such as, like, that is,  specifically, especially, particularly.

Cause and Effect : Above all, because, therefore, because of the reason, consequently, hence, as a result, thus, otherwise, thereupon, accordingly, thus, for this reason, so then, thereby, since, wherefore.

Restatement or To Show Conclusion: To summarize, in brief, in short, finally, to sum up, to put it in another way, in other words, accordingly, to conclude, in conclusion.

Sequence and order: In the first place, too, next, furthermore, what’s more, then, in addition, subsequently, likewise, firstly, finally, further, in the first place, and, besides, again, additionally, too, for the most part, including, together with, by the way, lastly.

Comparison or Contrast : Otherwise, while, whereas, on the contrary, by the same token, similarly, though, although, yet, opposite to, in the same way, on the other hand, otherwise, at the same time, compared to, in comparison to, but, in contrast, nonetheless, nevertheless, despite, notwithstanding, even so, still, however, simultaneously, rather.

Direction or spatial placemen t: there, here, above, below, under, over there, to the right, in the far end, in the distance, beyond, nearly, between opposite to, farther on, next to

Time or Location: To begin with, earlier, previously while, now, nearby, in the meantime, as soon as, prior to, till now, to the present, at present, before, after, later, afterwards, lastly, immediately, opposite to next to, meanwhile, there, farther on, to the west, then, since, for, soon, later on, eventually.

Purpose : for this reason, so, so that, in order to, for this purpose, with this object, to this end.

Generalisation : Usually, generally, as a rule usually, commonly, normally, for the most, ordinarily, on the whole, in most cases,as a rule, as usual, for the most part, generally speaking, popularly.

Attitude : Fortunately, unfortunately, oddly enough, strangely enough, undoubtedly, luckily, luckily, surprisingly.

Diversion : Incidentally, in any way, by the way, all of a sudden.

Qualification : almost, with this in mind, possibly.

State Obvious:  certainly, granted that, naturally, obviously, most probably, surely, of course, undoubtedly, without a doubt.

Useful Transition Words and Phrases to Start a New Paragraph

It is very common practice to use transition words and phrases also at the beginning of a new paragraph. The reason is simple as they help to link what you have said in the previous paragraph to what you are about to say in the new paragraph.

Moreover…..,

Notwithstanding such criticism….,

Its popularity remains largely undiminished…..,

Keeping in view….,

It is not possible…..,

To be able to understand…., Undoubtedly…..,

A contrary explanation is that….,

At first….,

as a consequence……,

Taking advantage of this….,

This also suggests….,

that said….,

at the same time….,

as a result….,

although….,

accordingly….,

All this might be different….,

The day is not far….,

another significant factor in….,

An equally significant aspect of….,

By the same token….,

It may be useful….,

but we should also consider…., Conversely…..,

in particular….,

These technological developments have Greatly increased the growth in…..,

A significant feature of….,

To put it in a nutshell….,

Has focused on the….,

Despite this….,

Despite these criticisms….,

The popularity of X remains largely undiminished….,

Noting the compelling nature of this new evidence….,

Has suggested that….,

Nevertheless….,

Remains a growing problem…..,

Keeping all this aside, Nonetheless…..,

The number of….,

Has continued to expand at an exponential rate….,

Correspondingly…..,

The current high profile debate with regard to….,

Proponents of…,

Have also suggested that….., Subsequently….,

Similarly….,

By the way….,

The sentiment expressed in the quotation…..,

Embodies the view that…..,

What is more….,

Its popularity remains high…..,

Despite these criticisms…..,

In that case….,

Each of these theoretical positions makes an important contribution to our understanding of…..,

Evidence for in support of this position…., Can be found in…. ,

Evidently…..,

For this reason….,

At that he….,

When at last…..,

For these reasons….,

Furthermore….,

Before considering this it is important to note….,

That may be a bit surprising ….,

Certainly…..,

There is no shortage of disagreement within.…,

Consequently…..,

In any case….,

Above all….,

Having considered X…..,

It is also reasonable to look at…. ,

There are times….,

In addition, too…..,

In contrast….,

In this way….,

In this manner….,

In the final analysis…..,

In short….,

Its popularity remains high….,

The use of the term….,

It is quite surprising that….,

The other dimension is….,

That about that….,

the advantages of…..,

Outlined in the previous paragraph…..,

It is quite predictable that…..,

This point is also sustained by the work of….,

This counter-argument is supported by evidence from…..,

In the face of such criticism,

Proponents of…..,

It is important to note….,

Therefore….,

There is also….,

A further point to be considered…., Important to note the limitations of….., This interpretation of…..,

Though it concerns….,

Has not been without its detractors….,

It is important however not to overemphasis the strengths of……,

After a careful examination…., However…..,

That, It is important however not to  assume  the applicability of…..,

In all cases…..,

It could also be said that….,

Notwithstanding these limitations….,

Significantly….,

This critique….,

Its worth of situation….,

On the other hand… ,

Critics of….,

Point to its blindness….,

With respect to….,

Of central concern….,

Therefore, too….,

Sociologists are explaining how social processes and institutions….,

This approach is similar to the….., knowing all this…..,

If that had been the case….,

Unfortunately…..,

Implies a singular cause of…..,

It can be seen from the above analysis….

Have responded in a number of ways….,

It could easily perceive that….,

Transitional words have been organized into three categories. These three categories are:

Beginning sentences or paragraphs,

Within paragraphs or

Concluding a Paragraph or Writing

Transitions Based on Location

Meaning and Use of English Transitions

Additive transitions: used to add more information or ideas to what has already been discussed.

In addition : “In addition to the main points discussed in the previous paragraph, there are also several secondary points to consider.”

Furthermore :”Furthermore, the study also found that there was a positive correlation between increased exercise and improved mental health.”

Moreover :”Moreover, the impact of social media on young people’s mental health has become a major concern in recent years.”

Also : “The research also found that there were significant differences in the way men and women responded to the treatment.”

As well : “The survey also revealed that a majority of respondents preferred online shopping to in-store shopping, as well as.”

Besides :”Besides the main findings of the study, there were also several interesting observations made by the researchers.”

Comparative transitions: used to compare two or more ideas or points, indicating that they have opposing or contrasting characteristics or qualities.

Similarly : “Similarly, both approaches have their advantages and disadvantages, and it is important to carefully consider which one is most appropriate for the given situation.”

On the other hand: “On the one hand, some argue that social media can be a powerful tool for connecting people and fostering online communities. On the other hand, there are also concerns about the negative effects of social media on mental health and personal relationships.”

In contrast: “In contrast to previous research, the study found that there was no significant difference in performance between the two groups.”

Conversely : “Conversely, those who reported higher levels of social support had significantly lower levels of anxiety and depression.”

Unlike : “Unlike other studies, the research found no significant differences between the two groups in terms of performance.”

However : “The research found that there was a positive correlation between physical activity and mental health. However, there were also several limitations to the study that need to be considered.”

Temporal transitions: used to indicate the first in a sequence or list of events or points.

First : “First, let’s consider the main findings of the study.”

Next : “Next, we will discuss the implications of the study for future research.”

Then : “First, the research found that there was a significant relationship between physical activity and mental health. Then, the researchers conducted a series of follow-up studies to further explore the relationship.”

Afterwards :”The researchers conducted the initial study and found a significant relationship between physical activity and mental health. Afterwards, they conducted several follow-up studies to further explore the relationship.”

Eventually : “The researchers conducted several studies, eventually leading to the conclusion that physical activity has a positive impact on mental health.”

Finally : “Finally, the researchers made recommendations for future research and ways to promote the importance of physical activity for mental health.”

Causal transitions: used to indicate a cause-and-effect relationship between two or more ideas or points.

Because :”The study found that there was a significant relationship between physical activity and mental health because regular exercise has been shown to improve mood and reduce stress.”

Therefore : “The research found that physical activity has a positive impact on mental health. Therefore, it is important to prioritize regular exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle.”

Thus : “The study found that regular exercise has a range of benefits for mental health. Thus, it is important to make physical activity a regular part of daily life.”

As a result: “The research found that physical activity has a positive impact on mental health. As a result, it is important to prioritize regular exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle.”

Consequently : “The study found that regular exercise has a range of benefits for mental health. Consequently, it is important to make physical activity a regular part of daily life.”

So : “The research found that physical activity has a positive impact on mental health. So, it is important to prioritize regular exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle.”

Emphatic transitions: used to emphasize a particular point or idea.

Indeed :”Indeed, the research found a strong relationship between physical activity and mental health.”

Certainly :”Certainly, the study highlights the importance of regular exercise for mental health.”

In fact : “In fact, the research found that regular exercise had a greater impact on mental health than other forms of treatment.”

Without a doubt: “Without a doubt, the study shows the importance of physical activity for maintaining good mental health.”

Concessive transitions: used to indicate a concession or exception to what has been stated.

However : “The study found a strong relationship between physical activity and mental health. However, there were also several limitations to the study that need to be considered.”

Nevertheless : “The research found a significant relationship between physical activity and mental health. Nevertheless, further research is needed to explore the full extent of the relationship.”

Despite : “Despite the promising results of the study, more research is needed to confirm the findings and explore the full extent of the relationship between physical activity and mental health.”

Even though : “Even though the study found a significant relationship between physical activity and mental health, there were also several limitations to the research that need to be considered.”

Conditional transitions: used to introduce a condition or possibility.

If :”If regular exercise is incorporated into a healthy lifestyle, it can have a positive impact on mental health.”

As long as: “As long as physical activity is a regular part of daily life, it can have a positive impact on mental health.”

Provided that: “Physical activity can have a positive impact on mental health, provided that it is a regular part of daily life.”

In case: “It is important to prioritize physical activity as part of a healthy lifestyle, in case it has a positive impact on mental health.”

Illustrative transitions: used to provide examples or illustrate a point.

For instance: “Physical activity has a range of benefits for mental health, for instance, it can improve mood and reduce stress.”

For example :”Regular exercise has a positive impact on mental health, for example, it can improve sleep quality and reduce feelings of anxiety and depression.”

Such as : “Physical activity has a range of benefits for mental health, such as improving mood and reducing stress.”

As an illustration: “As an illustration, several studies have found that regular exercise can improve sleep quality and reduce feelings of anxiety and depression.”

Summarizing transitions: used to summarize or conclude a point.

In summary: “In summary, the research found that physical activity has a positive impact on mental health, and it is important to prioritize regular exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle.”

In conclusion : “In conclusion, the study highlights the importance of physical activity for maintaining good mental health, and further research is needed to explore the full extent of the relationship.”

To sum up: “To sum up, the research found that regular exercise has a range of benefits for mental health, and it is important to make physical activity a regular part of daily life.”

Finally : “Finally, the study shows the importance of physical activity for mental health, and the need for further research to explore the full extent of the relationship.”

There are many other transitions that can be used in different contexts depending on the purpose and meaning of the content. Some additional examples of transitions include:

Specifically : used to provide more specific or detailed information about a particular point or idea. Example: “Specifically, the study found that regular exercise was associated with improved mood and reduced stress.”

Indeed : used to emphasize a particular point or idea. Example: “Indeed, the research found a strong relationship between physical activity and mental health.”

Above all: used to indicate that a particular point or idea is the most important or significant. Example: “Above all, the study highlights the importance of regular exercise for maintaining good mental health.”

As a matter of fact: used to emphasize a particular point or idea. Example: “As a matter of fact, the research found that regular exercise had a greater impact on mental health than other forms of treatment.”

After all: used to summarize or conclude a point. Example: “After all, the research shows the importance of physical activity for mental health, and the need for further research to explore the full extent of the relationship.”

Consequently : used to indicate a cause-and-effect relationship between two or more ideas or points. Example: “The study found that regular exercise has a range of benefits for mental health. Consequently, it is important to make physical activity a regular part of daily life.”

Accordingly : used to indicate that a particular action or decision follows logically from a previous idea or point. Example: “The research found that regular exercise has a positive impact on mental health. Accordingly, it is important to make physical activity a regular part of daily life.”

In any case: used to indicate that a particular point or idea is relevant or applicable regardless of the circumstances. Example: “In any case, the importance of physical activity for mental health cannot be overemphasized.”

In any event: used to indicate that a particular point or idea is relevant or applicable regardless of the circumstances. Example: “In any event, the research shows that regular exercise has a positive impact on mental health, and it is important to prioritize it as part of a healthy lifestyle.”

In the final analysis: used to summarize or conclude a point, indicating that all factors or considerations have been taken into account. Example: “In the final analysis, the research shows that physical activity has a positive impact on mental health, and it is an important factor to consider in maintaining good mental health.”

To begin with: used to introduce the first in a sequence or list of events or points. Example: “To begin with, let’s consider the main findings of the study.”

To put it another way: used to rephrase or explain a point in a different way. Example: “The research found that regular exercise has a positive impact on mental health. To put it another way, physical activity can improve mood and reduce stress.”

Ultimately : used to summarize or conclude a point, indicating that it is the final or ultimate outcome or conclusion. Example: “Ultimately, the research shows that regular exercise has a positive impact on mental health, and it is an important factor to consider in maintaining good mental health.”

In short: used to summarize or conclude a point in a concise way. Example: “In short, the study shows that physical activity has a positive impact on mental health, and it is important to prioritize regular exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle.”

Briefly : used to summarize or conclude a point in a concise way. Example: “Briefly, the research found that regular exercise has a range of benefits for mental health, and it is important to make physical activity a regular part of daily life.”

To repeat : used to restate a point or idea that has already been mentioned. Example: “To repeat, the research found that regular exercise has a positive impact on mental health.”

To clarify: used to explain or make a point clearer. Example: “To clarify, the study found that regular exercise was associated with improved mood and reduced stress, as well as improved sleep quality and reduced feelings of anxiety and depression.”

To summarize: used to summarize or conclude a point. Example: “To summarize, the research found that regular exercise has a range of benefits for mental health, and it is important to make physical activity a regular part of daily life.”

To put it briefly: used to summarize or conclude a point in a concise way. Example: “To put it briefly, the research found that physical activity has a positive impact on mental health, and it is important to prioritize regular exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle.”

To put it simply: used to explain or clarify a point in a straightforward or easy-to-understand way. Example: “To put it simply, the study found that regular exercise has a range of benefits for mental health, and it is important to make physical activity a regular part of daily life.”

In a word: used to summarize or conclude a point in a concise way. Example: “In a word, the research shows that physical activity has a positive impact on mental health, and it is important to prioritize regular exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle.”

To sum up: used to summarize or conclude a point. Example: “To sum up, the research found that regular exercise has a range of benefits for mental health, and it is important to make physical activity a regular part of daily life.”

To sum things up: used to summarize or conclude a point. Example: “To sum things up, the study highlights the importance of physical activity for maintaining good mental health, and further research is needed to explore the full extent of the relationship

To sum it all up: used to summarize or conclude a point, indicating that all factors or considerations have been taken into account. Example: “To sum it all up, the research shows that physical activity has a positive impact on mental health, and it is an important factor to consider in maintaining good mental health.”

In brief: used to summarize or conclude a point in a concise way. Example: “In brief, the research found that regular exercise has a range of benefits for mental health, and it is important to make physical activity a regular part of daily life.”

To wrap up: used to summarize or conclude a point. Example: “To wrap up, the research found that regular exercise has a range of benefits for mental health, and it is important to make physical activity a regular part of daily life.”

All in all: used to summarize or conclude a point, taking into account all factors or considerations. Example: “All in all, the research shows that physical activity has a positive impact on mental health, and it is an important factor to consider in maintaining good mental health.”

To bring everything together : used to summarize or conclude a point, taking into account all factors or considerations. Example: “To bring everything together, the study highlights the importance of physical activity for maintaining good mental health, and further research is needed to explore the full extent of the relationship.”

To cap it all off: used to summarize or conclude a point, taking into account all factors or considerations. Example: “To cap it all off, the research found that regular exercise has a range of benefits for mental health, and it is important to make physical activity a regular part of daily life.”

To put the icing on the cake: used to emphasize or conclude a point in a strong or definitive way. Example: “To put the icing on the cake, the study shows that physical activity has a positive impact on mental health, and it is an important factor to consider in maintaining good mental health.”

To make a long story short: used to summarize or conclude a point in a concise way. Example: “To make a long story short, the research found that regular exercise has a range of benefits for mental health, and it is important to make physical activity a regular part of daily life.”

To put it all in perspective: used to summarize or conclude a point, taking into account all factors or considerations and providing context or comparison. Example: “To put it all in perspective, the research shows that physical activity has a positive impact on mental health, and it is an important factor to consider in maintaining good mental health compared to other forms of treatment.”

To put it all in a nutshell : used to summarize or conclude a point in a concise way. Example: “To put it all in a nutshell, the study found that regular exercise has a range of benefits for mental health, and it is important to make physical activity a regular part of daily life.”

To put it all in a single sentence: used to summarize or conclude a point in a concise way. Example: “To put it all in a single sentence, the research shows that physical activity has a positive impact on mental health, and it is important to prioritize regular exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle.”

To put it all in a word: used to summarize or conclude a point in a concise way. Example: “To put it all in a word, the study highlights the importance of physical activity for maintaining good mental health, and further research is needed to explore the full extent of the relationship.”

To put it all in a nutshell: used to summarize or conclude a point in a concise way. Example: “To put it all in a nutshell, the research found that regular exercise has a range of benefits for mental health, and it is important to make physical activity a regular part of daily life.”

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4 thoughts on “Useful Transition Words and Phrases For Writing Essays”

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I am just looking for transitions that BEGIN the body paragraphs, you should section the transitions.

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IMAGES

  1. 105 Best Words To Start A Paragraph (2024)

    phrases to start a new paragraph in an essay

  2. The Best Words To Start A Paragraph

    phrases to start a new paragraph in an essay

  3. How To Start A Paragraph: 200+ Important Words And Phrases

    phrases to start a new paragraph in an essay

  4. How To Start A Paragraph: 200+ Important Words And Phrases

    phrases to start a new paragraph in an essay

  5. How To Start A Paragraph: 200+ Important Words And Phrases

    phrases to start a new paragraph in an essay

  6. How to write a basic paragraph. Some good transition words for starting

    phrases to start a new paragraph in an essay

VIDEO

  1. How to write a Good Paragraph / Paragraph writing

  2. Essay Writing

  3. Paragraph Writing || Myself || Bengali to English || Spoken English ||

  4. Everything About Essay Writing

  5. How to write introductory paragraphs|Things never to do while Writing introductory Paragraphs

  6. 6-Paragraph Timed Argumentative Essay -- Part 4 -- 2nd Body Paragraph

COMMENTS

  1. 105 Best Words To Start A Paragraph (2024)

    This article presents a comprehensive list of the best words to start a paragraph, be it the first, second, third, or concluding paragraph. Contents show Words to Start an Introduction Paragraph The words you choose for starting an essay should establish the context, importance, or conflict of your topic.

  2. What Are Good Sentence Starters for Essays?

    In general, a sentence starter is a quick word or phrase at the beginning of a sentence to help the reader transition, such as the phrase "in general." Without them, writing can be disorganized, disconnected, and therefore hard to read. But knowing which ones to add—and when—is not always obvious.

  3. How To Start A Paragraph: 200+ Important Words And Phrases

    by Kerri-Anne Edinburgh | Aug 3, 2022 There's a lot to get right when you're writing an essay. And a particularly important skill is knowing how to start a paragraph effectively. That first sentence counts!

  4. 40 Useful Words and Phrases for Top-Notch Essays

    General explaining Let's start by looking at language for general explanations of complex points. 1. In order to Usage: "In order to" can be used to introduce an explanation for the purpose of an argument. Example: "In order to understand X, we need first to understand Y." 2. In other words

  5. Transitional Words and Phrases

    Two recommendations: Use these transitions strategically by making sure that the word or phrase you're choosing matches the logic of the relationship you're emphasizing or the connection you're making.

  6. 92 Essay Transition Words to Know, With Examples

    Matt Ellis Updated on November 7, 2023 Students Abruptly switching topics in essays can be jarring; however, transition words can smooth the change for the convenience of the reader. Moreover, you can use essay transition words to start a paragraph, sentence, or clause more naturally.

  7. Transition Words & Phrases

    Transition words and phrases (also called linking words, connecting words, or transitional words) are used to link together different ideas in your text. They help the reader to follow your arguments by expressing the relationships between different sentences or parts of a sentence. Transition words example

  8. Transition Words and Phrases Examples

    What are transition words? Transition words are words that help writing move smoothly from one topic to another without confusing the reader. Words like however, next, or in conclusion prepare the reader by signaling that the topic is shifting.

  9. Easy Words to Use as Sentence Starters to Write Better Essays

    Tips for Using Transition Words and Phrases. 1. Use a variety of transition words, not the same one. 2. Put a comma after the transition word. 3. Put the subject of the sentence after the comma.

  10. Sentence Starters ⇒ Words and Phrases to Start Sentences

    A sentence starter is simply a word or a phrase that will help you to get your sentence going when you feel stuck, and it can be helpful in many different situations. A good sentence starter can help you better transition from one paragraph to another or connect two ideas. If not started correctly, your sentence will likely sound choppy, and ...

  11. How to begin a new paragraph. Useful linking words and phrases

    It is a good idea to occasionally use linking words and phrases at the start of a new paragraph. They can help to link what you have said in the previous paragraph to what you are about to say in your new paragraph. These link words and phrases are often referred to as signposts.

  12. Academic Phrasebank

    Introducing work Academic Phrasebank / Introducing work Introducing work There are many ways to introduce an academic essay or short paper. Most academic writers, however, appear to do one or more of the following in their introductions: establish the context, background and/or importance of the topic

  13. Paragraph Starters for Essays

    Lesson Summary Frequently Asked Questions How do you start a body paragraph? Starting a body paragraph depends on several factors. The starting sentence should take the information from...

  14. Transition Sentences

    Published on June 9, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023. Clear transitions are crucial to clear writing: They show the reader how different parts of your essay, paper, or thesis are connected. Transition sentences can be used to structure your text and link together paragraphs or sections.

  15. PDF Strategies for Essay Writing

    paragraph on one main point—and begin a new paragraph when you are moving to a new point or example. A strong paragraph in an academic essay will usually include these three elements: • A topic sentence. The topic sentence does double duty for a paragraph. First, a strong topic sentence makes a claim or states a main idea that is then developed

  16. How to Start an Essay: 7 Tips for a Knockout Essay Introduction

    Intriguing ways to start an essay. There are many different ways to write an essay introduction. Each has its benefits and potential drawbacks, and each is best suited for certain kinds of essays.Although these essay introductions use different rhetorical devices and prime the reader in different ways, they all achieve the same goal: hooking the reader and enticing them to keep reading.

  17. Transitions

    Sometimes, transitional words can help readers see how ideas are connected. But it's not enough to just include a "therefore," "moreover," "also," or "in addition." You should choose these words carefully to show your readers what kind of connection you are making between your ideas.

  18. How To Start a Paragraph (With Steps and Examples)

    The first sentence of this paragraph could look like this: The young girl saw the tree's first peach hanging from the top branch and started to climb toward it. Persuasive

  19. Top 35+ Linking Words and Phrases for beginning New Paragraphs

    At the beginning of each paragraph, you should aim to provide a clear topic sentence that tells the reader the subject of the paragraph and also connects the paragraph with the previous paragraph or the main topic of the assignment. The following words and expressions are frequently used as paragraph openers and linking expressions.

  20. 100+ Useful Words and Phrases to Write a Great Essay

    Sharing is caring! How to Write a Great Essay in English! This lesson provides 100+ useful words, transition words and expressions used in writing an essay. Let's take a look! The secret to a successful essay doesn't just lie in the clever things you talk about and the way you structure your points.

  21. On Paragraphs

    To be as effective as possible, a paragraph should contain each of the following: Unity, Coherence, A Topic Sentence, and Adequate Development. As you will see, all of these traits overlap. Using and adapting them to your individual purposes will help you construct effective paragraphs. Unity

  22. When to Start a New Paragraph in an Essay

    When Writing the Introduction or Conclusion. Always start a fresh paragraph for your introduction and conclusion in an essay. Based on their length, substance, and intended audience, introductions and conclusions can frequently have many paragraphs. When introducing a new idea, focus, or point.

  23. Useful Transition Words and Phrases For Writing Essays

    Useful Transition Words and Phrases to Start a New Paragraph. It is very common practice to use transition words and phrases also at the beginning of a new paragraph. The reason is simple as they help to link what you have said in the previous paragraph to what you are about to say in the new paragraph. Moreover…..,

  24. 17 academic words and phrases to use in your essay

    4. Moreover; furthermore; in addition; what's more. These types of academic phrases are perfect for expanding or adding to a point you've already made without interrupting the flow altogether. "Moreover", "furthermore" and "in addition" are also great linking phrases to begin a new paragraph. Here are some examples: