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Sample petition letters.

These samples include all of the required elements for a student petition letter (date, a clear statement of the requested action, a description of the conditions that warrant an exception, the reason University policy and/or procedure could not be followed, student’s name and signature, current address, PSU ID number, current phone number, and email address).

Letter 1 (Request for a Retroactive Withdrawal)

Date: June 24, 2021 Student ID: 900000000 Student Name: Anna Student Student Email: [email protected] Student Phone: 814-000-0000

Senate Committee on Education University Faculty Senate Office 101 Kern Graduate Building University Park, PA 16802

To Vice Chair of the Senate Committee on Education:

I am requesting a  Retroactive Withdrawal (for all courses scheduled for a term).

Term(s) Requested (Like Spring 2020):  Fall 2020

Describe the extenuating circumstances that affected your academic performance during the term(s) for which you are requesting a retroactive action. Include details about how they affected your academic performance specifically. I was diagnosed with mono at the University Health Center. Although I was able to keep up with my courses at first, sometimes I was too tired to go to class and I fell behind in my work. Luckily, my instructors were very understanding and allowed me to make up exams and turn in papers late. Although I was behind, I felt I could keep making up the work initially.

Explain why you were not able to complete the retroactive action you are requesting by the established deadline during the term(s) you are requesting. just as final exams were beginning, I was hospitalized with pneumonia. I realized then that I was not going to be able to make up the work I had missed, turn in all of my final projects, and take my final exams. I decided that I needed to withdraw, but it was already past the withdrawal deadline at that point. I would have requested deferred grades in order to complete the work the next term, but I had surgery on January 4 and am not able to do school work for an extended period of time. Under the circumstances, it will not be possible to complete the work by the deferred grade deadline.

To the best of your ability, please provide documentation to support all extenuating circumstances mentioned in your student letter, and how it relates to the term(s) being requested specifically. Describe supporting documentation below that will be included with your petition. You will upload the documentation along with this letter when you enter the system. Please see my letter from University Health Services with my diagnosis of mono and hospital documentation with my diagnosis of pneumonia. Both illnesses occurred during the Fall 2020 term. I also provide letters of support from my adviser and a couple of my Fall 2020 instructors.

Thank you for your consideration.

Letter 2 (Request for a Retroactive Late Course Drop)

Date: June 24, 2021 Student ID: 900000002 Student Name: Joe Student Student Email: [email protected] Student Phone: 814-000-0002

I am requesting a  Retroactive Late Course Drop (for one or more courses, but not all courses scheduled for a term).

Term(s) and Course(s) Requested (Like ENGL 202D-Fall 2020): MKTG 437 and MKTG 440-Fall 2020

Describe the extenuating circumstances that affected your academic performance during the term(s) for which you are requesting a retroactive action. Include details about how they affected your academic performance specifically. On December 4, 2020, I was hit by a pickup truck on Route 322 in Lewistown, PA. I suffered a severe concussion, and my left patella was broken in several places. Since the accident, I underwent two surgeries to have my kneecap rebuilt and another operation to have the hardware removed. I was unable to attend my classes for the rest of the term.

If you are requesting a retroactive late course drop from one or some courses, but not all courses scheduled for a term, explain how your extenuating circumstances affected one or some courses, but not others. I was able to complete MKTG 426 and MKTG 428 from my home, but I was unable to complete MKTG 437 and MKTG 440 because both courses required a practicum, which I was unable to attend. This is my reason for being selective in asking for a retroactive late drop of these two courses.

Explain why you were not able to complete the retroactive action you are requesting by the established deadline during the term(s) you are requesting. I was unable to attend my classes for the rest of the term; and because the accident happened after the late drop deadline, I could not late drop the courses via LionPATH.

To the best of your ability, please provide documentation to support all extenuating circumstances mentioned in your student letter, and how it relates to the term(s) being requested specifically. Describe supporting documentation below that will be included with your petition. You will upload the documentation along with this letter when you enter the system. Please see the documentation from the hospital concerning my accident, concussion, broken patella, and kneecap surgeries. That all happened during the Fall 2020 term. I also provide support letters from my family doctor and some of my Fall 2020 instructors.

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Petitioning for admission: Getting in when you don't qualify

What does it mean to petition for admission? This is a chance to explain why your grades or scores were low. So instead of your application being thrown out right away, they'll take another look at it and consider your circumstances.

What are examples of good reasons for having low grades? Medical conditions, a sudden family death, illness, or other hardship are all good reasons to petition for admission. What wouldn't be acceptable is if you just hung out with the wrong group of friends or if you were in too many extracurricular activities to keep your grades up.

How do I petition? You'll have to contact the school directly to find out how to petition. Most of the time you'll just have to write a letter. Sometimes they may want you to come in for an interview.

What should I say? Explain your academic goals and reason(s) for getting low grades. If you have one, include a doctor's note for a medical condition. Explain what you're doing to improve your GPA. For example, if you fell behind because of a medical condition but you are now cured, let them know. If you were diagnosed with a learning disability, tell them how you've changed your study habits. Colleges want to know that you are prepared to handle college work, so show them in whatever way you can.

Your petition letter won't guarentee you admission, but it's your chance to get into schools you might not otherwise qualify for.

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How to Write a Petition

Last Updated: September 7, 2023 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by wikiHow Staff . Our trained team of editors and researchers validate articles for accuracy and comprehensiveness. wikiHow's Content Management Team carefully monitors the work from our editorial staff to ensure that each article is backed by trusted research and meets our high quality standards. There are 7 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 1,386,135 times. Learn more...

Is there something in your community, county, or nation that you want to see changed? Try creating a petition. Petitions can have a real impact if they are carefully thought out and written properly. You may already have a cause or strategy in mind. Still, you need to make sure your petition is well-researched so that you can easily present your case. Your message should be clear, and your delivery needs to be polite and friendly. When you bring this all together, it will help you get the signatures you need to effect change, no matter how great or small your goal.

Petition Help

how to write a college petition letter

Formulating Your Request

Step 1 Develop your argument.

  • If, for example, you want to petition your local government for a new park, look on your town's website regarding regulations and rules for parks. See if you can find previous budgets or proposals for past parks, too.

Step 2 Verify the jurisdiction for the petition.

  • If you are petitioning a government office, have the office direct you to the department that handles matters related to your cause. Then request petition guidelines. You may also want to confirm whether or not your petition needs approval prior to circulating.

Step 3 Find out how many signatures you need.

  • ”We support more funding for a park” is far too weak and general. Instead, try, “We demand that the Commissioners of Nature County allocate funds for a new park in the Adventure District.”
  • This statement will go at the top of your petition. You may choose to put it in larger and/or bolded text to make it stand out.

Explaining Your Cause

Step 1 Add a brief summary of your cause.

  • The longer your petition is, the less likely people will be to read it through completely or sign it. Try keeping your petition's text to two or three short, easy to scan paragraphs. Adding a few bullet points or number can also he helpful.
  • Do a check to make sure your petition text makes sense. Have someone else read it over to check for clarity and see if they understand your the problem and your campaign's end goal.

Step 2 Prepare references for your statements.

  • You can even choose to print out a few extra copies and hand them out if someone requests such.

Step 3 Edit your petition for spelling and grammar errors.

Calling People to Action

Step 1 Make a call to action.

  • Try something like, "we call on the Department of Housing and Economic Development to require at least 20% voucher-sponsored housing in all buildings in the city within the next five years."

Step 2 Let people know what else they can do to support the cause.

  • You could add on a brief statement like, "To further support the cause, make an appointment to meet with the City Manager's Office sometime before the City Council vote this coming March."

Step 3 Create a signer's form on a separate sheet for paper petitions.

  • Collect postal codes, zip codes, or any other information legally required so that you can verify the signers live in an area impacted by your petition issue.
  • Print out more copies of the signature form than you think you'll need. It's always better to be over-prepared than to have to turn away impactful signatures.
  • If you are using a website to collect signatures, the program will develop the signature form for you.

Promoting Your Petition

Step 1 Talk to people in person.

  • If you want to speak or solicit on private property or closed campuses, including schools, make sure you get the necessary permission first.
  • If there is a local rally or event scheduled regarding your petition issue, ask if you can make a quick speech there to get people to sign.
  • Be polite when soliciting signatures in person. Even if someone believes in your cause, they might not have the time or ability to support you at the moment. It's always better to be polite. People may still contact you or help fund your cause later on.

Step 2 Use e-mail to circulate online petition forms.

  • Try not to flood people with e-mails. Sending an e-mail every day will not get results. Instead, follow up a first round of petitions with 1-2 reminders over the period when you are petitioning.

Step 3 Create an online presence for your petition.

  • Use a designated hashtag that you develop specifically for your petition so that it is easy to track the attention your social media posts receive.
  • Even if you're petitioning for a national cause, focusing on local media can help gather support in your area and draw attention from larger media sources.

Community Q&A

Community Answer

  • Clip your petition to a clipboard with a pen attached to it. Sometimes there is no convenient surface for writing and signing a petition or a potential signer won't have a pen. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Keep your paper clean and unwrinkled. Your petition will look less professional if it is dirty and dog-eared. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 1
  • Always make sure to say "Thank you" after receiving a signature. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 1

how to write a college petition letter

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Write an Appeal Letter

  • ↑ https://ww3.aauw.org/resource/how-to-start-a-petition/
  • ↑ https://www.resourcecentre.org.uk/information/organising-a-petition/#collecting
  • ↑ http://www.useful-community-development.org/how-to-start-a-petition.html
  • ↑ http://www.uua.org/re/tapestry/children/sing/session12/handout1
  • ↑ https://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/advocacy/direct-action/petition-drive/main
  • ↑ https://www.cfer.org/campaign/petitioners.html
  • ↑ https://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/advocacy/direct-action/electronic-advocacy/main

About This Article

wikiHow Staff

The first step in writing a petition is to research, develop, and write a clear and specific goal statement. Then expand on your goal statement by summarizing your cause in just a paragraph or two, keeping it simple and straightforward so even people who know nothing about your cause can understand. Next, tell people what you want to see happen, what your desired outcome is, and how they can help. Make sure you include a signer’s form so your readers can show their support. If you want to learn how to get support for your petition online, keep reading the article! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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What is an academic petition?

The University has many academic policies, which are spelled out in the University Catalog .

Sometimes, students finds themselves in unusual circumstances in which a particular University academic policy poses a challenge. A student may petition for an exception to the specific policy. The Academic Petitions Committee is the body that considers such petitions.

Crafting a persuasive petition

University policies exist for a reason, so the Academic Petitions Committee can only make an exception to a policy under exceptional circumstances. If you are writing a petition, you must first consider the policy’s purpose, so that you can persuasively explain why it should be waived in your particular situation. Think about why either the policy’s goal does not apply to your specific circumstances or why its goal would best be served by granting you the exception you are requesting.

The more exceptional the request, the more exceptional must be the circumstances justifying it. For example, requesting a late add or drop the day after the add/drop deadline is clearly an exception to policy, but not a very great exception; in this case, your petition would still need to explain the lateness, but the exception being requested does not violate the spirit of the policy, which is to allow a short time for students to adjust their schedules once they have started to attend their classes and have a sense of the course material. On the other hand, petitioning to waive a general education requirement such as Environmental Literacy or Diversity is a huge exception to policy, as these are core components of the university curriculum whose designation (EL or DIV13) is only awarded to a course after it passes a rigorous review by the Academic Affairs Committee; in this case, your petition would have to both explain how a specific course you took meets the learning goals of the requirement and why the course was not approved for such credit by the appropriate committee, if the faculty member thought it met the relevant learning goals.

What should and should not be in an academic petition?

An academic petition needs to include a rationale for the exception to policy being requested. For example, a student petitioning for a late withdrawal need not explain the motive for the withdrawal (since that is allowed—until the established deadline), but must explain the lateness of the request (which is the exception to policy being requested); only if the motive for the withdrawal itself were related to the lateness of the request would it be relevant.

An academic petition is a formal document, which should be written in clear, formal language. It should begin with the date and some form of salutation (such as “Dear Academic Petitions Committee”), followed by a clear articulation of what the petitioner is requesting and then a persuasive rationale for that request. It should conclude with a formal closing (such as “Sincerely,” followed by your signature and printed name). You may also wish to include a line such as “Thank you for considering this petition.”

Preparing to submit an academic petition

To be considered by the Academic Petitions Committee, your petition needs the support of your academic advisor. It is a good idea to see your advisor at the beginning of the process to talk over the rationale. You then need to write the rationale and share it with your academic advisor to get approval. Since the petition form requires your advisor to indicate either support or lack of support, it is crucial that your advisor read your completed rationale first.

In addition to your academic advisor, you may also consult with the Associate Dean of Academic Advising about your petition rationale or about appealing a petition that was rejected.

More information about the petitions process and the academic petition form itself may be found on the Registrar’s Office website .

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Free Petition Letter for College [Sample]

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Learn how to write a petition letter for college. Use our sample petition letters for college as a template for your petition letter.

Sample 1: Petition Letter for College – Change in Curriculum

[Your Name] [Your Address] [City, State ZIP Code]

[College Name] [Department Name] [College Address] [City, State ZIP Code]

Dear [Dean/Department Head],

I am writing to express my concerns about the current curriculum in [name of program/department] and to request changes to be made in order to better prepare students for their future careers.

As a current [year of study] student in [name of program/department], I have found that the courses being offered are outdated and do not align with the current industry standards. 

Many of my fellow students share my opinion and believe that the curriculum needs to be revised in order to provide us with the knowledge and skills we need to succeed in our chosen fields.

I believe that [specific courses or topics] should be included in the curriculum in order to better prepare students for their future careers. These courses/topics are currently not being offered, but I believe they are essential for students to be competitive in the job market. 

Additionally, [specific courses or topics] are being taught that are no longer relevant or are redundant, and I suggest that they be removed from the curriculum.

I would like to request a meeting with you and the [Department] faculty to discuss the proposed changes to the curriculum. I am confident that with your support, we can make the necessary changes to the curriculum to benefit current and future students.

Thank you for your attention to this matter. I look forward to hearing from you soon.

[Your Name]

Sample 2: Petition Letter for College – Improve Campus Safety

[College Name] [College Address] [City, State ZIP Code]

Dear [College Administration],

I am writing to bring attention to the issue of campus safety and to urge the college administration to take action in order to make the campus a safer place for all students, faculty, and staff.

As a student at [College Name], I have witnessed or heard about various incidents of crime on campus, including [specific examples, such as theft, assault, or harassment]. These incidents have caused me and many of my peers to feel unsafe and uncomfortable on campus.

I believe that the college administration has a responsibility to provide a safe environment for its students, faculty, and staff. 

I urge you to take action to improve campus safety by [specific actions, such as increasing lighting in dark areas, increasing the number of security personnel, or installing security cameras in high-risk areas]. 

Additionally, I believe that the college should provide more education and resources to students on how to stay safe on campus.

I would like to request a meeting with you to discuss the proposed changes and to learn more about what the college is currently doing to address the issue of campus safety. I am confident that with your support, we can work together to make the campus a safer place for everyone.

Sample 3: Petition Letter For College – Dismissal

Your Name Your Address City, State, Zip Code DATE Admissions Officer  Name of College Address of College City, State, Zip Code Dear Name of Admission’s Officer, I am writing this letter to bring to your attention something that I believe is unfair and requires attention. I would like to appeal my dismissal from Name of College. 

I was ready to appear for my Name of Subject exam on DATE, but was diagnosed with West Nile virus and was hospitalized for two weeks at that time. 

I sent a letter to the college informing of my medical condition and inability to appear for the exam.

I had understood that I was entitled to appear for the exam when I had been certified healthy by my doctor. When I sent an application to appear for the exam, I was informed that I had been dismissed from the college. 

This caused me considerable mental anguish and confusion, because the reason for missing the exam was out of my control.  I am requesting that my status be reinstated in the institution, and that I be allowed to take the exam. I have understood that this is in keeping with the rules and regulations of the college. Enclosed are copies of my letter informing the college about my illness and inability to appear for the exam as well as the exam schedule, my medical records and my medical certificate stating that I am well. Thank you for your attention to this matter. If you have any questions or would like more information, I can be reached at 555-123-4567 or at [email protected] Sincerely,

Your Signature Your Name Printed List of enclosure

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how to write a college petition letter

Also, don't make any demands in your letter. Even if you feel that you haven't been treated entirely fairly, express your appreciation for the committee's willingness to consider your appeal. 

Ensure Your Letter Is Your Own

If you're a student who has earned terrible grades in writing classes and done poorly on essays, the appeals committee is going to be very suspicious if you submit an appeal letter that sounds like it was written by a professional writer. Yes, spend time polishing your letter, but ensure that it is clearly your letter with your language and ideas.

Also, be careful about letting your parents have a heavy hand in the appeal process . Appeals committee members want to see that you—not your parents—are committed to your college success. If it looks like your parents are more interested in appealing your dismissal than you are, your chances for success are slim. Committee members want to see you taking responsibility for your bad grades, and they expect to see you advocating for yourself.

Many students fail out of college for the simple reason that they aren't motivated to do college-level work and earn a degree. If you allow someone else to craft your appeal letter for you, that will confirm any suspicions the committee might have about your motivation levels.

Be Painfully Honest

The underlying reasons for an academic dismissal vary widely and are often embarrassing. Some students suffer from depression; some tried to go off their meds; some got messed up with drugs or alcohol; some stayed up every night playing video games; some became overwhelmed pledging a Greek.

Whatever the reason for your bad grades, be honest with the appeals committee. Jason's appeal letter , for example, does a good job owning up to his struggles with alcohol. Colleges believe in second chances—it's why they allow you to appeal. If you don't own up to your mistakes, you're showing the committee that you lack the maturity, self-awareness, and integrity that you'll need to succeed in college. The committee will be happy to see you trying to overcome a personal failing; it will be unimpressed if you try to hide your problems.

Realize that the committee will be informed about your behavior on campus. Committee members have access to any judicial reports, and they will receive feedback from your professors. If your appeal seems to contradict the information the committee receives from other sources, it is unlikely to be successful.

Don't Blame Others

It's easy to get embarrassed and defensive when you fail some classes. Still, no matter how tempting it is to point at others and blame them for your bad grades, the appeals committee will want to see you taking responsibility for your academic performance. The committee will not be impressed if you try to blame those "bad" professors, your psycho roommate, or your unsupportive parents. The grades are your own, and it will be up to you to improve them. Don't do what Brett did in his appeal letter . This is an example of what not to do.

This doesn't mean you shouldn't explain any extenuating circumstances that contributed to your poor academic performance. But in the end, you are the one who failed those exams and papers. You need to convince the appeals committee that you won't let external forces lead you astray.

Have a Plan

Identifying and owning up to the reasons for your poor academic performance are the first steps to a successful appeal. The equally important next step is presenting a plan for the future. If you were dismissed because of alcohol abuse, are you now seeking treatment for your problem? If you were suffering from depression, are you working with a counselor to try to address the issue? Going forward, are you planning to take advantage of the academic services offered by your college?

The most convincing appeals show that the student has identified the problem and come up with a strategy for addressing issues that led to low grades. If you don't present a plan for the future, the appeals committee is likely to think you will end up repeating the same mistakes.

Show Humility and Be Polite

It's easy to be angry when you've been academically dismissed. It's easy to feel a sense of entitlement when you've given the university thousands and thousands of dollars. These feelings, however, shouldn't be part of your appeal.

An appeal is a second chance. It is a favor being offered to you. The staff and faculty members on the appeals committee spend a lot of time (often vacation time) to consider appeals. The committee members are not the enemy—they are your allies. As such, an appeal needs to be presented with the appropriate "thank yous" and apologies.

Even if your appeal is denied, send an appropriate note of thanks to the committee for considering your appeal. It's possible you'll be applying for readmission in the future.

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How to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter

Parents of dependent students should be honest and provide examples if they hope to write a successful appeal letter.

Successful financial aid appeals are rare, experts say. But crafting a good financial aid appeal letter can give students the best chance of getting more money for college .

After receiving an award letter , students may be able to appeal the financial aid package they were given by a specific college. Not all students find themselves in a circumstance that merits writing an appeal letter to request more financial aid , and in some situations appealing could even lower the amount of aid they receive.

But Mark Kantrowitz, publisher and vice president of research for Savingforcollege.com, says more awareness is needed about appeals.

"Too often families think of the financial aid award letter as being set in stone and not subject to appeal," he says. "The first sign there might be an issue is if the financial aid offer is not merely a harsh assessment of your ability to pay, but an impossible assessment. Chances are there is some bit of information the financial aid office was unaware of when they calculated your financial aid package."

In those cases, families should consider appealing the financial aid offer , he says, noting that an appeal letter should be written by a parent if the student is considered a dependent.

Whatever the circumstance, students and their parents typically must demonstrate to financial aid administrators a significant change in their ability to pay for college by providing proof or new information. For families who determine an appeal is the best route, here are tips on how to write a successful financial aid appeal letter:

  • Start by calling the financial aid office.
  • Include specific examples.
  • Gather documentation.
  • Be respectful and honest, and keep it short.
  • Submit the financial aid appeal letter the right way.

Start by Calling the Financial Aid Office

The appeal process can vary across colleges. Some require students to fill out a form in addition to writing an appeal letter, while others don't require a letter at all. For this reason, experts recommend students call the target school's financial aid office before taking any steps toward an appeal.

But students and families should plan to do more than just make a phone call, experts say. A physical letter can be powerful.

"There's a formal process if the student is asking to have their eligibility for aid re-evaluated, because you have to have a reason to be re-evaluated," says Abril Hunt, manager of outreach and financial literacy for Educational Credit Management Corp., a nonprofit based in Minneapolis that aims to promote financial literacy and student success in higher education.

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Include Specific Examples

No two financial aid circumstances are the same. Even in situations when two families have a similar event occur that inhibits their ability to pay for college, Kantrowitz says they shouldn't expect the same outcome from an appeal. Colleges and financial aid administrators have significant flexibility in deciding how to respond to appeals.

"Schools are able to practice what is called professional judgment," says Megan Coval, vice president of policy and federal relations at the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators.

"This is a process that we think works pretty well right now, and we like the flexibility schools have. If you made it a little more standardized or rigid, you'd run the risk of it being too one size fits all, and there are so, so many different scenarios in which students might appeal or ask for professional judgment to be done. So we think that's in the hands of the financial aid office and the student," she says.

The way families present their financial circumstances can affect the result of an appeal. Experts say parents should list specific circumstances that have an impact on their ability to pay for college in their appeal letters, possibly in a bulleted list. Using a clear bulleted list can help quickly convey the facts of a family's situation in a way that is digestible for financial aid administrators and easy to connect to supporting documentation.

Some of the most common situations that may warrant an appeal are if a parent dies or loses his or her job; if parents get a divorce; if child support has ended; in cases of significant natural disasters that result in losses for the family; in the case of significant medical or dental expenses; if the student has a special needs family member or cares for a special needs child; or if the estimate for commuting and other educational costs is significantly lower than the actual costs, Kantrowitz says.

Families should also explain how the specific circumstance has affected their ability to pay.

The contents of the letter should be different depending on whether the family is hoping to get more need-based or more merit-based aid . If the aid is based on merit, it might be helpful to include more information about a student's GPA and accomplishments, but if it is strictly need-based , experts say that information is unnecessary.

Gather Documentation

Providing proof of the specific circumstances listed in the appeal is critical, experts say. If the appeal letter doesn't include any documentation, students and families can expect to get a response from the financial aid office asking for it.

The best kind of documentation families can provide is a document from a third-party source, Kantrowitz says. An example of a good document to include might be a paid medical bill or pay stubs and W-2s showing a decrease in income.

Letters from other sources can also be included, but those from family members may not carry the same weight as one from an outside source with knowledge of the family's financial situation, such as an insurance agent or health professional who can speak to the family's situation.

"It's not just narrative," Hunt says. "You need something in writing to back it up. They won't take your word for it; they need to have some proof of the situation changing or the information being inaccurately reported."

Hunt says if other colleges have offered more generous packages, copies of those offers can be included with the appeal letter.

Be Respectful and Honest, and Keep it Short

An appeal letter should include other information beyond specific examples of financial changes or hardships. A parent should thank the financial aid office for its consideration, and write briefly about the student's excitement to attend the institution.

Experts say families should never lie about their financial need or treat the process like a negotiation.

While the financial aid appeal letter should include specific details, Kantorwitz warns: "Don't tell them your entire life story."

For an appeal of need-based financial aid, writing a long narrative or including too many details are unlikely to help a student's chances. The most important elements of the letter, experts say, are often the examples and corresponding proof.

"Processors really don't have the time to read long letters like that, so I would say be succinct and to the point." Hunt says. "Stick to the facts."

In his book "How to Appeal for More College Financial Aid," Kantrowitz provides examples of good and bad financial aid appeal letters. Here's an example of what he says a good appeal letter written by a parent might look like:

"Dear Director of Financial Aid,
I am very excited that my daughter, [name of daughter], has been accepted by such a prestigious university. I am proud of her accomplishments.
Unfortunately, there are some unusual aspects of our family's finances that make it difficult for my daughter to afford to enroll, despite your generous financial aid offer.
* I am a single parent, raising three daughters on my own. My husband died last year, after a long battle with cancer.
* Our family income has decreased significantly in the last two years. Besides the loss of my husband's income, I was laid off by my employer and had to accept a job at a much lower salary after six months on unemployment. Also, my income two years ago included a big one-time bonus that obviously will not be repeated.
* I am still making payments on a significant amount of medical debt. The insurance company did not cover all of the costs of my husband's cancer treatment because it included therapies that were classified as experimental by the insurance company. The COBRA payments after my husband lost his job because of the cancer were and remain very high. We also liquidated our small retirement plans to cover the deductibles and co-pays.
* My daughter's Social Security survivor's benefits end next year when she turns 18.
* My daughter's younger siblings are enrolled at a private high school. Although the school has helped with a scholarship after my husband's death, it doesn't cover full tuition. I thought about sending them to public school because the expense is no longer affordable, but I don't have the heart to do that to them after they lost their father. I don't want them to lose their friends. Plus, our reasons for sending them to a private school are still valid.
I have enclosed copies of documentation of these circumstances, a copy of my pay stubs before and after the job change, a copy of the unemployment benefits, a copy of my husband's death certificate, copies of our medical bills and a copy of this year's federal income tax return.
Your university is my daughter's first choice. I hope you will provide her with more financial aid, so she can afford to enroll at your fine institution. I am sure she will thrive there.
Thank you for your time and consideration."

Submit the Financial Aid Appeal Letter the Right Way

Parents should submit the appeal letter as soon as possible, Kantrowitz says. While experts say it is rare for a student to receive financial aid before being admitted to an institution, Kantrowitz says in most cases parents should submit an appeal letter early, even if financial aid administrators won't respond to it until the student is admitted.

The letter should be mailed, ideally through certified mail that includes delivery confirmation, to the financial aid office in most cases, Kantrowitz says. Parents should confirm the correct address with the institution's financial aid office.

However, families who don't have clear changes to their financial situation but feel they could still get more financial aid through an appeal may want to wait to send the letter, Hunt says.

"They might want to wait until the first round of award letters, after mid-June," Hunt says. "Then the school will have a better idea of what the enrollment numbers will be. And if the school is behind in their enrollment numbers they might be more likely to find an extra couple thousand dollars for the student in order to get their enrollment numbers up."

Trying to fund your education? Get tips and more in the U.S. News Paying for College center.

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How to Write a Letter of Appeal to Retake a College Course

Sara volmering, 25 jun 2018.

How to Write a Letter of Appeal to Retake a College Course

College and university classes, especially required classes, fill up fast and student space is often limited. Most colleges and universities limit the number of times a student can sign up for class so that other students have a chance to take the course. Students who need to retake a course, but have reached their maximum allotted attempts, can write a letter to a request an additional chance to take the course. Permission to retake a course is granted at the discretion of the college or university, but a well-written letter may help sway a decision.

Explore this article

  • State Your Intent
  • Documentation

Check the college website before you begin writing your appeal letter to see if there is a specific process to follow, specific forms to submit and a list of what department or staff accept course appeal letters. If the information isn't available online, consult with your college academic counselor for guidance on the process. Sending the letter to the wrong department or person can further slow down the process and may make it more difficult to appeal.

2 Addressing

Write your address at the top left of the paper with the date one line below your address. Below the date, write the recipient's name, department, and address. Check the college website beforehand to see if there is a specific process to follow, specific forms to submit, who you should submit your request to and what department and address receives these letters for processing.

3 Salutation

Begin your letter with a salutation followed by the recipient's name. Use "Dear Sir or Madam" if the correct recipient name at the college's is unknown or not listed.

4 State Your Intent

The next step is to state the intent of your letter. This is a simple request to make that you will support in other sections. The main intent is that you would like to retake a course at the college and are unable to do that using the regular channels available. Further, if you have been denied registration, state that this letter is an appeal to retake a course.

After you address the letter and state your intent, include the reasons why you were unable to complete the course successfully on previous attempts. Detail any medical problems, learning disabilities, financial or personal hardships, or family issues that affected your class performance. Also state why you need the course in your college schedule and how it will potentially affect your college career if you aren't allowed to retake it. State your plan to successfully complete the course on your next attempt, including study strategies, tutoring options, coping techniques or a lighter academic schedule.

6 Documentation

If you were initially unable to successfully complete the course due to medical reasons or other reasons that can be supported by outside references, include any documentation that may strengthen your case, such as doctor's notes, grade reports and other records.

7 Etiquette

As you write your appeal letter, keep basic etiquette in mind throughout. Conclude the letter with a thank you to the reader for his or her time and consideration. Close your letter with "Sincerely" or "Best Regards," and then sign your name.

  • Include any documentation that may strengthen your case, such as doctor's notes, grade reports and other records.
  • Maintain a clear, professional tone in your letter; do not make any accusations or defamatory statements in your letter.
  • Check the college website beforehand to see if there is a specific process to follow or specific forms to submit and to determine to whom to submit your appeal.
  • 1 San Diego State University: Office of the Ombudsman: How to Write an Effective Appeal or Request Letter

About the Author

Sara Volmering started writing in 2007. She has contributed film reviews and human-interest stories to the "Western Herald," her university newspaper. Volmering holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Western Michigan University.

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How to Write a Successful Financial Aid Appeal Letter

how to write a college petition letter

A lot can happen between when you file your FAFSA and receive your student aid offer letter. It could be that new circumstances mean  your ability to pay for college has changed. Maybe you think the college overlooked something when it decided your award amount. Or maybe your student aid offer was simply a lot less than you expected. 

No need to panic. You always have options. One of those options is to craft a well-written financial aid appeal letter. Here, we're going to tell you how to write one. Bonus: We'll even show you a sample that you can customize.

Want to cut right to the chase? Click here to view our sample letter .

When you should appeal

Maybe your financial situation has changed — a parent became unemployed or had to take a lower-paying job, or money intended for college is now needed to pay for a serious health issue. Whatever the reason, you're experiencing more financial need than you did when filled out the FAFSA. 

Or, perhaps aid you were granted was withdrawn. Maybe you were even denied aid completely.

There are any number of reasons why you may find yourself needing to write a financial aid appeal letter. The most likely will probably be attributable to an unexpected change in your personal economic situation . For instance:

unemployment

serious medical situations

Another situation: The income listed on your FAFSA isn't accurate . That might the case if someone's job situation has changed or if a large portion of income has to go toward debt and can't be used for college costs. 

What if you lose financial aid because you've failed to maintain the requisite grades ? You might be able to appeal if you've experienced a dramatic life event, such as:

a newly diagnosed ongoing illness

homelessness/eviction

the death of an immediate family member

See also: Could You Be Eligible for More Financial Aid Because of Coronavirus?

4 things to include

Remember that the purpose of a financial aid appeal letter is to request help. That means it's not a place for you to vent, complain, or make a demand. Ultimately, you're requesting more money and need to find a way to clearly, but politely state your case to the people who can assist you.

Here are some tips you should apply when creating your letter, regardless of the reason you're writing it:

Be sure to address your letter to a specific person in the school's financial aid office. If you don't already have a contact, consult the department listing on the school's website.

While you're on the school's website, research the guidelines for their appeal process including any specific forms or documention they may require. Following the exact procedure will increase your chances of success.

In the body of your letter, always address the individual by name: Mr. Jones, Mrs. Smith, etc. You want to establish a personal yet respectful tone. Avoid addressing people solely by their title. Be direct, succinct, and courteous.

Note the forms you've submitted to your school, the status of your award, and the reason for your appeal.

See also: We Rank Your Best Parent Loan Options: Are Parent PLUS Loans a Good Deal for Fall 2020?

Tips to increase your chances of success

What does a financial aid appeal letter look like? Here are some aspects to keep in mind:

For the sake of clarity and readability, don't get fancy with the appearance of your letter. The reliable block letter format works fine and is easier to read.

Be up front with your reason for writing. That doesn't mean just saying 'I didn't get enough financial aid.' What is your why?  Explain your circumstances and the specific reasons you require additional aid. 

Keep your letter to one side of one page.

Are you asking for more money from your school or from the federal government? It's an important distinction, so make sure you are clear on that. If any income information reported on your FAFSA has changed, you may be eligible for more federal aid (which still goes through the school). If you believe you should be entitled to additional merit aid (for academics, athletics, or similar), you're asking the school for those funds. Merit aid requests may be funneled to the admissions office for consideration. 

Provide documentation, if available, that reinforces your appeal. The more relevant information a financial aid officer has, the more likely you are to get a favorable response. The people responsible for judging your appeal are governed by rules and regulations, so do your homework, craft an informed request, and help them to help you.

Always thank the person you're writing for considering your request.

Sample Letter:

August 17, 2022

Ms. Kristen Hopkins Office of Financial Aid University College Street City, State  Zip

Dear Ms. Hopkins,

I am Ben Brown, an incoming freshman, and I'm looking forward to attending University College this fall. Thank you for the detailed financial aid package. After my application was accepted, my family has, unfortunately, experienced an extreme setback in our financial situation.

Just a day after receiving my award information, my father lost his job. After 30 years at The Widget Factory he was unexpectedly let go. He was our family's main source of income. My mother remains employed, but she works part-time at a minimum-wage retail job. Consequently, we are now unable to provide the additional funds I'll need for outstanding tuition, books, and expenses.

It is my sincere wish to attend college this fall, and that is in jeopardy now. I'm requesting a review of my award with consideration of these new, extenuating circumstances. Your help is greatly appreciated. Thank you for taking the time to review my appeal.

Attached please find confirmation of my father's termination, as well as the required financial aid appeal form from your office. If there is anything else I can provide or any questions I can answer for you, please do not hesitate to call or e-mail me. I will respond promptly.

Ben Brown 1520 My Street City, State  Zip 555-456-7890 [email protected]

Click here to review more financial aid appeal letter samples that each address one of the most common reasons people send appeal letters .

What to do next

Especially ahead of the fall 2022 semester, keep in mind that schools may be swamped with appeal requests. Allow at least a week or two before following up. Remember to check your spam filter and your voicemail to make sure you don't miss a response. If you don't hear back, email the person you addressed your letter to. Include a copy of your original letter so they don't have to go hunting for your original request. Keep your followup short, sweet, and extremely polite. For example:

I am emailin to follow up on the financial aid appeal I sent to you on July 8, 2022. For your convenience, I have attached my original letter and all documentation to this email. Thank you for consideration and I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards, 

Ben Brown 555-456-7890 [email protected]

If you need additional funds

Remember, private student loans can help cover any tuition gaps remaining after financial aid and scholarships. Check out our picks for today's best deals on private student loans . 

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Writing an Effective Appeal or Request Letter

When to write a letter.

Some university policies may require the writing of a letter.  A letter is sometimes the most effective way to send a particular message.  When talking to someone, using email or filling out a form haven’t worked or aren’t practical, try a letter.

Send the letter directly to the office, department or individuals involved in the situation. Simply sending the letter to the ombudsman is not appropriate.

The elements found in typical business letters are:

  • full mailing address of the sender
  • date on which letter is written
  • address of person to whom letter is addressed
  • subject line
  • body (the main message)
  • complimentary closing
  • signature line (be sure to sign your letter)
  • enclosure and copy notations

Model Letter:

The model below uses all the elements from the list.  The above layout is a matter of personal choice, as is the decision to include a phone number and email address.

Note: the text of the model letter is exceptionally brief.  Most appeal and request letters require a page or two.

  • Samuel Student 123 ABC Street San Diego, CA 92120 [email protected] (619) 555-1234
  • February 20, 2018 
  • Dr. Jane Skool, Professor College of _____________ San Diego State University San Diego, CA 92182+mail code
  • Subject: Request for Examination
  • Dear Dr. Skool:
  • I am writing to request a special examination in Course 101. On March 12, the date of the regularly scheduled exam, I have to appear in court as a witness. I have enclosed a copy of the court summons.  
  • Thank you for taking the time to consider my request.  Please contact me by email or phone if you have any questions. 
  • Respectfully, Sam Student
  • Samuel Student Red ID*                
  • Encl. Cc: John O. Smith

Content and Tone

While the appearance of a letter is important, the content and tone will determine whether the letter really does its job.  Review any relevant policy and pay particular attention to what the decision maker needs to know to consider an appeal or request.  That is the information which should be included in your letter.

Opening Statement The first sentence or two should state the purpose of the letter clearly.

I am writing to appeal my current disciplinary status, and to apologize for my involvement in the floor crawl which led to my being placed on notice. I realize that what seemed harmless fun to me was actually a danger to my health and the health of others.  I sincerely regret my actions that night…

I am writing to request a course overload for 2018-2019…

Be Factual Include factual detail but avoid dramatizing the situation.

In late October I was diagnosed with tonsillitis. I was sick for over a week, and missed most of my mid-term exams.

NOTIn late October after feeling really sick for a few days I finally dragged myself to Student Health Services…

Be Specific If an appeal or request depends on particular facts which the decision maker will want to verify, be specific.

I missed a test on January 23, because I flew to Vancouver on January 19 for my grandfather’s funeral and returned on January 26.  I enclose the airline receipt and can provide further corroboration if that would be helpful.

NOT I had to attend a funeral out of town so I missed the test on January 23.

Documentation Include any documentation required by policy or needed to substantiate your claims.  If documentation is being sent by a third party, state that with details.

Dr. Well, my father’s physician, has agreed to write to you about this matter…

Stick to the Point Don’t clutter your letter with information or requests that have no essential connection to the main message.

Do Not Try to Manipulate the Reader Threatening, cajoling, begging, pleading, flattery and making extravagant promises are manipulative and usually ineffective methods.

If you give me a chance to come back to residence next year, I promise to work really hard, get rich, and donate a million dollars to the University…

How to Talk About Feelings It is tempting to overstate the case when something is important to us.  When feelings are a legitimate part of a message own the feeling, and state it as a fact.

When I saw my grade, I was very disappointed.

Be Brief It is more work to write a good short letter than a long one.  Busy decision makers appreciate the extra effort.

Avoid errors A letter will make a better impression if it is typed; free of spelling and grammar mistakes; free of slang; and placed in the right sized envelope. BUT it is much more important to meet deadlines and state the purpose clearly than to submit a letter which is completely error-free.

Keep Copies Until a matter is settled, keep copies of all letters sent or received, as well as relevant documents and forms.

*Adapted from The University of Western Ontario Ombuds Office, Frances Bauer, Ombudsperson

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How to Appeal for More Financial Aid for College

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By Mark Kantrowitz

August 16, 2023

Your financial aid award letter lists a package of various types and amounts of financial aid available to you, but they sometimes fall short of your need.

If you don’t get enough financial aid, you can always ask for more. The worst that can happen is the college financial aid administrator says “no.” But, to increase the chance of a successful financial aid appeal, it is important to understand how the appeals process works.

College financial aid is not like negotiating with a car dealership, where bluff and bluster will get you a bigger, better deal. Appealing for more financial aid depends on presenting the college financial aid office with adequate documentation of special circumstances that affect the family’s ability to pay for college.

[See also How to Get More Financial Aid for College , which provides tips on how to increase eligibility for need-based financial aid. Also, read about how to find scholarships and how to increase your odds of winning a scholarship .]

What is a Special Circumstance?

Special circumstances include any family financial circumstances that have changed in the last two years or any financial circumstances that differentiate the student from typical students. 

The top 10 most common special circumstances include:

  • Job loss or decrease in income 
  • Divorce or separation of a dependent student’s parents
  • Death of a dependent student’s parent
  • High unreimbursed dependent care costs for a special needs or disabled child or elderly parents
  • High unreimbursed medical and dental expenses
  • Catastrophic losses, such as damages or losses from a natural disaster like a tornado, hurricane, pandemic, or flood
  • Textbook costs beyond the standard allowance in the cost of attendance
  • Change in the student’s marital status
  • Dependency override
  • End of child support, Social Security benefits for a child or alimony payments

As part of the changes to the Free Application for Federal Student Aid ( FAFSA ) that take effect for the 2024-2025 school year, special circumstances will also include unusual business, investment and real estate losses, as well as severe disability of the student, parent or spouse.

What is a Dependency Override?

A college financial aid administrator can change a student’s dependency status from dependent to independent when there are unusual circumstances. This is called a dependency override .

Dependency overrides generally involve the end of the family relationship, such as court protection from abuse orders against the parents, long-term incarceration or institutionalization of both parents, and abandonment of the student.

When Can You Appeal for More Financial Aid?

You can appeal for more financial aid at any time.

You can appeal before you apply for financial aid. You can appeal after you apply for financial aid. You can appeal in the middle of the academic year. You can appeal during the first year in college or after the first year in college.

It is best to appeal for more financial aid as soon as the special circumstance has occurred. For example, if a parent has lost their job, appeal for more financial aid as soon as you’ve received the layoff notice or termination letter. The sooner you appeal for more financial aid, the most likely you are to get a favorable result.

Note that an appeal lasts for only one year. If the special circumstances still apply, you must appeal again in subsequent years.

See also: Complete Guide to Financial Aid and the FAFSA

How to Appeal for More Financial Aid

To appeal for more financial aid for college, follow these steps:

  • Call the college financial aid office to ask about the financial aid appeals process. Depending on the college, the appeals process might be called a professional judgment review, a special circumstances review or a financial aid appeal. The college may ask you to complete a form that addresses the most common situations. Most colleges ask the family to write an appeal letter.
  • Identify the special circumstances that affect your ability to pay for college. The special circumstances are the reasons why you are appealing for more financial aid. You might have just one special circumstance, or you might have several, but you need to have at least one. Wanting more money is not sufficient justification for a financial aid appeal. The special circumstances provide the reasons why you need more money. Focus on needs, not wants.
  • Write a financial aid appeal letter. Keep the letter concise, limiting it to one or two pages. The appeal letter should summarize the special circumstances and their financial impact on the family. If there is more than one special circumstance, provide a bulleted list of the special circumstances, with one special circumstance per bullet. Organize the special circumstances according to the financial impact, listing the most significant special circumstance first. Be specific, especially concerning dates and dollars. Emphasize when a special circumstance is due to factors beyond the family’s control. College financial aid administrators are less likely to approve changes that are due to discretionary choices, such as lifestyle expenses. Include your contact information in the appeal letter, in case the financial aid office has follow-up questions.
  • Don’t ask for a specific amount of money . The change in financial aid package will be based on the financial impact of the special circumstances on the family, not how much money you are requesting. Requesting a specific amount of money might backfire, causing you to get less money than you really need. Some colleges will give you the calculated change in financial need or the amount you asked for, whichever is less.
  • Be polite, as there is no appeal beyond the college financial aid administrator . You cannot appeal to the college president or to the U.S. Department of Education. Congress delegated the authority to make adjustments to the data elements on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to the college financial aid administrator, and only the college financial aid administrator. Close the letter by thanking the college financial aid administrator for their consideration of your appeal.
  • Gather independent third-party documentation of the special circumstances. Examples of documentation include copies of layoff notices, medical/dental bills, bank and brokerage account statements, receipts, and letters from people who are familiar with the family’s situation. Letters should ideally be written by people who are unrelated to the family, such as teachers, school counselors, social workers, doctors and police. Letters from priests, rabbis, pastors, imams and other clergy can also be helpful. The documentation must be related to the special circumstances.
  • Complete any forms required by the college financial aid office. These forms are designed to gather details about the special circumstances and other aspects of the family’s financial background. Most colleges perform a holistic review of the family’s financial circumstances as part of an appeal for more financial aid.
  • Attach copies of documentation to the appeal letter. Do not send originals, as they will not be returned. At many colleges, the documentation will be imaged and then shredded.
  • Mail the financial aid appeal letter, documentation and forms to the college’s financial aid office. It is best to send the letter with delivery confirmation or by certified mail, return receipt requested, so you have proof that the letter was received. Send the letter to each of the colleges to which the student has applied, since each college performs its own review of the financial aid appeal.
  • Follow-up by calling each college’s financial aid office a week after mailing the appeal letters, to confirm receipt. Ask the college financial aid office if they need any more information.

A Tool for Writing the Financial Aid Appeal Letter

Swift Student provides a tool for writing the financial aid appeal letter for free. They also provide several templates for various special circumstances . 

There’s just one caveat. The tool assumes that the family is affected by just one special circumstance. But, when it rains, it pours. Often, families are affected by several special circumstances at once. For example, if a primary wage-earned has a serious illness like cancer, they might also experience a pay cut at the same time, and so be affected by a drop in income and high medical expenses. Even if they don’t lose their job, they might no longer be able to earn overtime. 

So, when using the Swift Student tool, you may need to run it once for each special circumstance, then merge the appeal letters it produces.

What Happens If Your Appeal Is Approved?

The process is largely formulaic and data-driven.

If your financial aid appeal is approved, it will be implemented by making a change in the data elements on the FAFSA. For example, if a parent has lost their job, the financial aid administrator will change the income and income tax figures on the FAFSA.

This will generate a new Student Aid Index (SAI) using the FAFSA’s standard financial aid formula. The SAI will yield a new figure for demonstrated financial need, based on the difference between the cost of attendance and the new SAI. This, in turn, will yield a new financial aid package.

The college financial aid administrator can also implement some adjustments through a change to the cost of attendance. Changing the cost of attendance is more common when the student’s SAI is already zero or lower.

Financial aid administrators are also more likely to make an adjustment to the cost of attendance when the appeal concerns the cost of attendance, such as textbook costs, transportation expenses, dependent care costs and disability-related expenses. 

Recent Developments Concerning Financial Aid Appeals

The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, implements FAFSA simplification effective starting with the 2024-2025 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). However, some of the changes are being implemented early, starting with the 2023-2024 award year. These changes include:

  • College financial aid administrators can no longer have a policy or practice of denying all financial aid appeals. Every appeal must be considered on a case-by-case basis.
  • College financial aid administrators cannot limit adjustments to just the data elements on the FAFSA or just the components of the cost of attendance.
  • Dependency overrides will be assumed to continue for the duration of the student’s entire college enrollment. College financial aid administrators can rely on a dependency override made by a financial aid administrator at another college in the same or previous year, if there isn’t any conflicting information.
  • Requests for a dependency override must be evaluated within 60 days of the start of the student’s enrollment in the college.
  • Income earned from work may be set to zero due to unemployment during a qualifying emergency.
  • Determination of homelessness must be made without regard to the reasons why the student is unaccompanied and/or homeless.
  • Eligibility for unsubsidized Federal Direct Stafford Loans no longer requires parents to cut off all financial support.
  • Emergency aid will no longer reduce the student’s other aid.

What You Can Do If Your Financial Aid Appeal is Not Approved

If your financial aid appeal is not approved, you can explore other ways to pay for college. If you haven’t done so already, apply for as many scholarships as possible. Claim the American Opportunity Tax Credit (AOTC) or other education tax breaks. You may also consider borrowing a private student loan to cover costs. 

This article is based on the book, How to Appeal for More College Financial Aid , written by Mark Kantrowitz. The book is available on Amazon.com in paperback and Kindle formats.

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College and University Life Made Simple

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How to Write a Petition Letter for University?

In today’s article, we will delve into the process of writing a petition letter specifically tailored for university settings. Whether you are seeking an exception to a university policy, requesting financial aid, or advocating for a change in curriculum, a well-crafted petition letter can significantly enhance your chances of success.

Understanding the Purpose of a Petition Letter

First and foremost, it is crucial to grasp the purpose of a petition letter. A petition letter is a formal written request addressed to the appropriate university authorities. It typically aims to persuade decision-makers to reconsider, grant, or support a particular course of action or request put forward by a student or group of students.

By expressing your concerns and outlining clear, compelling arguments, you can effectively advocate for change or seek approval for a specific course of action. A petition letter serves as a powerful tool to voice your opinion, push for fairness or equity, and propose viable solutions.

The Importance of a Well-Written Petition Letter

A well-written petition letter holds immense importance in influencing the outcome of your request. It showcases your professionalism, attention to detail, and ability to articulate your ideas effectively. Furthermore, a poorly constructed letter may fail to convey your message, weakening your chances of success.

By investing time and effort in crafting a coherent, persuasive letter, you can demonstrate your commitment, dedication, and genuine desire for positive change. A well-presented petition letter not only reflects your seriousness but also heightens the likelihood of your request being taken seriously by the university authorities.

Researching the University’s Policies and Guidelines

Before drafting your petition letter, it is crucial to thoroughly research and familiarize yourself with the university’s policies and guidelines. This step allows you to identify any existing rules, regulations, or procedures relevant to your request.

By having a comprehensive understanding of the university’s policies, you can align your arguments and justifications accordingly. Moreover, being well-versed in the university’s guidelines demonstrates your commitment to the institution and enhances the credibility of your letter.

Gathering Supporting Evidence for Your Petition

Supporting your petition with substantial evidence can significantly strengthen your arguments and increase the chances of a favorable response. Collecting relevant data, statistics, or research findings that support your claims adds credibility and persuasiveness to your petition letter.

Additionally, personal anecdotes, testimonies, or examples from other students who have encountered similar situations can serve as compelling evidence. Be sure to gather a wide range of evidence that supports each aspect of your petition to provide a well-rounded and convincing case for your request.

Structuring Your Petition Letter: Introduction, Body, and Conclusion

To ensure clarity and coherence throughout your petition letter, it is vital to follow a well-structured format. The letter should consist of an introduction, a body that details your arguments and justifications, and a conclusion that summarizes your key points and emphasizes your determination.

The introduction sets the tone for your letter and should grab the reader’s attention. Consider starting with a concise and engaging opening statement that highlights the urgency or significance of your request.

In the body of your letter, present your arguments and justifications in a logical and organized manner. Each paragraph should focus on a specific point, providing sufficient evidence and elaboration to support it. Use persuasive language and a confident tone to convey your message effectively.

In the concluding paragraph, summarize your main points and reiterate the desired outcome of your petition. Emphasize your commitment, determination, and dedication to making a positive impact within the university community. Finish with a polite request for a favorable response.

Crafting a Compelling Introduction to Grab Attention

The introduction of your petition letter plays a crucial role in capturing the reader’s attention and setting the tone for the rest of the document. To create a compelling introduction, consider starting with a strong, attention-grabbing statement.

You may highlight the significance of the issue you are addressing, share a concise personal anecdote that illustrates the problem, or present a thought-provoking statistic or quote. The goal is to engage the reader from the very beginning and create a sense of urgency around your request.

Clearly Stating the Purpose and Goals of Your Petition

Once you have successfully captured the reader’s attention, it is important to clearly state the purpose and goals of your petition. Provide a concise but comprehensive overview of the issue at hand and explain the desired outcome you are seeking.

Avoid ambiguity or confusion by clearly articulating the specific change, exception, or request you are advocating for. Use clear and concise language to highlight the importance of your cause and the potential positive impact it can have on the university and its students.

Presenting Strong Arguments and Justifications in the Body of the Letter

The body of your petition letter forms the core of your argument. Each paragraph in the body should focus on a specific point or justification, presenting well-reasoned arguments that support your request.

Start each paragraph with a clear topic sentence that highlights the main point or argument you will be addressing. Follow it with supporting evidence, relevant examples, or expert opinions that substantiate your claims.

Take the time to anticipate potential counterarguments and address them proactively. By acknowledging opposing viewpoints and offering a strong rebuttal, you demonstrate thoroughness and a well-rounded understanding of the issue.

Using Persuasive Language and Tone to Convey Your Message Effectively

The language and tone you use in your petition letter play a pivotal role in conveying your message effectively. Opt for a confident and persuasive tone, employing words and phrases that highlight the importance and urgency of your request.

Steer clear of using offensive or confrontational language, as it may undermine the professionalism of your letter. Instead, aim for a respectful and authoritative tone that appeals to the reader’s sense of reason and fairness.

Providing Concrete Examples to Support Your Claims

To bolster the credibility of your petition letter, it is crucial to provide concrete examples that support your claims and arguments. Whether it is personal experiences, testimonials, or documented evidence, concrete examples provide tangible evidence that resonates with the reader.

Make sure to choose examples that directly relate to the issue at hand and clearly demonstrate the need for change or support your proposed solution. By grounding your arguments in real-life situations, you make your petition letter more relatable and compelling.

Addressing Counterarguments and Offering Rebuttal, if necessary

A well-crafted petition letter takes into account potential counterarguments or objections that decision-makers may have. Anticipating these counterarguments allows you to prepare a strong rebuttal, effectively debunking any doubts or objections that may arise.

Showcase your ability to consider multiple perspectives by addressing potential reservations or challenges head-on. Offer logical and compelling counterarguments, supported by evidence or expert opinions, to address and overcome any doubts or objections.

Demonstrating your Understanding of University Policies and Procedures

When writing a petition letter, it is essential to demonstrate your understanding of the university’s policies and procedures. This shows decision-makers that you have done your due diligence and are aware of the processes involved.

Specifically reference the relevant policies or guidelines in your letter. Highlight your respect for these regulations while making a compelling case as to why an exception should be made or a change should be implemented.

Highlighting the Potential Benefits or Positive Impact of Granting Your Petition

In addition to presenting your arguments and justifications, it is crucial to highlight the potential benefits or positive impact that granting your petition can have. By focusing on the positive outcomes, you create a persuasive argument for why your request should be seriously considered.

Explain how your proposal aligns with the university’s mission or goals and how it can contribute to creating a better educational environment for all students. Emphasize the potential long-term impact or advantages that result from addressing your concerns or implementing your suggested changes.

Emphasizing your Commitment and Determination to Succeed at University

Showcasing your commitment and determination throughout your petition letter is vital. Clearly convey your dedication to your studies and your desire to succeed academically and personally at the university.

Highlight any relevant achievements, extracurricular activities, or leadership roles that demonstrate your commitment to the university’s community. By emphasizing your drive and passion, you create a compelling case for why your request should be given serious consideration.

Formatting Tips: Font, Spacing, and Length Guidelines for a Professional Appeal

When it comes to formatting your petition letter, it is important to maintain a professional and polished appearance. Use a clear and legible font, such as Arial or Times New Roman, with a font size between 11 and 12 points.

Ensure appropriate spacing between paragraphs and use a standard format for business correspondence. Address the recipient formally and include a clear subject line that specifies the purpose of your letter.

Although the length of your petition letter may vary depending on the complexity of your request, strive to keep it concise and focused. While being thorough is important, avoid unnecessary repetition or overly long explanations that may dilute the impact of your arguments.

Proofreading and Editing: Polishing Your Petition Letter to Perfection

Avoid sending a petition letter riddled with errors or inconsistencies by carefully proofreading and editing it before submission. Mistakes can undermine the professionalism and effectiveness of your letter.

Review your letter for spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors. Ensure that your arguments flow logically and coherently and that your language is clear and concise. Consider seeking the assistance of a trusted friend, family member, or mentor who can provide an objective review.

Seeking Feedback from Peers or Mentors for Improvement

Before finalizing your petition letter, seek feedback from trusted peers, mentors, or faculty members who can provide valuable insights and suggestions for improvement. They can offer a fresh perspective and help identify any areas that require clarification or modification.

Consider joining writing groups or seeking guidance from university-provided resources such as writing centers or academic advisors. Incorporating constructive feedback can significantly enhance the overall quality and persuasiveness of your petition letter.

Submitting Your Petition Letter: Timing, Method, and Important Considerations

When it comes to submitting your petition letter, timing and method are important factors to consider. Research the university’s guidelines or protocols for submitting petitions and ensure that you adhere to any specified deadlines.

Electronically submitting your petition letter via email or an online platform may be the preferred method. However, verify if the university requires a physical copy or additional supporting documents such as signatures or endorsements. Follow the university’s instructions to ensure proper submission.

Following Up on Your Petition: Strategies for Effective Communication with University Authorities

After submitting your petition letter, it is essential to follow up with the appropriate university authorities to demonstrate your commitment and actively advocate for your cause. However, approach this follow-up with tact and professionalism.

Consider sending a polite email acknowledging receipt of your petition and expressing your gratitude for the consideration. Avoid pressuring or demanding an immediate response. Instead, inquire politely about the timeline for reviewing your petition and any additional steps you can take to support your request.

Handling Rejection: How to Stay Resilient and Explore Alternative Options

In some cases, your petition may be rejected or receive an unfavorable response. It is essential to remain resilient and consider alternative options to address your concerns or achieve your goals.

Reflect on the feedback provided and critically analyze any weaknesses or areas for improvement in your petition letter. Use this learning experience as an opportunity to refine your skills and develop a stronger case for future endeavors. Seek guidance from mentors or advisors to explore alternative options or strategies that align with your objectives.

Success Stories: Real-life Examples of Students who Successfully Wrote a Petition Letter for University

To inspire and motivate you further, here are a few success stories of students who effectively wrote petition letters for university:

Alexandra: Alexandra successfully petitioned for a change in the university’s course offerings. She conducted extensive research, collected student testimonials, and presented a thorough argument for the need to introduce a specific course. The university authorities acknowledged the merits of her petition and worked towards incorporating the suggested course into the curriculum.

David: David wrote a petition letter requesting financial aid to alleviate the financial burden of his education. He meticulously documented his family’s financial situation and highlighted his commitment to academic excellence. David’s petition was granted, and he received the financial assistance needed to continue his studies.

These examples demonstrate the power of a well-constructed and thoroughly researched petition letter. By presenting compelling arguments, supporting evidence, and a genuine desire for positive change, you can increase the chances of your petition being successful.

Writing a petition letter for a university can be a challenging task, but by following the steps outlined in this article, you can enhance your chances of success. Remember to thoroughly research the university’s policies, present strong arguments with supporting evidence, and carefully craft each section of your letter to convey your message effectively. By maintaining professionalism, clarity, and determination throughout your petition letter, you can effectively advocate for change and increase the likelihood of achieving your desired outcome.

We hope this article has provided comprehensive and valuable insights into the process of writing a petition letter for university. By investing time and effort into creating a compelling and persuasive letter, you can effectively advocate for your cause and make a positive impact within your university community.

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How to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter (With Example)

how to write a college petition letter

Let’s say you get accepted to college, but the financial aid package does not work for you and your family. Did you know that many colleges will allow you to submit a financial aid appeal letter to be considered for more financial aid and scholarships?

When I worked in college admissions, I was a part of our college’s “scholarship appeal committee” where I helped evaluate various appeals for more financial aid and merit scholarships.

Related:  Scholarships360’s free scholarship search tool

Jump ahead to:

Starting the merit scholarship appeal process

How to write your merit appeal letter, how to appeal for need-based financial aid.

  • Financial Aid Appeal Example

Can you ask for more money from private scholarships?

  • What can you do the college turns down your appeal?

Feel free to jump ahead to any of the above sections or keep on reading to learn more about the appeals process. Students should also thoroughly review their financial aid award letter to understand what types of aid the college offered them.

Recommended: How to read a financial aid award letter (with examples)

Before you begin thinking about the merit scholarship appeal process, you should make sure that the college or university actually offers merit scholarships. If the institution does not offer merit scholarships, this is a nonstarter (a quick review of their admissions and financial aid website should tell you whether they do).

Once you know that the college does offer merit scholarships, you can inquire about the merit scholarship appeal process and whether they offer it. You can either call the admissions office or email the admissions officer responsible for your region. If they say that there is a process, you can start working on your appeal letter.

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First things first, let’s talk about how you can write a successful merit appeal letter. A successful letter is all about making your case to the admissions officer.

Here is our step-by-step process for writing a merit appeal letter:

  • Begin your letter by introducing yourself, where you are from, and your high school.
  • You should also reiterate how grateful you are to be admitted to the college and how excited you are to potentially attend.
  • Next explain the reasons why you are appealing for money in scholarships–did you receive need-based financial aid? Perhaps you did not receive  enough  need-based financial aid? Or maybe there was a life circumstance that’s making paying for college difficult for your family? If so, provide a brief explanation.
  • Have you accomplished anything significant academically/extracurricularly since you applied? This would be a good time to mention that. Same goes for any new grades/test scores.
  • Do you have more generous merit scholarship offers from other schools? Include the offer letters along with your note. While this may seem a bit crass, it helps give the admissions office context of where you are coming from.
  • Finally, you should conclude the letter by thanking the admissions officer for their time and consideration. You can also restate your interest in the college and why you hope to attend.

Related:  Why didn’t I receive financial aid?

Need-based financial aid is a completely different type of financial aid than merit aid. Colleges award need-based scholarships according to a formula dictated by your family’s financial situation. This means that there is very little (if any) wiggle room for how colleges award need-based financial aid.

With this said, there are two ways that you may be able to receive a reevaluated need-based financial aid package:

  • There was an error on your FAFSA or other financial aid form (like the CSS Profile )
  • Your family’s financial aid situation has changed since you submitted your financial aid forms. Two of the most common reasons that this can happen include dramatically increased medical expenses or a parent loses their job. However, there may be other situations that could impact a family’s financial situation.

In these situations it is absolutely worth contacting the college’s financial aid office to ask if there is any possibility of an adjusted aid package. Generally, the office of financial aid will ask you for a letter explaining your change in circumstances, with context and possible documentation.

Is there any harm to appealing for more financial aid?

When a need-based financial aid appeal is filed, the financial aid officers will examine the entire financial aid application again. In this second, careful review, it is possible that the financial aid officers might see something that could cause the award letter to change for the worse. While this is rare, it is important to know that financial aid appeals can impact your financial aid positively and negatively.

Advice from an admissions professional

Christina labella.

Director of Undergraduate Admissions

Manhattanville College

Financial aid appeal letter sample

Below you will find a financial aid appeal letter sample that you can use as an outline when writing your own appeal letter.

Dear [Ms. Gomez],

My name is [Will Geiger] and I am a senior at [Manasquan High School] in [Manasquan, NJ]. I was so excited to be accepted to [Wake Forest University] as a member of the class of [2024]. 

However, as I weigh my college options, affordability is an important factor for me. [Wake Forest University] is a top choice college for me. [Include 2-3 reasons why the college is a good fit].

I am writing to ask to be considered for any merit scholarship opportunities. [Include 2-3 academic or extracurricular updates from this year]. 

I have been lucky enough to receive the following scholarships from some other colleges:

[Specific colleges and award amounts]

Additionally, I have attached the actual award amounts.

Nonetheless, I want to attend [Wake Forest University] to study [insert major] and can’t wait to study [insert details about specific classes, programs, or professors that you hope to experience at the college]. With my [insert major] degree, I want to go into [insert job or ambition].

Thank you for the opportunity to be reconsidered for additional merit scholarship opportunities. I am honored to be accepted at [Wake Forest University] and hope to be a member of the freshman class.

Please let me know if you have any other questions!

Will Geiger

Private scholarships are almost always awarding a very fixed amount of money so it is unlikely that they are going to be considering appeals. This is unlikely to be a winning strategy for students. Of course, with billions of dollars in scholarship money available each year, nothing should stop you from finding and winning more scholarships!

What can you do if your appeal is turned down?

Once you have exhausted the appeals process and have determined that your financial aid forms accurately represent your family’s financial situation your next best move is to apply for more scholarships and consider more affordable options on your list.

There are still many scholarships available for current high school seniors . Additionally, you should continue to apply for scholarships once you are in college (there are a number of scholarships available for college freshmen ).

In addition to scholarships, you may also qualify for federal work study , which is essentially a part time job to help pay for educational expenses.

If your financial situation simply won’t permit you to accept the college’s offer, there are many other options available . Coding bootcamps , certificate programs , and community college can all help you land a higher-paying job. These alternatives typically take a fraction of the time and cost of traditional college.

Finally, student loans or Income Share Agreements can be a last resort for paying for college. Students should consider all of their federal student loan options before considering any private student loans.

Recommended: How to apply for student loans

Key Takeaways

  • Being accepted by a college means they want you to join their institution
  • As a result, they may be open to considering you for additional merit scholarships
  • Taking an hour to negotiate merit scholarship aid could result in thousands of dollars in scholarships down the line
  • Financial aid appeals will not result in your admission being rescinded

Frequently asked questions about financial aid appeal letters

Will a college rescind my admission if i ask for more financial aid, could i lose my financial aid if i file a financial aid appeal, how do i ask for more financial aid from a college, what if i can't afford my financial aid package, what are some valid reasons for a financial aid appeal.

  • A significant change in your family’s financial situation
  • Recent unemployment
  • High medical related expenses
  • Changes in family size or dependency status
  • Other extenuating circumstances

How long does it take to receive a response to a financial aid appeal letter?

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How to write a request letter to attend a seminar (+ free template)

How to write a request letter to attend a seminar (+ free template)

A request letter for attending a seminar is not just a formality; it's a strategic tool to justify your need to participate in the event. This letter should not only convince your boss of the inherent value of the seminar but also address the practical aspects of cost and logistics, like expense reports and reimbursements . 

In this article, we'll guide you through the essential steps of crafting a persuasive request letter, complete with tips and a free template to help you get started. Let’s break down six steps to writing the perfect conference justification letter below! 

1. Gather necessary background info

Gather as much information as possible before drafting your letter of request to attend a conference. This step is important for two reasons: first, it helps you build a strong case for why attending the event is beneficial, and second, it prepares you to answer any follow-up questions your boss might have.

Consider these key aspects while researching:

Event details: Look into the size, location, date, and agenda of the event. Check if any notable keynote speakers, workshops, or breakout sessions align with your professional interests or the company's goals.

Attendee profile: Understand who typically attends the event. Are they professionals from your industry? Knowing the attendee profile can help you argue the networking potential of the conference.

Previous success stories: If the event is annual, look for success stories or testimonials from previous years. This can provide insight into the event's reputation and effectiveness.

Unique opportunities: Identify any unique opportunities the event offers, such as workshops for specific skills, panels with industry leaders, or networking sessions that could lead to potential partnerships or client relationships.

Alignment with professional goals: Consider how the event aligns with your current role and responsibilities. How will attending help you achieve your professional goals or contribute more effectively to the team?

By collecting this information, you're preparing to write a compelling letter and demonstrating your initiative and strategic thinking to your manager. A win-win! 

2. Write a brief event overview

Once you’ve finished your research, it's time to start drafting your conference justification letter! The first part of your letter should include a brief but informative overview of the event. This is your chance to set a positive tone and immediately interest your manager.

Begin with these key elements:

Professional salutation: Address your manager formally, using their name and title. This sets a respectful and professional tone for your request.

Event description: Provide a concise description of the event. Include the name, date, location, and event summary. You can paraphrase this information to give an accurate picture if you've found a compelling description from the event's website or promotional materials.

Statement of purpose: This is a crucial part of your letter. You should clearly articulate why you are interested in this particular seminar or conference. Explain how it relates to your current role or career aspirations. A well-crafted statement of purpose can catch your manager's attention and set the stage for the following arguments.

This section of your letter is not just about providing information; it's about building a persuasive case for your attendance. Ensure this part of the letter is clear, concise, and compelling.

3. Explain the benefits of the event

It could be helpful to incorporate the following points:

Skill enhancement and knowledge gain: Detail how the sessions and workshops at the event will enhance your skills or provide you with new knowledge directly applicable to your job — beneficial to the business.

Relevance to current projects or goals: Draw connections between the event's content and your current projects or the company's strategic goals, demonstrating the immediate value of your attendance.

Competitive advantage: Discuss how insights from the event could give your company a competitive edge, whether through implementing new technologies, strategies, or industry best practices.

Long-term benefits: Outline the long-term benefits of attending, such as staying ahead in industry trends, fostering continuous learning, and enhancing team expertise through shared knowledge.

Remember, the goal here is to make it clear that attending the conference isn’t just good for you but good for the entire company. Be specific about how the event can contribute to both your growth and the organization's success.

4. Emphasize Networking or Career Building Opportunities

Take time in your letter to shine a spotlight on these opportunities, focusing on the following key aspects:

Professional networking: Explain how connecting with other professionals in your field can lead to knowledge exchange, potential collaborations, or even new business opportunities. Emphasize the value of expanding your professional network.

Learning from industry leaders: Mention how interacting with thought leaders and experts at the conference can provide insights and perspectives that you can bring back to your team.

Career development: Discuss how the event aligns with your career growth. Whether it's acquiring new skills, getting exposed to different roles in your field, or understanding industry trends, explain how this contributes to your long-term professional development.

Brand representation: By attending, you will be representing your organization, potentially raising its profile within the industry and bringing back valuable contacts and information.

5. Discuss cost and reimbursement

An essential part of your conference justification letter involves a clear and honest discussion about the financial aspects of attending the seminar event. This section should address the cost implications and how you plan to manage expenses while you travel. 

Consider including the following points:

Detailed cost breakdown: Provide a clear breakdown of the expected expenses, including registration fees, travel costs, accommodation, and other related expenses. Being upfront about this shows that you've thought through the financial implications.

Explain how you'll manage expenses: Describe your approach to keeping track of expenses, explaining how you'll record and report costs, track miles , and keep up with receipts. This could include apps or software designed for expense tracking, highlighting your commitment to organization and fiscal responsibility — even while you're on the road. 

Cost-effective planning: Talk about the importance of finding the most economical options for travel and lodging that align with the company's budget and policies.

Investment vs return: Highlight that the investment in attending the conference is justifiable by the potential returns in knowledge, networking opportunities, and business leads, which can far outweigh the initial costs.

By addressing the costs and your plan for managing them efficiently, you assure your manager of a well-considered and cost-effective approach to attending the conference! 

6. Conclude with a prompt for further discussion

You're almost there! The final part of your letter should wrap up your request with a tone of appreciation and openness to keep the conversation going. Include these key points to drive your request home:

Express gratitude: Begin by thanking your manager for considering your request. This shows respect and appreciation for their time and the potential opportunity.

Reiterate key points: Briefly summarize the main arguments of your letter. This reinforces why attending the conference is beneficial and reminds your manager of the value it can bring to the team and organization.

Encourage open discussion: Invite your manager to discuss the request further. This could be through a formal meeting or a casual conversation. Indicate that you are open to answering any questions or providing additional information.

Professional closing: End your letter with a professional closing, such as "Sincerely" or "Best regards," followed by your name and contact details, ensuring your letter remains professional and courteous.

A well-crafted conclusion leaves a lasting positive impression and demonstrates your professionalism and eagerness for a constructive dialogue about your professional development. Whose manager doesn’t love that? 

Ready to get started on your request? Download our letter of justification template below for a head start! 

Simplify every aspect of professional development with Expensify 

A well-argued request letter combined with the right tools for managing expenses can make a compelling case to your boss. 

With Expensify in your back pocket, you simplify expense tracking and ensure a smooth and policy-compliant trip — no matter where your career might take you.

Ready to craft your conference justification letter? Download our free template today!

how to write a college petition letter

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  1. 30 Petition Templates + How To Write Petition Guide

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  4. 22 How To Write A Petition Letter

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COMMENTS

  1. Best Petition Letter For University: The Simple Way!

    Step 1: Identify Your Audience First, know who you're addressing. This could be a department head, a dean, or a specific committee. Make sure you get their title and address right. List of Potential Recipients: Department Head Academic Dean University Registrar Student Affairs Officer Step 2: Clearly State Your Request

  2. Sample Petition Letters

    101 Kern Graduate Building University Park, PA 16802 To Vice Chair of the Senate Committee on Education: I am requesting a Retroactive Withdrawal (for all courses scheduled for a term). Term (s) Requested (Like Spring 2020): Fall 2020

  3. Petitioning for admission: Getting in when you don't qualify

    Explain your academic goals and reason (s) for getting low grades. If you have one, include a doctor's note for a medical condition. Explain what you're doing to improve your GPA. For example, if you fell behind because of a medical condition but you are now cured, let them know.

  4. How to Write a Petition: 13 Steps (with Pictures)

    1 Develop your argument. Before you start your petition, put some time into researching your topic thoroughly. Look at websites and literature about your cause. Get an idea of not only what you want to change, but what the counterpoints to your arguments might be. [1]

  5. Sample Letters

    Senate Petition Requests. These samples include all of the required elements for a student petition letter (date, a clear statement of the requested action, a description of the conditions that warrant an exception, the reason University policy and/or procedure could not be followed, student's name and signature, current address, Penn State ID number, current phone number, and e-mail address).

  6. How to Write a Petition Letter · Change.org

    Guides How to Write a Petition Letter Sep 11, 2023 A petition letter is used to make a request to an authority, such as a court or a university. Sometimes the terms petition and petition letter are used interchangeably because they contain similar information.

  7. Sample Appeal Letter—Academic Dismissal from College

    Dear Dean Smith and Members of the Scholastic Standards Committee: I am writing to appeal my academic dismissal from Ivy University. I was not surprised, but very upset to receive a letter earlier this week informing me of my dismissal. I'm writing to you with the hope to be reinstated for next semester.

  8. Academic petitions

    Preparing to submit an academic petition. To be considered by the Academic Petitions Committee, your petition needs the support of your academic advisor. It is a good idea to see your advisor at the beginning of the process to talk over the rationale. You then need to write the rationale and share it with your academic advisor to get approval.

  9. How To Write an Appeal Letter for College Admissions

    1. Understand the appeals process Colleges may have a formal appeals process with instructions listed on their website or in the communications they send you, but they may not. Colleges that don't have an official way to appeal a decision might have a more flexible approach to appealing, or they may not consider appeals at all.

  10. Free Petition Letter for College [Sample]

    Learn how to write a petition letter for college. Use our sample petition letters for college as a template for your petition letter. Sample 1: Petition Letter for College - Change in Curriculum [Your Name] [Your Address] [City, State ZIP Code] [Date] [College Name] [Department Name] [College Address] [City, State ZIP Code]

  11. How to Write an Appeal Letter for a College Dismissal

    Begin your letter by addressing it to the dean or committee handling your appeal. "To Whom It May Concern" may be a typical opening for a business letter, but you most likely have a specific name or committee to whom you can address your letter. Give it a personal touch. Emma's appeal letter provides a good example of an effective opening.

  12. 20 FREE Petition Examples (with Templates & How to Guide)

    A petition is a formal document designed to appeal to an authorizing figure to take specified action by changing a policy, fixing a problem, granting relief or privileges to an individual or group of people, etc. The initiator usually highlights the issue at hand and what the party in authority should do to remedy it.

  13. How to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter

    For families who determine an appeal is the best route, here are tips on how to write a successful financial aid appeal letter: Start by calling the financial aid office. Include specific examples ...

  14. How to Write a Letter of Appeal to Retake a College Course

    Colleges and universities may limit the number of times a student signs up to retake classes. Students who reach their maximum attempts can write a request letter for an additional chance to take the course. While the college has to approve the request, a well-written letter may sway the decision.

  15. How to Write a Petition Letter for University

    The first step in writing an effective title for a petition letter for a university or college is to clearly define the circumstances justifying the request.

  16. How to Write a Successful Financial Aid Appeal Letter

    For example: Dear Ms. Hopkins, I am emailin to follow up on the financial aid appeal I sent to you on July 8, 2022. For your convenience, I have attached my original letter and all documentation to this email. Thank you for consideration and I look forward to hearing from you. Best regards, Ben Brown.

  17. How to Write a Persuasive Petition Letter for School

    Making your request Develop the argument for your petition. Take time to research and read about the topic or problem that you have. Make sure you have looked into the little details that may help you in your argument. Look for books, go to the library and look for literature that is in hand with your case.

  18. Writing an Effective Appeal or Request Letter

    Model Letter: The model below uses all the elements from the list. The above layout is a matter of personal choice, as is the decision to include a phone number and email address. Note: the text of the model letter is exceptionally brief. Most appeal and request letters require a page or two. Samuel Student. 123 ABC Street. San Diego, CA 92120.

  19. How to Appeal for More Financial Aid for College

    The college may ask you to complete a form that addresses the most common situations. Most colleges ask the family to write an appeal letter. Identify the special circumstances that affect your ability to pay for college. The special circumstances are the reasons why you are appealing for more financial aid.

  20. How to Write a Petition Letter for University?

    In today's article, we will delve into the process of writing a petition letter specifically tailored for university settings. Whether you are seeking an exception to a university policy, requesting financial aid, or advocating for a change in curriculum, a well-crafted petition letter can significantly enhance your chances of success.

  21. How to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter (With Example)

    First things first, let's talk about how you can write a successful merit appeal letter. A successful letter is all about making your case to the admissions officer. Here is our step-by-step process for writing a merit appeal letter: Begin your letter by introducing yourself, where you are from, and your high school.

  22. How To Write A Letter Of Recommendation For A College Application

    Whether submitted in print or electronically, a recommendation letter should use a business-like font like Times New Roman or Arial (in other words, this is not the place for Comic Sans). Stick to ...

  23. How To Write a College Application Cover Letter (With Template)

    1. Write your name and street address. At the top of your cover letter, write your first and last name. On a separate line include your street address, followed by your city, state and zip code on another line. 2. Include the date. Below your contact information, write the date you plan on sending the cover letter.

  24. Your Guide To Creating a Salary Increase Letter (+ Free Template ...

    To write a letter for a salary increase, follow a structured and professional format. Start with the company's letterhead to ensure authenticity, and include the date at the top of the letter. Address the letter directly to the employee with their name, job title, and department. Begin with a warm opening and then proceed to state the purpose ...

  25. How to write a request letter [+ template]

    The first part of your letter should include a brief but informative overview of the event. This is your chance to set a positive tone and immediately interest your manager. Professional salutation: Address your manager formally, using their name and title. This sets a respectful and professional tone for your request.

  26. Man Tracking Taylor Swift's Private Jets Fires Back at Letter From Her

    A college student named Jack Sweeney fired back against Taylor Swift ' s lawyer after receiving a cease and desist letter for tracking the pop superstar's private jets. Swift's legal team sent two ...