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73 Essay Hook Examples

essay hook examples and definition, explained below

An essay hook is the first one or two sentences of your essay that are used to grab the reader’s attention and draw them into your discussion.

It is called a hook because it “grabs” the reader and doesn’t let them go! It should have something in there that makes the reader feel curious and intrigued, compelling them to continue reading.

Techniques for Good Essay Hooks

Here are a few techniques that you can use to write a good essay hook:

  • Use a Quotation : Sometimes, a relevant quotation from a well-known author or expert can help establish the context or theme of your essay. Next time you’re conducting research for an essay, keep an eye out for a really compelling quote that you could use as your hook for that essay.
  • Start with a Statement that is Surprising or Unusual: A surprising or unusually statement will draw a reader in, making them want to know more about that topic. It’s good if the statement contradicts common knowledge or reveals an insight about your topic that isn’t immediately obvious. These can be particularly good for argumentative essays where you’re putting forward a controversial or compelling argument as your thesis statement .
  • Tell a Brief Anecdote : A short, interesting story related to your topic can personaize the story, making it more than just a dry essay, and turning it into a compelling narrative that’s worth reading.
  • Use Statistics or Facts: Interesting, surprising, or shocking facts or statistics work similarly to surprising statements: they make us want to know more about a topic. Statistics and facts in your introductions are particularly useful for analytical, expository , and argumentative essays.
  • Start with a Question: Questions that make the reader think deeply about an issue, or pose a question that the reader themselves has considered, can be really effecitve. But remember, questions tend to be better for informal and personal essays, and are generally not allowed in formal argumentative essays. If you’re not sure if you’re allowed to use questions in your essays, check with your teacher first.

Below, I’ll present some examples of hooks that you could use as inspiration when writing your own essay hook.

Essay Hook Examples

These examples might help stimulate your thinking. However, keep in mind that your essay hook needs to be unique to your essay, so use these as inspiration but write your own essay hook that’s perfect for your own essay.

1. For an Essay About Yourself

An essay about yourself can be personal, use “I” statements, and include memories or thoughts that are deeply personal to you.

  • Question: “Have you ever met someone who could turn even the most mundane events into a thrilling adventure? Let me introduce myself.”
  • Anecdote: “The smell of freshly baked cookies always takes me back to the day when I accidentally started a baking business at the age of nine.”
  • Intriguing Statement: “I’ve always believed that you haven’t truly lived until you’ve read a book upside down, danced in the rain, or taught a parrot to say ‘I love pizza.'”
  • Quotation: “As Mark Twain once said, ‘The secret of getting ahead is getting started.’ That’s a philosophy I’ve embraced in every aspect of my life.”
  • Humorous Statement: “I’m a self-proclaimed ‘professional chocolate tester’ – a title that’s not only delicious but also requires extreme dedication.”
  • Start with your Mission Statement : “My life motto is simple but powerful: be the person who decided to go for it.
  • Fact or Statistic: “According to a study, people who speak more than one language tend to be better at multitasking . As a polyglot, I certainly live up to that statistic.”
  • Comparison or Metaphor: “If my life were a book, it would be a blend of an adventurous novel, a suspense thriller, and a pinch of romantic comedy.”
  • Personal Revelation: “Ever since I was a child, I’ve had an uncanny ability to communicate with animals. It’s an unusual skill, but one that has shaped my life in many ways.”
  • Narrative: “The day everything changed for me was an ordinary Tuesday. Little did I know, a single conversation would lead me to discover my true passion.”

2. For a Reflective Essay

A reflective essay often explores personal experiences, feelings, and thoughts. So, your hooks for reflective essays can usually be more personal, intriguing, and engaging than other types of essays. Here are some examples for inspiration:

  • Question: “Have you ever felt as though a single moment could change your entire life? This essay is going to explore that moment for me.”
  • Anecdote: “I was standing on the edge of the Grand Canyon, looking at the vast emptiness, and for the first time, I truly understood the word ‘perspective’.”
  • Bold Statement: “There is a part of me that is still trapped in that room, on that rainy afternoon, holding the letter that would change everything.”
  • Personal Revelation: “The first time I truly felt a sense of belonging wasn’t in a crowded room full of friends, but in the quiet solitude of a forest.”
  • Intriguing Statement: “In my life, silence has been a teacher more profound than any words could ever be.”
  • Quotation: “Einstein once said, ‘The only source of knowledge is experience.’ Now, looking back, I realize how profound that statement truly is.”
  • Comparison or Metaphor: “If my life is a tapestry, then that summer was the vibrant thread that changed the entire pattern.”
  • Narrative: “As the train pulled out of the station, I realized I wasn’t just leaving my hometown, I was leaving my old self behind.”
  • Philosophical Statement: “In the theater of life, we are both the actor and the audience, playing our part and watching ourselves simultaneously.”
  • Emotive Statement: “There is a sort of sweet sorrow in remembering, a joy tinged with a hint of sadness, like the last notes of a beautiful song.”

For an Argumentative Essay

Essay hooks for argumentative essays are often the hardest. This type of essay tends to require the most formal type of academic writing, meaning your hook shouldn’t use first person, and should be more based on fact and objectivity, often at the expense of creativity. Here are some examples.

  • Quotation: “Thomas Jefferson once said, ‘Whenever the people are well-informed, they can be trusted with their own government.’ If Jefferson were alive today, he would likely feel that this meed for a well-informed citizenry is falling well short of where he would aspire.”
  • Provocative Statement: “Despite what romantic films may portray, love at first sight is merely a myth perpetuated by society. This essay will prosecute the argument that love at first sight is a myth.”
  • Statistical Fact: “According to the World Health Organization, depression is the leading psychological disability worldwide. Yet, mental health is still stigmatized and often overlooked. This essay will argue that depression should be seen as a health issue, and stigmatization of depression causes serious harm to society.”
  • Comparison: “Much like an unchecked infection, climate change, if left ignored, can spread far beyond what it is today, causing long-term economic and social problems that may even threaten the longevity of humanity itself.”
  • Contradiction : “While we live in an era of unprecedented technological advancements, millions around the world are still denied basic internet access.”
  • Bold Declaration: “Animal testing is not only ethically unacceptable, but it also undermines the progress of medical research.”
  • Challenging Belief: “Despite popular belief, the automation of jobs is not a threat but an opportunity for society to evolve.”
  • Quotation: “George Orwell wrote in ‘1984’, ‘Big Brother is Watching You.’ In our modern society, with the advancement of technology, this is becoming more of a reality than fiction.”
  • Intriguing Statement: “Despite countless diet fads and fitness trends, obesity rates continue to rise. This argumentative essay will argue that this is because medical practitioners’ approaches to health and weight loss are fundamentally flawed.”
  • Statistical Fact: “Research reveals that over 90% of the world’s plastic waste is not recycled. This alarming figure calls for a drastic change in social attitudes towards consumption and waste management.”
  • Challenging Assumption: “Society often assumes that progress and growth are intrinsically good, but this is not always the case in the realm of economic development.”
  • Contradiction: “Western society upholds the value of freedom, yet every day, members of society cede personal liberties in the name of convenience and security.”
  • Analogy: “Like an overplayed song, when a news story is repeated too often, it loses its impact. In the era of digital media, society is becoming desensitized to critical issues.”
  • Relevant Anecdote: “In a village in India, the arrival of a single computer transformed the lives of the residents. This small anecdote underscores the importance of digital inclusion in today’s world.”
  • Call to Rethink: “In a world where success is often equated with financial wealth, it is time for society to reconsidered what truly constitutes a successful life.”

For a Compare and Contrast Essay

A compare and contrast essay examines two issues, looking at both the similarities and differences between them. A good hook for a compare and contrast essay will immediately signal to the reader the subjects that are being compared and why they’re being compared. Here are sine ideas for hooks for a compare and contrast essay:

  • Quotation: “As Charles Dickens wrote in his novel ‘A Tale of Two Cities’, ‘It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’. This could equally apply to the contrasting dynamics of urban and rural living.”
  • Provocative Statement: “Despite popular belief, cats and dogs have more in common than society tends to think.”
  • Comparison: “Comparing being an only child to growing up with siblings is like contrasting a solo performance with an orchestral symphony.”
  • Contradiction: “While many view classic literature and contemporary fiction as worlds apart, they are more akin to two sides of the same coin.”
  • Bold Declaration: “Android and iPhone may compete in the same market, but their philosophies could not be more different.”
  • Statistical Fact: “Statistics show that children who grow up reading books tend to perform better academically than those who do not. But, the jury is out on how reading traditional books compares to reading e-books on screens.”
  • Quotation: “As Robert Louis Stevenson once wrote, ‘Sooner or later, we all sit down to a banquet of consequences.’ This statement can be used to frame a comparison between short-term and long-term thinking.”
  • Provocative Statement: “Democracy and dictatorship are often seen as polar opposites, but are they are not as different as they seem.”
  • Comparison: “Climate change and plastic pollution are two major environmental issues, yet they demand different approaches and solutions.”
  • Contradiction: “While traditional classrooms and online learning are seen as separate modes of education, they can often blend into a cohesive learning experience.”
  • Bold Declaration: “Though both based on merit, the structures of capitalism and socialism lead to vastly different societal outcomes.”
  • Imagery: “The painting styles of Van Gogh and Monet can be contrasted as a stormy sea versus a tranquil pond.”
  • Historical Reference: “The philosophies of the Cold War-era – capitalism and communism – provide a lens to contrast economic systems.”
  • Literary Comparison: “The dystopian societies portrayed in George Orwell’s ‘1984’ and Aldous Huxley’s ‘Brave New World’ serve as contrasting visions of the future.”
  • Philosophical Question: “Individualism and collectivism shape societies in distinct ways, but neither one can truly exist without the other.”

See Here for my Guide on Writing a Compare and Contrast Essay

For a Psychology Essay

Writing an engaging hook for a psychology essay involves sparking the reader’s interest in the human mind, behavior, or the specific psychology topic you’re discussing. Here are some stimulating hooks for a psychology essay:

  • Rhetorical Question: “How much control do we truly have over our own actions?”
  • Quotation: “Sigmund Freud once said, ‘Unexpressed emotions will never die. They are buried alive and will come forth later in uglier ways.’ This essay will explore whether this is universally true.”
  • Provocative Statement: “Contrary to popular belief, ‘venting out’ anger might actually be fueling the fire of fury.”
  • Comparison: “Just as an iceberg reveals only a fraction of its bulk above water, conscious minds may only be a small piece of who humans truly are.”
  • Contradiction: “While it may seem counterintuitive, studies show that individuals who are more intelligent are also more likely to suffer from mental health issues.”
  • Bold Declaration: “Despite advances in technology, understanding the human brain remains one of the final frontiers in science.”
  • Statistical Fact: “According to a study by the American Psychological Association, nearly one in five adults in the U.S. lives with a mental illness. Yet, mental health continues to be a topic shrouded in stigma.”

For a Sociology Essay

Writing an engaging hook for a sociology essay involves sparking the reader’s interest in social behaviors, cultural phenomena, or the specific sociology topic you’re discussing. Here are ideas for hooks for a sociology essay:

  • Quotation: “As Karl Marx once noted, ‘Social progress can be measured exactly by the social position of the fair sex.’ Sadly, society has not made much progress in gender equality.”
  • Provocative Statement: “Social media, initially created to connect people, is ironically leading society into an era of unprecedented isolation.”
  • Comparison: “Comparing society to a theater, where each individual plays a role, it is possible to start to see patterns and scripts embedded in daily interactions.”
  • Contradiction: “While people often believe that technology is bringing society closer together, evidence suggests that it’s actually driving a wedge between people, creating ‘digital divides’.”
  • Bold Declaration: “Human societies are constructed on deeply ingrained systems of inequality, often invisible to those benefiting from them.”
  • Statistical Fact: “A recent study found that women still earn only 81 cents for every dollar earned by men. This stark wage gap raises questions about equality in the workforce.”

For a College Application Essay

A college essay is a personal statement where you can showcase who you are beyond your grades and resume. It’s your chance to tell your unique story. Here are ten potential hooks for a college essay:

  • Anecdote: “At the age of seven, with a wooden spoon as my baton, I confidently conducted an orchestra of pots and pans in my grandmother’s kitchen.”
  • Provocative Statement: “I believe that life is like a game of chess. The king might be the most important piece, but it’s the pawns that can change the entire course of the game.”
  • Personal Revelation: “It wasn’t until I was lost in a foreign city, armed with nothing but a map in a language I didn’t understand, that I truly discovered my love for adventure.”
  • Intriguing Question: “Have you ever wondered how it feels to be part of two completely different cultures, yet wholly belong to neither?”
  • Bold Declaration: “Breaking a bone can be a painful experience. Breaking stereotypes, however, is an entirely different kind of challenge.”
  • Unusual Fact: “I can recite the periodic table backwards while juggling three tennis balls. It’s a strange talent, but it’s a perfect metaphor for how I tackle challenges.”
  • Quotation: “As Albert Einstein once said, ‘Imagination is more important than knowledge.’ This quote has defined my approach to learning.”
  • Narrative: “It was a cold winter’s day when I first discovered the magic of turning a blank page into a world full of characters, stories, and ideas.”
  • Metaphor: “Like a caterpillar transforming into a butterfly, my high school years have been a period of profound metamorphosis.”
  • Humorous Statement: “Being the youngest of five siblings, I quickly learned that the best way to be heard was to become the family’s unofficial lawyer.”

Conclusion: The Qualities of a Good Essay Hook

As I wrap up this article, I want to share a few last tips on qualities that a good essay hook should have. Keep these tips in mind when writing your essay hook and using the above essay hook examples:

First, relevance . A good hook should be directly relevant to the topic or theme of your essay. The hook should provide a preview of what’s to come without giving too much away.

Second, Intrigue. A great hook should make the reader want to continue reading. It should create a question in the reader’s mind or present a fascinating idea that they want to know more about.

Third, uniqueness. An effective hook should be original and unique. It should stand out from the many other essays that the reader might be going through.

Fourth, clarity. Even though a hook should be captivating and original, it should also be clear and easy to understand. Avoid complex sentences and jargon that might confuse the reader.

Fifth, genre conventions. Too often, my students try to be so creative in their essay hooks that they forget genre conventions . The more formal an essay, the harder it is to write the hook. My general approach is to focus on statistics and facts, and avoid rhetorical questions , with more formal essay hooks.

Keep in mind that you should run your essay hook by your teacher by showing them your first draft before you submit your essay for grading. This will help you to make sure it follows genre conventions and is well-written.

Chris

Chris Drew (PhD)

Dr. Chris Drew is the founder of the Helpful Professor. He holds a PhD in education and has published over 20 articles in scholarly journals. He is the former editor of the Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education. [Image Descriptor: Photo of Chris]

  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 50 Durable Goods Examples
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  • How to write an argumentative essay | Examples & tips

How to Write an Argumentative Essay | Examples & Tips

Published on July 24, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

An argumentative essay expresses an extended argument for a particular thesis statement . The author takes a clearly defined stance on their subject and builds up an evidence-based case for it.

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Table of contents

When do you write an argumentative essay, approaches to argumentative essays, introducing your argument, the body: developing your argument, concluding your argument, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about argumentative essays.

You might be assigned an argumentative essay as a writing exercise in high school or in a composition class. The prompt will often ask you to argue for one of two positions, and may include terms like “argue” or “argument.” It will frequently take the form of a question.

The prompt may also be more open-ended in terms of the possible arguments you could make.

Argumentative writing at college level

At university, the vast majority of essays or papers you write will involve some form of argumentation. For example, both rhetorical analysis and literary analysis essays involve making arguments about texts.

In this context, you won’t necessarily be told to write an argumentative essay—but making an evidence-based argument is an essential goal of most academic writing, and this should be your default approach unless you’re told otherwise.

Examples of argumentative essay prompts

At a university level, all the prompts below imply an argumentative essay as the appropriate response.

Your research should lead you to develop a specific position on the topic. The essay then argues for that position and aims to convince the reader by presenting your evidence, evaluation and analysis.

  • Don’t just list all the effects you can think of.
  • Do develop a focused argument about the overall effect and why it matters, backed up by evidence from sources.
  • Don’t just provide a selection of data on the measures’ effectiveness.
  • Do build up your own argument about which kinds of measures have been most or least effective, and why.
  • Don’t just analyze a random selection of doppelgänger characters.
  • Do form an argument about specific texts, comparing and contrasting how they express their thematic concerns through doppelgänger characters.

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An argumentative essay should be objective in its approach; your arguments should rely on logic and evidence, not on exaggeration or appeals to emotion.

There are many possible approaches to argumentative essays, but there are two common models that can help you start outlining your arguments: The Toulmin model and the Rogerian model.

Toulmin arguments

The Toulmin model consists of four steps, which may be repeated as many times as necessary for the argument:

  • Make a claim
  • Provide the grounds (evidence) for the claim
  • Explain the warrant (how the grounds support the claim)
  • Discuss possible rebuttals to the claim, identifying the limits of the argument and showing that you have considered alternative perspectives

The Toulmin model is a common approach in academic essays. You don’t have to use these specific terms (grounds, warrants, rebuttals), but establishing a clear connection between your claims and the evidence supporting them is crucial in an argumentative essay.

Say you’re making an argument about the effectiveness of workplace anti-discrimination measures. You might:

  • Claim that unconscious bias training does not have the desired results, and resources would be better spent on other approaches
  • Cite data to support your claim
  • Explain how the data indicates that the method is ineffective
  • Anticipate objections to your claim based on other data, indicating whether these objections are valid, and if not, why not.

Rogerian arguments

The Rogerian model also consists of four steps you might repeat throughout your essay:

  • Discuss what the opposing position gets right and why people might hold this position
  • Highlight the problems with this position
  • Present your own position , showing how it addresses these problems
  • Suggest a possible compromise —what elements of your position would proponents of the opposing position benefit from adopting?

This model builds up a clear picture of both sides of an argument and seeks a compromise. It is particularly useful when people tend to disagree strongly on the issue discussed, allowing you to approach opposing arguments in good faith.

Say you want to argue that the internet has had a positive impact on education. You might:

  • Acknowledge that students rely too much on websites like Wikipedia
  • Argue that teachers view Wikipedia as more unreliable than it really is
  • Suggest that Wikipedia’s system of citations can actually teach students about referencing
  • Suggest critical engagement with Wikipedia as a possible assignment for teachers who are skeptical of its usefulness.

You don’t necessarily have to pick one of these models—you may even use elements of both in different parts of your essay—but it’s worth considering them if you struggle to structure your arguments.

Regardless of which approach you take, your essay should always be structured using an introduction , a body , and a conclusion .

Like other academic essays, an argumentative essay begins with an introduction . The introduction serves to capture the reader’s interest, provide background information, present your thesis statement , and (in longer essays) to summarize the structure of the body.

Hover over different parts of the example below to see how a typical introduction works.

The spread of the internet has had a world-changing effect, not least on the world of education. The use of the internet in academic contexts is on the rise, and its role in learning is hotly debated. For many teachers who did not grow up with this technology, its effects seem alarming and potentially harmful. This concern, while understandable, is misguided. The negatives of internet use are outweighed by its critical benefits for students and educators—as a uniquely comprehensive and accessible information source; a means of exposure to and engagement with different perspectives; and a highly flexible learning environment.

The body of an argumentative essay is where you develop your arguments in detail. Here you’ll present evidence, analysis, and reasoning to convince the reader that your thesis statement is true.

In the standard five-paragraph format for short essays, the body takes up three of your five paragraphs. In longer essays, it will be more paragraphs, and might be divided into sections with headings.

Each paragraph covers its own topic, introduced with a topic sentence . Each of these topics must contribute to your overall argument; don’t include irrelevant information.

This example paragraph takes a Rogerian approach: It first acknowledges the merits of the opposing position and then highlights problems with that position.

Hover over different parts of the example to see how a body paragraph is constructed.

A common frustration for teachers is students’ use of Wikipedia as a source in their writing. Its prevalence among students is not exaggerated; a survey found that the vast majority of the students surveyed used Wikipedia (Head & Eisenberg, 2010). An article in The Guardian stresses a common objection to its use: “a reliance on Wikipedia can discourage students from engaging with genuine academic writing” (Coomer, 2013). Teachers are clearly not mistaken in viewing Wikipedia usage as ubiquitous among their students; but the claim that it discourages engagement with academic sources requires further investigation. This point is treated as self-evident by many teachers, but Wikipedia itself explicitly encourages students to look into other sources. Its articles often provide references to academic publications and include warning notes where citations are missing; the site’s own guidelines for research make clear that it should be used as a starting point, emphasizing that users should always “read the references and check whether they really do support what the article says” (“Wikipedia:Researching with Wikipedia,” 2020). Indeed, for many students, Wikipedia is their first encounter with the concepts of citation and referencing. The use of Wikipedia therefore has a positive side that merits deeper consideration than it often receives.

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An argumentative essay ends with a conclusion that summarizes and reflects on the arguments made in the body.

No new arguments or evidence appear here, but in longer essays you may discuss the strengths and weaknesses of your argument and suggest topics for future research. In all conclusions, you should stress the relevance and importance of your argument.

Hover over the following example to see the typical elements of a conclusion.

The internet has had a major positive impact on the world of education; occasional pitfalls aside, its value is evident in numerous applications. The future of teaching lies in the possibilities the internet opens up for communication, research, and interactivity. As the popularity of distance learning shows, students value the flexibility and accessibility offered by digital education, and educators should fully embrace these advantages. The internet’s dangers, real and imaginary, have been documented exhaustively by skeptics, but the internet is here to stay; it is time to focus seriously on its potential for good.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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An argumentative essay tends to be a longer essay involving independent research, and aims to make an original argument about a topic. Its thesis statement makes a contentious claim that must be supported in an objective, evidence-based way.

An expository essay also aims to be objective, but it doesn’t have to make an original argument. Rather, it aims to explain something (e.g., a process or idea) in a clear, concise way. Expository essays are often shorter assignments and rely less on research.

At college level, you must properly cite your sources in all essays , research papers , and other academic texts (except exams and in-class exercises).

Add a citation whenever you quote , paraphrase , or summarize information or ideas from a source. You should also give full source details in a bibliography or reference list at the end of your text.

The exact format of your citations depends on which citation style you are instructed to use. The most common styles are APA , MLA , and Chicago .

The majority of the essays written at university are some sort of argumentative essay . Unless otherwise specified, you can assume that the goal of any essay you’re asked to write is argumentative: To convince the reader of your position using evidence and reasoning.

In composition classes you might be given assignments that specifically test your ability to write an argumentative essay. Look out for prompts including instructions like “argue,” “assess,” or “discuss” to see if this is the goal.

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Essay Writing Guide

Hook Examples

Last updated on: Nov 20, 2023

Hook Examples: How to Start Your Essay Effectively

By: Nova A.

15 min read

Reviewed By: Jacklyn H.

Published on: Feb 19, 2019

Hook Examples

Tired of getting poor grades on your high school or college essays? Feeling lost when it comes to captivating your professor's attention?

Whether you're a high school or college student, the constant stream of essays, assignments, and projects can be overwhelming. But fear not!

There's a secret weapon at your disposal: hooks. 

These attention-grabbing phrases are the key to keeping your reader hooked and eager for more. In this blog, we'll explore powerful essay hook examples that will solve all your essay writing concerns.

So let’s get started!

Hook Examples

On this Page

What is an Essay Hook?

An essay hook is the opening sentence or a few sentences in an essay that grab the reader's attention and engage them from the very beginning. It is called a " hook " because it is designed to reel in the reader and make them interested in reading the rest of the essay.

The purpose of an essay hook is to:

  • Grab the reader's attention from the very beginning
  • Create curiosity and intrigue
  • Engage the reader emotionally
  • Establish the tone and direction of the essay
  • Make the reader want to continue reading
  • Provide a seamless transition into the rest of the essay
  • Set the stage for the main argument or narrative
  • Make the essay memorable and stand out
  • Demonstrate the writer's skill in captivating an audience

Check out our complete guide on how to start an essay here!

How to Write a Hook?

The opening lines of your essay serve as the hook, capturing your reader's attention right from the start. Remember, the hook is a part of your essay introduction and shouldn't replace it.

A well-crafted introduction consists of a hook followed by a thesis statement . While the hook attracts the reader, the thesis statement explains the main points of your essay.

To write an effective hook, consider the following aspects:

  • Understand the nature of the literary work you're addressing.
  • Familiarize yourself with your audience's preferences and interests.
  • Clearly define the purpose behind your essay writing.

Keep in mind that the hook should be directly related to the main topic or idea of your writing piece. When it comes to essays or other academic papers, you can employ various types of hooks that align with your specific requirements. 

Learn more about Hook Statements in this informative Video!

Hook Sentence Examples

To give you a better understanding of the different types of essay hooks, we will be discussing essay hook examples.

Question Hook

Starting your essay by asking a thought-provoking question can be a good way to engage the reader. Ask your reader a question that they can visualize. However, make sure to keep your questions relevant to the reader's interest. Avoid generalized, and yes or no questions.

Rhetorical questions make up good hooks.

  • “How are successful college students different from unsuccessful college students?”
  • “What is the purpose of our existence?”
  • “Have you ever wondered whether Hazel Grace and Augustus Waters would have been still together if he didn’t die of cancer?”
  • "Ever wondered what lies beneath the ocean's depths? Dive into an underwater adventure and uncover the wonders of the deep sea."
  • "Have you ever pondered the true meaning of happiness? Join us on a quest to unravel the secrets of lasting joy."
  • Ready to challenge your limits? How far would you go to achieve your dreams and become the best version of yourself?"
  • "Curious about the future of technology? Can you envision a world where robots and humans coexist harmoniously?"
  • "Are you tired of the same old recipes? Spice up your culinary repertoire with exotic flavors and innovative cooking techniques."
  • "Are you ready to take control of your finances? Imagine a life of financial freedom and the possibilities it brings."
  • "Ever wondered what it takes to create a masterpiece? Discover the untold stories behind the world's most celebrated works of art."

Quotation Hook

A quotation from a famous person is used to open an essay to attract the reader's attention. However, the quote needs to be relevant to your topic and must come from a credible source. To remove any confusion that the reader might have it is best to explain the meaning of the quote later.

Here are the quotes you can use to start your essay:

  • “Education is the most powerful weapon you can use to change the world.”
  • If your topic is related to hard work and making your own destiny, you can start by quoting Michael Jordan.
  • “Some people want it to happen; some wish it would happen; others make it happen.”
  • The only way to do great work is to love what you do." - Steve Jobs
  • "In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity." - Albert Einstein
  • "Don't watch the clock; do what it does. Keep going." - Sam Levenson
  • "Believe you can and you're halfway there." - Theodore Roosevelt
  • "The best way to predict the future is to create it." - Peter Drucker
  • "The harder I work, the luckier I get." - Samuel Goldwyn
  • "Don't let yesterday take up too much of today." - Will Rogers

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Statistic Hook

Here you use statistical data such as numbers and figures, percentages, etc. to hook the reader. This is mostly used in informative writing to provide the reader with new and interesting facts. It is important to mention the source.

  • “Reports have shown that almost two-thirds of adults in the United States of America have lived in a place with at least one gun, at some point of their life.”
  • Another persuasive essay hook example about people’s psychology and lying is mentioned below:
  • “It is noted by Allison Komet from the Psychology Today magazine that people lie in every one out of five conversations that last for at least 10 minutes.”
  • "Did you know that 8 out of 10 entrepreneurs fail within their first year? Discover the secrets of the successful 20% and defy the odds."
  • "According to recent studies, people spend an average of 2 hours and 22 minutes on social media every day. Is it time to reevaluate our digital habits?"
  • "Did you know that over 75% of communication is non-verbal? Explore the power of body language and unlock the secrets of effective communication."
  • "Research shows that 1 in 4 adults suffer from mental health issues. It's time to break the stigma and prioritize our well-being."
  • "Did you know that nearly 70% of consumers rely on online reviews before making a purchase? Build trust and boost your business with positive feedback."
  • "According to recent data, the global e-commerce industry is projected to reach $6.38 trillion by 2024. Don't miss out on the digital revolution."
  • "Did you know that 80% of car accidents are caused by distracted driving? Let's put an end to this dangerous epidemic."

Anecdotal Hook

An anecdote is a short story relevant to the essay topic, illustrated to gain the reader’s attention. This story can be derived from a personal experience or your imagination. Mostly, an anecdote is humorous; it makes the reader laugh and leaves them wanting to read more.

It is mostly used when writing narrative or descriptive essays.

If you are a non-English speaker and call the support department or the helpline and hear:

  • “If you want instructions in English, press 1. If you don't understand English, press 2.”
  • “ An elderly person came to buy a TV, asked the shopkeeper if they had colored TVs. When told that they are available, he asked to purchase a purple one.” 

Here are some more anecdotal hook examples:

  • "Picture this: It was a cold winter's night, the snowflakes gently falling from the sky, as I embarked on a journey that would change my life forever..."
  • "I still remember the day vividly, sitting in my grandmother's kitchen, the aroma of freshly baked cookies filling the air. Little did I know, that day would teach me a valuable lesson about the power of kindness..."
  • "It was a crowded subway ride during rush hour, everyone lost in their own world. But then, a stranger's act of generosity restored my faith in humanity..."
  • "As I stepped onto the stage, the spotlight shining down, my heart pounding with a mix of excitement and nerves. It was in that moment, I realized the transformative power of facing your fears..."
  • "In the heart of the bustling city, amidst the noise and chaos, I stumbled upon a hidden park, an oasis of serenity that reminded me of the importance of finding peace within ourselves..."
  • "The dusty attic held countless treasures, but it was the tattered journal that caught my eye. As I flipped through its pages, I discovered the untold story of my ancestors, and a connection to my roots I never knew I had..."
  • "Lost in the maze of a foreign city, unable to speak the language, I relied on the kindness of strangers who became my unexpected guides and lifelong friends..."
  • "As the final notes of the symphony resonated through the concert hall, the audience erupted in a thunderous applause. It was in that moment, I witnessed the pure magic that music can evoke..."

Personal Story

Starting with a personal story is the right way to go when writing a personal narrative or admissions essay for College.

There is no such rule that the story has to be yours. You can share your friends' story or someone you know of.

Remember that such hooks aren't suitable when writing a more formal or argumentative piece of writing.

  • “My father was in the Navy; I basically grew up on a cruise. As a young boy, I saw things beyond anyone's imagination. On April 15, 2001…”
  • "Growing up, I was the shyest kid in the classroom. But one day, a simple act of courage changed the course of my life forever..."
  • "I'll never forget the exhilarating rush I felt as I crossed the finish line of my first marathon, defying all odds and proving to myself that anything is possible..."
  • "At the age of 18, I packed my bags, bid farewell to familiarity, and embarked on a solo adventure across the globe. Little did I know, it would become the journey of self-discovery I had always longed for..."
  • "As a single parent, juggling multiple jobs and responsibilities, I faced countless obstacles. But my unwavering determination and the support of my loved ones propelled me towards success..."
  • "It was a rainy day when I stumbled upon an old, forgotten journal in my grandmother's attic. Its pages held untold stories and secrets that would unearth the hidden truths of our family history..."
  • "The sound of applause echoed through the auditorium as I stepped onto the stage, my heart pounding with a mix of nerves and excitement. Little did I know, that performance would be a turning point in my artistic journey..."
  • "After years of battling self-doubt, I finally found the courage to pursue my passion for writing. The moment I held my published book in my hands, I knew I had conquered my fears and embraced my true calling..."
  • "As a volunteer in a remote village, I witnessed the resilience and strength of the human spirit. The people I met and the stories they shared forever changed my perspective on life..."
  • "In the midst of a turbulent relationship, I made the difficult decision to walk away and embark on a journey of self-love and rediscovery. It was through that process that I found my own worth and reclaimed my happiness..."

In the next section we will be discussing hook examples for different kinds of essays.

Surprising Statement Hook

A surprising statement hook is a bold and unexpected statement that grabs the reader's attention and piques their curiosity. It challenges their assumptions and compels them to delve deeper into the topic. Example:

  • "Contrary to popular belief, spiders are our unsung heroes, silently protecting our homes from pesky insects and maintaining delicate ecological balance."
  • "Forget what you know about time management. The key to productivity lies in working less, not more."
  • "In a world where technology dominates, studies show that the old-fashioned pen and paper can boost memory and learning."
  • "You'll be shocked to discover that the average person spends more time scrolling through social media than sleeping."
  • "Contrary to popular belief, introverts possess hidden powers that can make them exceptional leaders."
  • "Prepare to be amazed: chocolate can actually be beneficial for your health when consumed in moderation."
  • "Buckle up, because recent research reveals that multitasking can actually make you less productive, not more."
  • "Did you know that learning a new language can slow down the aging process and keep your brain sharp?"
  • "Hold onto your hats: studies suggest that taking regular naps can enhance your overall productivity and creativity."
  • "You won't believe it, but playing video games in moderation can enhance problem-solving skills and boost cognitive function."

Argumentative Essay Hook Examples

The opening paragraph of an argumentative essay should be similar to the opening statement of a trial. Just as a lawyer presents his point with a logical system, you must do the same in your essay.

For example, you are writing about the adverse effects of smoking, and arguing that all public places should be turned into no smoking zones. For such essays, good hook examples will be statistical such as:

“According to the World Health Organization consumption of tobacco kills about five million people every year, which makes it more than the death rate from HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria altogether.”

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Persuasive Essay Hook Examples

The main idea or aim for writing a persuasive essay is to convince and persuade the reader to do something. It is also written to change their beliefs and agree with your point of view.

Hook sentences for such essays are a shocking revelation that the reader is curious to learn more about.

“On average each year, humans release 38.2 billion tons of carbon dioxide approximately. Due to this, the level of carbon dioxide has increased significantly, more than it has been in centuries. If you think climate change is nothing to worry about then you are highly mistaken.”

Narrative Essay Hook Examples

Simply put, a narrative essay is just like a story. In other types of essays you need to pick a side, argue and prove your point with the help of evidence. A narrative essay gives you a freehand to tell your story however you may please.

It can be a story inspired by your life, something you may have experienced. If you feel like it isn’t exciting enough you can always transform it using your imagination.

Examples of a hook sentence for a narrative essay can be something like:

“I was riding the bus to school; the other kids were making fun of me thinking I couldn’t understand them. “Why are his eyes like that?” “His face is funny.” A Chinese kid in America is probably like a zoo animal.”

Subject-wise Hook Examples

Here are 20+ interesting hook examples across various subjects:

  • Technology: "Imagine a world where machines can read our thoughts. Welcome to the future of mind-reading technology."
  • Health and Wellness: "Did you know that a simple 10-minute meditation can change your entire day? Unlock the transformative power of mindfulness."
  • Environment: "The clock is ticking. Discover the urgent and astonishing truth behind the disappearing rainforests."
  • Travel: "Pack your bags and leave your comfort zone behind. Uncover the hidden gems of off-the-beaten-path destinations."
  • History: "Step into the shoes of a time traveler as we unravel the untold secrets of ancient civilizations."
  • Science: "Prepare to be amazed as we dive into the mind-bending world of quantum physics and its implications for our understanding of reality."
  • Education: "Traditional classrooms are a thing of the past. Explore the innovative and disruptive trends shaping the future of education."
  • Food and Cooking: "Savor the tantalizing flavors of a culinary revolution, where unexpected ingredient pairings redefine the boundaries of taste."
  • Psychology: "Unmask the hidden forces that drive our decision-making and explore the fascinating world of subconscious influences."
  • Art and Creativity: "Witness the collision of colors and ideas in a mesmerizing display of artistic expression. Unlock your inner creativity."
  • Finance: "Escape the paycheck-to-paycheck cycle and discover the path to financial freedom. It's time to take control of your wealth."
  • Sports: "Feel the adrenaline surge as we uncover the captivating stories behind the world's most legendary sports moments."
  • Relationships: "Love in the digital age: How technology has transformed the way we connect, flirt, and navigate modern relationships."
  • Self-Improvement: "Embark on a journey of self-discovery and learn the life-changing habits that lead to personal growth and fulfillment."
  • Business and Entrepreneurship: "From startup to success story: Explore the rollercoaster ride of building and scaling a thriving business."
  • Fashion: "Step into the fashion revolution as we decode the latest trends and unveil the stories behind iconic designer collections."
  • Music: "Unleash the power of music: How melodies, rhythms, and lyrics can touch our souls and evoke powerful emotions."
  • Politics: "Behind closed doors: Delve into the intriguing world of political maneuvering and the impact on global affairs."
  • Nature and Wildlife: "Journey to the untouched corners of our planet, where awe-inspiring creatures and breathtaking landscapes await."
  • Literature: "Enter the realm of literary magic as we explore the profound symbolism and hidden meanings within beloved classics."

In conclusion, these were some catchy hook examples just to give you an idea. You can make use of any one of these types according to your paper and its requirements. Generate free essays through our AI essay writer , to see how it's done!

The key to making your essay stand out from the rest is to have a strong introduction. While it is the major part, there’s more that goes into writing a good essay.

If you are still unable to come up with an exciting hook, and searching “ who can write my essay ?”. The expert essay writers at 5StarEssays.com are just a click away.  Reach out to our essay writer today and have an engaging opening for your essay.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a visual hook.

The visual hook is a scene that captures the audience's interest by encapsulating something about the movie. It usually occurs around 15 minutes into it, and can be found in marketing or reviews of movies.

Nova A.

As a Digital Content Strategist, Nova Allison has eight years of experience in writing both technical and scientific content. With a focus on developing online content plans that engage audiences, Nova strives to write pieces that are not only informative but captivating as well.

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How to Write Captivating Hooks for Your Argumentative Essays

Adela B.

Table of contents

Are you ready to sharpen your argumentative essay writing skills? If so, then mastering the art of creating a compelling hook is a skill you can't afford to miss. The hook, a crucial component of your introductory paragraph, has the power to either grip your reader's attention or cause them to lose interest in your argument.

In the dynamic world of essay writing, the ability to write a persuasive hook for your argumentative essay is a critical skill that can set your work apart. Whether you're a student aiming to impress your professor, a professional trying to sway a critical audience, or simply a person who thrives in the realm of logical debates, this skill is invaluable.

In this guide, we aim to demystify the process of writing an enticing hook for an argumentative essay - a technique that will captivate your reader's attention, spark their curiosity, and compel them to delve deeper into your argument. Prepare to wield the power of the hook and engage your readers from the outset, maintaining their interest right through to the conclusion.

The Role of a Hook in an Argumentative Essay

In an argumentative essay, the first impression is everything. Your initial statement or question—also known as the hook—serves as the doorway inviting your reader to step into your argument. With a compelling hook, you’re not just getting their attention; you're making a promise that your essay is worth their time.

The hook's main purpose is to draw readers in and compel them to want to read more. It piques their curiosity, stirs up emotions, or provokes thought. A strong hook aligns with your essay’s topic and thesis, yet it also stands on its own as a captivating snippet of your overall argument.

Remember, an argumentative essay is not just about presenting an argument; it's about making it interesting and engaging for the reader. The hook plays an instrumental role in achieving this goal. As the saying goes, "You never get a second chance to make a first impression." With an argumentative essay, the first impression begins with the hook.

In the sections that follow, we will unpack different types of hooks, provide a step-by-step guide on how to craft them, and offer real-life examples for inspiration. Ready to get started? Let’s dive in!

Different Types of Hooks for an Argumentative Essay

  • Question Hook
  • Quotation Hook
  • Statistic Hook
  • Anecdotal Hook
  • Declaration Hook
  • Descriptive Hook

Creating an impactful hook requires choosing the right type for your argumentative essay. Each kind of hook serves a different purpose and can help establish the tone, voice, and direction of your essay. Let's walk through the most commonly used types and how they can boost your writing:

Question Hook : This type of hook poses a thought-provoking question that relates to your argument's theme. It can be a rhetorical question or one that seeks an answer. It makes your readers engage directly by prompting them to think about a possible answer or form an opinion about the question.

Quotation Hook : A well-chosen quote from a notable person or source related to your argument can be a powerful way to begin your essay. It instantly lends credibility to your argument and shows that your point of view aligns with respected opinions.

Statistic Hook : This type of hook involves beginning your essay with a surprising or compelling statistic related to your argument. It's a fantastic way to show your readers that your point is backed by evidence, and it is often a surprising piece of information that can grab their attention.

Anecdotal Hook : An anecdotal hook involves telling a short and captivating story or an incident related to your topic. A well-told anecdote can humanize your argument and help your reader connect with your topic on a more personal level.

Declaration Hook : This is a straightforward statement that declares your argument or a related point. It's bold, it's confident, and it lets your reader know exactly where you stand.

Descriptive Hook : This type of hook uses vivid imagery to draw your reader into your essay. By painting a picture with your words, you can help your reader visualize your argument and become more engaged with your essay.

REMEMBER : the best type of hook for your essay largely depends on your essay’s topic, your personal writing style, and the effect you want to have on your reader. In the next section, we’ll guide you step-by-step through the process of writing your own captivating hook.

Step-By-Step Guide to Writing a Hook for Your Argumentative Essay

  • Understand Your Audience
  • Identify Your Essay's Purpose
  • Choose the Appropriate Type of Hook
  • Write Your Hook
  • Revise and Refine

Now that we have a better understanding of the different types of hooks and their importance in an argumentative essay, it's time to delve into how to actually write an effective one. Here's a step-by-step guide to help you craft a compelling hook for your argumentative essay:

Understand Your Audience : Before you start writing your hook, you need to understand who your readers are. What interests them? What are their concerns? What kind of language do they understand best? Once you have this information, you can craft a hook that speaks directly to them.

Identify Your Essay's Purpose : What is the central argument or point you want to make in your essay? Your hook should tie into this and give a hint or a preview of what's to come.

Choose the Appropriate Type of Hook : Refer to the different types of hooks we discussed in the previous section. Depending on your topic and audience, one type might be more effective than the others. For instance, a serious topic might benefit more from a statistic hook, while a personal argument might be better served by an anecdotal hook.

Write Your Hook : Now comes the actual writing. Keep it concise, engaging, and relevant to your argument. Ensure that it leads naturally into your introduction and gives your readers a reason to continue reading.

Revise and Refine : First drafts aren't always perfect. Read your hook out loud, get feedback from others, and revise as necessary. It should not only grab your reader's attention but also be a seamless part of your introduction.

Now, let's put this theory into practice. In the next section, we will provide a series of examples that will demonstrate how these steps work in real-life situations. Each example will show a different type of hook, so you can see the variety of ways to engage your reader right from the start.

Examples of Hooks in Argumentative Essays

Now that we’ve explained how to write a hook, it's time to show you some examples in action. As we go through these examples, remember that your hook should be relevant to your topic and effectively engage your reader.

Statistical Hook : If you were writing an essay about the effects of climate change, you could start with a statistical hook like, "According to the United Nations, the last 20 years have seen 17 of the hottest on record."

Anecdotal Hook : For an essay on the importance of education, you could begin with an anecdotal hook: "When I first moved to the United States, I didn't know a word of English. It was in school that I discovered not only the language but a love of literature."

Question Hook : If your essay revolves around the theme of personal fitness, you could use a question hook like, "How many times have you told yourself you'd start exercising 'tomorrow'?"

Quotation Hook : For an essay about the importance of perseverance, you could use a quotation hook: "'It always seems impossible until it's done.' Nelson Mandela’s words resonate with anyone who has faced seemingly insurmountable challenges."

Factual Hook : In an essay about the dangers of plastic waste, you could use a factual hook: "Every year, an estimated 8 million metric tons of plastic end up in our oceans."

Personal Story Hook : If your essay is about the impact of bullying, you could start with a personal story hook: "In middle school, I was the 'new kid'. What that meant was I also became the perfect target for bullies."

Declaration Hook : If you are writing about the importance of mental health, you could start with a strong declaration: "Mental health is just as important as physical health, and it's time we treated it that way."

Descriptive Hook : For an essay on traveling, you could start with a descriptive hook: "The vibrant colors of the bustling marketplace, the distant hum of street music, and the intoxicating aroma of street food – there's nothing quite like the sensory overload of visiting a new city."

Metaphor/Simile Hook : If you're writing about time management, a metaphorical hook could work well: "Managing your time effectively is like conducting an orchestra; every task has its place and rhythm."

Dilemma Hook : For an essay on moral or ethical decision-making, you could use a dilemma hook: "You're in a lifeboat with a maximum capacity of five people, but there are six of you. What do you do?"

Remember, the goal of your hook is to captivate your reader and make them want to continue reading. We hope these examples inspire you as you craft your own hooks for your argumentative essays.

Final Thoughts on Writing an Effective Hook for an Argumentative Essay

The success of your argumentative essay can significantly hinge on your opening hook. It sets the tone, piques interest, and beckons your readers into your world of persuasion. Remember, it's not just about writing a catchy first sentence—it's about creating an entry point into your argument that your reader can't resist.

Crafting an effective hook requires some creative thinking, but remember, it should serve your argument and fit the tone of your essay. Whether you choose to start with a shocking statistic, a compelling question, or a personal anecdote, make sure your hook leads smoothly into your thesis statement.

Now that we've walked you through the process of crafting a hook for your argumentative essay, it's time to practice. Don't worry if you don't get it right the first time. Like all aspects of writing, creating compelling hooks comes easier with time and practice. The most important thing is to keep your reader in mind and aim to engage them from the first word.

Remember, your argumentative essay is a journey for your reader, and your hook is the door into that journey. Make that door as enticing as possible, and your reader will be eager to step through it and explore the argument you've laid out before them.

Additional Resources

Delving deeper into argumentative essays and refining your writing skills can be an enriching journey. Here are a few more resources to help you navigate this path effectively:

Articles from the Writers Per Hour Blog

  • How Significant Are Opposing Points of View in an Argument
  • Rebuttal in Argumentative Essay
  • Strong Argumentative Essay Topic Ideas
  • Writing Strong Introductions for Argumentative Essays
  • Strong Conclusion for Argumentative Essay
  • What is a Hook for an Essay and How to Use It

External Resources

  • Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL)
  • Harvard College Writing Center
  • University of North Carolina Writing Center

IMPORTANT : mastery in argumentative writing is a journey that requires patience, practice, and persistence. However, if you ever find yourself struggling with your essay, our team of professional essay writers for hire is always ready to assist you. With their expertise in crafting compelling, well-structured essays, they can provide invaluable support in your academic journey.

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What is an Argumentative Essay? How to Write It (With Examples)

Argumentative Essay

We define an argumentative essay as a type of essay that presents arguments about both sides of an issue. The purpose is to convince the reader to accept a particular viewpoint or action. In an argumentative essay, the writer takes a stance on a controversial or debatable topic and supports their position with evidence, reasoning, and examples. The essay should also address counterarguments, demonstrating a thorough understanding of the topic.

Table of Contents

  • What is an argumentative essay?  
  • Argumentative essay structure 
  • Argumentative essay outline 
  • Types of argument claims 

How to write an argumentative essay?

  • Argumentative essay writing tips 
  • Good argumentative essay example 

How to write a good thesis

Frequently asked questions, what is an argumentative essay.

An argumentative essay is a type of writing that presents a coherent and logical analysis of a specific topic. 1 The goal is to convince the reader to accept the writer’s point of view or opinion on a particular issue. Here are the key elements of an argumentative essay: 

  • Thesis Statement : The central claim or argument that the essay aims to prove. 
  • Introduction : Provides background information and introduces the thesis statement. 
  • Body Paragraphs : Each paragraph addresses a specific aspect of the argument, presents evidence, and may include counterarguments. 
  • Evidence : Supports the main argument with relevant facts, examples, statistics, or expert opinions. 
  • Counterarguments : Anticipates and addresses opposing viewpoints to strengthen the overall argument. 
  • Conclusion : Summarizes the main points, reinforces the thesis, and may suggest implications or actions. 

examples of argumentative essay hooks

Argumentative essay structure

Aristotelian, Rogerian, and Toulmin are three distinct approaches to argumentative essay structures, each with its principles and methods. 2 The choice depends on the purpose and nature of the topic. Here’s an overview of each type of argumentative essay format.

Argumentative essay outline

An argumentative essay presents a specific claim or argument and supports it with evidence and reasoning. Here’s an outline for an argumentative essay, along with examples for each section: 3  

1.  Introduction : 

  • Hook : Start with a compelling statement, question, or anecdote to grab the reader’s attention. 

Example: “Did you know that plastic pollution is threatening marine life at an alarming rate?” 

  • Background information : Provide brief context about the issue. 

Example: “Plastic pollution has become a global environmental concern, with millions of tons of plastic waste entering our oceans yearly.” 

  • Thesis statement : Clearly state your main argument or position. 

Example: “We must take immediate action to reduce plastic usage and implement more sustainable alternatives to protect our marine ecosystem.” 

2.  Body Paragraphs : 

  • Topic sentence : Introduce the main idea of each paragraph. 

Example: “The first step towards addressing the plastic pollution crisis is reducing single-use plastic consumption.” 

  • Evidence/Support : Provide evidence, facts, statistics, or examples that support your argument. 

Example: “Research shows that plastic straws alone contribute to millions of tons of plastic waste annually, and many marine animals suffer from ingestion or entanglement.” 

  • Counterargument/Refutation : Acknowledge and refute opposing viewpoints. 

Example: “Some argue that banning plastic straws is inconvenient for consumers, but the long-term environmental benefits far outweigh the temporary inconvenience.” 

  • Transition : Connect each paragraph to the next. 

Example: “Having addressed the issue of single-use plastics, the focus must now shift to promoting sustainable alternatives.” 

3.  Counterargument Paragraph : 

  • Acknowledgement of opposing views : Recognize alternative perspectives on the issue. 

Example: “While some may argue that individual actions cannot significantly impact global plastic pollution, the cumulative effect of collective efforts must be considered.” 

  • Counterargument and rebuttal : Present and refute the main counterargument. 

Example: “However, individual actions, when multiplied across millions of people, can substantially reduce plastic waste. Small changes in behavior, such as using reusable bags and containers, can have a significant positive impact.” 

4.  Conclusion : 

  • Restatement of thesis : Summarize your main argument. 

Example: “In conclusion, adopting sustainable practices and reducing single-use plastic is crucial for preserving our oceans and marine life.” 

  • Call to action : Encourage the reader to take specific steps or consider the argument’s implications. 

Example: “It is our responsibility to make environmentally conscious choices and advocate for policies that prioritize the health of our planet. By collectively embracing sustainable alternatives, we can contribute to a cleaner and healthier future.” 

examples of argumentative essay hooks

Types of argument claims

A claim is a statement or proposition a writer puts forward with evidence to persuade the reader. 4 Here are some common types of argument claims, along with examples: 

  • Fact Claims : These claims assert that something is true or false and can often be verified through evidence.  Example: “Water boils at 100°C at sea level.”
  • Value Claims : Value claims express judgments about the worth or morality of something, often based on personal beliefs or societal values. Example: “Organic farming is more ethical than conventional farming.” 
  • Policy Claims : Policy claims propose a course of action or argue for a specific policy, law, or regulation change.  Example: “Schools should adopt a year-round education system to improve student learning outcomes.” 
  • Cause and Effect Claims : These claims argue that one event or condition leads to another, establishing a cause-and-effect relationship.  Example: “Excessive use of social media is a leading cause of increased feelings of loneliness among young adults.” 
  • Definition Claims : Definition claims assert the meaning or classification of a concept or term.  Example: “Artificial intelligence can be defined as machines exhibiting human-like cognitive functions.” 
  • Comparative Claims : Comparative claims assert that one thing is better or worse than another in certain respects.  Example: “Online education is more cost-effective than traditional classroom learning.” 
  • Evaluation Claims : Evaluation claims assess the quality, significance, or effectiveness of something based on specific criteria.  Example: “The new healthcare policy is more effective in providing affordable healthcare to all citizens.” 

Understanding these argument claims can help writers construct more persuasive and well-supported arguments tailored to the specific nature of the claim.  

If you’re wondering how to start an argumentative essay, here’s a step-by-step guide to help you with the argumentative essay format and writing process.

  • Choose a Topic: Select a topic that you are passionate about or interested in. Ensure that the topic is debatable and has two or more sides.
  • Define Your Position: Clearly state your stance on the issue. Consider opposing viewpoints and be ready to counter them.
  • Conduct Research: Gather relevant information from credible sources, such as books, articles, and academic journals. Take notes on key points and supporting evidence.
  • Create a Thesis Statement: Develop a concise and clear thesis statement that outlines your main argument. Convey your position on the issue and provide a roadmap for the essay.
  • Outline Your Argumentative Essay: Organize your ideas logically by creating an outline. Include an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. Each body paragraph should focus on a single point that supports your thesis.
  • Write the Introduction: Start with a hook to grab the reader’s attention (a quote, a question, a surprising fact). Provide background information on the topic. Present your thesis statement at the end of the introduction.
  • Develop Body Paragraphs: Begin each paragraph with a clear topic sentence that relates to the thesis. Support your points with evidence and examples. Address counterarguments and refute them to strengthen your position. Ensure smooth transitions between paragraphs.
  • Address Counterarguments: Acknowledge and respond to opposing viewpoints. Anticipate objections and provide evidence to counter them.
  • Write the Conclusion: Summarize the main points of your argumentative essay. Reinforce the significance of your argument. End with a call to action, a prediction, or a thought-provoking statement.
  • Revise, Edit, and Share: Review your essay for clarity, coherence, and consistency. Check for grammatical and spelling errors. Share your essay with peers, friends, or instructors for constructive feedback.
  • Finalize Your Argumentative Essay: Make final edits based on feedback received. Ensure that your essay follows the required formatting and citation style.

Argumentative essay writing tips

Here are eight strategies to craft a compelling argumentative essay: 

  • Choose a Clear and Controversial Topic : Select a topic that sparks debate and has opposing viewpoints. A clear and controversial issue provides a solid foundation for a strong argument. 
  • Conduct Thorough Research : Gather relevant information from reputable sources to support your argument. Use a variety of sources, such as academic journals, books, reputable websites, and expert opinions, to strengthen your position. 
  • Create a Strong Thesis Statement : Clearly articulate your main argument in a concise thesis statement. Your thesis should convey your stance on the issue and provide a roadmap for the reader to follow your argument. 
  • Develop a Logical Structure : Organize your essay with a clear introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion. Each paragraph should focus on a specific point of evidence that contributes to your overall argument. Ensure a logical flow from one point to the next. 
  • Provide Strong Evidence : Support your claims with solid evidence. Use facts, statistics, examples, and expert opinions to support your arguments. Be sure to cite your sources appropriately to maintain credibility. 
  • Address Counterarguments : Acknowledge opposing viewpoints and counterarguments. Addressing and refuting alternative perspectives strengthens your essay and demonstrates a thorough understanding of the issue. Be mindful of maintaining a respectful tone even when discussing opposing views. 
  • Use Persuasive Language : Employ persuasive language to make your points effectively. Avoid emotional appeals without supporting evidence and strive for a respectful and professional tone. 
  • Craft a Compelling Conclusion : Summarize your main points, restate your thesis, and leave a lasting impression in your conclusion. Encourage readers to consider the implications of your argument and potentially take action. 

examples of argumentative essay hooks

Good argumentative essay example

Let’s consider a sample of argumentative essay on how social media enhances connectivity:

In the digital age, social media has emerged as a powerful tool that transcends geographical boundaries, connecting individuals from diverse backgrounds and providing a platform for an array of voices to be heard. While critics argue that social media fosters division and amplifies negativity, it is essential to recognize the positive aspects of this digital revolution and how it enhances connectivity by providing a platform for diverse voices to flourish. One of the primary benefits of social media is its ability to facilitate instant communication and connection across the globe. Platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram break down geographical barriers, enabling people to establish and maintain relationships regardless of physical location and fostering a sense of global community. Furthermore, social media has transformed how people stay connected with friends and family. Whether separated by miles or time zones, social media ensures that relationships remain dynamic and relevant, contributing to a more interconnected world. Moreover, social media has played a pivotal role in giving voice to social justice movements and marginalized communities. Movements such as #BlackLivesMatter, #MeToo, and #ClimateStrike have gained momentum through social media, allowing individuals to share their stories and advocate for change on a global scale. This digital activism can shape public opinion and hold institutions accountable. Social media platforms provide a dynamic space for open dialogue and discourse. Users can engage in discussions, share information, and challenge each other’s perspectives, fostering a culture of critical thinking. This open exchange of ideas contributes to a more informed and enlightened society where individuals can broaden their horizons and develop a nuanced understanding of complex issues. While criticisms of social media abound, it is crucial to recognize its positive impact on connectivity and the amplification of diverse voices. Social media transcends physical and cultural barriers, connecting people across the globe and providing a platform for marginalized voices to be heard. By fostering open dialogue and facilitating the exchange of ideas, social media contributes to a more interconnected and empowered society. Embracing the positive aspects of social media allows us to harness its potential for positive change and collective growth.
  • Clearly Define Your Thesis Statement:   Your thesis statement is the core of your argumentative essay. Clearly articulate your main argument or position on the issue. Avoid vague or general statements.  
  • Provide Strong Supporting Evidence:   Back up your thesis with solid evidence from reliable sources and examples. This can include facts, statistics, expert opinions, anecdotes, or real-life examples. Make sure your evidence is relevant to your argument, as it impacts the overall persuasiveness of your thesis.  
  • Anticipate Counterarguments and Address Them:   Acknowledge and address opposing viewpoints to strengthen credibility. This also shows that you engage critically with the topic rather than presenting a one-sided argument. 

The length of an argumentative essay can vary, but it typically falls within the range of 1,000 to 2,500 words. However, the specific requirements may depend on the guidelines provided.

You might write an argumentative essay when:  1. You want to convince others of the validity of your position.  2. There is a controversial or debatable issue that requires discussion.  3. You need to present evidence and logical reasoning to support your claims.  4. You want to explore and critically analyze different perspectives on a topic. 

Argumentative Essay:  Purpose : An argumentative essay aims to persuade the reader to accept or agree with a specific point of view or argument.  Structure : It follows a clear structure with an introduction, thesis statement, body paragraphs presenting arguments and evidence, counterarguments and refutations, and a conclusion.  Tone : The tone is formal and relies on logical reasoning, evidence, and critical analysis.    Narrative/Descriptive Essay:  Purpose : These aim to tell a story or describe an experience, while a descriptive essay focuses on creating a vivid picture of a person, place, or thing.  Structure : They may have a more flexible structure. They often include an engaging introduction, a well-developed body that builds the story or description, and a conclusion.  Tone : The tone is more personal and expressive to evoke emotions or provide sensory details. 

  • Gladd, J. (2020). Tips for Writing Academic Persuasive Essays.  Write What Matters . 
  • Nimehchisalem, V. (2018). Pyramid of argumentation: Towards an integrated model for teaching and assessing ESL writing.  Language & Communication ,  5 (2), 185-200. 
  • Press, B. (2022).  Argumentative Essays: A Step-by-Step Guide . Broadview Press. 
  • Rieke, R. D., Sillars, M. O., & Peterson, T. R. (2005).  Argumentation and critical decision making . Pearson/Allyn & Bacon. 

Paperpal is an AI writing assistant that help academics write better, faster with real-time suggestions for in-depth language and grammar correction. Trained on millions of research manuscripts enhanced by professional academic editors, Paperpal delivers human precision at machine speed.

Try it for free or upgrade to  Paperpal Prime , which unlocks unlimited access to premium features like academic translation, paraphrasing, contextual synonyms, consistency checks and more. It’s like always having a professional academic editor by your side! Go beyond limitations and experience the future of academic writing.  Get Paperpal Prime now at just US$19 a month!

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Empirical research: a comprehensive guide for academics .

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  • What is a Literature Review? How to Write It (with Examples)
  • Chemistry Terms: 7 Commonly Confused Words in Chemistry Manuscripts

Make Your Research Paper Error-Free with Paperpal’s Online Spell Checker 

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Essay Writing Guide

Hook Example

Nova A.

20+ Hook Examples to Grab Reader’s Attention

15 min read

Published on: Oct 10, 2017

Last updated on: Dec 30, 2023

hook example

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Are your essays falling flat with a disinterested audience? Do you find it challenging to keep readers engaged from start to finish?

The truth is, if you don't capture your reader's attention right away, they might just click away or, worse, never even start reading your essay.

But how can we make sure that does not happen? 

An essay hook is what you need to meet this challenge. It is an attention grabber that hooks your reader’s interest.

Here, we will discuss several catchy hook examples to make your piece of writing more engaging. You can also read the types of hooks and tips to write effective hook statements for your essay. 

So, let’s start with the blog!

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What is an Essay Hook?

An essay hook, often found at the beginning of an essay introduction , serves as an opening sentence that immediately grabs the reader's attention. These hooks are a common feature in high school, college, and various academic assignments.

It's vital to understand that hooks are distinct from introductions; they complement introductions rather than replacing them. A well-crafted hook should be self-contained, avoiding the pitfalls of being dull or predictable.

Purpose of Hook in Writing

An effective hook serves two primary purposes. 

  • Firstly, it sets the tone for the essay by providing the reader with a glimpse of the topic's essence. 
  • Secondly, it constructs a compelling introduction that tempts the reader to dive deeper into the essay's content.

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Examples of Different Types of Hook

In this section, we will explore different types of essay hooks and hook sentence examples. We will look into how these hooks can be used for writing different academic papers.

Question Hook

You can grab the reader’s attention by asking them an intriguing question that they would want to know the answer to. When posing a question, think about the interest of the reader and the things they would want to learn more about.

Avoid making your question generalized or simple Yes or No questions. For instance, asking a general question such as “Do you watch television?” won’t grab their attention and make them think it over. 

Using rhetorical questions to engage the reader is always a good idea!

Question Hook Example

Here are 10 hook question examples:

An anecdote can be a personal story or a product of your imagination. Provided that the story is relevant to your focus topic.

Typically, an anecdote is a funny statement, written to make the reader laugh and want to continue reading further.

Our lives are full of stories. Every day something interesting, funny, or strange happens. So, why don’t you use such stories to attract the reader’s attention?

Anecdote Hook Example

An anecdotal hook should be directly related to the central theme of the paper, demonstrating its relevance and connection to the main idea.

A "quote hook" is a type of hook used in writing that involves opening an essay with a quotation from a notable person, a famous author, or a respected source. The purpose of a quote hook is to immediately capture the reader's attention and establish the relevance of the topic by providing an authoritative statement.

A well-chosen quote can add credibility to your writing, evoke emotion, or introduce a key theme or idea that you intend to explore in your essay. It can also set the tone for the piece, whether it's persuasive, informative, or narrative.

Quotation Hook Example

The following is a quotation hook example that you can consider for your essay. 

Statistical Facts 

Fact or statistic hook is a type of hook used in writing that involves opening an essay or piece of content with a numerical fact or data point. The purpose of a statistical facts hook is to immediately engage the reader's interest by presenting them with a surprising, statistic related to the essay's topic.

This type of hook is particularly effective when writing an informative essay or persuasive essays that rely on data and evidence to support the main argument. 

Statistical Hook Example

Below is an interesting statistical hook example:

Personal Story

Starting a piece of writing with a personal short story is a good idea when writing narrative essays or a college application essay .

It doesn’t have to be an experience that you faced firsthand; it could be something that happened with a friend or a relative.

Personal Story Hook Example

Here is a great hook example for a personal story essay that you can consider. 

Description Hook

This hook is a vivid description of a scene or event to draw readers' attention to your writing. A well-written descriptive hook will make your readers want to know more about what is in the rest of your paper. 

Descriptive hooks are most commonly used in narrative essays but can be used in any type of writing. 

Description Hook Essay Example

The following is an interesting example of a description hook that you can read for your better understanding. 

Metaphor/Simile Hook

The metaphor/simile hook is used to help readers think about a particular topic in a different way. Your readers will think about the meaning and the context in which the topic is being addressed. 

A metaphor directly compares two things that are not related to each other. 

Metaphor/Simile Hook Example

Literary quotes.

When writing book reviews, it is often a good idea to use literary quotes. However, it is important to keep in mind that these quotes may not be appropriate for use in persuasive or expository essays .

We remember visual information more efficiently than words. When we see something, our brains quickly turn it into a picture. Scenes are often used in descriptive or narrative essays.

Scene Hook Example

Hook examples for types of essays.

There are different types of essays according to their structure and purpose. For instance, an argumentative essay is a serious essay written to persuade the reader on an argument. Whereas a narrative essay could be a light-hearted narration of an event. 

You can not use a funny question to start an argumentative essay. Similarly, you can not use a serious fact to start a funny narrative essay. 

The table shows hook examples for essays:

Let’s explore in detail some interesting hook examples according to different types of essays.

Expository Essay Hook Example

Hook: "Did you know that bees are responsible for pollinating one-third of the world's crops?"

Explanation: This hook explains the surprising and essential role that bees play in our food production, setting the stage for an expository essay that will explore this topic in detail.

Argumentative Essay Hook Example

Hook: "Is the use of technology making us more connected or driving us further apart as a society?"

Explanation: This hook presents a thought-provoking question about the impact of technology on human relationships, signaling that the argumentative essay will analyze and argue different perspectives on this issue.

Descriptive Essay Hook Example

A hook example sentence for a descriptive essay is as follows: 

Hook: "Imagine standing on a pristine white beach, the turquoise waves gently caressing your toes, and the scent of saltwater filling the air."

Explanation: This hook invites the reader to visualize a tranquil scene, creating anticipation for a descriptive essay that will provide vivid details and sensory experiences of this beautiful location.

Persuasive Essay Hook Example 

A hook example sentence for a persuasive essay is as follows:

Hook: "What if I told you that a simple change in diet could extend your lifespan by years?"

Explanation: This hook raises a compelling question about the potential health benefits of dietary choices, hinting at the persuasive argument that will follow in the essay.

Narrative Essay Hook Example

A hook example for narration is as follows: Hook: “I am really not sure if it is a real memory or just something that became more solid over time. But I am not sure that my neighbor once tried to murder me.”

Explanation: This hook introduces doubt about the authenticity of a memory involving the neighbor's alleged murder attempt.

Compare and Contrast Essay Hook Example 

Hook: "Apples and oranges—two fruits that couldn't be more different in taste, texture, and appearance." Explanation: This hook highlights the contrast between apples and oranges, signaling that the compare and contrast essay will explore the differences and similarities between these two fruits.

Process Essay Hook Example

A hook example sentence for a process analysis essay is as follows:

Hook: "Have you ever wondered how your favorite chocolate chip cookies are made?"

Explanation: This hook engages the reader's curiosity about the process of making chocolate chip cookies, setting the stage for a process essay that will provide step-by-step instructions.

Cause and Effect Essay Hook Example 

A hook example sentence for a cause and effect essay is as follows:

Hook: "In the realm of environmental science, the butterfly effect is real."

Explanation: This hook introduces the concept of the butterfly effect and its relevance to environmental science, foreshadowing a cause and effect essay that will explore the ripple effects of small actions on the environment.

Analytical Essay Hook Example

A hook example sentence for a analytical essay is as follows:

Hook: "Unlocking the hidden layers of Shakespearean sonnets is like deciphering a cryptic code."

Explanation: This hook uses a metaphor to describe the complexity of analyzing Shakespearean sonnets, indicating that the analytical essay will delve into the intricate language and themes within these works.

Hook Examples In Speeches

Hook: “In the United States, people are still fighting to be free. Many are fighting for free access to resources, free speech, and even the right to marry.”

Hook: “Getting revenge can easily become an obsession for many people. Some really crave for that kind of thing when they are being wronged.”

How to Choose a Good Hook?

Choosing a good hook involves engaging your audience, creating interest, and setting the stage for your content. Here is how to choose a good hook: 

  • Know Your Audience: Understand the interests and preferences of your target audience.
  • Relevance is Key: Ensure your hook directly relates to your content's topic.
  • Shock or Surprise: Use shocking facts, surprising statistics, or intriguing anecdotes.
  • Tell a Story: Engage emotionally with personal stories or narratives.
  • Pose a Question: Ask thought-provoking questions that make readers curious.
  • Quotations: Share powerful quotes from relevant authorities.
  • Visual Imagery: Use descriptive language to create vivid mental images.
  • Conciseness: Keep your hook brief and to the point.
  • Test and Refine: Experiment with different hooks and refine based on audience response.

Now that you have learned various techniques for crafting effective hooks, you're well-prepared to start writing one.

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How to Write a Good Essay Hook?

Here are the points that you need to keep in mind to write a hook for your essay. 

Step#1 Know the Kind of Literary Work 

First, it is important to have a clear vision in mind of the literary work you have selected for your paper. Here you need to describe what a certain essay type demands and what types of techniques you require to support your arguments in your essay. 

Step#2 Create an Outline

Always create an essay outline to see how the information can be organized better and which points need to be highlighted. Try to find an attention grabber that adds to the significance of that point. 

Step#3 Who are You Writing for?

Know your target audience and choose a way in which you want to develop your work. Your hook statement should be according to it. If you are writing for children, write in simple language. If you are writing for professionals, take the specific language into account. 

Step#4 Know the Purpose of Writing Your Essay

Choose hooks that fit your paper. Know the type of essay you are writing and its purpose. You can go for funny hooks if you are writing a paper on a light topic. If you are writing a conference paper, then you should be more formal. 

To Sum it Up!

Now you know the different ways to start your essay or research paper. You are the one to decide which hook is better and more effective to use according to the type of paper. Don’t forget to take into account the preparatory steps and figure out what type of hook is best to use.

You know that starting with a hook can make or break your academic essay. However, it is not always easy to come up with the perfect anecdote or statement for an opening line. 

Luckily, you can get help from a legit essay writing service like MyPerfectWords.com , which can create perfect essays and do your paper for you. You may be asking yourself why you should use this service instead of creating one yourself and here's your answer - getting high-quality academic writing help from our professional essay writer at affordable prices is a good deal!

Avail your chance and order your essay now.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a good hook sentence.

A good hook sentence is a sentence that grabs the reader’s attention or compels them to read your essay further. It is supposed to make your essay more interesting and engaging for them.

A great technique to use is starting out by making an assertive claim about your topic. This will help in grabbing the reader’s attention the moment they begin reading your essay.

What comes first, thesis or hook?

The hook of your essay is the first line of your introductory paragraph or can be more than one also. But the essay hook is written first.

A thesis statement follows it. It is included as a mini-outline of the essay and tells the readers about the essay’s content. Further on, the transitional hook sentence is added at the end of the paragraph.

What is the purpose of a hook?

The main and foremost purpose of a hook is to grab the attention of readers and hook them to your work. It creates an interesting and enticing start to an essay or any other assignment and connects the readers to your work.

What is a hook statement?

The hook is the first sentence of your introduction, and it should be interesting. A great way to start your introduction is by writing an engaging, concise, and clear hook. This will spark curiosity in the reader, which leads them through all that you have written about.

How long is a hook in an essay?

The hook is 1-2 sentences of your essay are important because they help capture the reader's attention. They will continue reading if they are interested in what you have to say.

Nova A. (Literature, Marketing)

Nova Allison is a Digital Content Strategist with over eight years of experience. Nova has also worked as a technical and scientific writer. She is majorly involved in developing and reviewing online content plans that engage and resonate with audiences. Nova has a passion for writing that engages and informs her readers.

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Need to defend your opinion on an issue? Argumentative essays are one of the most popular types of essays you’ll write in school. They combine persuasive arguments with fact-based research, and, when done well, can be powerful tools for making someone agree with your point of view. If you’re struggling to write an argumentative essay or just want to learn more about them, seeing examples can be a big help.

After giving an overview of this type of essay, we provide three argumentative essay examples. After each essay, we explain in-depth how the essay was structured, what worked, and where the essay could be improved. We end with tips for making your own argumentative essay as strong as possible.

What Is an Argumentative Essay?

An argumentative essay is an essay that uses evidence and facts to support the claim it’s making. Its purpose is to persuade the reader to agree with the argument being made.

A good argumentative essay will use facts and evidence to support the argument, rather than just the author’s thoughts and opinions. For example, say you wanted to write an argumentative essay stating that Charleston, SC is a great destination for families. You couldn’t just say that it’s a great place because you took your family there and enjoyed it. For it to be an argumentative essay, you need to have facts and data to support your argument, such as the number of child-friendly attractions in Charleston, special deals you can get with kids, and surveys of people who visited Charleston as a family and enjoyed it. The first argument is based entirely on feelings, whereas the second is based on evidence that can be proven.

The standard five paragraph format is common, but not required, for argumentative essays. These essays typically follow one of two formats: the Toulmin model or the Rogerian model.

  • The Toulmin model is the most common. It begins with an introduction, follows with a thesis/claim, and gives data and evidence to support that claim. This style of essay also includes rebuttals of counterarguments.
  • The Rogerian model analyzes two sides of an argument and reaches a conclusion after weighing the strengths and weaknesses of each.

3 Good Argumentative Essay Examples + Analysis

Below are three examples of argumentative essays, written by yours truly in my school days, as well as analysis of what each did well and where it could be improved.

Argumentative Essay Example 1

Proponents of this idea state that it will save local cities and towns money because libraries are expensive to maintain. They also believe it will encourage more people to read because they won’t have to travel to a library to get a book; they can simply click on what they want to read and read it from wherever they are. They could also access more materials because libraries won’t have to buy physical copies of books; they can simply rent out as many digital copies as they need.

However, it would be a serious mistake to replace libraries with tablets. First, digital books and resources are associated with less learning and more problems than print resources. A study done on tablet vs book reading found that people read 20-30% slower on tablets, retain 20% less information, and understand 10% less of what they read compared to people who read the same information in print. Additionally, staring too long at a screen has been shown to cause numerous health problems, including blurred vision, dizziness, dry eyes, headaches, and eye strain, at much higher instances than reading print does. People who use tablets and mobile devices excessively also have a higher incidence of more serious health issues such as fibromyalgia, shoulder and back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and muscle strain. I know that whenever I read from my e-reader for too long, my eyes begin to feel tired and my neck hurts. We should not add to these problems by giving people, especially young people, more reasons to look at screens.

Second, it is incredibly narrow-minded to assume that the only service libraries offer is book lending. Libraries have a multitude of benefits, and many are only available if the library has a physical location. Some of these benefits include acting as a quiet study space, giving people a way to converse with their neighbors, holding classes on a variety of topics, providing jobs, answering patron questions, and keeping the community connected. One neighborhood found that, after a local library instituted community events such as play times for toddlers and parents, job fairs for teenagers, and meeting spaces for senior citizens, over a third of residents reported feeling more connected to their community. Similarly, a Pew survey conducted in 2015 found that nearly two-thirds of American adults feel that closing their local library would have a major impact on their community. People see libraries as a way to connect with others and get their questions answered, benefits tablets can’t offer nearly as well or as easily.

While replacing libraries with tablets may seem like a simple solution, it would encourage people to spend even more time looking at digital screens, despite the myriad issues surrounding them. It would also end access to many of the benefits of libraries that people have come to rely on. In many areas, libraries are such an important part of the community network that they could never be replaced by a simple object.

The author begins by giving an overview of the counter-argument, then the thesis appears as the first sentence in the third paragraph. The essay then spends the rest of the paper dismantling the counter argument and showing why readers should believe the other side.

What this essay does well:

  • Although it’s a bit unusual to have the thesis appear fairly far into the essay, it works because, once the thesis is stated, the rest of the essay focuses on supporting it since the counter-argument has already been discussed earlier in the paper.
  • This essay includes numerous facts and cites studies to support its case. By having specific data to rely on, the author’s argument is stronger and readers will be more inclined to agree with it.
  • For every argument the other side makes, the author makes sure to refute it and follow up with why her opinion is the stronger one. In order to make a strong argument, it’s important to dismantle the other side, which this essay does this by making the author's view appear stronger.
  • This is a shorter paper, and if it needed to be expanded to meet length requirements, it could include more examples and go more into depth with them, such as by explaining specific cases where people benefited from local libraries.
  • Additionally, while the paper uses lots of data, the author also mentions their own experience with using tablets. This should be removed since argumentative essays focus on facts and data to support an argument, not the author’s own opinion or experiences. Replacing that with more data on health issues associated with screen time would strengthen the essay.
  • Some of the points made aren't completely accurate , particularly the one about digital books being cheaper. It actually often costs a library more money to rent out numerous digital copies of a book compared to buying a single physical copy. Make sure in your own essay you thoroughly research each of the points and rebuttals you make, otherwise you'll look like you don't know the issue that well.

body_argue

Argumentative Essay Example 2

There are multiple drugs available to treat malaria, and many of them work well and save lives, but malaria eradication programs that focus too much on them and not enough on prevention haven’t seen long-term success in Sub-Saharan Africa. A major program to combat malaria was WHO’s Global Malaria Eradication Programme. Started in 1955, it had a goal of eliminating malaria in Africa within the next ten years. Based upon previously successful programs in Brazil and the United States, the program focused mainly on vector control. This included widely distributing chloroquine and spraying large amounts of DDT. More than one billion dollars was spent trying to abolish malaria. However, the program suffered from many problems and in 1969, WHO was forced to admit that the program had not succeeded in eradicating malaria. The number of people in Sub-Saharan Africa who contracted malaria as well as the number of malaria deaths had actually increased over 10% during the time the program was active.

One of the major reasons for the failure of the project was that it set uniform strategies and policies. By failing to consider variations between governments, geography, and infrastructure, the program was not nearly as successful as it could have been. Sub-Saharan Africa has neither the money nor the infrastructure to support such an elaborate program, and it couldn’t be run the way it was meant to. Most African countries don't have the resources to send all their people to doctors and get shots, nor can they afford to clear wetlands or other malaria prone areas. The continent’s spending per person for eradicating malaria was just a quarter of what Brazil spent. Sub-Saharan Africa simply can’t rely on a plan that requires more money, infrastructure, and expertise than they have to spare.

Additionally, the widespread use of chloroquine has created drug resistant parasites which are now plaguing Sub-Saharan Africa. Because chloroquine was used widely but inconsistently, mosquitoes developed resistance, and chloroquine is now nearly completely ineffective in Sub-Saharan Africa, with over 95% of mosquitoes resistant to it. As a result, newer, more expensive drugs need to be used to prevent and treat malaria, which further drives up the cost of malaria treatment for a region that can ill afford it.

Instead of developing plans to treat malaria after the infection has incurred, programs should focus on preventing infection from occurring in the first place. Not only is this plan cheaper and more effective, reducing the number of people who contract malaria also reduces loss of work/school days which can further bring down the productivity of the region.

One of the cheapest and most effective ways of preventing malaria is to implement insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs).  These nets provide a protective barrier around the person or people using them. While untreated bed nets are still helpful, those treated with insecticides are much more useful because they stop mosquitoes from biting people through the nets, and they help reduce mosquito populations in a community, thus helping people who don’t even own bed nets.  Bed nets are also very effective because most mosquito bites occur while the person is sleeping, so bed nets would be able to drastically reduce the number of transmissions during the night. In fact, transmission of malaria can be reduced by as much as 90% in areas where the use of ITNs is widespread. Because money is so scarce in Sub-Saharan Africa, the low cost is a great benefit and a major reason why the program is so successful. Bed nets cost roughly 2 USD to make, last several years, and can protect two adults. Studies have shown that, for every 100-1000 more nets are being used, one less child dies of malaria. With an estimated 300 million people in Africa not being protected by mosquito nets, there’s the potential to save three million lives by spending just a few dollars per person.

Reducing the number of people who contract malaria would also reduce poverty levels in Africa significantly, thus improving other aspects of society like education levels and the economy. Vector control is more effective than treatment strategies because it means fewer people are getting sick. When fewer people get sick, the working population is stronger as a whole because people are not put out of work from malaria, nor are they caring for sick relatives. Malaria-afflicted families can typically only harvest 40% of the crops that healthy families can harvest. Additionally, a family with members who have malaria spends roughly a quarter of its income treatment, not including the loss of work they also must deal with due to the illness. It’s estimated that malaria costs Africa 12 billion USD in lost income every year. A strong working population creates a stronger economy, which Sub-Saharan Africa is in desperate need of.  

This essay begins with an introduction, which ends with the thesis (that malaria eradication plans in Sub-Saharan Africa should focus on prevention rather than treatment). The first part of the essay lays out why the counter argument (treatment rather than prevention) is not as effective, and the second part of the essay focuses on why prevention of malaria is the better path to take.

  • The thesis appears early, is stated clearly, and is supported throughout the rest of the essay. This makes the argument clear for readers to understand and follow throughout the essay.
  • There’s lots of solid research in this essay, including specific programs that were conducted and how successful they were, as well as specific data mentioned throughout. This evidence helps strengthen the author’s argument.
  • The author makes a case for using expanding bed net use over waiting until malaria occurs and beginning treatment, but not much of a plan is given for how the bed nets would be distributed or how to ensure they’re being used properly. By going more into detail of what she believes should be done, the author would be making a stronger argument.
  • The introduction of the essay does a good job of laying out the seriousness of the problem, but the conclusion is short and abrupt. Expanding it into its own paragraph would give the author a final way to convince readers of her side of the argument.

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Argumentative Essay Example 3

There are many ways payments could work. They could be in the form of a free-market approach, where athletes are able to earn whatever the market is willing to pay them, it could be a set amount of money per athlete, or student athletes could earn income from endorsements, autographs, and control of their likeness, similar to the way top Olympians earn money.

Proponents of the idea believe that, because college athletes are the ones who are training, participating in games, and bringing in audiences, they should receive some sort of compensation for their work. If there were no college athletes, the NCAA wouldn’t exist, college coaches wouldn’t receive there (sometimes very high) salaries, and brands like Nike couldn’t profit from college sports. In fact, the NCAA brings in roughly $1 billion in revenue a year, but college athletes don’t receive any of that money in the form of a paycheck. Additionally, people who believe college athletes should be paid state that paying college athletes will actually encourage them to remain in college longer and not turn pro as quickly, either by giving them a way to begin earning money in college or requiring them to sign a contract stating they’ll stay at the university for a certain number of years while making an agreed-upon salary.  

Supporters of this idea point to Zion Williamson, the Duke basketball superstar, who, during his freshman year, sustained a serious knee injury. Many argued that, even if he enjoyed playing for Duke, it wasn’t worth risking another injury and ending his professional career before it even began for a program that wasn’t paying him. Williamson seems to have agreed with them and declared his eligibility for the NCAA draft later that year. If he was being paid, he may have stayed at Duke longer. In fact, roughly a third of student athletes surveyed stated that receiving a salary while in college would make them “strongly consider” remaining collegiate athletes longer before turning pro.

Paying athletes could also stop the recruitment scandals that have plagued the NCAA. In 2018, the NCAA stripped the University of Louisville's men's basketball team of its 2013 national championship title because it was discovered coaches were using sex workers to entice recruits to join the team. There have been dozens of other recruitment scandals where college athletes and recruits have been bribed with anything from having their grades changed, to getting free cars, to being straight out bribed. By paying college athletes and putting their salaries out in the open, the NCAA could end the illegal and underhanded ways some schools and coaches try to entice athletes to join.

People who argue against the idea of paying college athletes believe the practice could be disastrous for college sports. By paying athletes, they argue, they’d turn college sports into a bidding war, where only the richest schools could afford top athletes, and the majority of schools would be shut out from developing a talented team (though some argue this already happens because the best players often go to the most established college sports programs, who typically pay their coaches millions of dollars per year). It could also ruin the tight camaraderie of many college teams if players become jealous that certain teammates are making more money than they are.

They also argue that paying college athletes actually means only a small fraction would make significant money. Out of the 350 Division I athletic departments, fewer than a dozen earn any money. Nearly all the money the NCAA makes comes from men’s football and basketball, so paying college athletes would make a small group of men--who likely will be signed to pro teams and begin making millions immediately out of college--rich at the expense of other players.

Those against paying college athletes also believe that the athletes are receiving enough benefits already. The top athletes already receive scholarships that are worth tens of thousands per year, they receive free food/housing/textbooks, have access to top medical care if they are injured, receive top coaching, get travel perks and free gear, and can use their time in college as a way to capture the attention of professional recruiters. No other college students receive anywhere near as much from their schools.

People on this side also point out that, while the NCAA brings in a massive amount of money each year, it is still a non-profit organization. How? Because over 95% of those profits are redistributed to its members’ institutions in the form of scholarships, grants, conferences, support for Division II and Division III teams, and educational programs. Taking away a significant part of that revenue would hurt smaller programs that rely on that money to keep running.

While both sides have good points, it’s clear that the negatives of paying college athletes far outweigh the positives. College athletes spend a significant amount of time and energy playing for their school, but they are compensated for it by the scholarships and perks they receive. Adding a salary to that would result in a college athletic system where only a small handful of athletes (those likely to become millionaires in the professional leagues) are paid by a handful of schools who enter bidding wars to recruit them, while the majority of student athletics and college athletic programs suffer or even shut down for lack of money. Continuing to offer the current level of benefits to student athletes makes it possible for as many people to benefit from and enjoy college sports as possible.

This argumentative essay follows the Rogerian model. It discusses each side, first laying out multiple reasons people believe student athletes should be paid, then discussing reasons why the athletes shouldn’t be paid. It ends by stating that college athletes shouldn’t be paid by arguing that paying them would destroy college athletics programs and cause them to have many of the issues professional sports leagues have.

  • Both sides of the argument are well developed, with multiple reasons why people agree with each side. It allows readers to get a full view of the argument and its nuances.
  • Certain statements on both sides are directly rebuffed in order to show where the strengths and weaknesses of each side lie and give a more complete and sophisticated look at the argument.
  • Using the Rogerian model can be tricky because oftentimes you don’t explicitly state your argument until the end of the paper. Here, the thesis doesn’t appear until the first sentence of the final paragraph. That doesn’t give readers a lot of time to be convinced that your argument is the right one, compared to a paper where the thesis is stated in the beginning and then supported throughout the paper. This paper could be strengthened if the final paragraph was expanded to more fully explain why the author supports the view, or if the paper had made it clearer that paying athletes was the weaker argument throughout.

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3 Tips for Writing a Good Argumentative Essay

Now that you’ve seen examples of what good argumentative essay samples look like, follow these three tips when crafting your own essay.

#1: Make Your Thesis Crystal Clear

The thesis is the key to your argumentative essay; if it isn’t clear or readers can’t find it easily, your entire essay will be weak as a result. Always make sure that your thesis statement is easy to find. The typical spot for it is the final sentence of the introduction paragraph, but if it doesn’t fit in that spot for your essay, try to at least put it as the first or last sentence of a different paragraph so it stands out more.

Also make sure that your thesis makes clear what side of the argument you’re on. After you’ve written it, it’s a great idea to show your thesis to a couple different people--classmates are great for this. Just by reading your thesis they should be able to understand what point you’ll be trying to make with the rest of your essay.

#2: Show Why the Other Side Is Weak

When writing your essay, you may be tempted to ignore the other side of the argument and just focus on your side, but don’t do this. The best argumentative essays really tear apart the other side to show why readers shouldn’t believe it. Before you begin writing your essay, research what the other side believes, and what their strongest points are. Then, in your essay, be sure to mention each of these and use evidence to explain why they’re incorrect/weak arguments. That’ll make your essay much more effective than if you only focused on your side of the argument.

#3: Use Evidence to Support Your Side

Remember, an essay can’t be an argumentative essay if it doesn’t support its argument with evidence. For every point you make, make sure you have facts to back it up. Some examples are previous studies done on the topic, surveys of large groups of people, data points, etc. There should be lots of numbers in your argumentative essay that support your side of the argument. This will make your essay much stronger compared to only relying on your own opinions to support your argument.

Summary: Argumentative Essay Sample

Argumentative essays are persuasive essays that use facts and evidence to support their side of the argument. Most argumentative essays follow either the Toulmin model or the Rogerian model. By reading good argumentative essay examples, you can learn how to develop your essay and provide enough support to make readers agree with your opinion. When writing your essay, remember to always make your thesis clear, show where the other side is weak, and back up your opinion with data and evidence.

What's Next?

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Christine graduated from Michigan State University with degrees in Environmental Biology and Geography and received her Master's from Duke University. In high school she scored in the 99th percentile on the SAT and was named a National Merit Finalist. She has taught English and biology in several countries.

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How to Write a Hook for An Argumentative Essay in 5 Minutes

Author Image

by  Antony W

October 24, 2022

how to write a hook for an argumentative essay

In this guide, you’ll learn how to write a hook for an argumentative essay without trying so hard.

At Help for Assessment, we understand that introducing an argument isn’t as easy. You might find yourself writing and rewriting the introduction more than you can count.

However, if you can write a solid hook for your argument, the rest of the essay will be easy to write even if you’re already running out of time.

Key Takeaways

Writing a strong hook for your essay doesn’t have to be difficult. You can:

  • Grab a reader’s attention with a common misconception.
  • Share a unique story your audience have never read anywhere else.
  • Start the essay with a quote provided the quote within the context of your argument.
  • Use statistics as a means to raise curiosity.
  • Ask questions to grab reader’s attention and draw their interest in the topic.
  • If everything else fails, buy an argumentative essay online from our team of creative custom writers.

What is a Hook in an Argumentative Essay?

In an argumentative essay, a hook is an opening statement that introduces the focus topic to the target audience. The hook can be one or two sentence long, and it serves the purpose of drawing in the attention of a target to read the next consecutive paragraphs.

To be abundantly clear:

A hook is not an introduction of the essay. It’s a part of the introduction, and it makes the starting point just immediately after the argumentative essay topic .

When it comes to writing a solid hook for an argument, the goal isn’t to present oneself as a formal writer to an audience.

Don’t hesitate to wear your creativity hat and write the hook in a way that piques your audience’s interest. That way, they’ll want to read the rest of the essay to learn more about your argument.

How to Write a Hook for an Argumentative Essay and Grab Readers’ Attention

Here are five ways to write a hook for an argumentative essay and grab your reader’s attention:

1. Use a Common Misconception

The purpose of a hook is to grab the attention of a reader instantly, and one of the best way to do that in an argumentative essay is to use a common misconception.

A common misconception is a statement, event, person, or something many people accept to be true but is actually false.

Starting the essay with such a misconception will startle and intrigue your reader, giving them the urge to read the rest of the essay because they want to know more about what you have to say. 

2. Share a Short Story

Can you tell a whole story in a sentence or two? If you can, don’t hesitate to use an anecdote to illustrate your points.

Stories mostly work well for narrative topics and descriptive essays . They can also fit well in your argumentative essay if you know how to incorporate them.

To be clear, you have a very small chance to impress your readers with your story. To impress your audience, make your story short, clear, and direct to the point.

In addition to being something that you can relate to, the story you share should be free from personal feelings. In other words, unless your instructor allows you to incorporate personal pronouns in your argument , your essay shouldn’t reflect personalization.

Also, you must ensure that the story you share relate to the essay’s main idea.

3. Start with a Quote

We never recommend starting an essay with a quote .

Quite too often, professors discourage the use of quotes in an essay for two reasons:

  • A quote reflect another author’s thoughts and hiders the presentation of your ideas.
  • Quotes can limit your ability to express yourself, hence crippling your creativity.

However, if the quote falls within the context of an argument, it could make a solid hook for your assignment.

For a quote to fit in your work, it must be relevant to the topic and agree with your argument’s thesis statement. Also, ensure the quote you use in your hook is neither general nor insanely overused.

4. Use Statistics

Statistics raise curiosity. They can hook readers to facts and information they didn’t even know existed, thus sparking their interest in reading the rest of the essay.

Academic writing requires clarity and authenticity.

With this respect, do some preliminary research to validate the statistics before including them in your essay. Also, you must include the source where you collected the data for reference.

5. Ask a Rhetorical Question 

Starting an argument with a question can grab a reader’s attention and draw their interest in a topic so much that they develop the urge to keep reading.

However, the case of questions is only viable if the question isn’t too general or already obvious.

Let’s say you’re writing about phones.

A question such as “are smartphones bad?” is vague and obvious. Everyone is familiar with the details. Such a question will do very little to capture anyone’s attention.

You must refrain from questions that require Yes or No answers and come up with interesting questions that engage your audience in critical thinking.

Rhetoric should be your secret weapon.

For example, “ should kids own smartphones before going to college?” is a question that, in addition to being argumentative, draws a reader’s attention from the get go. Also, such a question leaves room for debate. 

6. Get Essay Writing Help

Even if you can write a strong hook for an argumentative essay yourself, you still might find the assignment challenging to compete.

If that’s the case, you can contract our writers to help you write your argumentative essay for you.

If there’s one thing you should learn from this guide, it’s that writing a hook for an argumentative essay doesn’t have to be difficult.

We’ve shown you six ways to grab your audience’s attention. Pick an option that best suits you. Then utilize it to write a solid hook that can draw your readers’ attention on the spot.

If that’s the case, and you feel like you need a helping hand, our writers can help you write great argumentative essays in a short time. Simply click the button on the right and talk to us about your assignment.

About the author 

Antony W is a professional writer and coach at Help for Assessment. He spends countless hours every day researching and writing great content filled with expert advice on how to write engaging essays, research papers, and assignments.

examples of argumentative essay hooks

How to Write a Hook: Start Off Your Essay Strong with This Guide

examples of argumentative essay hooks

What is a Hook for an Essay: Importance and Purpose

Which section of your essay can make your readers dip their toes into your writing? Is it the body paragraphs where all the analysis is laid out? Or maybe the introduction, where you present your thesis statement and voice your perspective on the subject? Well, if you think it is the latter, then we must agree with your decision. However, let's get more specific; if we take the introductory paragraph to pieces, which piece gets the most recognition? You must have guessed from the article's title that we're talking about a hook. But first, let's define what is a hook for an essay before we walk you through the reasons why it deserves our pat on the back.

The hook is the initial sentence in a written work. Whether you're asking how to write a hook for a song, blog post, or term paper, know that the purpose of any effective hook is to seize the reader's attention. It can be one sentence long, often for shorter pieces, or composed of several lines - usually for larger pieces. Making the reader want to keep reading is what an essay hook accomplishes for your paper, just as an intriguing introduction does for any piece.

Our main emphasis in this guide is on creating a good hook for an essay. Nonetheless, these fundamental guidelines apply to nearly every format for communicating with your audience. Whether writing a personal statement, a speech, or a presentation, making a solid first impression is crucial to spur your readers into action.

How to Write a Hook for Different Kinds of Writing

Although it is a tough skill to master, understanding how to write a hook is crucial for academic writing success. By reviewing the most prevalent kinds of essay hooks, you can discover how to effectively captivate readers from the start and generate a hook that is ideal for your article. To do so, let's head over to the following sections prepared by our dissertation writers .

essay hooks

How to Write a Hook for a College Essay?

By mastering how to write a hook for a college essay, you have the opportunity to stand out from the hundreds of applicants with identical academic portfolios to yours in your college essay. It should shed light on who you are, represent your true nature, and show your individuality. But first, you need an attention-grabbing start if you want the admissions committee to read more of yours than theirs. For this, you'll require a strong hook.

Set the Scene

When wondering how to write a good hook for an essay, consider setting the scene. Open in the middle of a key moment, plunge in with vivid details and conversation to keep your essay flowing and attract the reader. Make the reader feel like they are seeing a moment from your life and have just tuned in.

Open with an Example

Starting with a specific example is also a great idea if you're explaining how you acquired a particular skill or unique accomplishment. Then, similar to how you established the scenario above, you may return to this point later and discuss its significance throughout the remaining sections.

Open with an Anecdote

Using an anecdotal hook doesn't necessarily mean that your essay should also be humorous. The joke should be short and well-aimed to achieve the best results. To assist the reader in visualizing the situation and understanding what you are up against when tackling a task or overcoming a challenge, you might also use a funny irony. And if this sounds too overwhelming to compose, buy an essay on our platform and let our expert writers convey your unmatched story!

How to Write a Hook for an Argumentative Essay?

If you write a strong hook, your instructor will be compelled to read your argument in the following paragraphs. So, put your creative thinking cap on while crafting the hook, and write in a way that entices readers to continue reading the essay.

Use Statistics

Statistics serve as a useful hook because they encourage research. When used in argumentative writing, statistics can introduce readers to previously undiscovered details and data. That can greatly increase their desire to read your article from start to finish. You can also consider this advice when unsure how to write a good hook for a research paper. Especially if you're conducting a quantitative study, a statistic hook can be a solid start.

Use a Common Misconception

Another answer to your 'how to write a hook for an argumentative essay' question is to use a common misconception. What could be a better way to construct an interesting hook, which should grab readers' attention, than to incorporate a widely held misconception? A widespread false belief is one that many people hold to be true. When you create a hook with a misinterpretation, you startle your readers and immediately capture their interest.

How to Write a Hook for a Persuasive Essay?

The finest hooks for a persuasive essay capture the reader's interest while leading them to almost unconsciously support your position even before they are aware of it. You can accomplish this by employing the following hook ideas for an essay:

Ask a Rhetorical Question

By posing a query at the outset of your essay, you may engage the reader's critical thinking and whet their appetite for the solution you won't provide until later. Try to formulate a question wide enough for them to not immediately know the answer and detailed enough to avoid becoming a generic hook.

Use an Emotional Appeal

This is a fantastic approach to arouse sympathy and draw the reader into your cause. By appealing to the reader's emotions, you may establish a bond that encourages them to read more and get invested in the subject you cover.

Using these strategies, you won't have to wonder how to write a hook for a persuasive essay anymore!

How to Write a Hook for a Literary Analysis Essay?

Finding strong essay openers might be particularly challenging when writing a literary analysis. Coming up with something very remarkable on your own while writing about someone else's work is no easy feat. But we have some expert solutions below:

Use Literary Quotes

Using a literary quote sounds like the best option when unsure how to write a hook for a literary analysis essay. Nonetheless, its use is not restricted to that and is mostly determined by the style and meaning of the quotes. Still, when employing literary quotes, it's crucial to show two things at once: first, how well you understand the textual information. And second, you know how to capture the reader's interest right away.

Employ Quotes from Famous People

This is another style of hook that is frequently employed in literary analysis. But if you wonder how to write a good essay hook without sounding boring, choose a historical person with notable accomplishments and keep your readers intrigued and inspired to read more.

How to Write a Hook for an Informative Essay?

In an informative essay, your ultimate goal is to not only educate your audience but also engage and keep them interested from the very beginning. For this, consider the following:

Start with a Fact or Definition

You might begin your essay with an interesting fact or by giving a definition related to your subject. The same standard applies here for most types mentioned above: it must be intriguing, surprising, and/or alarming.

Ask Questions that Relate to Your Topic

Another solution to 'How to write a hook for an informative essay?' is to introduce your essay with a relevant question. This hook lets you pique a reader's interest in your essay and urge them to keep reading as they ponder the answer.

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Expert-Approved Tips for Writing an Essay Hook

Are you still struggling with the ideal opening sentence for your essay? Check out some advice from our essay helper on how to write a hook sentence and make your opening stand out.

good essay hook

  • Keep your essay type in mind . Remember to keep your hook relevant. An effective hook for an argumentative or descriptive essay format will differ greatly. Therefore, the relevancy of the hook might be even more important than the content it conveys.
  • Decide on the purpose of your hook . When unsure how to write a hook for an essay, try asking the following questions: What result are you hoping to get from it? Would you like your readers to be curious? Or, even better, surprised? Perhaps even somewhat caught off guard? Determine the effect you wish to accomplish before selecting a hook.
  • Choose a hook at the end of the writing process. Even though it should be the first sentence of your paper, it doesn't mean you should write your hook first. Writing an essay is a long and creative process. So, if you can't think of an effective hook at the beginning, just keep writing according to your plan, and it will eventually come into your head. If you were lucky enough to concoct your hook immediately, double-check your writing to see if it still fits into the whole text and its style once you've finished writing.
  • Make it short . The shorter, the better – this rule works for essay hooks. Keeping your hook to a minimum size will ensure that readers will read it at the same moment they start looking at your essay. Even before thinking if they want or don't want to read it, their attention will be captured, and their curiosity will get the best of them. So, they will continue reading the entire text to discover as much as possible.

Now you know how to write a good hook and understand that a solid hook is the difference between someone delving further into your work or abandoning it immediately. With our hook examples for an essay, you can do more than just write a great paper. We do not doubt that you can even write a winning term paper example right away!

Try to become an even better writer with the help of our paper writing service . Give them the freedom to write superior hooks and full essays for you so you may learn from them!

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How To Write A Great Essay Hook (With Examples)

How To Write A Great Essay Hook (With Examples)

  • Smodin Editorial Team
  • November 24, 2023

Learning the secrets behind an effective essay starts with understanding the power of a hook. Your hook is the opening statement of your introduction and ultimately acts as an invitation to your readers. It invites them to explore the ideas you’re presenting, while also engaging their attention for a long enough time to read your work.

With a great hook, you can improve your writing skills and set the stage for a masterfully written essay. But what else is a good hook able to do? And what kind of hook can you use to write an incredible essay?

This guide (complete with hook sentence examples) will help walk you through the steps of writing a hook and how to use it to boost your grades and make your work more compelling than ever!

What Is An Essay Hook?

An essay hook is the opening sentence or paragraphs of your essay and is designed to pique the curiosity of your reader while also holding their attention long enough to read the rest of your work. Think about it – would you want to read an essay if the first sentence is long-winded and boring?

Generally, writers use an effective hook to set the tone for the rest of the work and give you a quick look ‘behind the curtain’. The hook tells you exactly what the essay is about in a thoughtful and thought-provoking way that leaves you hungry for more.

For example: “ Did you know that the average person eats around five pounds of shark meat every year? In a shocking study by the Shark Lovers World Organization, it was revealed that around 4% of all fish-based products contain shark meat. ”

Of course, this isn’t true (at least, we hope not!). But it did capture your interest and make you want to find out more. That’s exactly what a hook does.

A good essay hook can keep your readers interested and helps to engage them in what you’re saying. It also leaves a lasting impression on them, which means you’ve accomplished your goal of starting a conversation about your essay topic.

Types Of Essay Hooks

With the many types of essays and writing structures you can use for your work, there are just as many hooks to suit your topic. But which ones are relevant? And which one should you use to effectively introduce your writing?

Below, we’ve listed some of the most common types of essay hooks to help you narrow down your search.

Question hook

If you start your essay with a thought-provoking question, you have a great chance of engaging your readers from the get-go. This is because a question can encourage them to actively think about what you’re saying and spark curiosity about what the real answer to the question is.

It’s important to ensure that your question is relevant and intriguing, but it’s even more important that it aligns with the theme of your essay. Usually, your readers will want to keep reading to find the answers in the body of your essay.

Quotation hook

When you open your essay with a quote from a notable person or reputable organization, you add credibility to your work. This can be particularly important when you’re discussing a topic that needs expertise to build trust.

After you use a relevant quote, you’ll also need to explain why it’s relevant to set the stage for the discussion or argument that you’re presenting.

Statistic hook

Introducing your topic with a compelling statistic or data is another great way to add credibility to your paper. It shows your reader that you’ve done your research, and you have proof to back up the claims that you may be making in the body of your essay.

It’s essential to use statistics that are accurate, though, and they should come from credible sources. Otherwise, you may be undermining your work, which could lead to losing the trust of your reader.

Anecdote hook

The last time I started an essay with an anecdote, my professor gave my work a stellar review and I got the best grades in my class .

Did we grab your attention? Good. That’s how an anecdote hook works. An anecdote is a short personal story that establishes trust with your reader and creates an emotional connection. It can also add a layer of interest to narrative or descriptive essays.

In some essays, you can write an anecdotal hook from the perspective of a fictional character. As long as it sounds like a personal experience, it should reel your readers in.

Surprising statement hook

If you can, try to capture your reader’s attention with a bold or unexpected statement. When you catch them off guard, you can stimulate their curiosity. They’re going to want to keep reading to see how you address or support your surprising statement.

You can use this type of hook in several different ways. Whether you’re challenging a common misconception, giving counterintuitive insights, or presenting intriguing facts that will wow or shock your reader, you can start your essay off on the right note.

Description hook

A description hook helps to engage readers by painting an image or setting a scene using descriptive language. Typically, it appeals to the senses (sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell) and describes something in enough detail that it makes the reader feel as if they’re actually experiencing it for themselves!

This type of hook is suited for narrative or descriptive essays because it allows you to set the tone, establish a certain atmosphere, and even evoke an emotional response in your reader. In turn, the reader becomes fully immersed in the scene that you’re setting.

How To Write A Great Essay Hook

Now that you understand the basics, it’s time to put your pen to paper (or fingers to the keyboard) and write a hook that will draw readers in and keep them reading. If you follow the steps we’ve outlined below, you’re sure to craft a hook that will reel in your audience – hook, line, and sinker .

1. Know your audience

Knowing your audience is perhaps one of the most important things to consider when you’re writing an essay hook. Are you writing for your teachers, peers, or a broader audience? Once you know that, you can move on to understanding their motives, and values, and how their emotions will affect how impactful your hook is.

Creating a connection with your audience grabs the reader’s attention and encourages them to keep reading your essay. And, by fostering this connection, you can make them more receptive to the message you’re trying to convey.

2. Understand the purpose of your essay

Before you can write your hook, you’ll need to know what the purpose of your essay is. Generally, your essay will try to inform, persuade, or narrate your subject. Either way, narrowing down the motivation behind writing the essay will help you on your quest to write a hook that suits your writing.

Your hook should always align with the concept of your essay since it’s used to introduce the main theme or argument. You can think of it as a preview of what you’re going to talk about – it gives your readers a glimpse into the direction of your written work and sets expectations for what your essay will cover.

3. Choose the right type of hook

The type of essay hook you choose significantly impacts your essay’s style and whether it will keep your reader’s interest. You can pick from a question, quotation, anecdotal hook, or any of the others we’ve listed.

By carefully selecting what types of hook sentences will captivate your reader and establish the right tone for your essay, you’re guaranteed to have a compelling introduction. You just need to make sure that your hook suits the essay you’re writing.

For example, if you’re writing a personal story hook as an introduction to a historical essay that relies on a chronological structure, it wouldn’t be very impactful. Instead, a quotation or statistic hook may be better suited to an academic essay like this.

4. Make sure your hook is relevant

Relevance is the key to creating a compelling essay hook. The hook should always connect to the topic of your essay, and the link between the two needs to be clear from the get-go.

This does mean, however, that you need to avoid unrelated information in your hook. Keeping with the example of writing a historical essay, we can illustrate this point perfectly.

Say you’re writing an essay on World War II, and you’ve chosen a statistical hook to open your writing. Adding statistics about coffee sales during the same time period is completely irrelevant and won’t have much of an impact.

Unrelated hooks can confuse your audience and completely lose the reader’s interest. On the other hand, a focused and relevant hook can grab the reader’s attention and make your essay more exciting.

5. Spark curiosity

The way that you phrase your essay hook is just as important as the type of hook you use. Ideally, your hook should excite the reader and spark curiosity that makes them want to keep reading.

A poorly worded hook can be confusing or – let’s face it – boring! And you don’t want to bore your audience before they even get past your introduction. Whether you’re asking a question or introducing the topic for your ideas, your hook should set the stage for the rest of your essay.

You may need to use some creativity for this step. But putting yourself in the shoes of your reader can help. Ask yourself ‘What would make me want to keep reading?’. Your answer is usually a good place to start!

6. Keep it short

Although an attention-grabbing hook is ideal, it’s essential to keep it short. You should focus on using impactful language that can effectively convey your message. This is mainly because a shorter hook can keep your reader’s attention without overwhelming them with too much information.

Remember, it’s all about balance. When it comes to essay hooks, you want to strike a balance between capturing your audience’s attention and giving them a concise overview of what your essay is about.

7. Tweak the tone

The tone of your hook sets up the tone for the rest of your essay – so it’s pretty important that you align your tone with the topic. To do this, you first have to ask yourself what the tone is . Is it serious? Or perhaps you want to come across as humorous? Either way, you’ll want to maintain a consistent tone throughout.

A good example of this would be when writing a personal essay. In this case, an anecdote hook would be a great way to kick off your writing. However, if your personal story is serious, a funny anecdote isn’t necessarily the best choice. Instead, you’ll want to pick an anecdote that matches the seriousness of what you’re discussing in the body of your work.

8. Revise your hook with Smodin

After you’ve written your hook, it might still need a little nip and tuck to go from almost perfect to perfectly polished. To do this, you can use several different techniques to rewrite it.

But the easiest way to ensure that your hook is bulletproof is to use Smodin’s AI Paraphrasing tool . It can spin your words to sound like it was crafted by an expert – in a matter of seconds. It’s also a good way to avoid plagiarism and check your text to see how well it performs (the flow, tone, and relevance).

You can also use our free AI Writer to generate a unique, plagiarism-free, and professional essay in just a few prompts. This can help you draft a rough copy of your work before making any adjustments or modifications to your final product.

Catchy Hook Examples For Your Essay

With a better understanding of the types of essay hooks, and how to use them, you are well on your way to crafting an effective and attention-grabbing introduction to your writing. But, if you still need a little help with tailoring hook types to suit your writing structure, take a look at some of these examples of hooks for different types of essays:

Argumentative essay hook examples

Statistical hook: “ According to a recent study conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Americans generate around 4.48 pounds of trash every day. This highlights the urgent need for recyclable products and packaging to address this pressing issue. ”

Question hook: “ Have you ever wondered how our experiences as children impact our daily lives and our resulting choices as adults? This critical question has prompted us to explore the topic of childhood trauma and the profound implications that it could have on our futures. ”

Persuasive essay hook examples

Statistic hook: “ Did you know that over 1.3 million tons of plastic waste are dumped into our oceans every year? This alarming statistic demands our attention and immediate action to address the pressing issue of plastic pollution. ”

Surprising statement: “ In a world that’s run by technology, it’s shocking to realize that the average person spends more time in their day scrolling through social media than sleeping. The digital age has not only revolutionized communication but has also left us questioning the true value of our time and relationships. ”

Narrative essay hook examples

Anecdotal hook: “ Raindrops tapped lightly on the window pane, and the slight rustling of the leaves seemed to whisper secrets in the wind. Little did I know that this ordinary evening would soon become an extraordinary chapter in the story of my life. It all began with a letter—an old, weathered envelope that held the key to a long-buried family mystery .”

Question hook: “ Have you ever wondered what it feels like to stand at the edge of a cliff, staring into the vast unknown below? The adrenaline coursing through your veins, the wind tousling your hair—each moment pregnant with the possibility of adventure. What if I told you that such a moment would change the course of my life forever? ”

Compare and contrast essay hook examples

Quotation hook: “ In the words of Aristotle, ‘Excellence is an art won by training and habituation’. As we delve into the realms of two seemingly disparate subjects, we must consider how their unique qualities and shared traits contribute to the pursuit of excellence in their own distinct ways. ”

Anecdote hook: “ As the sun went down, the city lit up with its busy streets, and I stood there, feeling stuck between two different places—the lively city and the peaceful countryside. In that moment, I noticed how city life and rural living are alike in some ways but also have their unique features. ”

Can I use the same type of hook for different essays?

While some hooks are versatile, it’s best to tailor your hook to the specific essay you’re writing and the topic you’re covering. You’ll need to consider the audience, purpose, and nature of your writing before choosing a hook.

Can I use a combination of different types of hooks in one essay?

Yes, you can experiment with combining different types of essay hooks in your writing, especially if your topic allows for different approaches. However, you should always make sure to include a smooth transition between the hooks and keep them simple. Otherwise, you risk confusing your reader.

Writing catchy hooks is more than just finding something clever to say at the opening of your essay. It’s about leaving an impression on your reader that will carry through the body of your work and leave them hanging on every word you say. Ultimately, your hook can make or break your essay.

With Smodin, coming up with, writing, and revising your hook is as simple as one, two, three. So why not try out our tools to streamline your writing process? There’s nothing to lose – and everything to gain!

Good Hooks for Essays: 14 Hook Ideas with Examples

Now here’s the clue.

If you want to wow your teacher, polish the introduction. Add something interesting, funny, shocking, or intriguing. Good essay hooks help you build an emotional connection right from the start. Think of an essay hook as bait for your readers.

Our expert team has prepared numerous examples of hooks for essays. You’ll find hook examples for an argumentative essay, personal story, history essay, and other types of papers.

For 100% clarity, we provided examples using each hook tactic. And a short part about how to write a good hook.

Teacher: "I won't forgive you for this essay."  Student: "But you gave me an A. What's wrong with it?"  Teacher: "I couldn't stop reading it, and I burned my dinner."

We highly recommend reading all the methods and examples, so you don’t have any questions:

  • 💎 What Exactly Is a Hook & How to Write a Good One
  • 📜 Examples of Classical Essay Hooks
  • 💡 Try Some Informative Essay Hooks
  • 🦄 Here are the Most Uncommon Essay Hooks

✅ Good Hooks for Essays: Bonus Tips

  • 🔗 References for More Information

We highly recommend reading all the methods and examples, so you don’t have any questions.

💎 How to Write a Hook That Will Work for Your Essay?

The hook of your essay usually appears in the very first sentence.

The average length of an essay hook should be 3-7 sentences, depending on the topic.

But first, let’s quickly go through the key questions.

What Is an Essay Hook?

An essay hook (or narrative hook) is a literary technique that writers use to keep their readers engaged. It shows that the content below is worth reading.

The hook can have different lengths. Some writers make it last for several pages. Though, it better be a short paragraph or even a sentence.

Why Do You Need a Good Essay Hook?

Writing the right hook is essential for a few reasons:

  • It heats up your readers’ interest. If you did it right, they read the whole piece.
  • It shows off your skills . A right hook presents you as an expert in your field.
  • It attracts target audience. Only the readers you want will keep reading.
  • It keeps the tension on the right level. Use an intriguing question, and a reader dies to find out the answer.
  • It makes a good introduction. Starting your essay off a boring fact is simply not a good idea.

How to Write a Good Hook: Ideas and Examples

Next, we will discuss these hook types in more detail. We’ll also provide essay hook examples of less common yet intriguing types: dialogue, story, contradiction, comparison, definition, metaphor, puzzle, announcement, and background information hooks.

💬 The Famous Quote Hook

Use a famous quote as a hook for your essay on history, literature, or even social sciences. It will present you as an established writer. It shows how knowledgeable you are and motivates the readers to engage in the text.

⬇️ Check out examples below ⬇️

Quote Hook Example: Political Science

Hilary Clinton once said that "there cannot be true democracy unless women's voices are heard." Which creates a discussion about how perfect democracy should look like. If it is a form of government that considers all opinions, why are women silenced so often even nowadays? The truth is that we need to ensure completely equal opportunities for women in politics before we talk about establishing the correct version of democracy. And even the most developed and progressive countries are still struggling to get to that level of equality. It can be achieved by various methods, even though they might only work in certain countries.

Social Sciences

"Ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country." These words of wisdom from John Kennedy reflect the perspective we need to teach the younger generations. For some reason, it has become popular to blame the government for any problem arising in society. Is it their fault that we don't think about waste and keep trashing our home? Social responsibility is a real thing. The well-being of our countries starts with the actions of every separate individual. It is not entirely right to wait until the government fixes all the issues for us. The best strategy is to start thinking about what we can do as a community to make our home even a better place.

And excellent sources of quotes for you:

  • Brainyquote.com – you can search quotes by topic or by author.
  • Goodreads.com is not only a great collection of e-books but also quotes.
  • Quoteland.com has plenty of brilliant words for all imaginable situations.
  • Quotationspage.com – more than 30,000 quotations for unique essay hooks.

❓Rhetorical Question Essay Hooks

It doesn’t have to be rhetorical – any type of question addressed to your audience will do its job. Such a universal kind of hook can spike the interest of your readers immediately.

Some useful patterns of rhetorical questions:

  • What could be more important than…?
  • What if there was only one… (chance/day/hour)?
  • Who wouldn’t like to… (be a cat/turn visitors into clients)?
  • Why bother about… (inequality/imperfect education system)?
  • Which is more important: … (making money or realizing potential)?

And more in examples:

Example of a Question Hook on Education

Wouldn't free access to education for everyone be wonderful? The answer would most likely be positive. However, it is not as simple as it seems. As much as the governments try to achieve this goal, there are still many uneducated people. On the bright side, in the era of technology, learning has never been so easy. Of course, some young adults just prefer the shortcut option of taking a student loan. Other ways are much more challenging and require a lot of responsibility and patience. Finding free educational resources online and gaining experience with the help of video tutorials might sound unprofessional. Still, you will be surprised how many experts hired in different fields only received this type of education.

Question Hook Example: Health

Is there anything that can help you lose weight fast? You have probably heard of this magical keto diet that is getting more and more popular worldwide. People claim that it helps them shred those excess pounds in unbelievably short terms. But how healthy is it, and does it suit anyone? The truth is that no diet is universal, and thanks to our differences, some weight-loss methods can even be harmful. Keto diet, for example, leads your body into the state of ketosis. What happens is that you don't receive carbohydrates, and in this state, fat is used as the primary source of energy instead them. However, it carries potential threats.

😂 Anecdotal Essay Hooks

This type would usually be more suitable for literary pieces or personal stories. So, don’t use it for formal topics, such as business and economics. Note that this hook type can be much longer than one sentence. It usually appears as the whole first paragraph itself.

It wouldn't be Kate if she didn't do something weird, so she took a stranger for her best friend this time. There is nothing wrong with it; mistakes like that happen all the time. However, during only five minutes that Kate spent with the stranger, she blabbed too much. Thinking that she sat down at the table that her friend took, Kate was so busy starting on her phone that she didn't notice that it wasn't her friend at all. Sure enough, the naive girl started talking about every little detail of her last night that she spent with her date. It was too much for the ears of an old lady. Kate realized she took the wrong table only when it was too late.

Literature (personal story)

Do not ever underestimate the power of raccoons! Those little furry animals that may look overly cute are too smart and evil. It only takes one box of pizza left outside your house by the delivery person for the disaster to begin. When they smell that delicious pizza, no doors can stop them. They will join the forces to find a hole in your house to squeeze into. Even if it's a window crack four feet above the ground, they know how to get to it. Using their fellow raccoons as the ladder, they get inside the house. They sneak into the kitchen and steal your pizza in front of your eyes and your scared-to-death dog. Not the best first day in the new home, is it? 

📈 Fact or Statistic Hook

Looking deeper into your essay topic, you might find some numbers that are quite amusing or shocking. They can serve as perfect hooks for economics- and business-oriented writings. Also, it is better if they are less known.

Business/social sciences

The UAE workforce is culturally diverse since around 20% of employees (usually called expatriates) come from different countries. Ex-pats tend to take managerial positions, which makes communication within companies quite tricky. The training focused on raising cultural awareness is getting more common, but such educational strategies as games (or gamification) are still rarely applied in the UAE companies. Yet, gamification was a useful tool in other places, making it an attractive UAE team building method. It can significantly help integrate ex-pats and create a more culturally aware environment.

The full version of this paper is here: Gamification and Cross-Cultural Communication in Dubai

Statistic Hook Example in Economics

The United Arab Emirate's debt has been rising drastically in past years, from about US$17 billion in 2003, which is almost 19 percent of GDP, to US$184 billion in 2009. Only a small proportion of the debt can be tracked directly to the public sector. A report by UBS bank shows that most of the debt comes from the corporate sector. Most of the companies that hold the main section of the debt are financial institutions. The public sector partly owns them. Banks in the UAE have been accumulating their debt amounts in the years mentioned above and could now account for 75 percent of the total foreign debt. The discussion is about the reasons why the UAE debt has been rising at an alarming rate.

Check the whole essay Debts in the United Arab Emirates .

Some good sources for statistics

  • Finance.yahoo.com is perfect for business papers.
  • Usa.gov/statistics is an easy-to-use governmental engine for searching data and stats.
  • Unstats.un.org provides a massive collection of statistics published by UN organizations
  • Oecd-ilibrary.org is the online library of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), featuring its books, papers, and statistics and is a gateway to the OECD’s analysis and data.

🤯 Shocking Facts are Very Good Hooks for Essays

Very similar to a statistical hook, a fact can serve as a perfect engaging introduction. Search your field for some shocking phenomenon and gently insert it in the beginning.

Don’t forget to include a reliable source reinforcing your words!

Fact Hook Example in Economics

Nowadays, much attention is paid to the problem of shark finning around the world. Millions of sharks are killed annually for their fins, and many of them are dropped back to the ocean finless, where they die because of suffocation. In many countries, the idea of shark finning remains illegal and unethical, but the possibility of earning huge money cannot be ignored (Dell'Apa et al. 151). Regarding available technologies, market economies, trade relations, and cheap employment, it does not take much time to organize special trips for shark hunting. The Trade of shark fins is alive and well developed in countries like the United States and China. However, the number of people who are eager to try shark fin soup has considerably decreased during the last several years because of the popularity of anti-shark fin soup campaigns and laws supported worldwide (Mosbergen). The situation continues to change in China.

Read the full paper about China Southern Airlines being against shark finning .

Daniel Stacey and Ross Kelly observed that long lines and a new gray market trend for bigger screen phones marked Apple's new iPhones debut. As expected, new phone models drew Apple fans outside retail stores (Stacey and Kelly). Global critics, however, noted that this year's lines were generally longer relative to previous periods mainly because of the developing gray market for Apple products. The new Apple's iPhones have larger screens than the previous models. Also, they boast of improved battery life, faster processors, and an enhanced camera. Tim Cook called them "mother of all upgrades" (Stacey and Kelly).

For the whole text, go to Apple’s New iPhones Start Selling in Stores” by Stacey and Kelly

Sources to look for reliable facts:

  • Buzzfeed.com – news, videos, quizzes.
  • Cracked.com – a website full of funny stuff, like articles, videos, pictures, etc.
  • Webmd.com – an incredible collection of medical facts you will love.
  • Livescience.com – discoveries hitting on a broad range of fields.
  • National Geographic – needs no introduction.
  • Mental Floss answers life’s big questions, a compilation of fascinating facts and incredible stories.

🗣️ Dialogue as a Catchy Hook for Essays

Dialogue is another type of hooks that goes perfectly with pieces of literature and stories. It can even make your short essay stand out if you include it at the beginning. But don’t forget that it only concerns specific topics such as literature and history.

Here it is:

Dialogue Hook Example in Literature

– Why did you do it? – I don't know anymore… That's why I'm leaving for a little bit right now. I need time to think.

With these words, Anna stepped back into the train car and waved goodbye to Trevor. She couldn’t even find the right words to explain why she ran away on her wedding day. It wasn’t that she didn’t love Trevor, but there was this deep, natural, and unexplored feeling that told her it wasn’t time yet. But the only thing Anna realized was that the city made her sick. That day, she took off her wedding dress, bought a ticket on the next flight leaving that afternoon, and hopped on the train taking her to the airport. She couldn’t even remember the country’s name she was going to so blurry everything was from her tears.

Dialogue Hook for History Essay

– If we still had inquisition, we could probably set him on fire. – Some dark magic, indeed, my friend! It would have probably been a real dialogue if we knew who was the first automobile inventor for sure. People were undoubtedly shocked to see the cars moving by themselves without horses. However, since they started appearing around the globe around the same time, it is almost impossible to identify who was the original creator of the idea and the first automobile itself. The credit was usually given to Karl Benz from Germany, who created a gasoline car in 1885-1886. But there are also much earlier records of a gentleman named Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built the first vehicle powered by steam in France in 1769.

🔮 A Story Looks Like an Extremely Good Essay Hook

A universal essay hook is a story. You can use this trick pretty much anywhere. The main challenge is to be as authentic as possible, try to tell something fresh and engaging. The more specific and narrow the story, the more chances for a successful introduction.

Story Hook Example for an Essay on Business

Dell started fast and strong. The original company was founded in 1984 when the founder was only a 19-year-old student at the University of Texas. Four years after the inception of the company, Michael Dell became the Entrepreneur of the Year. Eight years after he started the company from his dorm room's comfort, Dell was chosen as the Man of the Year by PC Magazine. […] The company was acknowledged as the world's leading direct marketer of personal computers. At the same time, Dell was known as one of the top five PC vendors on the planet (Hunger 9). […] However, the company's journey encountered a major hurdle down the road. Even after recovering from an economic recession in 2010, the company continued to experience declining sales.

Continue reading Dell Technologies Mission, Vision, and Values .

🦚 Contradictory Statement – Queen of Good Hooks

Everybody loves to start an argument by contradicting some facts. Therefore, you simply need to add a controversial statement at the beginning of your essay. People of all ages and beliefs will not be able to stop reading it!

Challenging your readers works well for social sciences, business, and psychology topics.

Examples of contradictory statements essay hooks:

If you think being a manager is a calm and relatively easy task, try surviving on five cups of coffee, a sandwich, and two packs of cigarettes a day. You would rather believe that managers only walk around the office and give their staff orders, wouldn't you? Unfortunately, the reality is much harsher than such rainbowy dreams. The use of the internet in academic contexts is on the rise, and its role in learning is hotly debated. For many teachers who did not grow up with this technology, its effects seem alarming and potentially harmful. A whole set of personal qualities and professional skills must keep up with the successful strategic planning, assessment, and development. All the tasks the managers need to attend to are nerve-wracking and sometimes almost impossible to do. The stress from the demanding managerial position is often overlooked or underestimated.

Social sciences

Video games have been ruining our kids' lives and leading to an increase in crime. Since the gaming industry's development in recent years, the fear of its adverse effects on the younger generations' brains has become a significant concern. There is such a wide variety of games, ranging from educational to violent shooters and horrors. Almost immediately, caring parents jumped on the latter category, claiming that its impact is too significant and children become more aggressive and uncontrollable. Some supporters of this theory went even further. They decided to link real-life crimes to the effects of violent video games on child and adult behavior. However, as we will see later in this article, there is no or little scientific evidence supporting those ideas.

🔁 Vivid Comparison Essay Hook

Introducing your topic with an engaging, vivid comparison is a universal strategy. It is suitable for any kind of writing. The main idea is to grab your readers’ attention by showing them your unique perspective on the topic. Try to make the comparison amusing and exciting.

Comparison Essay Hook Options:

  • Comparison with daily chores (e.g., Proofreading your essays is like cleaning your teeth.)
  • Comparison with something everyone hates (e.g., Learning grammar is like going to the dentist.)
  • Comparison with something everyone loves (e.g., John was happy like a child eating a free vanilla ice cream.)
  • Comparison of modern and old-school phenomena (e.g., Modern email has much in common with pigeon post.)
  • Funny comparison (e.g., Justin Bieber is the Michael Jackson of his time)

Check out examples:

Environment

For many people, flying feels like a dream come true. More and more people take their first-ever flight thanks to the rapidly developing aviation technologies. Aircraft and airports are advancing, and air traveling is getting cheaper. However, except for transporting eager travel addicted and business people, planes are used in other ways. It appears that the whole economies across the world depend on the effectiveness and efficiency of airlines. Import and export demand this kind of transportation to work at all times. Aviation development seems like a great thing. However, just like any other technological breakthrough, it comes with a price. Environmental issues did not wait too long to show up.

Social sciences/psychology

Leaving home for the first time as a freshman can only be compared to the level of stress you had in childhood when your mother left you in the line at the checkout for too long. Indeed, becoming a student and moving out of the parent's house comes with a great deal of stress. All the unknown that lies ahead makes youngsters too anxious. Then, the difficulties of financial planning and increased academic pressure come as additional sources of worries. However, it does not have to be such a negative experience. Particular techniques can help students overcome their stress related to the separation from their parents.

📄 Definitions = Easy & Good Hooks for Essays

Another versatile essay hook option is introducing a qualitative definition. Try to make it capacious, and don’t fall into verbal jungles. This narrative hook is perfect for short scientific papers where there is only one focus subject.

Business Ethics

White-collar crime refers to the peaceful offense committed with the intention of gaining unlawful monetary benefits. There are several white-collar crimes that can be executed. They include extortion, insider trading, money laundering, racketeering, securities fraud, and tax evasion. Enron Company was an American based energy company. It was the largest supplier of natural gas in America in the early 1990s. The company had a stunning performance in the 1990s. Despite the excellent performance, stakeholders of the company were concerned about the complexity of the financial statements. The company's management used the complex nature of the financial statements and the accounting standards' weaknesses to manipulate the financial records. The white-collar crime was characterized by inflating the asset values, overstating the reported cash flow, and failure to disclose the financial records' liabilities. This paper carries out an analysis of the Enron scandal as an example of white-collar crime as discussed in the video, The Smartest Guys in the Room.

Go to see the full text here: Enron Company’s Business Ethics .

Motivation is the act of influencing someone to take any action to achieve a particular goal (Montana& Chanov, 2008). Employees' motivation depends on the job's nature, the company's organizational culture, and personal characteristics. In this case study, various theories influence and show how employees can be motivated in the workplace.

Continue reading this paper about Motivation Role in Management .

📚 Metaphor Hook for Essays

Naturally, using a metaphor as a hook for your essay comes with some limitations. You should only use this type in literature and sometimes in psychology. However, it serves as a great attention grabber if it’s engaging enough.

Let’s see how you can use a metaphor:

When life gives you dirt, don't try to squeeze the juice out of it. It's better to leave it alone and let it dry out a bit. Kate decided to follow this philosophy since nothing else seemed to work. After the painful divorce process, last week's ridiculous work assignments and managing two kids alone almost drove her crazy. No polite discussions, arguing, or bribing helped take care of seemingly a million tasks these little women had to deal with. Even letting out the anger just like her phycologist recommended did not help much. Instead, Kate referred to the last remedy. She put all the issues aside with the hope that it would get better later.

The recipe is relatively easy – take a cup of self-respect, two cups of unconditional love, half a cup of good health, a pinch of new positive experiences, and mix it all for a perfect state of happiness! We all wish it would be possible, right? However, the mystery of this state of being happy is still unsolved. The concept and its perception considerably change depending on time and values. Happiness is so complicated that there is even no universal definition of it. Besides, humans are social creatures, so associating your level of success with others is not unusual. Therefore, being happy means achieving a certain level of several aspects.

🧩 Puzzle? Yes! Amazing Hook for Your Essay

Doesn’t a good riddle grab your attention? Sometimes you just want to find out the answer. The other times, you want to figure out how it is related to the topic. Such a hook would be great for writings on psychology and even economics or business.

Here are the examples:

How many Google office employees you need to destroy a box of fresh donuts? Google is indeed famous for some of the most accommodating and unique working places around the whole world. However, the success of the company does not only appear from treats for employees. It seems that the organizational culture has many effects on business decisions and overall performance. All the staff working in Google share the same visions and values, helping them cooperate and lead the company to success. However, there is one aspect to consider. The organizational culture needs to be adapted to the ever-changing business environment.

Who survives on dirt-like substance, is never joyful, and only returns to the cave to sleep? It sounds horrible, but the correct answer is human. Nowadays, the demands for any kind of workers are rising, which brings tremendous effects on people. As the number of duties increases, it is getting harder for employees not to chug on coffee and come back home in time for a family dinner. The work-life balance is disturbed, leading to anxiety, relationship issues, and even health problems. Social life appears to be as important as making money. Therefore, the correct distribution of time between personal life and work duties is necessary for happiness.

📢 Announcement Is Also a Good Essay Hook Option

Announcements could be suitable for literary pieces and historical essays.

Such a hook doesn’t have to be too long. It should be significant enough to persuade your readers to stick to your writing. Make sure it aligns with your topic as well.

Ways to use announcements as essay hooks:

It was a revolution! The Beatle's first song came out in 1962, and almost immediately, hordes of fans pledged their loyalty to this new band. Nearly all youngsters became obsessed with their music. No one can deny that the Beatles are still considered the creators of some of the best songs in history. However, the arrival of the British band influences culture as well. Many photos depict girls going crazy on live concerts and guys shaping their haircuts after the Beatles' members. The revolution that the band brought left an impact, evidence that we can still trace in modern British culture and music.

I will never go to Starbucks again! Oh, no, mind me. I love their coffee. At some point in my life, I even thought I had an addiction and had to ask my friends to watch my consumption of Pumpkin Spice Latte. Then, the wind of change turned everything upside down. On my usual Starbucks morning run, I noticed a homeless man holding a paper cup begging for money. At first, I didn't pay much attention since it's a usual occurrence in our area. However, one day, I recognized my old neighbor in him. The only cash I had on me, I usually spent on my cup of coffee, but I decided it was not much of a sacrifice. From that moment, I only showed up on that street to shove a few bucks into that poor guy's cup. One day, to my surprise, he talked to me.

ℹ️ Background Information Essay Hook

Last but not least, give background information on your subject to make a good intro. Such an essay hook is effortless and suitable for practically any paper. Try to find the most unobvious angle to the background information. At the same time, keep it short and substantive.

Here are the ways to use background information essay hooks:

Air Arabia is among the leading low-cost carriers in the global airline industry. The airline is mainly based at the Sharjah International Airport in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) (Air Arabia, 2012). The airline came into inception in 2003 after His Highness Dr. Sheik Mohammed Al Qassimi, the Ruler of Sharjah, issued an Emiri Decree. Later, Air Arabia was transformed into a limited liability company. For nearly a decade, Air Arabia has witnessed tremendous growth, resulting in increased fleet size and improved sales revenues. At the same time, Air Arabia has created a renowned brand that offers reliable and safe services (Dubai Media Incorporated, 2012). Air Arabia identifies itself as a low-cost carrier by providing low fares in the industry. Some of the key strengths of the airline include punctuality and safety. This aims to ensure that the airline serves its customers most efficiently by observing its safety requirements and adhering to the landing and takeoff schedules (De Kluyver, 2010).

Read the full text here: Air Arabia Company Analysis.

Walmart was founded by Sam Walton in the Arkansas United States in 1962 as a grocery store. The company, which operates a chain of over 8,000 stores in fifteen countries, is estimated to employ over two million employees from diverse backgrounds. Wal-Mart was incorporated in 1969 and started trading in the New York Stock Exchange in 1972. […] Although the company can leave its consumers with a saving due to its low-price policy, it has faced some sharp criticisms over how it treats its employees and other stakeholders. Wal-Mart boasts of its ability to save its customers' money, an average of $950 per year. This, however, has been criticized as harming the community. Also, the feminists' activists have focused on Walmart's misconduct in offering low prices. (Fraedrich, Ferrell & Ferrell 440)

Now we won’t keep you for long. Let’s just go through simple points of essay hook writing.

Someone may think that you have to write your hook first. It comes first in the paper, right?

In reality, though, you can wait until your entire essay is nearly finished. Then go back and rewrite the very first paragraph. This way, you can have a fresh look at what you’ve written in the beginning.

Here’s a simple plan you can follow.

  • First, write a basic version of your thesis statement.
  • Then, provide supporting evidence for your thesis in every body paragraph.
  • After that, reword your thesis statement and write your concluding paragraph.
  • Finally, search for an attention-grabbing fact, statistic, or anything from the list above to serve as an engaging essay hook.

Add this essay hook to the beginning of your introduction. Make sure that your ideas still flow naturally into your thesis statement.

⚠️ Pro tip: choose various hooks and play around, adding each hook to your introduction paragraph. Like this, you can determine which one makes the most impressive beginning to your paper.

Some of your choices may sound interesting but may not lead to your essay’s main point. Don’t panic! Paper writing always involves trial and error. Just keep trying your essay hook ideas until one fits perfectly.

That’s it 😊

Good luck with your work!

🔗 References

  • Hook – Examples and Definition of Hook
  • How to Engage the Reader in the Opening Paragraph – BBC
  • Hooks and Attention Grabbers; George Brown College Writing Centre
  • Hook Examples and Definition; Literary Devices
  • What Is a Narrative Hook? Video
  • How to: Writing Hooks or Attention-Getting Openings-YouTube

Research Paper Analysis: How to Analyze a Research Article + Example

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How to write a good hook for an argumentative essay

When it comes to writing an argumentative essay, the introduction is crucial. It is the first thing that your reader will see, and it is your chance to grab their attention and make them want to read more. One of the most effective ways to do this is by using a good hook. But before we dive into how to write a good hook, let’s first understand the purpose and audience of your essay.

The purpose of an argumentative essay is to persuade your reader to agree with your point of view on a specific issue or topic. To do this, you will need to present a clear and logical argument, supported by evidence and examples.

Knowing your audience is also important in order to tailor your argument and hook to their interests and level of understanding. For example, if you are writing an essay for a college-level class, you can assume that your audience is familiar with the topic and can handle more complex arguments. On the other hand, if you are writing for a general audience, you may need to provide more background information and simplify your argument.

Once you have a clear understanding of the purpose and audience of your essay, the next step is to identify the main argument and thesis of your essay. The main argument is the central point or position that you will be arguing for in your essay. The thesis statement is a clear and concise statement that summarizes the main argument of your essay. It should be included in the introduction and will guide the rest of your essay.

Having a clear and concise main argument and thesis statement will make it easier to write a hook that aligns with the overall argument and purpose of your essay. Enhance your writing skills with this informative piece, which is just one part of our comprehensive guide, “ Master the Art of Writing “.

Argumentative essay hook

What is the Purpose of an Argumentative Essay Hook?

A hook in an argumentative essay is a statement or phrase that entices readers and encourages them to keep reading. It serves as an introduction to the essay’s topic, giving the reader a general idea of what the essay will be about. The goal of a hook is to grab the reader’s attention and make them interested in the story you are telling. An effective essay hook has the power to keep the reader intrigued and wanting to know more.

The purpose of a hook is to make an impactful first impression. It should reflect the topic of your paper and set the tone for the rest of the essay . The hook should provide the necessary context and introduce the main ideas of your essay. It should also create a connection between the reader and your essay topic, giving them a reason to read on.

Strong hooks should be creative and emphasize the main themes of your essay. It should be intriguing enough to capture the reader’s attention, but not so complex that they lose interest. Be sure to use interesting and engaging language to ensure that it makes an impact.

Different Types of Hooks for an Argumentative Essay

When writing an argumentative essay, it is essential to have an effective hook statement. A hook is a sentence or two that captures the attention of the reader, making them want to read on. There are several types of hooks you can use, depending on your topic and purpose.

Rhetorical questions can be a great way to engage the reader. They should not be answered within the essay but rather posed as a thought-provoking statement. Quotes can also be used as a hook, especially if they are from a well-known figure or relate to your topic in some way. Statistics can be an effective hook too – they peak the reader’s interest and give a clearer idea of the point you’re trying to make.

Anecdotes and stories can provide interesting insight into your thesis statement and draw the reader into the essay. Metaphors and allegories can help illustrate complex ideas in a more creative, accessible way. You can also use visual imagery to evoke strong emotions from the reader.

No matter which type of hook you choose, it is important to craft it carefully. Make sure it connects directly to your argument and paints a vivid mental image for the reader. When done correctly, a hook will make your argumentative essay stand out from the crowd.

Provide Examples of Each Type of Hook and Analyze Their Effectiveness

A hook is a statement at the beginning of an essay that grabs the reader’s attention and makes them interested in reading more. It is an essential component of any argumentative essay, as it helps make the essay more persuasive and engaging. There are several different types of hooks that can be used, each having its own distinct purpose. In this section, we will provide examples of each type of hook and explain how they can be used effectively.

Rhetorical Questions

Rhetorical questions are statements posed in the form of questions which do not necessarily require an answer. These can be used to make the audience think about the issue and become curious about what follows in the essay. For example: “Do you ever wonder why people act so differently around different groups of people?”

Quotes from famous people can help draw the reader in and get them to think about the argument in a different light. For example: “The only way to make sense out of change is to plunge into it, move with it, and join the dance,” – Alan Watts.

Statistics can be used to show the reader just how common or rare a particular problem is and can be especially helpful when trying to make a point about a social issue. For example: “Over 50% of all homeless individuals in the US are veterans.”

Anecdotes, Stories, Metaphors and Allegories

These literary devices can be used to paint a vivid picture in the reader’s mind and create a strong emotional response. For example: “She was like a leaf in the wind, desperate for someone to take her by the hand and give her a chance, but no one came.”

Each type of hook can be effective when used correctly, as long as it is relevant to the argument being made. While some hooks may work better for certain types of essays, it is important to experiment and find the best fit for your topic.

Hook Structure and Form

A hook is the most important part of your argumentative essay because it grabs the reader’s attention. There are several different types of hooks you can use to start your essay, each with its own specific structure and form. It’s important to know the structure and form of each type of hook so that you can create an effective one for your essay.

A rhetorical question is a statement that does not require an answer from the reader. Rather, it encourages them to think more deeply about your topic and helps to set the tone for the rest of your piece. Rhetorical questions should be direct and concise, but also be thought-provoking and engaging. For example, you could start your essay with a question such as, “How can we tackle environmental degradation?”

Quotes can be used to grab the reader’s attention and bring extra depth to your essay. It’s important to choose a quote that accurately reflects your argument and resonates with your audience. Make sure to explain how the quote relates to your argument and why it’s relevant to the reader. For example, you could start your essay with a quote from Mahatma Gandhi: “Be the change you wish to see in the world.”

Statistics can be a powerful way to make a point and engage readers. Be sure to cite the source of your statistics and explain why they are important and relevant to your argument. You can provide a shocking statistic to grab people’s attention or use a statistic to back up your point. For example, you could start your essay with the statistic: “Over 80% of the world’s coral reefs are in danger due to human activity.”

Anecdotes or Stories

Anecdotes or stories can be a great way to engage your readers and draw them into your essay. Keep your story relevant to the topic and make sure it has an impactful ending. For example, you could start your essay with a story about a person who overcame a challenge related to your topic. This could be a great way to illustrate your point and show the reader the importance of your argument.

Metaphors and Allegories

Metaphors and allegories can be useful tools for expressing complex ideas in a simple way. Metaphors are comparisons between two seemingly unrelated objects, while allegories are longer moral stories. When using metaphors and allegories, make sure to explain their relevance to your argument so that readers can understand them. For example, you could start your essay with an allegory about a tree and how it has been affected by pollution.

Discussing Relevant Topics for a Strong Hook Statement

A hook statement, also known as an attention grabber, is the opening sentence of an argumentative essay. The primary purpose of a hook statement is to grab the reader’s attention and make them interested in the essay. It is also important to create a hook that is relevant to the topic of the essay, so that the readers have an understanding of what the essay is about.

There are many topics and ideas that can provide a strong hook statement for an argumentative essay. It is important to consider the overall tone and theme of the essay when selecting a topic. Some potential topics for an argumentative essay include: immigration, gun control, social media, education, health care, and climate change.

For example, if your essay is about gun control, you could start with a rhetorical question such as “Should civilians have the right to own firearms?” or a quote such as “Guns don’t kill people, people kill people.” Other possible hooks could be a statistic, anecdote, story, metaphor, allegory, or even a personal experience related to the topic.

No matter what route you decide to go in terms of creating your hook statement, it is important to ensure that it is relevant to the topic of your essay and captures the reader’s attention. Once you have chosen an appropriate topic, you can begin crafting your hook statement and making sure that it is effective and compelling.

Citing Examples of Good Hooks from Literary Works and Public Speeches

Creating a strong hook for an argumentative essay can be difficult if you’re starting from scratch. Fortunately, there are many examples of hooks that have been used successfully by writers and speakers in the past. Examining these examples can give you ideas and inspiration for your own hooks.

When looking for example hooks, begin by researching literature and public speeches. Popular authors often write hooks that grab their audience’s attention. The same is true of well-known speakers. Consider examining some of the most famous works of fiction as well as speeches given by influential people.

Fiction is full of great hooks. In Charles Dickens’ novel A Tale of Two Cities , Dickens starts with the memorable line, “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.” This instantly grabs the reader’s attention and sets up the conflict of the story.

Public speeches also provide plenty of examples of great hooks. Martin Luther King Jr. famously begins his “I Have a Dream” speech with the stirring words, “I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.”

Reading literature and speeches from the past can help you develop unique hooks for your own argumentative essays. By analyzing how other writers and speakers have captured their audiences’ attention, you can develop your own creative ideas for hooks.

Synthesizing Data for an Argumentative Essay Hook

Writing a good hook for an argumentative essay is an essential step to engage the reader’s attention from the very start. Synthesizing data is the process of gathering information, analyzing it, and combining it in order to create an original idea or argument. When it comes to developing an effective hook statement for an argumentative essay, synthesizing data can be a great way to come up with a unique and intriguing statement that will grab the readers’ attention.

To begin, you should start by researching your topic and gathering all the relevant facts, statistics and opinions related to it. It is important to assess the credibility of the sources you use, and make sure that any facts you use are current and up-to-date. Once you have gathered your data, analyze the material and look for common patterns or trends. This will help you to identify any similarities between different points of view, and identify potential arguments.

Once you have identified potential arguments, take some time to think about how they could be combined and used to create a unique and original hook statement. Consider how each of the components of the data could be connected in order to create a powerful statement. The key is to draw on the facts and details that you have gathered in order to construct a persuasive claim that will capture the readers’ attention.

You should also consider the form and structure of the hook statement. Ask yourself questions such as “What type of statement would grab the readers’ attention?” and “Where and how should I include quotations or statistics?” The answers to these questions will help you to refine your hook statement so that it is engaging and effective.

By synthesizing the data that you have collected and using it to create an original and effective hook statement, you can ensure that your argumentative essay will be attention-grabbing and persuasive. With this method, you can guarantee that your audience will be interested in reading more and will be more likely to follow your argument.

Strategies for Developing an Effective Hook Statement

  • Focus on a Problem: A great way to capture your reader’s attention is by introducing a problem that your essay will be discussing. This can help to draw readers in, as they will want to know what the solution to the problem is, and how it is relevant to them.
  • Create a Sense of Urgency: Make it clear to the reader that if they don’t read your essay, then something bad will happen. Use phrases like “time is running out” or “now is the time for action”. You will also want to highlight the consequences of not taking action, as this can motivate readers to continue reading.
  • Include Surprising Facts: Startling facts or statistics can be a great way to grab the reader’s attention. By incorporating something unexpected into your hook statement, you will make the reader curious about what other surprises may be awaiting them in your essay.
  • Ask a Thought-Provoking Question: Ask a question that requires the reader to think. This will make them more engaged in the essay and push them to think further on the topic beyond the scope of the introductory paragraph.
  • Tell an Interesting Story: Stories have a special way of captivating readers. If you are able to tell an interesting story as part of your hook statement, it will entice the reader to find out how the story links to the main topic of the essay .

Connecting the Hook to the Introduction Paragraph

It is important to make sure that the hook statement in your argumentative essay is connected to the introduction paragraph. This will ensure that readers are kept engaged and interested in your essay. The hook must be relevant to the main point of the essay and set the tone for the arguments that follow.

In order to make an effective connection between the hook and the introduction, it is important to first plan out the main points you want to cover in your essay. Think about the most interesting and engaging way to introduce each point and then use this idea as the foundation for your hook statement. Once you have a hook statement, start writing your introduction paragraph by introducing the thesis statement. This will provide a bridge from the hook statement to the body of the essay.

The hook statement should also give the readers an idea of the content and the structure of the essay . Make sure to explain how the hook connects to the main argument and provide a short summary of what the reader should expect. Try to avoid using too much detail in the hook statement and focus more on the essence of the argument. Using a captivating hook and effectively linking it to the introduction paragraph will ensure that your readers will stay hooked on your essay until the end.

Revising a Hook Statement in an Argumentative Essay

Writing a powerful, attention-grabbing hook statement can be difficult, and even experienced writers can find it a challenge. Once a hook statement has been written, it is important to evaluate and revise it. There are several useful tips for revising a hook statement:

  • Check for clarity. Make sure the hook statement is clear and succinct so that readers can understand it quickly.
  • Ensure accuracy. Make sure the facts included in the statement are correct and relevant to the essay.
  • Evaluate for relevancy. Ensure that the hook statement is connected to the main point of the essay topic.
  • Verify credibility. Make sure all sources used are credible and properly cited.
  • Read it aloud. This can help to identify any potential grammar or syntax errors.
  • Seek feedback. Ask a peer, mentor, or teacher to look over the hook statement and offer constructive criticism.

Taking the time to go back and revise the hook statement will ensure that it is strong and successful in captivating the reader’s attention. Additionally, it can also help to strengthen the overall argument of the essay.

Summarizing the Key Points

A strong hook statement is critical for grabbing the reader’s attention and engaging them in an argumentative essay. A good hook will captivate the reader, generate interest in the essay topic and make them want to read further. Different types of hooks can be used to achieve this, such as rhetorical questions, quotes, stories, statistics, anecdotes, metaphors and allegories. Each of these has its own structure and form and can be used to craft an effective hook statement.

To create a strong hook it is important to carefully select the topics that the statement will cover. A well thought-out argumentative essay should be based on current topics that are relevant to the audience, and the hook should be tailored to reflect this. Additionally, it’s important to synthesize data to create an original hook statement which serves to introduce the main arguments of the essay in a concise manner.

When writing a hook statement for an argumentative essay, different strategies can be employed. It is recommended to start with a small summary and explain the importance of the essay topic before moving on to introducing the main argument. Finally, it’s important to revise the hook statement to make sure it is as effective as possible.

The Importance of a Strong Hook

A strong hook statement is essential when writing an argumentative essay. It captures the reader’s attention and encourages them to learn more about the essay topic. By using a variety of hooks such as rhetorical questions, quotes, stories, statistics, anecdotes, metaphors and allegories, a writer can create an effective hook that entices the reader to read further. Furthermore, the hook should be tailored to the audience by choosing relevant topics and synthesizing data to create an original statement. Writing an effective hook statement also requires the use of different strategies, such as starting with a small summary followed by an introduction to the main argument. Finally, it is important to remember to revise the hook statement for maximum effectiveness.

Final thoughts

In conclusion, writing a good hook for an argumentative essay is an important step in the writing process. It is the first thing that the reader will see, and it is your chance to grab their attention and make them want to read more. A good hook should be relevant to the main argument and thesis of your essay, and it should be interesting and engaging.

The key to writing a good hook is to understand the purpose and audience of your essay, identify the main argument and thesis statement, gather information and evidence to support your argument, brainstorm potential hooks, incorporate the hook into the introduction, revise and edit the introduction and hook, practice reading the introduction and hook out loud, and getting feedback from others.

However, it is important to remember that a good hook is just one part of an overall effective argumentative essay. It should be combined with a good thesis statement, clear and logical structure, and solid evidence to support your argument. Taking the time to revise and edit your essay, and to make sure that it is well-organized and well-supported, will help to ensure that your essay is effective in persuading your reader to agree with your point of view.

  • Last Edit 27 APR 2023

Nick Radlinsky

Nick Radlinsky

Nick Radlinsky is a devoted educator, marketing specialist, and management expert with more than 15 years of experience in the education sector. After obtaining his business degree in 2016, Nick embarked on a quest to achieve his PhD, driven by his commitment to enhancing education for students worldwide. His vast experience, starting in 2008, has established him as a reputable authority in the field.

Nick's article, featured in Routledge's " Entrepreneurship in Central and Eastern Europe: Development through Internationalization ," highlights his sharp insights and unwavering dedication to advancing the educational landscape. Inspired by his personal motto, "Make education better," Nick's mission is to streamline students' lives and foster efficient learning. His inventive ideas and leadership have contributed to the transformation of numerous educational experiences, distinguishing him as a true innovator in his field.

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examples of argumentative essay hooks

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Argumentative Essay Examples to Inspire You (+ Free Formula)

Argumentative Essay Examples to Inspire You (+ Free Formula)

Table of contents

examples of argumentative essay hooks

Meredith Sell

Have you ever been asked to explain your opinion on a controversial issue? 

  • Maybe your family got into a discussion about chemical pesticides
  • Someone at work argues against investing resources into your project
  • Your partner thinks intermittent fasting is the best way to lose weight and you disagree

Proving your point in an argumentative essay can be challenging, unless you are using a proven formula.

Argumentative essay formula & example

In the image below, you can see a recommended structure for argumentative essays. It starts with the topic sentence, which establishes the main idea of the essay. Next, this hypothesis is developed in the development stage. Then, the rebuttal, or the refutal of the main counter argument or arguments. Then, again, development of the rebuttal. This is followed by an example, and ends with a summary. This is a very basic structure, but it gives you a bird-eye-view of how a proper argumentative essay can be built.

Structure of an argumentative essay

Writing an argumentative essay (for a class, a news outlet, or just for fun) can help you improve your understanding of an issue and sharpen your thinking on the matter. Using researched facts and data, you can explain why you or others think the way you do, even while other reasonable people disagree.

Free AI argumentative essay generator > Free AI argumentative essay generator >

argumentative essay

What Is an Argumentative Essay?

An argumentative essay is an explanatory essay that takes a side.

Instead of appealing to emotion and personal experience to change the reader’s mind, an argumentative essay uses logic and well-researched factual information to explain why the thesis in question is the most reasonable opinion on the matter.  

Over several paragraphs or pages, the author systematically walks through:

  • The opposition (and supporting evidence)
  • The chosen thesis (and its supporting evidence)

At the end, the author leaves the decision up to the reader, trusting that the case they’ve made will do the work of changing the reader’s mind. Even if the reader’s opinion doesn’t change, they come away from the essay with a greater understanding of the perspective presented — and perhaps a better understanding of their original opinion.

All of that might make it seem like writing an argumentative essay is way harder than an emotionally-driven persuasive essay — but if you’re like me and much more comfortable spouting facts and figures than making impassioned pleas, you may find that an argumentative essay is easier to write. 

Plus, the process of researching an argumentative essay means you can check your assumptions and develop an opinion that’s more based in reality than what you originally thought. I know for sure that my opinions need to be fact checked — don’t yours?

So how exactly do we write the argumentative essay?

How do you start an argumentative essay

First, gain a clear understanding of what exactly an argumentative essay is. To formulate a proper topic sentence, you have to be clear on your topic, and to explore it through research.

Students have difficulty starting an essay because the whole task seems intimidating, and they are afraid of spending too much time on the topic sentence. Experienced writers, however, know that there is no set time to spend on figuring out your topic. It's a real exploration that is based to a large extent on intuition.

6 Steps to Write an Argumentative Essay (Persuasion Formula)

Use this checklist to tackle your essay one step at a time:

Argumentative Essay Checklist

1. Research an issue with an arguable question

To start, you need to identify an issue that well-informed people have varying opinions on. Here, it’s helpful to think of one core topic and how it intersects with another (or several other) issues. That intersection is where hot takes and reasonable (or unreasonable) opinions abound. 

I find it helpful to stage the issue as a question.

For example: 

Is it better to legislate the minimum size of chicken enclosures or to outlaw the sale of eggs from chickens who don’t have enough space?

Should snow removal policies focus more on effectively keeping roads clear for traffic or the environmental impacts of snow removal methods?

Once you have your arguable question ready, start researching the basic facts and specific opinions and arguments on the issue. Do your best to stay focused on gathering information that is directly relevant to your topic. Depending on what your essay is for, you may reference academic studies, government reports, or newspaper articles.

‍ Research your opposition and the facts that support their viewpoint as much as you research your own position . You’ll need to address your opposition in your essay, so you’ll want to know their argument from the inside out.

2. Choose a side based on your research

You likely started with an inclination toward one side or the other, but your research should ultimately shape your perspective. So once you’ve completed the research, nail down your opinion and start articulating the what and why of your take. 

What: I think it’s better to outlaw selling eggs from chickens whose enclosures are too small.

Why: Because if you regulate the enclosure size directly, egg producers outside of the government’s jurisdiction could ship eggs into your territory and put nearby egg producers out of business by offering better prices because they don’t have the added cost of larger enclosures.

This is an early form of your thesis and the basic logic of your argument. You’ll want to iterate on this a few times and develop a one-sentence statement that sums up the thesis of your essay.

Thesis: Outlawing the sale of eggs from chickens with cramped living spaces is better for business than regulating the size of chicken enclosures.

Now that you’ve articulated your thesis , spell out the counterargument(s) as well. Putting your opposition’s take into words will help you throughout the rest of the essay-writing process. (You can start by choosing the counter argument option with Wordtune Spices .)

examples of argumentative essay hooks

Counterargument: Outlawing the sale of eggs from chickens with too small enclosures will immediately drive up egg prices for consumers, making the low-cost protein source harder to afford — especially for low-income consumers.

There may be one main counterargument to articulate, or several. Write them all out and start thinking about how you’ll use evidence to address each of them or show why your argument is still the best option.

3. Organize the evidence — for your side and the opposition

You did all of that research for a reason. Now’s the time to use it. 

Hopefully, you kept detailed notes in a document, complete with links and titles of all your source material. Go through your research document and copy the evidence for your argument and your opposition’s into another document.

List the main points of your argument. Then, below each point, paste the evidence that backs them up.

If you’re writing about chicken enclosures, maybe you found evidence that shows the spread of disease among birds kept in close quarters is worse than among birds who have more space. Or maybe you found information that says eggs from free-range chickens are more flavorful or nutritious. Put that information next to the appropriate part of your argument. 

Repeat the process with your opposition’s argument: What information did you find that supports your opposition? Paste it beside your opposition’s argument.

You could also put information here that refutes your opposition, but organize it in a way that clearly tells you — at a glance — that the information disproves their point.

Counterargument: Outlawing the sale of eggs from chickens with too small enclosures will immediately drive up egg prices for consumers.

BUT: Sicknesses like avian flu spread more easily through small enclosures and could cause a shortage that would drive up egg prices naturally, so ensuring larger enclosures is still a better policy for consumers over the long term.

As you organize your research and see the evidence all together, start thinking through the best way to order your points.  

Will it be better to present your argument all at once or to break it up with opposition claims you can quickly refute? Would some points set up other points well? Does a more complicated point require that the reader understands a simpler point first?

Play around and rearrange your notes to see how your essay might flow one way or another.

4. Freewrite or outline to think through your argument

Is your brain buzzing yet? At this point in the process, it can be helpful to take out a notebook or open a fresh document and dump whatever you’re thinking on the page.

Where should your essay start? What ground-level information do you need to provide your readers before you can dive into the issue?

Use your organized evidence document from step 3 to think through your argument from beginning to end, and determine the structure of your essay.

There are three typical structures for argumentative essays:

  • Make your argument and tackle opposition claims one by one, as they come up in relation to the points of your argument - In this approach, the whole essay — from beginning to end — focuses on your argument, but as you make each point, you address the relevant opposition claims individually. This approach works well if your opposition’s views can be quickly explained and refuted and if they directly relate to specific points in your argument.
  • Make the bulk of your argument, and then address the opposition all at once in a paragraph (or a few) - This approach puts the opposition in its own section, separate from your main argument. After you’ve made your case, with ample evidence to convince your readers, you write about the opposition, explaining their viewpoint and supporting evidence — and showing readers why the opposition’s argument is unconvincing. Once you’ve addressed the opposition, you write a conclusion that sums up why your argument is the better one.
  • Open your essay by talking about the opposition and where it falls short. Build your entire argument to show how it is superior to that opposition - With this structure, you’re showing your readers “a better way” to address the issue. After opening your piece by showing how your opposition’s approaches fail, you launch into your argument, providing readers with ample evidence that backs you up.

As you think through your argument and examine your evidence document, consider which structure will serve your argument best. Sketch out an outline to give yourself a map to follow in the writing process. You could also rearrange your evidence document again to match your outline, so it will be easy to find what you need when you start writing.

5. Write your first draft

You have an outline and an organized document with all your points and evidence lined up and ready. Now you just have to write your essay.

In your first draft, focus on getting your ideas on the page. Your wording may not be perfect (whose is?), but you know what you’re trying to say — so even if you’re overly wordy and taking too much space to say what you need to say, put those words on the page.

Follow your outline, and draw from that evidence document to flesh out each point of your argument. Explain what the evidence means for your argument and your opposition. Connect the dots for your readers so they can follow you, point by point, and understand what you’re trying to say.

As you write, be sure to include:

1. Any background information your reader needs in order to understand the issue in question.

2. Evidence for both your argument and the counterargument(s). This shows that you’ve done your homework and builds trust with your reader, while also setting you up to make a more convincing argument. (If you find gaps in your research while you’re writing, Wordtune Spices can source statistics or historical facts on the fly!)

examples of argumentative essay hooks

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3. A conclusion that sums up your overall argument and evidence — and leaves the reader with an understanding of the issue and its significance. This sort of conclusion brings your essay to a strong ending that doesn’t waste readers’ time, but actually adds value to your case.

6. Revise (with Wordtune)

The hard work is done: you have a first draft. Now, let’s fine tune your writing.

I like to step away from what I’ve written for a day (or at least a night of sleep) before attempting to revise. It helps me approach clunky phrases and rough transitions with fresh eyes. If you don’t have that luxury, just get away from your computer for a few minutes — use the bathroom, do some jumping jacks, eat an apple — and then come back and read through your piece.

As you revise, make sure you …

  • Get the facts right. An argument with false evidence falls apart pretty quickly, so check your facts to make yours rock solid.
  • Don’t misrepresent the opposition or their evidence. If someone who holds the opposing view reads your essay, they should affirm how you explain their side — even if they disagree with your rebuttal.
  • Present a case that builds over the course of your essay, makes sense, and ends on a strong note. One point should naturally lead to the next. Your readers shouldn’t feel like you’re constantly changing subjects. You’re making a variety of points, but your argument should feel like a cohesive whole.
  • Paraphrase sources and cite them appropriately. Did you skip citations when writing your first draft? No worries — you can add them now. And check that you don’t overly rely on quotations. (Need help paraphrasing? Wordtune can help. Simply highlight the sentence or phrase you want to adjust and sort through Wordtune’s suggestions.)
  • Tighten up overly wordy explanations and sharpen any convoluted ideas. Wordtune makes a great sidekick for this too 😉

examples of argumentative essay hooks

Words to start an argumentative essay

The best way to introduce a convincing argument is to provide a strong thesis statement . These are the words I usually use to start an argumentative essay:

  • It is indisputable that the world today is facing a multitude of issues
  • With the rise of ____, the potential to make a positive difference has never been more accessible
  • It is essential that we take action now and tackle these issues head-on
  • it is critical to understand the underlying causes of the problems standing before us
  • Opponents of this idea claim
  • Those who are against these ideas may say
  • Some people may disagree with this idea
  • Some people may say that ____, however

When refuting an opposing concept, use:

  • These researchers have a point in thinking
  • To a certain extent they are right
  • After seeing this evidence, there is no way one can agree with this idea
  • This argument is irrelevant to the topic

Are you convinced by your own argument yet? Ready to brave the next get-together where everyone’s talking like they know something about intermittent fasting , chicken enclosures , or snow removal policies? 

Now if someone asks you to explain your evidence-based but controversial opinion, you can hand them your essay and ask them to report back after they’ve read it.

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Argumentative Essay Examples & Analysis

July 20, 2023

examples of argumentative essay hooks

Writing successful argumentative or persuasive essays is a sort of academic rite of passage: every student, at some point in their academic career, will have to do it. And not without reason—writing a good argumentative essay requires the ability to organize one’s thoughts, reason logically, and present evidence in support of claims. They even require empathy, as authors are forced to inhabit and then respond to viewpoints that run counter to their own. Here, we’ll look at some argumentative essay examples and analyze their strengths and weaknesses.

What is an argumentative essay?

Before we turn to those argumentative essay examples, let’s get precise about what an argumentative essay is. An argumentative essay is an essay that advances a central point, thesis, or claim using evidence and facts. In other words, argumentative essays are essays that argue on behalf of a particular viewpoint. The goal of an argumentative essay is to convince the reader that the essay’s core idea is correct.

Good argumentative essays rely on facts and evidence. Personal anecdotes, appeals to emotion , and opinions that aren’t grounded in evidence just won’t fly. Let’s say I wanted to write an essay arguing that cats are the best pets. It wouldn’t be enough to say that I love having a cat as a pet. That’s just my opinion. Nor would it be enough to cite my downstairs neighbor Claudia, who also has a cat and who also prefers cats to dogs. That’s just an anecdote.

For the essay to have a chance at succeeding, I’d have to use evidence to support my argument. Maybe there are studies that compare the cost of cat ownership to dog ownership and conclude that cat ownership is less expensive. Perhaps there’s medical data that shows that more people are allergic to dogs than they are to cats. And maybe there are surveys that show that cat owners are more satisfied with their pets than are dog owners. I have no idea if any of that is true. The point is that successful argumentative essays use evidence from credible sources to back up their points.

Argumentative essay structure

Important to note before we examine a few argumentative essay examples: most argumentative essays will follow a standard 5-paragraph format. This format entails an introductory paragraph that lays out the essay’s central claim. Next, there are three body paragraphs that each advance sub-claims and evidence to support the central claim. Lastly, there is a conclusion that summarizes the points made. That’s not to say that every good argumentative essay will adhere strictly to the 5-paragraph format. And there is plenty of room for flexibility and creativity within the 5-paragraph format. For example, a good argumentative essay that follows the 5-paragraph template will also generally include counterarguments and rebuttals.

Introduction Example

Now let’s move on to those argumentative essay examples, and examine in particular a couple of introductions. The first takes on a common argumentative essay topic —capital punishment.

The death penalty has long been a divisive issue in the United States. 24 states allow the death penalty, while the other 26 have either banned the death penalty outright or issued moratoriums halting the practice. Proponents of the death penalty argue that it’s an effective deterrent against crime. Time and time again, however, this argument has been shown to be false. Capital punishment does not deter crime. But not only that—the death penalty is irreversible, which allows our imperfect justice system no room for error. Finally, the application of the death penalty is racially biased—the population of death row is over 41% Black , despite Black Americans making up just 13% of the U.S. population. For all these reasons, the death penalty should be outlawed across the board in the United States.

Why this introduction works: First, it’s clear. It lays out the essay’s thesis: that the death penalty should be outlawed in the United States. It also names the sub-arguments the author is going to use to support the thesis: (1), capital punishment does not deter crime, (2), it’s irreversible, and (3), it’s a racially biased practice. In laying out these three points, the author is also laying out the structure of the essay to follow. Each of the body paragraphs will take on one of the three sub-arguments presented in the introduction.

Argumentative Essay Examples (Continued)

Something else I like about this introduction is that it acknowledges and then refutes a common counterargument—the idea that the death penalty is a crime deterrent. Notice also the flow of the first two sentences. The first flags the essay’s topic. But it also makes a claim—that the issue of capital punishment is politically divisive. The following sentence backs this claim up. Essentially half of the country allows the practice; the other half has banned it. This is a feature not just of solid introductions but of good argumentative essays in general—all the essay’s claims will be backed up with evidence.

How it could be improved: Okay, I know I just got through singing the praises of the first pair of sentences, but if I were really nitpicking, I might take issue with them. Why? The first sentence is a bit of a placeholder. It’s a platitude, a way for the author to get a foothold in the piece. The essay isn’t about how divisive the death penalty is; it’s about why it ought to be abolished. When it comes to writing an argumentative essay, I always like to err on the side of blunt. There’s nothing wrong with starting an argumentative essay with the main idea: Capital punishment is an immoral and ineffective form of punishment, and the practice should be abolished .

Let’s move on to another argumentative essay example. Here’s an introduction that deals with the effects of technology on the brain:

Much of the critical discussion around technology today revolves around social media. Critics argue that social media has cut us off from our fellow citizens, trapping us in “information silos” and contributing to political polarization. Social media also promotes unrealistic and unhealthy beauty standards, which can lead to anxiety and depression. What’s more, the social media apps themselves are designed to addict their users. These are all legitimate critiques of social media, and they ought to be taken seriously. But the problem of technology today goes deeper than social media. The internet itself is the problem. Whether it’s on our phones or our laptops, on a social media app, or doing a Google search, the internet promotes distracted thinking and superficial learning. The internet is, quite literally, rewiring our brains.

Why this introduction works: This introduction hooks the reader by tying a topical debate about social media to the essay’s main subject—the problem of the internet itself. The introduction makes it clear what the essay is going to be about; the sentence, “But the problem of technology…” signals to the reader that the main idea is coming. I like the clarity with which the main idea is stated, and, as in the previous introduction, the main idea sets up the essay to follow.

How it could be improved: I like how direct this introduction is, but it might be improved by being a little more specific. Without getting too technical, the introduction might tell the reader what it means to “promote distracted thinking and superficial learning.” It might also hint as to why these are good arguments. For example, are there neurological or psychological studies that back this claim up? A simple fix might be: Whether it’s on our phones or our laptops, on a social media app, or doing a Google search, countless studies have shown that the internet promotes distracted thinking and superficial learning . The body paragraphs would then elaborate on those points. And the last sentence, while catchy, is a bit vague.

Body Paragraph Example

Let’s stick with our essay on capital punishment and continue on to the first body paragraph.

Proponents of the death penalty have long claimed that the practice is an effective deterrent to crime. It might not be pretty, they say, but its deterrent effects prevent further crime. Therefore, its continued use is justified. The problem is that this is just not borne out in the data. There is simply no evidence that the death penalty deters crime more than other forms of punishment, like long prison sentences. States, where the death penalty is still carried out, do not have lower crime rates than states where the practice has been abolished. States that have abandoned the death penalty likewise show no increase in crime or murder rates.

Body Paragraph (Continued)

For example, the state of Louisiana, where the death penalty is legal, has a murder rate of 21.3 per 100,000 residents. In Iowa, where the death penalty was abolished in 1965, the murder rate is 3.2 per 100,000. In Kentucky the death penalty is legal and the murder rate is 9.6; in Michigan where it’s illegal, the murder rate is 8.7. The death penalty simply has no bearing on murder rates. If it did, we’d see markedly lower murder rates in states that maintain the practice. But that’s not the case. Capital punishment does not deter crime. Therefore, it should be abolished.

Why this paragraph works: This body paragraph is successful because it coheres with the main idea set out in the introduction. It supports the essay’s first sub-argument—that capital punishment does not deter crime—and in so doing, it supports the essay’s main idea—that capital punishment should be abolished. How does it do that? By appealing to the data. A nice feature of this paragraph is that it simultaneously debunks a common counterargument and advances the essay’s thesis. It also supplies a few direct examples (murder rates in states like Kentucky, Michigan, etc.) without getting too technical. Importantly, the last few sentences tie the data back to the main idea of the essay. It’s not enough to pepper your essay with statistics. A good argumentative essay will unpack the statistics, tell the reader why the statistics matter, and how they support or confirm the essay’s main idea.

How it could be improved: The author is missing one logical connection at the end of the paragraph. The author shows that capital punishment doesn’t deter crime, but then just jumps to their conclusion. They needed to establish a logical bridge to get from the sub-argument to the conclusion. That bridge might be: if the deterrent effect is being used as a justification to maintain the practice, but the deterrent effect doesn’t really exist, then , in the absence of some other justification, the death penalty should be abolished. The author almost got there, but just needed to make that one final logical connection.

Conclusion Example

Once we’ve supported each of our sub-arguments with a corresponding body paragraph, it’s time to move on to the conclusion.

It might be nice to think that executing murderers prevents future murders from happening, that our justice system is infallible and no one is ever wrongly put to death, and that the application of the death penalty is free of bias. But as we have seen, each of those thoughts are just comforting fictions. The death penalty does not prevent future crime—if it did, we’d see higher crime rates in states that’ve done away with capital punishment. The death penalty is an irreversible punishment meted out by an imperfect justice system—as a result, wrongful executions are unavoidable. And the death penalty disproportionately affects people of color. The death penalty is an unjustifiable practice—both practically and morally. Therefore, the United States should do away with the practice and join the more than 85 world nations that have already done so.

Why this conclusion works: It concisely summarizes the points made throughout the essay. But notice that it’s not identical to the introduction. The conclusion makes it clear that our understanding of the issue has changed with the essay. It not only revisits the sub-arguments, it expounds upon them. And to put a bow on everything, it restates the thesis—this time, though, with a little more emotional oomph.

How it could be improved: I’d love to see a little more specificity with regard to the sub-arguments. Instead of just rehashing the second sub-argument—that wrongful executions are unavoidable—the author could’ve included a quick statistic to give the argument more weight. For example: The death penalty is an irreversible punishment meted out by an imperfect justice system—as a result, wrongful executions are unavoidable. Since 1973, at least 190 people have been put to death who were later found to be innocent.

An argumentative essay is a powerful way to convey one’s ideas. As an academic exercise, mastering the art of the argumentative essay requires students to hone their skills of critical thinking, rhetoric, and logical reasoning. The best argumentative essays communicate their ideas clearly and back up their claims with evidence.

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Dane Gebauer is a writer and teacher living in Miami, FL. He received his MFA in fiction from Columbia University, and his writing has appeared in Complex Magazine and Sinking City Review .

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  • 13 Effective Essay Hook Sentences to Start Your Paper
  • How to Write a Hook for Your Essay: Attention-Grabbing Techniques

How to Write a Hook for Your Essay: Attention-Grabbing Techniques

What Is an Effective Hook?

Steps before choosing a type of hook, great essay hooks strategies, start with an interesting fact, place your favorite literary quotation, quote a famous personality, use a great story as an opening, anecdotal hook, strike with numbers and statistics, reveal a common misconception, involve a contradiction, create a metaphor or a comparison, pose a rhetorical question, ask a question - give an answer.

Being proficient at writing essay hooks is a vital skill to master for students in academic writing. It will be harder to make your readers get excited to read your essays without it. Suppose that you have produced some reliable content to present. Still, if you miss using a strong attention grabber, your audience will unlikely want to read the rest.

But don't worry, with our tips, you will learn how to write a hook that will keep your readers' attention until the end. Let this article be a shiny pearl you just found in a deep blue sea. Or you can always request help from an  essay writer  at our professinal academic service.

A hook in any piece of writing is a catchy sentence or paragraph in the introduction. Its primary purpose is to draw your reader's attention to your report.

If someone is searching for a book or article to read, they will decide from the very beginning whether this work is worth attention. For example, a book can be incredible in terms of content. But if the opening lines are dull, a reader will unlikely keep reading the rest.

The ability to motivate people to review the entire text defines the effectiveness of the hook. A hook sentence is the best way to start an academic paper of any type.  This attention grabber gives a hint of what the topic is and what kind of questions will be observed. A good hook can keep the reader intrigued until the end.

An excellent hook is a perfect method to start an argumentative or a persuasive essay. But don't forget that apart from the hook itself, the rest of the paper should be captivating. That's why it's essential to define the target audience , thesis, and supporting arguments not to fall off the point.

  • You must understand what type of paper you tackle . Descriptive and narrative essays differ from argumentative and persuasive essays because they require different approaches to writing. The first ones ask you to describe certain events or concepts. In contrast, the second group requires you to use persuasive techniques to support your argument.
  • Realize why you are writing this essay . If it is a paper on a popular magazine topic, you can go funny and humorous. Your readers will like this approach. Yet, if you are writing a report to present at a conference, try to be more formal. Great hooks must fit in your writing frame, your tone, and style.
  • Understand who your target audience is . Each generation has its language, and your primary task is to choose a particular way in which your work will develop. When you write for children, try to make your writing easier to understand. If you produce content for language professionals, take their specific vocabulary into account. 
  • Begin your work by creating an outline of an essay . It allows writers to see how the work is structured better and which points to highlight. An outline is an excellent tool to use, not to forget the ideas you want to describe.

Remember that you shouldn't use more than one hook in the essay introduction. A higher number of catchy phrases might make the reader lose the main point. In one or two sentences , express a single exciting hook to grab your reader's attention like these essay introduction examples do.

There are many types of hooks you can use while writing an essay. It is sometimes difficult to choose the most suitable one. But any attention grabber will work if done the right way. Our writing gurus gathered the most effective strategies for your perusal.

Do you want to make the audience read your full text? Get them hooked with the help of a fact they have never heard of and keep them interested throughout the entire work. Such hook sentences do not necessarily need specific figures.

For example:

It would be a great essay opening: a writer can choose to focus on the value of time, review " The Fellowship of the Ring " storyline, or describe Gandalf's character. A right hook has many different applications in one text. 

The wisdom of this man has no doubts. People tend to believe Steve Jobs as he has achieved remarkable results, a wealthy being, and a new technology age. Such people are worth your attention. You can start an essay on business, management, leadership, marketing, or I.T. with these words.

It is a great hook for an essay. Stories are always compelling, but stories about famous people are on top. Do the research, read their biographies, and find correlations with your writing theme. Give readers a nice story, and they will like it.

Every day we learn different jokes from our colleagues, family, or friends. You can use these funny stories as attention grabbers, but only if they are directly related to your main topic. Humor is an excellent way to smooth out stressful situations and put a smile on your face. It can also be a perfect tool to use in an essay about yourself .

For example :

In our case, such a hook may start a serious topic like the problems people with colorblindness experience. The tale can serve as an introduction to the research on stereotypes about Chukcha, especially their intellect. The same hook may open an essay on different types of humor.

You can write a hook that starts with numbers and interesting statistics. Demonstrate that you did extensive research and created a reasonable basis for your discussion.

For instance:

What can be more intriguing than finding out that an idea you have had in mind for years is wrong? It is a perfect trigger that will make a great impact on your readers in a second.

Essay hooks may also include contradictions. A good essay starter can show opposite ideas or situations in a single excerpt. The main feature of such a hook is leaving some food for thought for your reader.

For instance :

Obviously, this isn't a recipe or a story about eggs. The writer starts with a straightforward, everyday image and then adds a drop of unpredictability - 'oppressed' ones to break the eggs. We call such a sentence a fantastic starter and a strong hook.

Not all questions may have answers. Yes, we are referring to rhetorical ones. Rhetorical questions have obvious interpretation and do not require further explanation. You can use them as your reader's attention grabber. It is one way to let them ponder and guess about the content of your writing before actually reading it.

So it's called a rhetorical question hook . It is an exciting way to start essays on hate crime, life, existence, sense of life, moral or ethical values, etc. However, this method mostly works for narrative or descriptive writing . We would not recommend using it for other academic papers.

What a lovely question! We want to know the answer now, and we keep reading and realize that we have finished the entire essay. Nothing is more hooking than a question that interests lots of people. Don't be afraid to use this trick if you want your audience to get sincerely interested in your writing.

Hooks are a handy tool that can help to succeed in writing. It doesn't matter whether it's a hook for an essay or another type of written content. It should do its job every time. But hooks alone will not grant you a perfect score on your paper. Students should also remember to be precise with describing the topic of their assignment. Here's one of the essay tips : keep it simple but exciting and worth your readers' time.

If you are unsure which hook to choose for your essay, you can always trust our writers . Our experts will suggest the best solution or complete the entire paper for you. They know precisely how to start an essay with an attention grabber. Just give it a shot, and you won't regret it!

Draw people into reading your essay (for example informative essay or 500 word essay) by making your introduction interesting and intriguing with the first sentence it starts with. The best way to do that is by using attention-catching hooks. These are to engage your audience, spark curiosity in the...

“Book titled “Neverending Story” is the best literary piece I’ve ever read!”“Shopping at Walmart Makes My Day.”“How Comes Some People Don’t Fear Death?”Students break their heads against the wall trying to understand how to title an essay. These phrases seem extractions from some stories. Some colle...

Writing an excellent five-paragraph essay is a choice. Some students may choose to exert their efforts and time to meet all requirements. But others may opt for the easy path and submit a poorly-crafted paper which ultimately will lead them nowhere. To ensure that your next five-paragraph essay will...

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How to Write a Powerful Hook for an Argumentative Essay

How to Write a Powerful Hook for an Argumentative Essay

When it comes to writing an argumentative essay, one of the most important parts is crafting a compelling hook that will engage your readers right from the start. A hook is the opening sentence or two of your essay that grabs the reader’s attention and makes them want to continue reading. It sets the tone for the rest of the essay and helps you state your position clearly. In this article, we will explore the step-by-step process of writing a powerful hook for an argumentative essay.

Before we dive into the process, let’s make it clear what the purpose of an argumentative essay is. The main goal of this essay type is to present and analyze different viewpoints on a given topic, provide strong arguments to support your stance, and persuade the reader to take your side. In order to do that, you need to craft a hook that not only grabs the reader’s attention but also makes your position clear.

One way to create a strong hook is by introducing a thought-provoking fact or statistic. For example, did you know that zoos in the US receive over 180 million visitors each year, more than all the major sports events combined? This startling statistic immediately engages the reader and makes them interested in learning more about the topic.

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Another effective hook is presenting a case study or an example that illustrates your argument. For instance, you could start with a story about a specific zoo that faced funding cuts and had to give up its resources and space for animal sanctuaries. This example not only makes your argument more relatable but also demonstrates the real-life consequences of inadequate funding for zoos.

In addition to using examples and facts, you can also use quotes from experts or well-known individuals to support your argument. For instance, Jean Jacques Rousseau once said, “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains.” This quote can be used to introduce an argument about the importance of autonomy for animals in zoos.

Now that we have explored different types of hooks, it is important to consider the overall structure and format of your essay. While there are different ways to approach an argumentative essay, one popular method is the Toulmin model. This model breaks down the essay into six clear steps: the claim, grounds, warrant, backing, counterclaim, and rebuttal. By following this structure, you can present your arguments in a logical and concise manner.

The Importance of a Powerful Hook in an Argumentative Essay

Argumentative essays require a strong hook because they aim to persuade readers and present a case for a particular viewpoint. Whether you are using the Toulmin or Rogerian format, both formats require you to engage with the opposition and provide compelling arguments and facts to support your own position. A powerful hook can help you achieve this by defining the topic, presenting a captivating example, or providing a thought-provoking question.

For example, if your argumentative essay is about the use of autonomous machines in the workforce, a powerful hook could be: “What’s next for our workforce? Will human manpower continue to be replaced by machines?” This hook immediately grabs the reader’s attention and presents a topic that is both timely and relevant.

In addition to engaging the readers, a powerful hook can also help you organize your thoughts and craft a well-structured essay. By using a hook that presents a problem or a question, you are setting up the essay to provide answers and analysis throughout the body paragraphs. This step-by-step approach not only keeps the readers engaged but also provides a clear and logical flow to your essay.

Furthermore, a powerful hook can help you present conflicting viewpoints or background information in a concise and compelling way. For example, if your essay is about the importance of zoos in wildlife conservation, a hook like “Are zoos really the problem, or are they the solution?” immediately introduces the opposition and challenges readers to consider different viewpoints.

Lastly, a powerful hook can leave a lasting impression on your readers. It can make your essay stand out from the others and make the readers want to continue reading until the very end. This is especially important when writing argumentative essays, as you want to leave a strong final impression and make your point memorable.

Key factors for an impactful argumentative essay hook

When it comes to writing argumentative essays, the hook plays a vital role in capturing the reader’s attention and persuading them to continue reading. Crafting a powerful hook requires some thought and creativity, but it doesn’t have to be complicated. Here, we present 5 simple examples to guide you in crafting an impactful hook for your essay.

  • Present a thought-provoking question: One way to engage readers from the start is by posing a question that challenges their assumptions or beliefs. For example, “Should zoos be seen as sanctuaries or prisons for wildlife?” This immediately introduces a conflicting position and invites readers to consider their own thoughts on the topic.
  • Begin with a concise anecdote or story: Humans are naturally drawn to stories, and starting your essay with an interesting anecdote can captivate readers. For instance, “In a recent study, zoo visitors were given badges that identified them as ‘wildlife experts.’ This experiment revealed some shocking insights about human perception and the role of zoos in preserving biodiversity.”
  • Create a strong statement: Making a bold statement can grab the reader’s attention and make them curious about your argument. For example, “Machines will replace the entire workforce within the next 10 years – here’s why.” This hook sets the stage for a thought-provoking analysis on the impact of automation.
  • Provide surprising facts or statistics: Give your readers a surprising piece of information that challenges their preconceived notions or opens up a new perspective. For instance, “Although accidents involving clothes dryers may seem rare, they cause an average of 15,500 fires in the United States each year.” This shocking statistic immediately highlights the importance of dryer safety.
  • Define a key term or concept: If your topic requires some background understanding, define a term or concept to give readers a clear idea of your essay’s scope. For example, “In the field of arts, craft refers to the skill and creativity involved in creating handmade objects.” This hook sets the stage for a discussion on the value of traditional craftsmanship in a modern society.

Remember, the purpose of an argumentative essay hook is to generate curiosity and entice readers to continue reading. While these examples may provide a starting point, it’s important to tailor your hook to fit the specifics of your topic. Craft a hook that is clear, concise, and thought-provoking, and you’ll be well on your way to writing an impactful argumentative essay.

Understanding the Purpose of the Hook

The hook is essentially the first few sentences or paragraph of your essay that grabs the reader’s attention and engages them to continue reading. It sets the tone for the rest of the essay and creates a strong first impression. The hook should be concise, clear, and thought-provoking.

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Engage the Reader

One of the main goals of a hook is to engage the reader right from the start. It should be like a badge that captures their interest and makes them want to continue reading. For instance, you can start with a thought-provoking question or an intriguing statement that sparks curiosity. By doing so, you create a space for the reader to think about the topic and become interested in your argument.

Show the Importance of the Topic

In addition to engaging the reader, the hook should also convey the significance of the topic you are discussing. It should provide some background information and demonstrate why the issue is worth exploring. This could be done by presenting relevant facts or statistics, introducing a case study, or providing a brief historical overview. By showing the importance of the topic, you make it clear why the reader should care about your argument.

Define Your Stance

Another purpose of the hook is to define your position or stance on the topic. This helps set the stage for the rest of your essay and gives your reader a clear understanding of where you stand. Whether you are taking a pro, con, or neutral position, the hook should reflect your overall thesis statement or main argument. This can be done through a strong statement or a preview of the case you will be making in the essay.

The role of the hook in capturing the reader’s attention

Why is the hook important.

When writing an argumentative essay, the hook plays an even more important role. It should not only capture the reader’s attention but also introduce the topic and clearly state your position or stance on the issue. A strong hook can make your arguments more compelling and persuade the reader to consider your point of view.

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What makes a good hook?

A good hook should be unique and original, providing information or posing a question that is not commonly understood or known. It should be engaging and thought-provoking, making the reader curious to find out more. For instance, you can start with a surprising statistic, a bold statement, or a compelling anecdote that relates to the topic of your essay.

It is also important to make sure that the hook is relevant to the topic and the arguments that will be made in the essay. The hook should set the stage for the reader and provide an understanding of the main points or ideas that will be discussed in the body paragraphs.

Examples of effective hooks

Here are a few examples of effective hooks:

  • A shocking statistic: “Did you know that 70% of the world’s population does not have access to proper healthcare?”
  • A provocative statement: “In a world where we have sanctuaries for animals, why are there no sanctuaries for the human mind?”
  • An intriguing question: “What’s more important: your clothes or your health?”

These examples make the reader pause and think about the topic at hand, creating a strong initial impression and setting the stage for the arguments that will be presented in the essay.

Types of Hooks for Argumentative Essays

1. the classic hook.

The classic hook is a tried and true method of hooking the reader’s attention. It involves starting your essay with a well-known quote or an interesting fact about the topic. This hook works particularly well when the quote or fact is surprising or thought-provoking. For example, you could start your essay on the importance of arts education by quoting Pablo Picasso: “Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.”

2. The Personal Anecdote Hook

A personal anecdote can be an effective way to draw the reader into your argumentative essay. By sharing a personal story or experience related to the topic, you can create a connection with the reader and make them more invested in your argument. For example, if you are writing about the benefits of autonomous vehicles, you could start with a personal anecdote about how a self-driving car saved you from a potential accident.

3. The Provocative Question Hook

Asking a provocative question is a powerful way to engage the reader and make them think about the topic. The question should be relevant to your argument and challenge the reader’s beliefs or assumptions. For example, if you are writing about the ethics of animal experimentation, you could start with a question like: “Is it morally acceptable to sacrifice the lives of animals in the pursuit of scientific knowledge?”

4. The Startling Statistic Hook

Starting your essay with a surprising statistic can captivate the reader’s attention and make them interested in your argument. Choose a statistic that is both relevant and shocking to make an impact. For example, if you are writing about the impact of smoking on health, you could start with a statistic like: “Every year, smoking causes over 7 million deaths worldwide.”

5. The Definition Hook

Using a definition as a hook can be an effective way to introduce complex terms or concepts in your argumentative essay. By providing a clear and concise definition, you can make sure that the reader understands the terms you will be using throughout your essay. For example, if you are writing about the Toulmin model of argumentation, you could start by defining the term and explaining its main components.

6. The Background Information Hook

Providing background information on the topic is a great way to set the stage for your argumentative essay. By giving the reader some context, you can help them understand why the topic is important and why they should care about it. For example, if you are writing about the effects of climate change, you could start by providing some background information on the current state of the environment and the impact of human activities.

7. The Quote from an Expert Hook

Quoting an expert can lend credibility to your argumentative essay and make your hook more persuasive. By using a quote from a well-known authority or expert in the field, you can show that your argument is supported by reputable sources. For example, if you are writing about the benefits of zoos, you could start with a quote from a wildlife conservationist who believes that zoos play a crucial role in wildlife conservation.

Remember, the hook is just the first step in crafting a powerful argumentative essay. Once you have grabbed the reader’s attention, you need to continue building your argument and presenting evidence to support your claims. Use the hook as a guide to outline the main points of your essay and make sure they are clear and well-supported. In the next section, we will explore some dos and don’ts of essay-writing to help you make your argumentative essay even stronger.

Exploring different hook strategies and examples

1. start with a striking fact or statistic.

One effective way to hook your readers is by starting with a surprising or intriguing fact or statistic related to your topic. For example, did you know that accidents involving autonomous vehicles have increased by 50% in the past year? This statistic immediately grabs attention and sets the stage for discussing the pros and cons of autonomous cars.

2. Pose a thought-provoking question

Another strategy is to pose a question that challenges your readers’ existing beliefs or knowledge. For instance, you can ask, “What is the purpose of zoos? Are they sanctuaries for animals or just a bad idea?” This question introduces the conflicting viewpoints on zoos and encourages readers to think critically about the subject.

3. Share a compelling anecdote or personal story

Anecdotes and personal stories are powerful hooks that can instantly connect readers to your topic. For example, you could begin your essay with a story about a year-long journey to understand the impact of fast fashion on the workforce. By sharing a relatable experience, you engage readers on an emotional level and make your essay more compelling.

4. Provide a concise summary or analysis of a relevant case

If your topic involves a complex case or controversial issue, you can hook your readers by providing a concise summary or analysis of that case. This helps them understand the background and context of your essay. For instance, you could introduce the case of Rogerian argumentative essay-writing but don’t forget to emphasize the main purpose and the conflict between opposing arguments.

5. Introduce a surprising comparison or analogy

A creative way to hook your readers is by introducing a surprising comparison or analogy that relates to your essay topic. For example, you could say, “Writing an argumentative essay is like putting together a puzzle. Both require careful analysis, logical thinking, and attention to detail.” This comparison immediately captures the reader’s interest and sets the stage for explaining how the pieces of an argument fit together.

6. Start with a bold and controversial statement

To grab your readers’ attention, you can start your essay with a bold and controversial statement. For example, you could say, “Wearing school uniforms should be mandatory for all students, as it promotes discipline and a sense of equality.” This statement immediately provokes a reaction and invites readers to consider your stance on the topic.

Crafting an Effective Hook for an Argumentative Essay

The purpose of a hook.

The main purpose of a hook is to grab your readers’ attention and make them want to continue reading your essay. It sets the tone for the entire piece and introduces the main idea or argument that you will be making. A well-crafted hook can make a world of difference in terms of engaging your audience and making them invested in your essay.

The Anatomy of a Good Hook

A good hook should be clear, concise, and thought-provoking. It can take various forms, such as a quote, a statistic, a question, a bold statement, or a personal anecdote. Regardless of the format, a good hook should be relevant to the topic of your essay and provide a preview of the argument you will be making.

For example, if you are writing an essay on the topic of capital punishment, you might start with a quote from a famous philosopher or a statistic on the number of wrongful convictions. This hook effectively introduces the topic and immediately engages the reader’s curiosity.

Step-by-Step Guide to Crafting a Compelling Hook

To help you craft a compelling hook for your argumentative essay, we have outlined a step-by-step process:

  • Step 1: Understand your essay topic and purpose – Before you start writing your hook, make sure you have a clear understanding of the topic and purpose of your essay. This will help you choose a hook that is relevant and compelling.
  • Step 2: Research and gather sources – To write a compelling hook, you need to have a good understanding of the topic and access to credible sources. Take the time to research and gather relevant information that supports your argument.
  • Step 3: Choose the most appropriate hook format – Depending on the topic and purpose of your essay, choose a hook format that best fits your argument. Consider using a quote, a statistic, a question, or a personal anecdote.
  • Step 4: Introduce conflicting viewpoints – A powerful hook can also introduce conflicting viewpoints or opposing arguments. This not only adds depth to your essay but also creates an opportunity for you to refute those arguments and strengthen your own.
  • Step 5: Outline your essay structure – Before finalizing your hook, make sure you have an outline of your essay structure. This will help you craft a hook that aligns with the overall flow and organization of your essay.
  • Step 6: Write and edit your hook – Once you have all the necessary information and a clear outline, it’s time to write your hook. Take the time to make it clear, concise, and compelling. Edit and revise it as needed to ensure that it meets the highest standards.

Dos and Don’ts of Writing a Hook

When it comes to writing a hook for your argumentative essay, there are some dos and don’ts to keep in mind:

  • Do invest time in brainstorming and experimenting with different hook formats.
  • Do include relevant and credible sources to support your hook and overall argument.
  • Do tailor your hook to your target audience’s level of understanding and familiarity with the topic.
  • Don’t start your essay with a bad or weak hook that fails to engage your readers.
  • Don’t use a quote or statistic without providing proper context and analysis.
  • Don’t rely solely on classic hook formats such as rhetorical questions or famous quotes – think outside the box.
  • Don’t overwhelm your hook with too much information or irrelevant details.

By following these guidelines and incorporating the right hook into your argumentative essay, you can grab your readers’ attention from the first hour and make a powerful impact with your writing.

For more resources, tips, and examples of effective hooks, visit YourDictionary.com – a trusted source for all your writing needs.

What is a hook in an argumentative essay?

A hook in an argumentative essay is the opening sentence or sentences that grab the reader’s attention and entice them to continue reading. It is meant to “hook” the reader and make them interested in what you have to say.

What are some examples of effective hooks for an argumentative essay?

There are several ways to create a powerful hook for an argumentative essay. You can start with a shocking statistic, an interesting fact, a compelling question, a relevant quote, or a vivid description. These hooks can immediately engage the reader and make them want to learn more.

Why is it important to have a strong hook in an argumentative essay introduction?

A strong hook is important in an argumentative essay introduction because it sets the tone for the rest of the essay. It grabs the reader’s attention and makes them interested in what you have to say. A weak hook can make the reader lose interest and not continue reading, so it is crucial to have a powerful hook to capture their attention from the beginning.

What are the key components of a good argumentative essay introduction?

A good argumentative essay introduction consists of several key components. First, it should have a strong hook to grab the reader’s attention. Second, it should provide some background information on the topic to give the reader context. Third, it should present a clear thesis statement that states the main argument of the essay. Lastly, it should outline the main points that will be discussed in the body paragraphs.

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Hook Examples Generator

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  • 💡 Examples of Hooks

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🎣 do i need a hook for essays.

Students often spend a lot of time procrastinating on their work because they need help figuring out where to start. Writing an introduction to any paper is a challenge. That's why here, we bring to your attention our hook examples generator. This straightforward and easy-to-use tool not only will not only support you in getting started on your project, but will also make it even more engaging for your audience.

So, what is a hook? And what is it for? Let's find out together!

What Is a Hook?

A hook appears in the text as an opening sentence or paragraph that forms first impression and encourages readers to continue reading.

The hook aims to set the essay's tone and style, allowing you to stand out, but this part differs from the introduction.

So, after you have intrigued the reader, you can introduce the topic by giving background information and a thesis statement.

As for the size, the hook can range from 1 sentence to an entire 6-sentence paragraph . It all depends on the expected length of your paper, the hook type, and your preferences. When you choose the hook type, consider the audience and the purpose. However, you shouldn’t overload it with unnecessary details. It may have good content and lots of information, but it won't be as appealing and memorable as you could imagine.

How to Write a Good Hook

Whether you're writing a philosophy essay , a descriptive essay , or an essay about your personal story , you will find help in our advice. In the following section, we'll tell you what to pay attention to. We'll also give you some tips to make your hook writing process easier and point you in the right direction.

💡 Examples of Hooks in Writing

The truth is, almost anything can be a hook. A well-constructed statement, an interesting fact, or an appropriate quote can make excellent openings for your introduction. Nevertheless, some of them will be more effective than others, depending on the kind of work you do. Here, we'll tell you about different examples of hooks in writing.

Argumentative Essay Hooks

As this essay type aims to research, present, and explain evidence, two hooks will work for you — fact and common misconception . If you choose to go with the factual approach, you should find something captivating. We can't use a fact that we've heard many times before. If you can’t find a piece of impressive information, then use a common misconception. This will intrigue your audience and motivate them to read on to find the truth.

Bacteria are tiny but scary-looking organisms that can make one frightened even on a photograph. However, not all of them are harmful. While some bacteria spread disease, others help our bodies absorb nutrients and digest food.

Informative Essay Hooks

As a rule, an informative essay aims to educate your readers or advance in-depth on a topic. A hook with statistical data will work fine in this case. The main thing is to cite the source to avoid sounding baseless. It’d also be interesting to start with a question to stimulate reasoning from the audience. There is a good chance that a provocative question will motivate reading.

What would you do if a tarantula bit your friend?

Expository Essay Hooks

An expository essay is a revealing text with factual information for comparisons and contrasts. Consequently, it'd be ideal to use conflict as a hook. For example, you could give several opinions on the topic.

On the one hand, genetic engineering helps us to fight diseases and gene defects, but on the other hand, people find it unethical and unnatural.

Another option is to use a definition as a hook, which can be straightforward yet effective.

Success is often used to describe achieving a desired outcome. However, success means different things to different people.

Literary Analysis Hooks

A literary analysis aims to examine or evaluate a work of literature carefully. Therefore, a quotation hook is excellent because you can take a famous or relevant quote to make an essay memorable and thought-provoking.

“So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past” - this is how Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby ends.

The same powerful impact on reflection has a hook phrased as a metaphor . The reader may need time to understand what the paper is about or interpret it differently.

Presentation Hooks

You can present your material in many ways, depending on the topic and the tone you want to set. You can start with an exciting question for intrigue or use a striking fact . It's equally effective to give statistics , if those are relevant to your presentation. But one unusual choice would be a strong statement hook. We use it to provide an affirmative stance about a certain topic that leaves no room for discussion. In turn, your audience will definitely be intrigued to see how you can back up your position.

Vegetarianism is an example of a healthy and balanced nutrition.

Personal Statement Hooks

A personal statement is used by university applicants or job candidates . Therefore, the primary purpose of such an essay is to stand out among competitors. So, a great option is to start with an anecdote , immediately setting the readers into a positive mindset. Then, you increase your chances of being remembered with good associations. Alternatively, you can start with a story or a relevant. But remember that this is an academic type of writing, and you need to know the measure and stay formal.

The most memorable experience during my undergraduate studies was...

Also, we recommend the descriptive hook, which is brilliant for a personal narrative. You can write about a successful project you’re planning or have done.

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Take the time to familiarize yourself with our hook examples generator. This free online tool will save you plenty of time and energy thinking about how to begin writing your academic paper. Don’t know which hook will be most applicable? Not a problem! Learn all about examples of hooks in writing from this page.

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Hook Examples

Barbara P

200+ Creative Hook Examples: Ready, Set, Hook

27 min read

Published on: Mar 22, 2023

Last updated on: Jan 30, 2024

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As a student, you know how important it is to grab your reader’s attention right away. 

Stories without strong starts can leave readers feeling uninspired and bored—and that's not what we want! After all, compelling stories require creative hooks to seal the deal. 

That's why we're here!

To avoid a bland start, it's important to craft a clever and memorable hook. With the use of effective hooks, you can leave a lasting impression on even the most discerning of readers.

Join us now as we jump into different types of hooks, from intriguing questions to vivid imagery – let's get started!

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Question Hook Examples

If you're stuck in the creative hook-writing process, a question hook can be your go-to. 

Questions hook readers and make them think about what’s being asked. You can also use a fact statistic too.

They also immediately draw attention to the topic at hand and make readers more likely to continue reading. 

 Let's look at some examples : 

  • "What if I told you that a single dream could change your life?" 
  • "Who can inhabit a place where the past and the present intersect?" 
  • "How would you respond if you had to choose between love and ambition?" 
  • "Where does one draw the line between passion and obsession?" 
  • "Can humanity survive in a world of conflicting values?" 
  • "What if our dreams became reality?" - John Steinbeck 
  • "How do you explain something that cannot be explained?" 
  • "Is it possible to find true love in an imperfect world?"
  • "Do we control our destiny, or does fate have a hand in it?" 
  • "How much can power corrupts us before we become monsters?"

Statistic Hook Examples

Numbers don't lie, and sometimes they can be the most powerful way to make a point. 

Here are some examples of statistic hooks that can grab your readers' attention:

  • "Did you know that over 50% of adults in the United States are single?"
  • "According to recent studies, over 70% of high school students report feeling overwhelmed and stressed on a daily basis."
  • "In the United States, the average household debt is over $90,000."
  • "Over 80% of Americans believe that climate change is a serious problem, but what are we doing to address it?"
  • "According to recent polls, only 20% of Americans trust the government to do what is right always or most of the time."
  • "In the last decade, the use of social media has skyrocketed, with over 3 billion users worldwide."
  • "Studies show that women still earn only 82 cents for every dollar earned by men in the United States."
  • "Over 40% of food produced in the United States is wasted each year, while millions of people go hungry."
  • "Recent research has found that over 90% of plastic waste in the ocean comes from just 10 rivers in Asia and Africa."
  • "Despite advances in medical technology, the United States has one of the highest rates of maternal mortality in the developed world, with over 700 deaths per year."

Metaphor / Simile Hook Examples

Metaphors and similes can be powerful tools for engaging your reader and making your writing more vivid. 

Here are ten examples to inspire your own metaphorical hooks.

  • "Like a beacon in the night, [topic] shines a light on our deepest hopes and fears."
  • "Metaphorically speaking, [topic] is a Pandora's box of complex emotions and ideas that challenge us to confront our own biases and assumptions."
  • "Just as a ship navigates treacherous waters, [topic] requires a steady hand and a clear sense of direction to navigate successfully."
  • "In many ways, [topic] is a mirror that reflects the beauty and complexity of the human experience."
  • "Like a puzzle with countless pieces, [topic] invites us to piece together disparate elements to uncover deeper truths and insights."
  • "Metaphorically speaking, [topic] is a garden that requires careful tending and nurturing to flourish."
  • "Just as a painter uses color and light to create a masterpiece, [topic] allows us to paint a vivid portrait of the world around us."
  • "In many ways, [topic] is a labyrinth that challenges us to explore its winding paths and discover hidden treasures along the way."
  • "Like a key that unlocks a door, [topic] gives us access to new worlds of knowledge and understanding."
  • "Metaphorically speaking, [topic] is a journey that takes us on a winding path through the highs and lows of the human experience."

Anecdote Hook Examples

If you want to hook your readers from the start with a narrative that's more fun and lighthearted, an anecdote hook is a way to go.  

Let's look at some examples: 

  • "It all started when I decided to take a walk in the woods one summer day..." 
  • "The night began as any other night out with my friends - until the police showed up..."
  • "The day I found out my grandmother had cancer was one of the saddest days of my life" 
  • "It was a sunny Sunday afternoon when I decided to take a chance and go for a drive on an unfamiliar road" 
  • "I never expected that one day I'd be standing in the World Cup final..."
  • "It was summertime, and all my friends were out at the beach while I was stuck inside baking cookies" 
  • "I remember the day I finally decided to take a leap of faith and start my own business" 
  • "My first day at university was filled with anxiety and excitement" 
  • "That's when I realized I wanted to be a teacher - when I saw the look on my student's faces after they finally understood something"
  • "My first time walking into a yoga class was nerve-wracking, but it ended up being one of the best decisions of my life" 

Quote Hook Examples

If you want to hook your readers right away with a strong introduction, using a quote hook can be an effective strategy.  

Let's look at some examples of a quote from a famous person. 

  • "We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars" - Oscar Wilde 
  • "To infinity and beyond!" - Buzz Lightyear 
  • "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take" - Wayne Gretzky 
  • "If you can dream it, you can do it" - Walt Disney 
  • "It is our choices that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities" - J.K. Rowling 
  • "You can't calm the storm, so stop trying. What you can do is calm yourself" - Tim Berners-Lee 
  •  "The only way to do great work is to love what you do" - Steve Jobs 
  • "A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step" - Lao Tzu 
  • "Life is what you make it" - Anonymous 
  • "The best way to predict the future is to create it" - Abraham Lincoln 

Story Hook Examples

If your main goal is to fully captivate and engage readers in an unforgettable story, then a well-crafted story hook is the way to go.

  • "It all started on a cold January night with a phone call that changed my life..." 
  • "The moment I saw my best friend in that hospital bed, I knew everything would never be the same again..." 
  • "I had been dreaming of this day for years - the day I'd finally get to explore the world outside of my small town..." 
  • "The sun was just setting as we drove through the old neighborhood, remembering all the good times we had growing up..." 
  • "I opened my front door to find a man standing in the hallway with a strange package - and that's how it all began..." 
  • "The morning of my eighteenth birthday, I woke up feeling strangely different - like an adventure was about to begin..." 
  • "I remember the day I decided to face my fears and take a leap of faith - that's when everything changed..." 
  • "The night I saw the shooting stars were like nothing I had ever experienced before, and I knew it would stay with me forever..." 
  • "It took one coincidence for me to realize that life was about to take me on a wild ride..." 
  • "I had never felt so brave in my life when I decided to take a stand and fight for what I believed in..." 

Hook Examples For Essay

If you desire to seize your reader's attention and keep them enthralled in your essay, a persuasive hook is essential.

Check out these hooks for essays examples: 

  • "The world we live in today has changed drastically since the introduction of technology" 
  • "Every generation has had its own unique set of challenges - and the current generation is no exception" 
  • "We can learn a lot from history and the mistakes that have been made in the past" 
  • "Society often puts a label on things without really understanding them or giving them a chance" 
  • "The power of technology can be both a blessing and a curse" 
  • "Education is the key to success - and it's important for everyone to have access to it" 
  • "What would life be like without our modern-day conveniences?" 
  • "We all have our own unique perspectives, but sometimes we forget to look at the bigger picture" 
  • "Not everything is as it seems - sometimes we have to dig deeper to understand the truth" 
  • "Life is a journey, not a destination - and every step of the way holds valuable lessons to be learned"

Narrative Hook Examples

Narrative hook examples are a great way to engage your reader in your story. Here are some examples of hooks for a narrative essay :

  • "It was a dark and stormy night, and I heard something outside my window..." 
  • "I had been waiting for this moment my whole life, and finally it was here..." 
  • "I had no idea what I was getting myself into when I opened that door..." 
  • "The air around me suddenly changed, and a chill ran down my spine as I realized how alone I was..." 
  • "It had been years since we'd seen each other, and now I was standing face to face with my old enemy..." 
  • "I followed the faint light until I stumbled upon a mysterious room with an unknown secret inside..." 
  • "It began as a normal day, but by nightfall, it was like nothing I'd ever experienced before..." 
  • "The cold wind was howling as I made my way across the deserted desert, searching for something greater..." 
  • "As I stepped through the ruins of the long-abandoned castle, I could feel an eerie presence watching me..." 
  • "The clock struck midnight and suddenly everything changed - it felt like a new world had been born..." 

Argumentative Essay Hook Examples

Argumentative hook examples can be a great tool to draw readers in and engage them with an argumentative essay . 

Let's look at some hook examples for argumentative essay: 

  • "The world we live in today is drastically different from what it used to be - and much of this change has been caused by technology"
  • "Every generation has its own set of challenges, and the current generation is no exception" 
  • "We should always be willing to learn from history and the mistakes that have been made in the past" 
  • "Society often judges things without really understanding them or giving them a chance" 
  • "The power of technology can be both a blessing and a curse - we must find the balance" 
  • "Education is essential to success, but not everyone has access to it" 
  • "We all have our own unique perspectives, but we must consider the greater good" 
  • "Sometimes things are not as they seem - it's important to look at all sides of an issue" 
  • "Life is full of lessons - and it's impossible to learn them all in one lifetime" 

College Essay Hook Examples

Crafting an effective hook for a college essay is essential to grab your reader's attention and draw them into the story. 

College hook examples can serve as invaluable guides when creating this crucial element of any composition.

Check out some examples: 

  • "The journey of life has taken me down many paths, but never in my wildest dreams did I imagine it would lead me here" 
  • "My story is not a traditional one, but it's uniquely mine and I'm ready to make my mark" 
  • "When I think back to the decisions that have shaped my life, this one stands out as the most important" 
  • "I had no idea how much I could learn from taking a leap of faith and going outside my comfort zone" 
  • "From the age of four, I knew that I wanted to be a doctor - and here I am on the brink of making it happen" 
  • "I wasn't always the most successful student, but I never gave up and now I'm ready to prove what I can do" 
  • "A person's future isn't predetermined - I'm determined to make mine a success" 
  • "Education is power, and I'm ready to take hold of my own destiny" 
  • "It's not about where you come from, but what you can achieve with hard work and dedication"  
  • "Life is unpredictable, but I'm ready to face any challenge that comes my way" 

Hook Examples For Speech

Speech hook examples provide a great way to hook your audience into your speech . 

Here are some examples: 

  • "We've all heard the phrase 'knowledge is power', but what does that really mean?" 
  • "What would our lives be like if we weren't as connected to technology as we are today?" 
  • "The world is a vast and mysterious place - let's explore how different cultures live and think" 
  • "What can we learn from the mistakes of our ancestors? Let's find out!" 
  • "We've heard about climate change, but what can we actually do to help?" 
  • "We live in a world of opportunity - let's explore how we can make the most of it" 
  • "Everyone has a story to tell - let's discover what makes us unique and wonderful" 
  • "Hard work and dedication are key ingredients for success - let's learn how to make the most of them" 
  • "Let's talk about what it means to make a difference in our world, and how we can do it!" 
  • "We all have the potential to reach our goals - let's find out how!" 

Hook Examples For Expository Essays

An expository essay provides a great way to engage your reader in your writing. Here are some examples:

  • "We often take for granted the little things in life - let's explore why they are so important." 
  • "What lies beneath the surface of our world? Let's look deeper and find out!" 
  • "Our environment is rapidly changing - let's see what we can do to protect it." 
  • "What causes people to make bad decisions? Let's explore the psychology behind it." 
  • "Without laws, society would be chaos - let's look at how laws keep us safe." 
  • "What can we learn from history? Let's uncover the lessons of our past." 
  • "Fear is an inevitable part of life - let's examine how to conquer it." 
  • "Our minds are incredibly powerful - let's explore the potential of our thoughts." 
  • "Life can be unpredictable, but how do we handle it? Let's discover some strategies." 
  • "What is the meaning of success? Let's define it and work towards achieving it!"?

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Hook Examples For Compare And Contrast Essay 

When writing a compare and contrast essay, it's important to have strong hooks.

Here are some examples of hooks that you can use for your compare-and-contrast essay :

  • "They say that 'opposites attract,' but do they really?"
  • "If you think two things can't be more different, think again."
  • "You might be surprised to learn that two seemingly similar things can have vast differences."
  • "Have you ever wondered what makes two things that seem identical actually very different?"
  • "There are many similarities between X and Y, but there are also key differences that make them stand out."
  • "Are you struggling to choose between two options that seem equally appealing?"
  • "At first glance, it may seem like two things have nothing in common."
  • "They say that variety is the spice of life, but is it always better?"
  • "It's easy to get lost in the details, but sometimes all we need is a little comparison to see things clearly."
  • "They say that everything is relative, but is that really true?"

Hook Examples For Research Papers

Crafting an effective research hook can be a powerful way to draw your readers into the world of your paper. 

Examples can provide excellent guidance when crafting this important part of any academic work!

Let's look at some hook examples in writing that can help you with your research paper : 

  • "Many people believe that X is the answer, but what does the research say?" 
  • "We've all heard about Y, but how does it actually work?" 
  • "What can we learn from the mistakes of the past and how can we use that knowledge to move forward?" 
  • "How has technology changed the way we do research and what ethical considerations do we need to take into account?" 
  • "What are some of the implications of Z and what can we do to address them?" 
  • "The debate around A is growing - let's explore both sides and see where the research takes us" 
  • "We all have our own opinions on B, but what does the evidence tell us?" 
  • "Let's take a look at C and uncover what it really means" 
  • "What can we learn from examining the history of D and how can that help us in the present?" 
  • "There are many theories surrounding E - let's explore them and draw our own conclusions" 

Hook Examples For Literary Analysis

Literary hook examples provide a great way to hook your readers into a literary analysis essay . 

Let's look at some examples of a great hook sentence here!

  • "What secrets do the characters in this story hold and what truths can we uncover?" 
  • "What does this piece of literature tell us about the human condition?" 
  • "What themes can we uncover by examining this text through a feminist lens?" 
  • "What is the author trying to say about society and how can we interpret it?" 
  • "How does this story stand out from others in its genre and what makes it unique?" 
  • "Let's explore the symbolism and imagery used in this piece of literature" 
  • "What message is the author trying to convey and how can that help us better understand the world we live in?" 
  • "The setting of this story plays an important role - let's examine it more closely" 
  • "How does the use of language in this text help to convey its themes and ideas?" 
  • "What can we learn about human nature by analyzing the characters in this story?" 

Paragraph Hook Examples 

Writing can be challenging, especially when it comes to crafting engaging openings. Here are ten hook ideas that might inspire your next paragraph:

  • "We all have our guilty pleasures, whether it's binge-watching reality TV or devouring junk food."
  • "Technology has transformed every aspect of our lives, from how we work and communicate to how we entertain ourselves."
  • "History is full of fascinating stories and characters. Let's shine a light on the forgotten voices of the past."
  • "Climate change is one of the most pressing issues of our time, but what can we do to address it?"
  • "Language is a powerful tool for communication, but it can also be a source of confusion and misunderstanding."
  • "The human brain is a mysterious and complex organ, capable of incredible feats of creativity and intelligence. Let's delve into the latest research on how our brains work."
  • "Art has the power to inspire, challenge, and transform us. But what is it about certain works of art that make them timeless and universal?"
  • "Identity is a complex and multifaceted concept, shaped by factors like race, gender, sexuality, and class."
  • "Philosophy has been a source of inquiry and debate for centuries, but how can it help us navigate the complexities of modern life?"
  • "Food is not just a source of sustenance, but a reflection of culture, history, and identity."

Query Letter Hook Examples

Query letter hook examples are a great way to engage your potential readers and agents. 

  • "This story will make you question everything you thought you knew." 
  • "Uncover an extraordinary tale of courage and determination." 
  • "Discover the power of hope in this heartfelt journey of transformation." 
  • "Follow a gripping story of passion and adventure." 
  • "Journey with a character on a quest to find the truth." 
  • "Experience an unforgettable tale of mystery and intrigue." 
  • "Meet a remarkable cast of characters in this stirring journey of discovery." 
  • "Go behind the scenes with a daring group of heroes." 
  • "Explore a world of mystery and wonder with a captivating story." 
  • "Be swept away in this thrilling adventure of courage and hope."  ? 

Hook Examples For Presentation

Presentation hooks are a remarkable way to captivate your audience and keep them engaged in your presentation. You can use interesting facts and statistic hooks as well!

With examples, you can create compelling stories or images that will make quite an impact!

  • "We all know that X is important, but why is it so crucial to our lives?" 
  • "What can we learn from the successes and failures of Y?" 
  • "Let's explore how technology has changed the way we do Z and how that affects our lives" 
  • "What is the one thing we need to know about A in order to understand its significance?" 
  • "We've all heard about B, but what does it really mean for us?" 
  • "What are the implications of C and how can we use that knowledge to our advantage?" 
  • "Let's take a look at the history and evolution of D" 
  • "How does E affect our daily lives and what can we do about it?" 
  • "What are some of the potential benefits of F and what risks do we need to consider?" 
  • "What has been the impact of G on our society and how can we use it to make positive changes?" 

Hook Examples For Introduction 

Introduction hook examples provide a great way to make a strong statement. 

  • "Welcome to the world of X - let's dive in and see what it has to offer" 
  • "We all know Y, but why is it so important?" 
  • "What can we learn from the successes and failures of Z?" 
  • "Let's take a journey through the history of A and uncover its secrets" 
  • "How has technology changed the way we do C and what ethical considerations do we need to take into account?" 
  • "What are some of the implications of D and what can we do to address them?" 
  • "The debate around E is growing - let's explore both sides and see where the research takes us" 
  • "Let's examine the facts and uncover what F really means" 
  • "What can we learn from exploring the history of G and how can that help us in the present?" 

Concluding Hook Examples 

Writing a strong conclusion can be just as challenging as crafting an engaging opening. Here are closing hook examples that might help inspire you.

  • "As we bring this discussion to a close, it's clear that [thesis statement]. But what are the implications of this insight for our lives and society as a whole?"
  • "In the end, the examples we've explored illustrate the complexity and nuance of [topic]. But what does this mean for us moving forward?"
  • "The evidence we've presented highlights the urgent need for [action or change]. So where do we go from here?"
  • "As we wrap up this conversation, let's remember that [key takeaway or lesson]. How can we apply this insight to our own lives?"
  • "The stories and characters we've examined offer a window into the human experience and our capacity for growth and transformation. What can we learn from their journeys?"
  • "As we conclude this discussion, let's reflect on what this means for us as individuals and as a society."
  • "The examples we've explored have shed light on the complexities and nuances of [topic]. But what are the broader implications of this understanding?"
  • "As we come to the end of this essay, it's clear that [thesis statement]. But how can we use this knowledge to make a positive difference in the world?"
  • "In conclusion, the evidence we've presented challenges us to rethink our assumptions about [topic]. Let's take this opportunity to broaden our perspectives and deepen our understanding."
  • "As we close out this conversation, let's remember the power of human connection to heal and transform."

Hook Examples For Personal Statement

Crafting an attention-grabbing hook for your personal statement can be a great way to increase engagement and draw readers in. 

Utilizing examples of successful hooks is an excellent strategy to help you create one that stands out!

  • "How have my experience and values shaped who I am today?" 
  • "What makes me unique from other applicants and how can that help me succeed?" 
  • "How have my past experiences, both good and bad, helped me understand the importance of X?" 
  • "What do I know about Y that makes me stand out from other applicants?" 
  • "Let's explore how my skillset can help me achieve success in Z" 
  • "What have I learned from the people around me and how has that shaped my goals?" 
  • "In what ways can I use my knowledge of A to make a difference?" 
  • "How will B help me grow as an individual and achieve my dreams?" 
  • "What have I learned through C that has helped me become a better person?" 
  • "What can I offer that makes me the ideal candidate for this role?" 

Catchy Hook Examples

Captivating hook examples are an excellent way to grab your readers' attention and entice them into the content.

  • "Are you ready for X? It's time to find out!" 
  • "Discover the shocking truth about Y" 
  • "Let's uncover the hidden secrets of Z" 
  • "Unlock the power of A - it will blow your mind" 
  • "B will change your life - here's how to get started" 
  • "What does C mean for us? Let's find out!" 
  • "Are you ready to take on the challenge of D?" 
  • "Can E really change your life? Let's find out" 
  • "F can provide incredible opportunities - here's how to get started" 
  • "Discover the hidden potential of G - it will amaze you!" 

Hook Examples For Romeo and Juliet Essays

Romeo and Juliet is one of the most iconic love stories in literary history. But what is it about this tragic tale that continues to captivate audiences centuries after it was written? 

Here are some hook ideas that might inspire your essay:

  • "What makes Romeo and Juliet one of the most enduring love stories of all time? Let's explore the themes and motifs that continue to captivate audiences today."
  • "From sword fights to sonnets, Romeo and Juliet has it all. But what is it about Shakespeare's language and imagery that makes the play so memorable?"
  • "Romeo and Juliet may seem like a straightforward story of love and tragedy, but what if there's more to it than meets the eye?"
  • "The feud between the Capulets and Montagues may seem like a typical Shakespearean conflict. But what does it reveal about the tensions and rivalries of Renaissance-era Italy?"
  • "What can Romeo and Juliet teach us about the power of passion and desire? Let's explore how the play challenges conventional morality and ethics."
  • "Romeo and Juliet has been adapted countless times in popular culture, but what can we learn from the original play? Let's examine how Shakespeare's work continues to influence modern storytelling."
  • "The tragic ending of Romeo and Juliet may seem predetermined, but what if the characters had made different choices? Let's explore the different paths the story could have taken."
  • "Romeo and Juliet is often seen as a story of youthful passion, but what about the older characters in the play? Let's analyze the roles of Friar Lawrence and the Nurse in shaping the course of events."
  • "Shakespeare's play may be set in Renaissance-era Italy, but its themes and motifs are universal. Let's examine how Romeo and Juliet speaks to contemporary issues and debates."
  • "The balcony scene in Romeo and Juliet is one of the most iconic moments in all of literature, but what is it about this scene that makes it so powerful? Let's explore the language, imagery, and symbolism at play."

Hook Examples For Social Media 

Social media has become a ubiquitous part of modern life, with billions of users around the world. But what is it about social media that has captured our attention and kept us hooked?

Here are some social media hook examples for you:

  • "Social media is like a never-ending rabbit hole, with endless scrolling and new content to explore."
  • "With social media, we have the power to connect with people from all over the world, but at what cost to our privacy and mental health?"
  • "The rise of social media has transformed the way we communicate, but it has also created a new set of challenges for individuals and society as a whole."
  • "From Instagram influencers to TikTok trends, social media has given rise to a whole new world of digital fame and fortune."
  • "In the age of social media, we are more connected than ever before, but are we really communicating?"
  • "What happens when the platform becomes a battleground for toxic behavior and hate speech?"
  • "From Facebook to Twitter, social media has revolutionized the way we consume news and information."
  • "Social media has made it easier than ever to connect with people who share our interests and passions."
  • "With social media, we can curate the perfect image of ourselves and our lives. But is this curated image an accurate reflection of who we really are?"
  • "Social media has opened up new opportunities for businesses and entrepreneurs."

Tips for Writing A Good Hook  

A hook is the first sentence or phrase in your writing that captures your reader's attention. 

A good hook is essential for any successful piece of writing, whether it's a novel, an essay, or a blog post. 

Here are some tips for writing a good hook that will engage your readers and keep them interested:

  • Start with an interesting fact or statistic: People love to learn new things. Starting with a surprising or little-known fact can be a great way to capture your reader's attention.
  • Ask a thought-provoking question: Asking a question that challenges your reader's assumptions or beliefs can be a powerful way to hook them to thinking.
  • Use descriptive language: Descriptive language can create a vivid picture in your reader's mind and draw them into your story or argument.
  • Create a sense of urgency: If your writing is about a timely or important topic, creating a sense of urgency in your hook can be an effective way to grab your reader's attention.
  • Start with a quote: A quote from a famous person or an expert in your field can lend credibility to your writing and pique your reader's interest.
  • Share a personal anecdote: Sharing a personal story or experience can make your writing feel more relatable and human, and can help to build a connection with your reader.

Writing a hook for your essay can be a challenge, but with the right approach, you can create one that will capture your reader's attention. 

If you're looking for some guidance to help you craft the perfect hook, CollegeEssay.org offers the best essay writing service to help you!

Stop wasting your time trying to craft the perfect hook and let CollegeEssay.org take care of it for you! 

Enhance your writing skills by utilizing our essay writer AI . Take advantage of this valuable resource to improve your writing abilities.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What is a hook example.

A hook example refers to an opening sentence of a piece of writing that is meant to grab the reader's attention and entice them to continue reading. 

Good hooks may use descriptive words, strong verbs, vivid imagery, or engaging dialogue to draw readers in.

How can I come up with a good hook?

Coming up with a good hook requires that you know your audience and the purpose of your writing.

Consider what interests readers in this particular topic or area.Use that to create an engaging opening sentence that will pique their curiosity.

Barbara P (Literature, Marketing)

Barbara is a highly educated and qualified author with a Ph.D. in public health from an Ivy League university. She has spent a significant amount of time working in the medical field, conducting a thorough study on a variety of health issues. Her work has been published in several major publications.

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How to Write Compelling Hooks For Essays (Essay Hook Examples Included)

Feb 15, 2024 | 0 comments

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Feb 15, 2024 | Blog | 0 comments

Are you struggling to grab your reader’s attention from the very first sentence of your essay? Whether you’re writing a college essay or a personal piece, the importance of compelling hooks for essays cannot be overstated. The hook is the first sentence or two of your essay that sets the stage for the rest of your writing and entices the reader to continue reading. It is the key to making your essay memorable and engaging. This article will explore the different essay hooks and provide examples to help you begin your essay with a bang. From a captivating anecdotal hook to a descriptive hook that paints a vivid picture, we’ve got you covered. So, if you’re struggling to write an essay hook that will make readers eager to read your essay, keep reading to discover how to craft the best hook for any essay topic.

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Different Types of Essay Hooks 

When you start your essay, grabbing readers’ attention is crucial. You need a great hook to keep them engaged from the get-go. You can use several hooks, each serving a specific purpose in drawing in your audience.

  • Anecdote : An anecdote hook involves sharing a brief personal story or experience related to your topic. Its purpose is to create a connection between the reader and the subject matter of your essay. For example, if you’re writing a personal narrative about overcoming obstacles, you might start with a description hook like,
“Once upon a time, I found myself standing at the base of a towering mountain, unsure if I had the strength to climb it.”
  • Question : A question hook involves posing a thought-provoking question to your readers about your essay topic. The purpose is to stimulate curiosity and encourage readers to think about the subject. For instance, if your essay is about the impact of technology on society, you might start with a question hook like,
“Have you ever wondered how much our reliance on smartphones has changed the way we interact with one another?”
  • Quotation : A quotation hook involves incorporating a relevant and impactful quote from a notable figure or source related to your essay’s theme. The purpose is to add authority and depth to your introduction while enticing readers with words of wisdom. For example, if you’re writing about the importance of perseverance, you could start with a quotation hook like,
“In the words of Winston Churchill, ‘Success is not final, failure is not fatal: It is the courage to continue that counts.'”
  • Statistical Data : A statistical data hook involves presenting compelling statistics or facts about your topic. The purpose is to provide concrete evidence and establish credibility while capturing readers’ attention with surprising or alarming data. For instance, if your essay is about climate change, you might start with a statistical data hook like,
“Did you know that the average global temperature has risen by 1.2 degrees Celsius since the late 19th century?”
  • Definition : A definition hook involves offering a clear and concise definition of a key term or concept central to your essay. The purpose is to provide clarity and context while inviting readers to explore the topic further. For example, if you’re writing about the concept of love, you could start with a definition hook like,
“Love, often defined as an intense feeling of affection and attachment towards someone or something, is a complex and multifaceted emotion that has puzzled philosophers and poets for centuries.”

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Where do you find ideas for great hook writing?

When considering how to write a hook for an essay, choosing one that aligns with your topic and audience is essential. Your hook sets the tone for the rest of your essay and determines whether readers will be engaged from the start.

  • Consider your topic and audience : Before selecting a hook, consider your essay’s subject matter and who will read it. What kind of hook would resonate with your audience and draw them in? For example, if you’re writing a research paper on environmental issues for a class of environmentally-conscious students, a statistical data hook highlighting the impact of climate change might be effective.
  • Align the hook with your essay’s purpose : Your hook should reflect your essay’s main idea or purpose. If you’re writing a persuasive essay arguing for stricter gun control laws, your hook could be a rhetorical question that prompts readers to consider the consequences of lax firearm regulations.
  • Mind mapping : Mind mapping involves visually organizing your thoughts and ideas related to your essay topic. This method can help you identify potential hooks by visually connecting concepts and themes.
  • Freewriting : Freewriting involves writing continuously for a set period without worrying about grammar or structure. This technique lets you explore different hook ideas by letting your thoughts flow freely onto the page.
  • Researching involves gathering information and examples related to your topic from various sources. This process can inspire unique hooks to use in your essay by providing you with valuable insights and data to incorporate into your introduction.

Crafting an Engaging Anecdote Hook 

An anecdote hook is a type of hook in an essay that involves sharing a brief personal story or experience related to your topic. It’s an effective way to start your essay as it captivates readers’ attention and creates an immediate connection between them and the subject matter. It’s effective as a hook because it draws readers in with a relatable and engaging story, making them emotionally invested in the rest of your essay.

Key elements to include in an anecdote :

  • Setting : Describe the time and place where the anecdote takes place. This helps paint a vivid picture for readers and sets the scene for the story.
  • Characters : Introduce the people involved in the anecdote, including yourself, if you’re part of the story. Providing details about the characters helps readers connect with them on a personal level.
  • Conflict or problem : Highlight the main challenge or obstacle faced by the characters in the anecdote. This creates tension and keeps readers engaged as they follow along to see how the conflict unfolds.
  • Resolution or lesson : Conclude the anecdote by revealing how the conflict was resolved or the lesson learned from the experience. This brings closure to the story and ties it back to the main theme of your essay.

Example of an anecdote hook :

“Once upon a time, during my first year of college, I found myself completely overwhelmed by the transition from high school. The pressure to excel academically, make new friends, and navigate newfound independence weighed heavily on my shoulders. One particular incident stands out in my memory: the day I had to give my first presentation in front of my entire class. As I stood trembling in front of the projector, I realized that conquering my fear of public speaking would be key to my success in college.”

Captivating Readers with a Thought-Provoking Question, Hook

A question hook is a hook in an essay that involves posing a thought-provoking question to your readers. It’s an effective way to start your essay as it encourages readers to engage with the topic actively and prompts them to think critically about the subject matter.

Benefits of using a question as a hook : Using a question as a hook has several benefits. Firstly, it stimulates curiosity and encourages readers to think about the topic from different perspectives. Secondly, it creates an immediate connection between the reader and the essay by inviting them to reflect on their experiences or beliefs. Finally, it sets the stage for the rest of the essay by compellingly presenting the main theme or argument.

Strategies for creating compelling questions :

  • Highlighting a common misconception : One strategy for creating a compelling question hook is highlighting a common misconception or widely held belief related to your topic. This challenges readers’ assumptions and prompts them to reconsider their views. For example, suppose you’re writing an essay about the benefits of vegetarianism. In that case, you might start with a question like, “Have you ever wondered if eating meat is necessary for a balanced diet?”
  • Controversial or thought-provoking topics : Another strategy is to choose a controversial or thought-provoking topic and pose a question that encourages readers to consider different viewpoints. This sparks debate and encourages readers to evaluate the issues at hand critically. For instance, if you’re writing an essay about marijuana legalization, you could start with a question like, “Is it time to rethink our approach to marijuana legalization in light of its potential medical benefits?”

Example of a question hook :

“What if I told you that the key to happiness lies not in material wealth or social status, but in embracing simplicity and gratitude? Imagine a world where success is measured not by the size of your bank account, but by the depth of your relationships and the richness of your experiences. Would you be willing to challenge the status quo and redefine your definition of success?”

Grabbing Attention with a Powerful Quotation Hook

Using a quotation as a hook in your essay can capture readers’ attention immediately. Choosing a relevant and impactful quote that sets the tone for your essay and draws readers in is crucial.

  • Importance of using relevant and impactful quotes : Incorporating a relevant and impactful quote at the beginning of your essay can immediately engage readers and pique their interest in your topic. A well-chosen quote can provide insight, add authority, or evoke emotion, setting the stage for the rest of your essay.
  • How to choose the right quote for your essay : When selecting a quote for your essay hook, consider its relevance to your topic and its ability to resonate with your audience. Look for quotes from reputable sources or well-known figures in the field that add credibility to your argument. Additionally, choose a quote that aligns with the tone and theme of your essay to create coherence and continuity.

Tips for integrating quotations effectively :

Once you’ve chosen a quote for your hook, it’s essential to integrate it seamlessly into your essay. 

  • Provide context for the quote by briefly explaining its significance or relevance to your topic.
  • Avoid quoting lengthy passages verbatim; select the most impactful phrases or sentences supporting your argument.
  • Use the appropriate citation format to attribute the quote to its source properly.

Example of a quotation hook :

“In the words of Maya Angelou, ‘I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.’ This profound statement by the renowned author and poet captures the essence of human connection and empathy. As we delve into the complexities of relationships in this essay, Angelou’s words serve as a poignant reminder of the enduring impact of kindness and compassion.”

Persuading with Statistical Data Hook

Using statistical data as a hook in your essay can be a powerful way to persuade readers and establish the credibility of your argument. It’s essential to use credible and persuasive statistics that are relevant to your topic and up-to-date.

  • Significance of using credible and persuasive statistics : Incorporating statistical data into your essay adds credibility to your argument by providing empirical evidence to support your claims. Readers are likelier to be persuaded by facts and figures than by mere opinions or anecdotes. By presenting data from reputable sources, you demonstrate to your audience that your argument is based on reliable information.
  • Finding relevant and up-to-date statistics : When searching for statistics to use as a hook in your essay, it’s crucial to ensure that they are relevant to your topic and reflect the current state of affairs. Look for data from reputable sources such as government agencies, academic journals, or research institutes. Pay attention to the publication date to ensure the statistics are up-to-date and accurately represent the current situation.
  • Incorporating statistics seamlessly into your essay : Once you’ve found relevant and up-to-date statistics, it’s essential to incorporate them seamlessly. Provide context for the statistics by explaining their significance and relevance to your argument. Avoid overwhelming readers with too many statistics; select the most compelling data points directly supporting your thesis. Use clear and concise language to present the statistics and ensure they flow smoothly within the text.

Example of a statistical data hook :

“According to a recent study conducted by the World Health Organization, approximately 1 in 3 adults worldwide are overweight or obese. This alarming statistic highlights the global prevalence of obesity and underscores the urgent need for action. As we delve into the health consequences of obesity in this essay, it is clear that this issue is not only a personal concern but also a public health crisis that demands immediate attention.”

Defining the Topic with a Definition Hook

Using a definition as a hook in your essay can effectively introduce the main concept or theme you’ll discuss. It sets the stage for your argument and helps readers understand the context of your writing.

Benefits of using a definition as a hook : Utilizing a definition hook offers several advantages. Firstly, it provides clarity and establishes a common understanding of the topic for your readers. Secondly, it captures attention by presenting a concise and focused definition that intrigues readers and makes them eager to learn more. Finally, it creates a framework for your essay, guiding readers through the main ideas and arguments you’ll be presenting.

Different types of definitions to consider :

  • Dictionary definition : This type of definition involves using the definition of a word or concept as found in a dictionary. It provides a straightforward and universally accepted interpretation of the topic.
  • Personal or unique definition : A personal definition involves offering your interpretation or understanding of the topic based on your experiences or perspective. This can add depth and authenticity to your hook, making it more engaging for readers.
  • Metaphorical or symbolic definition : A metaphorical or symbolic definition involves using imagery or figurative language to define the topic creatively and evocatively. This definition can evoke emotion and intrigue readers, encouraging them to explore the deeper meaning behind the topic.

Example of a definition hook :

“In the world of entrepreneurship, success is often defined not by the size of one’s bank account, but by the ability to overcome obstacles and pursue one’s passion with unwavering determination. For many entrepreneurs, success is not just a destination but a journey marked by resilience, innovation, and a relentless pursuit of excellence.”

Writing a Hook for Different Types of Essays

Writing a hook for an argumentative essay, a research paper, or a personal statement requires careful consideration of the specific goals and audience of each type of writing. Each type of essay demands a different approach to crafting an engaging hook that effectively captures readers’ attention and sets the tone for the rest of the piece.

Writing a hook for an argumentative essay :

When crafting a hook for an argumentative essay, your goal is to immediately grab readers’ attention and introduce the main argument or controversy you’ll be addressing. One effective approach is to start with a compelling statistic or fact highlighting the significance of the issue you’re discussing. For example, if you’re writing an argumentative essay on the importance of vaccinations, you might begin with a startling statistic about the rise of vaccine-preventable diseases in recent years.

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Writing a hook for a research paper :

In a research paper, your hook should draw readers into the topic you’ll be exploring and make them eager to learn more about your findings. Consider starting with a thought-provoking question or a surprising anecdote related to your research question. Alternatively, you could begin with a quotation from a notable expert in the field or a compelling statement that underscores the relevance of your research topic. For instance, if your research paper is about the impact of social media on mental health, you might start with a quote from a psychologist discussing the rise of anxiety and depression among young people due to excessive social media use.

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Writing a hook for a personal statement :

Your hook should capture your personality, experiences, and aspirations in a personal statement while grabbing the reader’s attention. Consider starting with a vivid anecdote or a memorable quote that reflects your values or interests. Alternatively, you could begin with a rhetorical question that prompts readers to reflect on their experiences or beliefs. For example, suppose you’re writing a personal statement for a college application. In that case, you might start with a brief anecdote about a formative experience that sparked your passion for your chosen field of study.

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What is a Hook in an Essay?

A hook in an essay is a sentence or set of sentences at the beginning of the essay that grabs the reader’s attention and encourages them to continue reading. It is meant to engage the reader and make them interested in the topic of your essay.

What are the Different Types of Hooks in Essay Writing?

There are several types of hooks that you can use in your essay. Some common types include:

  • A question hook: A hook that poses a thought-provoking question to the reader.
  • A quote hook: A hook that begins with a relevant quote from a credible source.
  • An anecdote hook: A hook that tells a short and interesting story related to your essay topic.
  • A statistic hook: A hook that presents a surprising fact or statistic.

Can you Provide Some Examples of Hooks for Essays?

Certainly! Here are a few examples of hooks that you can use in your essays:

  • “Once upon a time, in a faraway land…” (Narrative Hook)
  • “Did you know that 75% of people are afraid of heights?” (Statistic Hook)
  • “In the words of Albert Einstein, ‘Imagination is more important than knowledge.'” (Quote Hook)
  • “When I was ten years old, I experienced the thrill of riding a roller coaster for the first time.” (Anecdote Hook)

How Should I Structure My Essay with a Hook?

When using a hook in your essay, it is important to structure your essay in a way that follows a logical flow. Here is a suggested essay structure:

  • Introduction: Start with a hook to grab the reader’s attention and provide background information.
  • Thesis Statement: State your main argument or point of view in a strong and clear statement.
  • Body Paragraphs: Develop your main ideas and provide evidence to support them.
  • Conclusion: Summarize your main points and leave the reader with a final thought or reflection.

Why is Writing an Effective Hook Important for an Essay?

An effective hook is important for an essay because it sets the tone for the rest of the essay and captures the reader’s interest. A strong hook can make your essay stand out and make it more memorable to the reader.

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With a passion for helping students navigate their educational journey, I strive to create informative and relatable blog content. Whether it’s tackling exam stress, offering career guidance, or sharing effective study techniques

  • 170+ Compelling Essay Hook Examples that Grab Readers' Attention

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Steps to writing an essay: the complete guide, sponsored post.

  • February 22, 2024

Starting an essay writing journey may look scary at first, but don’t worry! When approached correctly and following a clear map, anyone can come up with a strong essay. This guide will help you to understand how to write an essay by breaking down the steps for writing an essay, and thus you will have a complete comprehension of the whole process. No matter if you are working on argumentative, persuasive, informative, or narrative essays, these steps on writing an essay will act as a good set of instructions to show you the way through the world of essay writing.

First 5 steps of writing an essay

1. Understanding the essay type: To begin the writing process, first, you will have to identify the type of an essay you are working on. What is its type? There are specific features and demands for each type. For instance, an argumentative essay needs a clear standpoint on a particular issue, while narrative essay comprises story telling. Spend some time musing over the core of your essay so that you will have an easier time writing.

2. Brainstorming and research: Once you have determined the essay type you are expected to write, make sure you do proper brainstorming and get all the necessary data. Put down the main arguments and explanations you wish to include in your essay. Do thorough research to guarantee the information is based on reliable sources. If you struggle to research information, ask for help at EssayHave. It’s an essay writing service which can help you with research.

3. Creating an outline: A good essay should be supported by a proper outline. Break down your essay into three main parts: The introduction, body, and conclusion. The introduction lists the main points, the body paragraphs are subtitled with the main arguments and the conclusion summarizes the main arguments and leaves a lasting impression. An outline makes your essay coherent and arranged in a certain chain of sequence.

4. Crafting a strong introduction: The introductory paragraph of your essay is its voice and it is what attracts the reader. First of all include a hook – interesting fact, challenging question, or good quote. Ensure that your thesis is clearly defined in your essay; it should lay down the central idea. Briefly introduce what readers will get and see to it that your intro is not long but still creative.

5. Developing the body: The body of your essay is the major component where you put forth and support your key issues in English studies. Every paragraph must have a main idea and certain. Lay out your arguments in simple and plain language, the connecting between paragraphs is also needed to be smooth. If you are writing an argumentative essay, one thing to think about is the counterarguments to build your position.

Tips on how to make an outstanding essay

Now that we’ve covered the initial steps to writing an essay, let’s explore some tips to elevate your essay writing skills:

  • Be clear and concise: Eliminate extraneous complexity from your writing. Your ideas, thus, argue eloquently. Make every word matter, and cut out any extraneous details that don’t support your essay’s main point.
  • Tailor your writing style to the essay type: Different kinds of essays demand different writing approaches. The tone of an argumentative essay must be strong and assertive whereas a narrative essay is more open and personal. Your writing style should conform to the objective of your essay.
  • Create a captivating thesis statement: Your thesis should capture your essay’s main idea in no more than one sentence. This is your reader’s compass as it points them to the central argument of your paper. Formalize a thesis statement which is precise, not too long, and impressive.
  • Revise and edit: Revise and edit your essay when you are done with the first draft. Check for grammatical errors, clarity of expression, and overall coherence. Think of asking fellow students or professors for their useful suggestions in the refinement process.

Refining your writing with style and clarity

An ideal essay is not just a matter of following the steps asked but is about having your own voice in the piece of writing and making it appeal to your reader with ease. Here’s how you can refine your essay to make it truly stand out:It is predicted.

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Final essay writing steps

6. Writing an engaging conclusion: Here the conclusion is the final chance to make a deep impact in the minds of the readers. In conclusion, and synthesis of the central idea of discussion, the thesis should be restated in a new light. Do not introduce some new information in the conclusion and let your readers think about it.

7. Proofreading: Before you hand in your essay, make a complete proofreading. Check for spelling and grammar mistakes, make your writing style consistent, and make sure that you have followed your teacher’s instructions. A well-reflected essay is a sign of your commitment to quality research.

8. Seeking feedback: In the essay writing steps, try to ask for feedback in the form of your peers, friends, and teachers. New angles can provide a different viewpoint and identify areas of deficiency. Criticism is supposed to help a writer grow and develop, and that is an integral aspect of the writing process.

Summing up!

Having mastered the segments of writing a great essay is an invaluable ability that sets the course open for competent communication and self-expression. No matter what type of essay you have to write, whether argumentative, persuasive, informative, or narrative, if you follow these steps of writing an essay and apply the tips provided, you will get a good essay. Practice makes perfect, so you should not be afraid of trying different types of essays and developing your techniques with time. Happy writing!

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COMMENTS

  1. 73 Essay Hook Examples (2024)

    1. For an Essay About Yourself An essay about yourself can be personal, use "I" statements, and include memories or thoughts that are deeply personal to you. Question: "Have you ever met someone who could turn even the most mundane events into a thrilling adventure? Let me introduce myself."

  2. How to Write a Strong Essay Hook, With Examples

    For example, an argumentative essay in support of new recycling policies might hook readers with a bleak description of what happens to batteries and other hazardous materials when they aren't recycled. 6 Common misconception

  3. Essay Hook Examples That Grab Attention (Formula for Better Grades)

    Students Have you ever read a line that caught your attention so fast, you didn't look up until five paragraphs later? Props to whoever wrote it — they mastered the attention-grabbing hook. Top 10 Essay Hooks "In a world where..." (for a descriptive essay) "Throughout history, it's been..." (for an explanatory essay) "The question remains:.."

  4. How to Write an Argumentative Essay

    Example: Two-sided argumentative essay prompt Has the rise of the internet had a net positive or negative impact on education? Support your argument with evidence. The prompt may also be more open-ended in terms of the possible arguments you could make. Example: Open argumentative essay prompt

  5. 80+ Interesting Hook Examples

    Argumentative Essay Hook Examples Persuasive Essay Hook Examples Narrative Essay Hook Examples Subject-wise Hook Examples What is an Essay Hook? An essay hook is the opening sentence or a few sentences in an essay that grab the reader's attention and engage them from the very beginning.

  6. Write Great Hooks for Argumentative Essays [EXAMPLES]

    Quotation Hook Statistic Hook Anecdotal Hook Declaration Hook Descriptive Hook Creating an impactful hook requires choosing the right type for your argumentative essay. Each kind of hook serves a different purpose and can help establish the tone, voice, and direction of your essay.

  7. What is an Argumentative Essay? How to Write It (With Examples)

    An argumentative essay presents a specific claim or argument and supports it with evidence and reasoning. Here's an outline for an argumentative essay, along with examples for each section: 3. 1. Introduction: Hook: Start with a compelling statement, question, or anecdote to grab the reader's attention.

  8. Types of Hook & 20+ Hook Examples to Kick-Start Your Essay

    What is an Essay Hook? 2. Examples of Different Types of Hook 3. Hook Examples for Types of Essays 4. How to Choose a Good Hook? 5. How to Write a Good Essay Hook? What is an Essay Hook? An essay hook, often found at the beginning of an essay introduction, serves as an opening sentence that immediately grabs the reader's attention.

  9. 3 Strong Argumentative Essay Examples, Analyzed

    Argumentative Essay Example 1 As online learning becomes more common and more and more resources are converted to digital form, some people have suggested that public libraries should be shut down and, in their place, everyone should be given an iPad with an e-reader subscription.

  10. How to Write a Hook for an Essay

    Writing a hook for an argumentative essay "What is a hook in an essay?" This is something students usually first learn about when they are writing essays for high school classes, though sometimes students make it to college without a clear understanding of what a hook is and how to build one.

  11. How to Write a Hook for An Argumentative Essay in 5 Minutes

    by Antony W October 24, 2022 In this guide, you'll learn how to write a hook for an argumentative essay without trying so hard. At Help for Assessment, we understand that introducing an argument isn't as easy. You might find yourself writing and rewriting the introduction more than you can count.

  12. How to Write a Hook for an Essay: Guide, Tips, and Examples

    9 min read Share the article What is a Hook for an Essay: Importance and Purpose Which section of your essay can make your readers dip their toes into your writing? Is it the body paragraphs where all the analysis is laid out? Or maybe the introduction, where you present your thesis statement and voice your perspective on the subject?

  13. 20 Compelling Hook Examples for Essays

    Reading & Writing Types of Writing Essays 20 Compelling Hook Examples for Essays By Mary Gormandy White, M.A. , Staff Writer Updated May 12, 2021 Image Credits The key to writing a great hook begins with brainstorming a compelling opening statement or question that will capture the attention and interest of readers.

  14. How To Write A Great Essay Hook (With Examples)

    And which one should you use to effectively introduce your writing? Below, we've listed some of the most common types of essay hooks to help you narrow down your search. Question hook If you start your essay with a thought-provoking question, you have a great chance of engaging your readers from the get-go.

  15. Good Hooks for Essays: 14 Hook Ideas with Examples

    You'll find hook examples for an argumentative essay, personal story, history essay, and other types of papers. For 100% clarity, we provided examples using each hook tactic. And a short part about how to write a good hook. Overview We highly recommend reading all the methods and examples, so you don't have any questions:

  16. How to write a good hook for an argumentative essay

    A hook in an argumentative essay is a statement or phrase that entices readers and encourages them to keep reading. It serves as an introduction to the essay's topic, giving the reader a general idea of what the essay will be about. The goal of a hook is to grab the reader's attention and make them interested in the story you are telling.

  17. Argumentative Essay Examples to Inspire You [+Formula]

    Argumentative essay formula & example. In the image below, you can see a recommended structure for argumentative essays. It starts with the topic sentence, which establishes the main idea of the essay. Next, this hypothesis is developed in the development stage. Then, the rebuttal, or the refutal of the main counter argument or arguments.

  18. Argumentative Essay Examples & Analysis

    Argumentative Essay Examples (Continued) Why this introduction works: This introduction hooks the reader by tying a topical debate about social media to the essay's main subject—the problem of the internet itself. The introduction makes it clear what the essay is going to be about; the sentence, "But the problem of technology ...

  19. How to Write a Hook

    An excellent hook is a perfect method to start an argumentative or a persuasive essay. But don't forget that apart from the hook itself, the rest of the paper should be captivating. ... Example: It is a great hook for an essay. Stories are always compelling, but stories about famous people are on top. Do the research, read their biographies ...

  20. How to Write a Powerful Hook for an Argumentative Essay

    These examples make the reader pause and think about the topic at hand, creating a strong initial impression and setting the stage for the arguments that will be presented in the essay. Types of Hooks for Argumentative Essays 1. The Classic Hook. The classic hook is a tried and true method of hooking the reader's attention.

  21. Hook Examples Generator for Essays and Presentations

    Example: On the one hand, genetic engineering helps us to fight diseases and gene defects, but on the other hand, people find it unethical and unnatural. Another option is to use a definition as a hook, which can be straightforward yet effective. Example: Success is often used to describe achieving a desired outcome.

  22. How to Write an AP Lang Synthesis Essay: Tips & Steps

    Here's an outline of each section and several AP Lang argument essay examples: Introduction. Hook: Start with an attention-grabbing statement or question related to the topic. Example: "In today's interconnected world, where information is readily available at our fingertips, the debate over the impact of social media on society has ...

  23. 200+ Hook Examples to Grab Your Reader's Attention

    1. Question Hook Examples 2. Statistic Hook Examples 3. Metaphor / Simile Hook Examples 4. Anecdote Hook Examples 5. Quote Hook Examples 6. Story Hook Examples 7. Hook Examples For Essay 8. Hook Examples For Speech 9. Hook Examples For Expository Essays 10.

  24. Writing Captivating Hooks For Essays

    Best 10 Persuasive Essay Examples for Students; 170+ Compelling Essay Hook Examples that Grab Readers' Attention; Argumentative vs Persuasive Essays: Differences & Examples; Different Types of Essay Hooks . When you start your essay, grabbing readers' attention is crucial. You need a great hook to keep them engaged from the get-go.

  25. 55 Best Argumentative Essay Hook Examples Categorized by Type

    An argumentative essay is a type of writing that presents arguments on a particular topic or issue. The goal of this essay is to convince the reader to adopt a particular perspective, take a ...

  26. Steps to Writing an Essay: The Complete Guide

    A well-reflected essay is a sign of your commitment to quality research. 8. Seeking feedback: In the essay writing steps, try to ask for feedback in the form of your peers, friends, and teachers ...