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Berkeley Berkeley Academic Guide: Academic Guide 2023-24

Entry level writing requirement.

All students who will enter the University of California as freshmen must demonstrate their command of the English language by satisfying the Entry Level Writing Requirement (ELWR).

The UC Entry Level Writing Requirement website provides information on how to satisfy the requirement by one of three options:

Standardized Exam option

See the link above for acceptable minimum scores on standardized exams.

Berkeley Writing Assessment (BWA) option {formerly known as the Analytical Writing Placement Exam (AWPE)}

High school students planning to attend a UC campus may take the Berkeley Writing Assessment  in May of their senior year. 

Admitted students who have not yet satisfied the requirement may take a make-up BWA their first semester at Berkeley .

English Composition Course option

Admitted student s may opt to complete a course articulated to the ENGLISH R1A course, as published in ASSIST , provided the course is completed by the start of the term of admission to Berkeley. A grade of C or higher will satisfy both Entry Level Writing and Part A of the Reading and Composition requirement.

Once an Admitted student begins courses at Berkeley, and the requirement has not otherwise been met, students must complete COLWRIT R1A. A grade of C or higher is will satisfy both Entry Level Writing and Part A of the Reading and Composition requirement.

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UC Berkeley Requirements for Admission

Choose your test.

What are UC Berkeley's admission requirements? While there are a lot of pieces that go into a college application, you should focus on only a few critical things:

  • GPA requirements
  • Testing requirements, including SAT and ACT requirements
  • Application requirements

In this guide we'll cover what you need to get into UC Berkeley and build a strong application.

School location: Berkeley, CA

This school is also known as: University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, UC Berkeley

Admissions Rate: 11.4%

If you want to get in, the first thing to look at is the acceptance rate. This tells you how competitive the school is and how serious their requirements are.

The acceptance rate at UC Berkeley is 11.4% . For every 100 applicants, only 11 are admitted.

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This means the school is extremely selective . Meeting their GPA requirements and SAT/ACT requirements is very important to getting past their first round of filters and proving your academic preparation. If you don't meet their expectations, your chance of getting in is nearly zero.

After crossing this hurdle, you'll need to impress UC Berkeley application readers through their other application requirements, including extracurriculars, essays, and letters of recommendation. We'll cover more below.

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UC Berkeley GPA Requirements

Many schools specify a minimum GPA requirement, but this is often just the bare minimum to submit an application without immediately getting rejected.

The GPA requirement that really matters is the GPA you need for a real chance of getting in. For this, we look at the school's average GPA for its current students.

Average GPA: 3.9

The average GPA at UC Berkeley is 3.9 .

(Most schools use a weighted GPA out of 4.0, though some report an unweighted GPA.

With a GPA of 3.9, UC Berkeley requires you to be at the top of your class . You'll need nearly straight A's in all your classes to compete with other applicants. Furthermore, you should be taking hard classes - AP or IB courses - to show that college-level academics is a breeze.

If you're currently a junior or senior, your GPA is hard to change in time for college applications. If your GPA is at or below the school average of 3.9, you'll need a higher SAT or ACT score to compensate . This will help you compete effectively against other applicants who have higher GPAs than you.

SAT and ACT Requirements

Each school has different requirements for standardized testing. Only a few schools require the SAT or ACT, but many consider your scores if you choose to submit them.

UC Berkeley hasn't explicitly named a policy on SAT/ACT requirements, but because it's published average SAT or ACT scores (we'll cover this next), it's likely test flexible. Typically, these schools say, "if you feel your SAT or ACT score represents you well as a student, submit them. Otherwise, don't."

Despite this policy, the truth is that most students still take the SAT or ACT, and most applicants to UC Berkeley will submit their scores. If you don't submit scores, you'll have one fewer dimension to show that you're worthy of being admitted, compared to other students. We therefore recommend that you consider taking the SAT or ACT, and doing well.

UC Berkeley SAT Requirements

Many schools say they have no SAT score cutoff, but the truth is that there is a hidden SAT requirement. This is based on the school's average score.

Average SAT: 1415

The average SAT score composite at UC Berkeley is a 1415 on the 1600 SAT scale.

This score makes UC Berkeley Strongly Competitive for SAT test scores.

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UC Berkeley SAT Score Analysis (New 1600 SAT)

The 25th percentile SAT score is 1300, and the 75th percentile SAT score is 1530. In other words, a 1300 on the SAT places you below average, while a 1530 will move you up to above average .

Here's the breakdown of SAT scores by section:

SAT Score Choice Policy

The Score Choice policy at your school is an important part of your testing strategy.

UC Berkeley has the Score Choice policy of "All Scores."

This means that UC Berkeley requires you to send all SAT scores you've ever taken to their office.

This sounds daunting, but most schools don't actually consider all your scores equally. For example, if you scored an 1300 on one test and a 1500 on another, they won't actually average the two tests.

More commonly, the school will take your highest score on a single test date. Even better, some schools form a Superscore - that is, they take your highest section score across all your test dates and combine them.

Some students are still worried about submitting too many test scores. They're afraid that UC Berkeley will look down on too many attempts to raise your score. But how many is too many?

From our research and talking to admissions officers, we've learned that 4-6 tests is a safe number to submit . The college understands that you want to have the best chance of admission, and retaking the test is a good way to do this. Within a reasonable number of tests, they honestly don't care how many times you've taken it. They'll just focus on your score.

If you take it more than 6 times, colleges start wondering why you're not improving with each test. They'll question your study skills and ability to improve.

But below 6 tests, we strongly encourage retaking the test to maximize your chances. If your SAT score is currently below a 1530, we strongly recommend that you consider prepping for the SAT and retaking it . You don't have much to lose, and you can potentially raise your score and significantly boost your chances of getting in.

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Download our free guide on the top 5 strategies you must be using to improve your score. This guide was written by Harvard graduates and SAT perfect scorers. If you apply the strategies in this guide, you'll study smarter and make huge score improvements.

Get eBook: 5 Tips for 160+ Points

UC Berkeley ACT Requirements

Just like for the SAT, UC Berkeley likely doesn't have a hard ACT cutoff, but if you score too low, your application will get tossed in the trash.

Average ACT: 31

The average ACT score at UC Berkeley is 31. This score makes UC Berkeley Strongly Competitive for ACT scores.

The 25th percentile ACT score is 28, and the 75th percentile ACT score is 34.

Even though UC Berkeley likely says they have no minimum ACT requirement, if you apply with a 28 or below, you'll have a very hard time getting in, unless you have something else very impressive in your application. There are so many applicants scoring 31 and above that a 28 will look academically weak.

ACT Score Sending Policy

If you're taking the ACT as opposed to the SAT, you have a huge advantage in how you send scores, and this dramatically affects your testing strategy.

Here it is: when you send ACT scores to colleges, you have absolute control over which tests you send. You could take 10 tests, and only send your highest one. This is unlike the SAT, where many schools require you to send all your tests ever taken.

This means that you have more chances than you think to improve your ACT score. To try to aim for the school's ACT requirement of 34 and above, you should try to take the ACT as many times as you can. When you have the final score that you're happy with, you can then send only that score to all your schools.

ACT Superscore Policy

By and large, most colleges do not superscore the ACT. (Superscore means that the school takes your best section scores from all the test dates you submit, and then combines them into the best possible composite score). Thus, most schools will just take your highest ACT score from a single sitting.

We weren't able to find the school's exact ACT policy, which most likely means that it does not Superscore. Regardless, you can choose your single best ACT score to send in to UC Berkeley, so you should prep until you reach our recommended target ACT score of 34.

image description

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Free eBook: 5 Tips to 4+ Points on the ACT

SAT/ACT Writing Section Requirements

Currently, only the ACT has an optional essay section that all students can take. The SAT used to also have an optional Essay section, but since June 2021, this has been discontinued unless you are taking the test as part of school-day testing in a few states. Because of this, no school requires the SAT Essay or ACT Writing section, but some schools do recommend certain students submit their results if they have them.

UC Berkeley considers the SAT Essay/ACT Writing section optional and may not include it as part of their admissions consideration. You don't need to worry too much about Writing for this school, but other schools you're applying to may require it.

Final Admissions Verdict

Because this school is extremely selective, getting a high SAT/ACT score and GPA is vital to having a chance at getting in . If you don't pass their SAT/ACT and GPA requirements, they'll likely reject you without much consideration.

To have the best shot of getting in, you should aim for the 75th percentile, with a 1530 SAT or a 34 ACT . You should also have a 3.9 GPA or higher. If your GPA is lower than this, you need to compensate with a higher SAT/ACT score.

For a school as selective as UC Berkeley, you'll also need to impress them with the rest of your application. We'll cover those details next.

But if you apply with a score below a 1530 SAT or a 34 ACT, you unfortunately start out with the odds against you and have a tiny chance of getting in. There are just too many students with high SAT/ACT scores and strong applications, and you need to compete against them.

Admissions Calculator

Here's our custom admissions calculator. Plug in your numbers to see what your chances of getting in are. Pick your test: SAT ACT

  • 80-100%: Safety school: Strong chance of getting in
  • 50-80%: More likely than not getting in
  • 20-50%: Lower but still good chance of getting in
  • 5-20%: Reach school: Unlikely to get in, but still have a shot
  • 0-5%: Hard reach school: Very difficult to get in

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Take your current SAT score and add 160 points (or take your ACT score and add 4 points) to the calculator above. See how much your chances improve?

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Application Requirements

Every school requires an application with the bare essentials - high school transcript and GPA, application form, and other core information. Many schools, as explained above, also require SAT and ACT scores, as well as letters of recommendation, application essays, and interviews. We'll cover the exact requirements of UC Berkeley here.

Application Requirements Overview

  • Common Application Not accepted
  • Electronic Application None
  • Essay or Personal Statement Required for all freshmen
  • Letters of Recommendation
  • Interview Not required
  • Application Fee $70
  • Fee Waiver Available? Available
  • Other Notes

Testing Requirements

  • SAT or ACT Not used if submitted
  • SAT Essay or ACT Writing Optional
  • SAT Subject Tests Optional
  • Scores Due in Office None

Coursework Requirements

  • Subject Required Years
  • Foreign Language 2
  • Social Studies
  • Electives 1

Deadlines and Early Admissions

  • Offered? Deadline Notification
  • Yes November 30 March 31

Admissions Office Information

  • Address: 110 Berkeley, CA 94720
  • Phone: (510) 642-6000 x6000
  • Fax: (510) 642-7333

Our Expert's Notes

We did more detailed research into this school's admissions process and found the following information:

You will submit a University of California application, which opens in August but can only be submitted during the month of November. The application consists of the online form, including your personal statement, and sending your ACT/SAT scores. Berkeley (and the other UC schools) have an interesting poilcy about letters of recommendation, transcripts and portfolios:

"As part of the UC application process, UC Berkeley and other UC campuses do not ask applicants for transcripts, portfolios, letters of recommendation, or other supporting documents. Applicants are expected to self-report their grades from their own transcripts, honestly and accurately. If a student is admitted and enrolled, the official transcripts are checked against what the student reported in the application. Any discrepancies can result in cancellation of enrollment.

When it comes to other supporting materials - such as art portfolios, letters of recommendations, resumes, etc. - UC Berkeley does not consider these during the application review. We expect the reported grades, test scores, extracurricular activities, personal statements, and additional comments to give us the full picture of a student's experience and aspirations. This is why it is so important to answer each section of the application thoughtfully and thoroughly.

Sometimes, during the application reading process, we do select a very small number of applicants to answer supplemental questionnaires. These questionnaires are designed to add clarity to information or answer questions that may arise during our application reading. Being selected - or not selected - for these questionnaires does not reflect a student's admissions status. The questionnaires are optional, but they do allow for Letters of Recommendation to be sent on the student's behalf. This is the only time we ask for Letters of Recommendation. Applicants are not able to request to be sent a questionnaire."

Other Schools For You

If you're interested in UC Berkeley, you'll probably be interested in these schools as well. We've divided them into 3 categories depending on how hard they are to get into, relative to UC Berkeley.

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Reach Schools: Harder to Get Into

These schools are have higher average SAT scores than UC Berkeley. If you improve your SAT score, you'll be competitive for these schools.

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Same Level: Equally Hard to Get Into

If you're competitive for UC Berkeley, these schools will offer you a similar chance of admission.

image description

Safety Schools: Easier to Get Into

If you're currently competitive for UC Berkeley, you should have no problem getting into these schools. If UC Berkeley is currently out of your reach, you might already be competitive for these schools.

Data on this page is sourced from Peterson's Databases © 2023 (Peterson's LLC. All rights reserved.) as well as additional publicly available sources.

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Berkeley Writing Assessment: General Questions

Berkeley writing assessment.

The Entry Level Writing Requirement (ELWR) is a reading and writing proficiency requirement. It is a prerequisite to the Reading and Composition (R&C) requirement. R&C is a two-part (A & B) college-level reading and writing requirement assigned to all Berkeley undergraduates. Check the Berkeley Guide to review ...

  • Read more about Berkeley Writing Assessment

How do I know which test scores satisfy ELWR?

A list of accepted tests and scores is found on the University of California Entry Level Writing Requirement page.

  • Read more about How do I know which test scores satisfy ELWR?

I took the BWA. How long will it be until I get my score?

It generally takes around 3 weeks for your essay to be scored and for the score to be submitted before it appears in your records. You can find your BWA scores on your Cal Central dashboard under the "My Academics" tab.

  • Read more about I took the BWA. How long will it be until I get my score?

I have a conflict with the most recent Assesment. Are there any make-up times?

Yes, the Berkeley Writing Assessment will be offered two times each year: the May administration (primarily for incoming students) and once during the fall semester. Note that you may take the Assessment only once . If you do not receive a qualifying score the first time you take the Assessment, and you have no other qualifying scores or acceptable transfer course completed prior to stating Berkeley, you should enroll in COLWRIT R1A

  • Read more about I have a conflict with the most recent Assesment. Are there any make-up times?

Do I need to take the Assessment in order to enroll in COLWRIT R1A?

No, you may enroll directly in COLWRIT R1A without an assessment score. Many students appreciate taking the course as a way to improve their reading and writing skills in a small class environment (College Writing classes have only 14 students per section). The class is designed to set you up for success with your future writing assignments at Berkeley.

  • Read more about Do I need to take the Assessment in order to enroll in COLWRIT R1A?

Can the fee for the Berkeley Writing Assessment be waived?

Fee waivers for the Berkeley Writing Assessment are only granted to students who qualified for the UC Application fee waiver. The Berkeley Writing Assessment fee waiver will be automatically processed if you have already qualified for the UC Application fee waiver.

  • Read more about Can the fee for the Berkeley Writing Assessment be waived?

How much does the Berkeley Writing Assessment cost?

There is a $196 fee for taking this assessment which is charged after you finish the assessment to your dashboard. You can view the charge in the Cal Central dashboard under the "My Finances" tab. Fee waivers for the Berkeley Writing Assessment are only granted to students who have qualified for the UC Application fee waiver. The Berkeley Writing Assessment fee waiver will be automatically processed if you already qualified for the UC Application fee waiver.

  • Read more about How much does the Berkeley Writing Assessment cost?

How do I pass the Assessment?

This is not an exam in the traditional sense. The Assessment doesn't have passing or failing grades. Instead, it will tell you which composition class is best for you given your skills and experience. If you receive a combined final score of 8 or higher, you will be recommended to take a 4-unit Reading and Composition Part A course in the department of your choice, including College Writing Programs. If your score is lower than 8, you will take College Writing (COLWRIT) R1A , a 6-unit ...

  • Read more about How do I pass the Assessment?

How do I sign up for the Assessment?

If you are a newly admitted first-year student who has accepted the offer to attend Berkeley, you will be assigned a Task in your CalCentral Dashboard to complete an Entry Level Writing Evaluation form. If you are a continuing Berkeley student, there is a registration link on this page.

You may take the Berkeley Writing Assessment only once.

  • Read more about How do I sign up for the Assessment?

How is the Assessment scored?

Each student essay will be read by two raters, working independently, to assign it a score from 1-6. The two scores are combined for the final score.

  • Read more about How is the Assessment scored?
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Essays help us learn about who you are as a person and how you will add to our community. We seek candidates from a broad range of industries, backgrounds, cultures, and lived experiences.

Our distinctive culture is defined by four key principles - Question the Status Quo, Confidence Without Attitude, Students Always, and Beyond Yourself. We encourage you to reflect on your experiences, values, and passions so that you may craft thoughtful and authentic responses that demonstrate your alignment with our principles. 

Below are the required essays, supplemental essays, and optional essays for the Fall 2023-2024 application cycle. 

Required Essay #1

What makes you feel alive when you are doing it, and why? (300 words maximum)

Required Essay #2

How will an MBA help you achieve your short-term and long-term career goals? (300 words max)

Required Essay #3 - Video

Required Essay #4 - Short Answer

Optional Essays

The admissions team takes a holistic approach to application review and seeks to understand all aspects of a candidate’s character, qualifications, and experiences. We will consider achievements in the context of the opportunities available to a candidate. Some applicants may have faced hardships or unusual life circumstances, and we will consider the maturity, perseverance, and thoughtfulness with which they have responded to and/or overcome them.

Optional Information #1

We invite you to help us better understand the context of your opportunities and achievements.

Optional Information #2 

Supplemental Information

  • If you have not provided a letter of recommendation from your current supervisor, please explain. If not applicable, enter N/A.
  • Name of organization or activity
  • Nature of organization or activity
  • Size of organization
  • Dates of involvement
  • Offices held
  • Average number of hours spent per month
  • List full-time and part-time jobs held during undergraduate or graduate studies indicating the employer, job title, employment dates, location, and the number of hours worked per week for each position held prior to the completion of your degree.
  • If you have ever been subject to academic discipline, placed on probation, suspended, or required to withdraw from any college or university, please explain. If not, please enter N/A. (An affirmative response to this question does not automatically disqualify you from admission.)

Video: Extracurricular Supplement Tips

Senior Associate Director of Full-time Admissions, Cindy Jennings Millette, shares how we look at, and evaluate, extracurricular and community involvement.

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University of California, Berkeley | UC Berkeley

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Want to see your chances of admission at University of California, Berkeley | UC Berkeley?

We take every aspect of your personal profile into consideration when calculating your admissions chances.

University of California, Berkeley | UC Berkeley’s 2023-24 Essay Prompts

Select-a-prompt short responses.

Please respond to any 4 of the 8 questions below.We realize that not all questions apply to all applicants, so be sure to select the 4 questions that you believe give us the best information about you.All 8 questions are given equal consideration in the application review process. Responses to each question should be between 250-350 words.

Describe an example of your leadership experience in which you have positively influenced others, helped resolve disputes or contributed to group efforts over time.

Every person has a creative side, and it can be expressed in many ways: problem solving, original and innovative thinking, and artistically, to name a few. Describe how you express your creative side.

What would you say is your greatest talent or skill? How have you developed and demonstrated that talent over time?

Describe how you have taken advantage of a significant educational opportunity or worked to overcome an educational barrier you have faced.

Describe the most significant challenge you have faced and the steps you have taken to overcome this challenge. How has this challenge affected your academic achievement?

Think about an academic subject that inspires you. Describe how you have furthered this interest inside and/or outside of the classroom.

What have you done to make your school or your community a better place?

Beyond what has already been shared in your application, what do you believe makes you stand out as a strong candidate for admissions to the University of California?

What will first-time readers think of your college essay?

Freshman Admissions

How to apply.

Thank you for considering the M.E.T. program for your next big academic and entrepreneurial step. You may want to begin by watching our informative Freshman Admissions webinar below.

Once you’re ready to apply:

  • Begin with a visit to admissions.berkeley.edu to become familiar with admission requirements and the selection process. From there, you can launch your UC application .
  • Then, visit the admissions pages of the College of Engineering and the Haas School of Business to learn what we’re looking for in applicants. Think about how your achievements and personal qualities position you for success in the M.E.T. program.
  • Read about the additional M.E.T.-specific admissions requirements below.

Watch Our Freshman Admissions Webinar

Note: As of Monday, October 30, 2023 video essays will be mandatory if given the opportunity to submit a video.

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Additional M.E.T. Admissions Requirements

Select an Academic Track

Freshman applicants can earn simultaneous B.S. degrees in one of the following tracks:

  • Engineering Undeclared + Business
  • Aerospace Engineering + Business
  • Bioengineering + Business
  • Civil Engineering + Business
  • Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences   + Business
  • Industrial Engineering & Operations Research + Business
  • Materials Science & Engineering + Business
  • Mechanical Engineering + Business

You must choose one of the eight M.E.T. engineering tracks under the College of Engineering or Berkeley-Haas. It doesn’t matter which college you select M.E.T. major offerings through – your selection will be captured.

Supplemental Essay

Once you submit your application, you’ll receive an additional email from UC Berkeley’s Office of Undergraduate Admissions asking you to write and submit a supplemental essay about your interest in M.E.T. Expect to receive this email 5-7 business days after submitting your UC application. From there, you’ll have until 11:59pm PST on December 15  to submit your supplemental essay. Failure to submit your essay by the deadline will remove you from consideration to the M.E.T. Program.

Applications for admission to M.E.T. are available beginning in October of the year prior to the year in which you’d enter UC Berkeley. The application filing period is October 1- November 30, and all applications must be submitted by November 30.

Video Essay

In some cases, additional information is needed, and you may receive a request to record a video essay. Video essay requests are by invitation only and will be requested starting in November. Videos must be submitted by 11:59 pm PST on January 12, 2024. It’s your responsibility to check your email inbox for information and if requested, be sure to submit your video essay by the deadline. Applicants who are selected for the M.E.T. program will be notified during February or March of the following year.

Student Voices

berkeley essay requirements

There are so many challenges within the esports industry that are either tech or business related. You need technology advancements to push the boundaries of where esports can go, but you also need to find new marketing opportunities, like expanding into new demographics. The M.E.T. dual degree trained me for both.

Lawrence Z.

Former Finance & Operations Intern

Immortals, LLC

EECS + Business ’21

photo of Louie

M.E.T. is a group of extremely hard-working and ambitious people, combined with an extraordinary entrepreneurial network. I want to create or join a startup, and one of the things that was really attractive about the program was that I could meet and learn from all these amazing entrepreneurs who have done exactly what I want to do.

Former Intern

Area 1 Security

photo of Michelle

We are a very cooperative and welcoming group. When you walk into the M.E.T. office, there are usually people working on projects together, and you can always ask someone to read over your essay or help you debug some code. Everyone is willing to help.

Michelle L.

Technology Investment Banking Analyst

Morgan Stanley

IEOR + Business ’21

Freshman requirements

  • Subject requirement (A-G)
  • GPA requirement
  • Admission by exception
  • English language proficiency
  • UC graduation requirements

Additional information for

  • California residents
  • Out-of-state students
  • Home-schooled students

Transfer requirements

  • Understanding UC transfer
  • Preparing to transfer
  • UC transfer programs
  • Transfer planning tools

International applicants

  • Applying for admission
  • English language proficiency (TOEFL/IELTS)
  • Passports & visas
  • Living accommodations
  • Health care & insurance

AP & Exam credits

Applying as a freshman

  • Filling out the application
  • Dates & deadlines

Personal insight questions

  • How applications are reviewed
  • After you apply

Applying as a transfer

Types of aid

  • Grants & scholarships
  • Jobs & work-study
  • California DREAM Loan Program
  • Middle Class Scholarship Program
  • Blue and Gold Opportunity Plan
  • Native American Opportunity Plan  
  • Who can get financial aid
  • How aid works
  • Estimate your aid

Apply for financial aid

  • Cal Dream Act application tips
  • Tuition & cost of attendance
  • Glossary & resources
  • Santa Barbara
  • Campus program & support services
  • Check majors
  • Freshman admit data
  • Transfer admit data
  • Native American Opportunity Plan
  • You will have 8 questions to choose from. You must respond to only 4 of the 8 questions.
  • Each response is limited to a maximum of 350 words.
  • Which questions you choose to answer is entirely up to you. However, you should select questions that are most relevant to your experience and that best reflect your individual circumstances.

Keep in mind

  • All questions are equal. All are given equal consideration in the application review process, which means there is no advantage or disadvantage to choosing certain questions over others.
  • There is no right or wrong way to answer these questions. It’s about getting to know your personality, background, interests and achievements in your own unique voice.  
  • Use the additional comments field if there are issues you'd like to address that you didn't have the opportunity to discuss elsewhere on the application. This shouldn't be an essay, but rather a place to note unusual circumstances or anything that might be unclear in other parts of the application. You may use the additional comments field to note extraordinary circumstances related to COVID-19, if necessary. 

Questions & guidance

Remember, the personal insight questions are just that—personal. Which means you should use our guidance for each question just as a suggestion in case you need help. The important thing is expressing who you are, what matters to you and what you want to share with UC. 

1. Describe an example of your leadership experience in which you have positively influenced others, helped resolve disputes or contributed to group efforts over time. Things to consider: A leadership role can mean more than just a title. It can mean being a mentor to others, acting as the person in charge of a specific task, or taking the lead role in organizing an event or project. Think about what you accomplished and what you learned from the experience. What were your responsibilities?

Did you lead a team? How did your experience change your perspective on leading others? Did you help to resolve an important dispute at your school, church, in your community or an organization? And your leadership role doesn't necessarily have to be limited to school activities. For example, do you help out or take care of your family? 2. Every person has a creative side, and it can be expressed in many ways: problem solving, original and innovative thinking, and artistically, to name a few. Describe how you express your creative side. Things to consider: What does creativity mean to you? Do you have a creative skill that is important to you? What have you been able to do with that skill? If you used creativity to solve a problem, what was your solution? What are the steps you took to solve the problem?

How does your creativity influence your decisions inside or outside the classroom? Does your creativity relate to your major or a future career? 3. What would you say is your greatest talent or skill? How have you developed and demonstrated that talent over time? Things to consider: If there is a talent or skill that you're proud of, this is the time to share it.You don't necessarily have to be recognized or have received awards for your talent (although if you did and you want to talk about it, feel free to do so). Why is this talent or skill meaningful to you?

Does the talent come naturally or have you worked hard to develop this skill or talent? Does your talent or skill allow you opportunities in or outside the classroom? If so, what are they and how do they fit into your schedule? 4. Describe how you have taken advantage of a significant educational opportunity or worked to overcome an educational barrier you have faced. Things to consider: An educational opportunity can be anything that has added value to your educational experience and better prepared you for college. For example, participation in an honors or academic enrichment program, or enrollment in an academy that's geared toward an occupation or a major, or taking advanced courses that interest you; just to name a few.

If you choose to write about educational barriers you've faced, how did you overcome or strive to overcome them? What personal characteristics or skills did you call on to overcome this challenge? How did overcoming this barrier help shape who you are today? 5. Describe the most significant challenge you have faced and the steps you have taken to overcome this challenge. How has this challenge affected your academic achievement? Things to consider: A challenge could be personal, or something you have faced in your community or school. Why was the challenge significant to you? This is a good opportunity to talk about any obstacles you've faced and what you've learned from the experience. Did you have support from someone else or did you handle it alone?

If you're currently working your way through a challenge, what are you doing now, and does that affect different aspects of your life? For example, ask yourself, How has my life changed at home, at my school, with my friends or with my family? 6. Think about an academic subject that inspires you. Describe how you have furthered this interest inside and/or outside of the classroom. Things to consider:  Many students have a passion for one specific academic subject area, something that they just can't get enough of. If that applies to you, what have you done to further that interest? Discuss how your interest in the subject developed and describe any experience you have had inside and outside the classroom such as volunteer work, internships, employment, summer programs, participation in student organizations and/or clubs and what you have gained from your involvement.

Has your interest in the subject influenced you in choosing a major and/or future career? Have you been able to pursue coursework at a higher level in this subject (honors, AP, IB, college or university work)? Are you inspired to pursue this subject further at UC, and how might you do that?

7. What have you done to make your school or your community a better place? Things to consider: Think of community as a term that can encompass a group, team or a place like your high school, hometown or home. You can define community as you see fit, just make sure you talk about your role in that community. Was there a problem that you wanted to fix in your community?

Why were you inspired to act? What did you learn from your effort? How did your actions benefit others, the wider community or both? Did you work alone or with others to initiate change in your community? 8. Beyond what has already been shared in your application, what do you believe makes you a strong candidate for admissions to the University of California? Things to consider:  If there's anything you want us to know about you but didn't find a question or place in the application to tell us, now's your chance. What have you not shared with us that will highlight a skill, talent, challenge or opportunity that you think will help us know you better?

From your point of view, what do you feel makes you an excellent choice for UC? Don't be afraid to brag a little.

Writing tips

Start early..

Give yourself plenty of time for preparation, careful composition and revisions.

Write persuasively.

Making a list of accomplishments, activities, awards or work will lessen the impact of your words. Expand on a topic by using specific, concrete examples to support the points you want to make.

Use “I” statements.

Talk about yourself so that we can get to know your personality, talents, accomplishments and potential for success on a UC campus. Use “I” and “my” statements in your responses.

Proofread and edit.

Although you will not be evaluated on grammar, spelling or sentence structure, you should proofread your work and make sure your writing is clear. Grammatical and spelling errors can be distracting to the reader and get in the way of what you’re trying to communicate.

Solicit feedback.

Your answers should reflect your own ideas and be written by you alone, but others — family, teachers and friends can offer valuable suggestions. Ask advice of whomever you like, but do not plagiarize from sources in print or online and do not use anyone's words, published or unpublished, but your own.

Copy and paste.

Once you are satisfied with your answers, save them in plain text (ASCII) and paste them into the space provided in the application. Proofread once more to make sure no odd characters or line breaks have appeared.

This is one of many pieces of information we consider in reviewing your application. Your responses can only add value to the application. An admission decision will not be based on this section alone.

Need more help?

Download our worksheets:

  • English [PDF]
  • Spanish [PDF]

Student looking at architecture drafts on a pinboard

Admissions Requirements

Application requirements.

Congratulations on taking the next step towards submitting your graduate application! To help you along the way, we’ve compiled a list of requirements to complete your graduate application.

It’s also important to check with the program to which you’re applying, as they may have additional requirements specific to their program of study and degree not listed on this page.

Minimum Admissions Requirements

The minimum graduate admissions requirements are:

  • Expect to or hold a bachelor’s degree or recognized equivalent from an accredited institution.
  • A satisfactory scholastic average, usually a minimum grade-point average (GPA) of 3.0 (B) on a 4.0 scale; and
  • Enough undergraduate training and/or professional experience to do graduate work in your chosen field.

Academic Records

You must hold or expect to hold a bachelor’s degree prior to the start of classes from a U.S.accredited institution by one of the AACRAO regional accrediting agencies* or a recognized equivalent from an accredited institution outside of the U.S.

* Regionally accredited college or university means an institution of higher education accredited by one of the following regional accreditation associations in the United States:

  • Middle States Commission on Higher Education
  • New England Association of Schools and Colleges
  • The Higher Learning Commission (formerly known as North Central Association of Colleges and Schools)
  • Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities
  • Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges
  • WASC Senior College and University Commission

Graduates of accredited academic institutions outside the United States should hold a degree equivalent to a U.S. bachelor’s degree. Please contact Graduate Admissions with questions.

Bachelor’s Degree from a U.S. Institution

Required Records : Upload unofficial transcripts (ie, a scanned copy) from every post-secondary school that you have attended, including your undergraduate institution, community colleges, summer sessions, and extension programs.

Bachelor’s Degree from an International Institution

Required Records : Upload a scanned copy of your transcript and degree certificate for each institution after high school. If your academic records are in a language other than English or Spanish, you may submit translations in one of two ways:

  • Submit translations prepared by certified translators from the American Translators Association or the Ministry of Education. Degree names and grades should be transcribed, not converted, into English words or the U.S. grades of A-F. 
  • Submit an official World Education Services (WES) International Credential Advantage Package (ICAP) evaluation (opens in a new tab) . To electronically submit your WES ICAP, follow the instructions provided by WES. Select “University of California at Berkeley” as the recipient and “Graduate Admissions” 318 Sproul Hall #5900, Berkeley, CA 94720-5900 as the school/division.

Evidence of English Language Proficiency

All applicants who have completed a basic degree in a country/region in which the official language is not English are required to submit official evidence of English language proficiency. This requirement applies to institutions from Bangladesh, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Latin America, the Middle East, Israel, the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asian countries, most European countries, and countries in Africa in which English is not the official language.

There are two standardized tests you may take: the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), and the International English Language Testing System (IELTS).

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL)

TOEFL is administered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). You can obtain detailed information from the TOEFL website .

We accept the internet based (iBT) and iBT Home Edition. We do not accept the TOEFL ITP or Duolingo .

For purposes of admission, your TOEFL test score must be at least 90 for the Internet-based test (IBT). Please contact individual academic departments for more information, as they may choose to require a higher score.

For Fall 2024, tests taken before June 1, 2022 will not be accepted even if your score was reported to UC Berkeley. Please send your test score directly from ETS to the institution code for UC Berkeley: 4833 for Graduate Organizations. We do not accept MyBest Scores.

International English Language Testing System (IELTS)

You can also submit scores from the Academic Modules of the International English Language Testing System (IELTS), which is jointly managed by the British Council, IDP:IELTS Australia, and the University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations. Consult the IELTS website to locate the office of the test center where you plan to take the test.

For purposes of admission, your most recent overall band score must be at least 7 on a 9-point scale.

For Fall 2024, tests taken before June 1, 2022 will not be accepted. All IELTS scores must be sent electronically from the testing center, and no institution code is required. Our address for identification purposes is: University of California, Berkeley, Graduate Division, Sproul Hall Rm 318, MC 5900, Berkeley, CA 94720. Please do not mail any score reports to us.

TOEFL/IELTS Exemption

To qualify for a TOEFL/IELTS exemption, you must fulfill one of the following options:

  • Have a basic degree from a recognized institution in a country where the official language is English.
  • Have completed a basic or advanced degree at an institution, in the United States or a United States institution abroad, where the language of instruction is English and the institution is accredited by one of the United States’ regional accrediting agencies.
  • The following courses do not qualify for an exemption: courses in English as a Second Language, courses conducted in a language other than English, courses that will be completed after applicants submit their application, or courses of a nonacademic nature.

The TOEFL or IELTS must be submitted by applicants who do not meet the exemption criteria above.

Graduate Record Examination (GRE) and Other Test Scores

Some programs require applicants to take a standardized test such as the GRE General Test, a GRE Subject Test, the GMAT or MCAT. Consult the program to which you are applying for the department’s requirements.

For the GRE, send your test score directly from ETS to the institution code for UC Berkeley: 4833 for Graduate Organizations. No department code is needed unless specified by the specific program. ETS will not report test scores older than 5 years.

For the GMAT or MCAT, please consult your program for details.

Letters of Recommendation

The application requires at least three letters of recommendation. Applicants should check with their prospective program for questions . Your recommenders are asked to give their personal impressions of your intellectual ability, your aptitude in research or professional skills, your character, and the quality of your previous work and potential for future productive scholarship. Be sure to inform your recommenders of the program’s application deadline.

Applicants may waive the right to inspect their letters of recommendation on a voluntary basis. This option can be selected when you fill out the recommendation invite for your recommender.

The Graduate Division may verify the authenticity of academic letters of recommendation with the school or recommender.

Submit a Statement of Purpose and Personal History statement, along with any other essays the program you are applying to requires.

The Statement of Purpose should describe your aptitude and motivation to enter the program. This can include relevant details about your preparation or specialization in the field. This is a good place to share your academic plans, research interests, and future career goals. Read tips on how to craft your Statement of Purpose .

The Personal History statement describes how your own background and experiences influenced your decision to pursue a graduate degree. Read tips on how to write your Personal History statement .

Application Fee

If you are a U.S. citizen or current permanent resident, the non-refundable application fee is $135; for all others, the fee is $155.

Fee Waiver : U.S. citizens or permanent residents who demonstrate financial need or have participated in an eligible program may apply for an application fee waiver. See guidelines for waivers .

Fee Exemption : Some programs do not require the application fee payment. See guidelines for fee exemption .

Application Requirements

Application tips, inform yourself.

Please read all pertinent information on the program and application requirements before you start the application process. Most questions are answered in these online materials.

Start Early

Letters of recommendation are a critical part of the application. Faculty recommenders are usually busy and have requests from many students. It is imperative to ask for recommendation letters early and to clearly communicate the application deadline.

Convey all you want the committee to know about you in a compelling, concise application. We review several hundred applications, so avoid sending excess materials that are not required.

Be Specific

You must choose a primary and secondary area of emphasis of neuroscience from the dropdown menu in the online application. While your choice does not obligate you to follow any specific path once enrolled, failure to do so delays the review process.

Application Components

All applications are submitted electronically through the UC Berkeley Graduate Application portal. Below are required components of the application you must submit in order to be considered for admission into the Neuroscience PhD program. We accept applications beginning mid September through the end of Novemeber for the following year's fall start cohort. 

  • Completed online  UC Berkeley Graduate Application , including the Neuroscience Program page
  • Statement of Purpose
  • Personal Statement
  • Transcripts from each college and graduate institution attended (scanned copies)
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • GRE scores (optional)
  • Evidence of English language proficiency (TOEFL or IELTS scores) if applicable 
  • Paid Application Fee of $135 if you are a U.S. citizen or U.S. permanent resident, and $155 otherwise

Please review UC Berkeley's Graduate Admissions information and  Graduate Admissions Requirements (link is external)  for futher information and requirements for all graduate program applicants. 

Additional Information

Undergraduate preparation.

Strong undergraduate preparation for neuroscience includes at least one year of college level coursework in one of the following disciplines: biology, physics, chemistry, calculus, or engineering. Additional coursework in cognitive science, psychology, biophysics, or neurobiology is advisable. Applicants should describe their research experience in the Statement of Purpose.

A bachelor’s degree or equivalent from an accredited institution with a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale is required for admissions. In addition, the Neuroscience PhD Program requires applicants to have at least one year of laboratory research experience.

Transcripts :  Upload unofficial transcripts (ie, scanned copies) to your application. International applicants sould also upload scanned copies of their degree certificate(s). If admitted to the program, you will be required to send official documents to UC Berkeley after accepting your admission offer.

GPA :  If your GPA is on a 4.0 scale, please complete fields in the "Grade Point Averages (GPA)" section of the application: cumulative, advanced, major, intended field of study (if differnt from major), and cumulative graduate GPA (if applicable.

If your GPA is not based on a 4-point scale, please  do not convert to this scale . Instead, complete the “Other Scale GPA” field on the application  using the scale used at your institution and be sure to include documentation of their grading system (usually this is part of your transcript).

Application Essays

You will prepare and submit two essays as part of your application: the Statement of Purpose (SOP) and the Personal History Statement (PHS). Please see general information about the  Statement of Purpose (link is external)  and the  Personal Statement (link is external)  provided by the Graduate Division. Below is more specific information petaining to the Neuroscience PhD Program.

Statement of Purpose:  In the SOP, you should describe your motivation, preparation, and aptitude for PhD study in neuroscience. Please include a description of your prior research experience and accomplishments, with enough detail (for at least one project) to illustrate how you think scientifically. You should also discuss your future research interests and career goals and why you think Berkeley is a good fit for your PhD training. The SOP should be 2-3 double-spaced pages.

Personal History Statement:  In the Personal History Statement (PHS), you should describe how your personal background and experiences influenced your decision to pursue a graduate degree. The PHS should not duplicate the SOP but should provide broader context on your personal story and goals. This may include how you overcame barriers to access higher education, how you have come to understand the barriers faced by others, your service to advance equitable access to education for under-represented groups, research you may have done that focuses on underserved populations or related issues of inequality, your leadership roles in such groups, and/or your plans in graduate school and your future career to address societal issues. The PHS should be 1-3 double-spaced pages.

Resume/Curriculum Vitae

The employment history section of the online application is optional. However, you are required to upload your Resume/CV in the Supporting Materials section of the application. In addition to your work history, you may like to list any awards, fellowships, summer research opportunities, traineeships, prizes, participation in student organizations etc.

Letters of Recommendation

You are required to submit three letters of recommendation. Letters should be from individuals who have supervised work in a laboratory, research, or academic setting and can comment on intellectual ability, creativity, scientific leadership skills, and scholarly potential.  

You will be asked to submit the names and email addresses of your three recommenders as part of the online application. Doing so will inititate a request to your recommender for a letter and they will submit their letters online directly to your application using a unique link sent to them. You do not have to wait until letters of recommendation are submitted in order to submit your online application.   It is the responsibility of the applicant to ensure that recommenders submit their letters by the deadline. 

More information about Letters of Recommendation can be found on Graduate Division's  Admission FAQs page (link is external) .

Exam Scores

You will be asked to enter your test scores into the online application and to submit official test scores directly to UC Berkeley for verification. Send your test score directly from ETS to the institution code for UC Berkeley: 4833 for Graduate Organizations. 

Graduate Record Exam (GRE): GRE scores are optional. 

Evidence of English language Proficiency: All applicants who have completed a basic degree in a country/region in which the official language is not English are required to submit official evidence of English language proficiency: the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Additional information including allowable exemptions can be found on the  Graduate Admissions website.

Application Fee

The application fee must be paid in order for your application to be reviewed. The application fee is $135 if you are a U.S. citizen or U.S. permanent resident, and $155 otherwise. 

U.S. citizen and permanent residents may qualify for application fee waivers. Please visit the the  fee waiver website (link is external) (link is external)  for more information. Fee waivers are administered by UC Berkeley Graduate Admissions and not by the Neuroscience PhD Program. Please direct all fee waiver questions to  [email protected] .

You will submit the application fee through your status page after you have submitted your application. If you applied for a fee waiver, fee waiver decisions will be posted on your status page after submission of the application.  Do not submit your application late.

The application payment system requires that you enter the exact billing address information on the credit card statement (no abbreviations, extra spaces etc.) including the name, address, and security code. Please see below if your payment status is "pending" and/or your credit card is being declined:

Check with your bank to make sure that the address information you are entering is exact.

Try a different credit card.

The charges you are seeing for the payments that did not go through are authorization holds from the bank. They will disappear in a few days once the charges are declined. If they do not disappear, you will need to contact your bank to have them removed.

For general questions about graduate admissions or technical problems with the online application, contact Graduate Admissions:

[email protected]

For questions about program specific requirements and Neuroscience admissions, contact the Neuroscience PhD Program:

[email protected]

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  • Transfer Requirements

At UC Berkeley, the world’s premier public university, you can excel beyond, exchange ideas and, ultimately, change the world.

  • You are a transfer student if you have completed coursework during a regular session at a college or university after high school (the summer session immediately following high school graduation does not count).
  • While the UC gives California community college applicants priority over other transfer applicants, we also accept applications from those applying from institutions outside of the California Community College system.
  • UC Berkeley only accepts applications for the Fall term. The UC Application is available in August the year prior to the Fall term you are applying for.

The minimum requirements for Berkeley transfer admissions are listed below. It is important to note that transfer admission requirements will vary by college and major, however there are a number of requirements that are common across all colleges. These requirements must be complete by the end of the spring term prior to the fall term you are applying for:

  • Completion of general education/breadth requirement
  • Please note that every course offered at your institution is not UC-transferable
  • For non-California Community College students click here for information on how to determine what courses are UC-transferable
  • Overall minimum GPA of 3.0 in all transferable college-level coursework
  • Please note that some majors require a minimum GPA in these courses

Learn about transfer admissions information by college .

Transfer applications are reviewed using a comprehensive review process. While no one attribute or characteristic guarantees the admission of any applicant to Berkeley, transfer students can be most competitive by excelling in the academic areas.

While academic indicators are weighted more heavily than other parts of the application, other factors are considered in the Comprehensive Review process. The following are examples of qualities and attributes we consider in the Comprehensive Review process:

  • The applicant’s full record of achievement in college-level courses, including number of units, general education, and major preparation courses.
  • Personal qualities of the applicant, including leadership ability, character, motivation, insight, tenacity, initiative, originality, intellectual independence, responsibility, maturity, and demonstrated concern for others and for the community are considered.

These factors can be demonstrated in different ways whether it is traditional clubs/organizations, home life, work life, or other life experiences.

  • Likely contributions to the intellectual and cultural vitality of the campus. In addition to a broad range of intellectual interests and achievements, admissions readers seek diversity in personal background and experience.
  • Achievement in academic enrichment programs, including but not limited to those sponsored by the University of California or California Community Colleges.

Race, ethnicity, gender, and religion are excluded from the criteria.

All achievements, both academic and nonacademic, are considered in the context of the opportunities an applicant has had, and the reader’s assessment is based on how fully the applicant has taken advantage of those opportunities. For an applicant who has faced any hardships or unusual circumstances, readers consider the maturity, determination and insight with which the applicant has responded to and/or overcome them. Readers also consider other contextual factors that bear directly upon the applicant’s achievement, including linguistic background, parental education level, and other indicators of support available in the home.

The review recognizes a wide range of talent and creativity that is not necessarily reflected in traditional measures of academic achievement but which, in the judgment of the reader, is a positive indicator of the student’s ability to succeed at Berkeley and beyond.

Students who have completed UC-transferable coursework at any four-year institution at any point in time may be ineligible for admission if they exceed the unit maximum policy for admission. Please note that students with all coursework completed at a 2 year institution will never exceed the unit maximum admission policy. To determine if you have exceeded the unit maximum for admission you must first understand and apply the UC lower-division maximum transfer credit limitation policy. Once you do that you apply the Unit Maximum Admission Policy.

UC lower-division maximum transfer credit limitation policy:

Units earned through AP, IB, and /or A-Level examinations are not included in the limitation and do not put applicants at risk of being denied admission

Units earned at any UC campus (extension, summer, cross/concurrent and regular academic-year enrollment) are not included in the limitation

Unit Maximum Admissions Policy:

  • After applying the UC lower-division maximum transfer credit limitation policy, all junior/senior (upper division) and all UC units (lower division and upper division) are added to that total unit count. If the resulting unit count exceeds 80 semester units (120 quarter units), the student is ineligible for admission.

Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate exams can be used to benefit students in two ways. Exams with scores of 3 or higher on AP exams, or 5 or higher on IB higher-level exams can be used for unit credit. Units from credit-bearing exams can help students meet the unit minimum requirement, but will not be counted toward the unit maximum admission policy. Students can also use AP and IB exams for general education and/or subject credit and are encouraged to review ASSIST.org or guide.berkeley.edu for more details. For more information on how AP credits can be used, review the UC Exam Credit Matrix .

International students have the same transfer admission requirements as all other students. International English Exams (i.e. TOEFL or IELTS) are not required for admission since English proficiency is assumed when completing the Reading and Composition requirement or completing an IGETC certification. However, they can be beneficial to the student’s success if admitted to Berkeley.

Effective for the fall 2025 application cycle, Berkeley will no longer require IGETC/Cal-GETC, Essential Skills, or UC Reciprocity for eligibility for students applying to the College of Letters and Science. Students will have to complete University of California 7-course pattern to satisfy eligibility requirements for admission.

Berkeley will still require a minimum 3.0 GPA (higher than the University of California's minimum), and will continue to require a minimum of 60 semester units.

This change in policy will not impact students applying for fall 2024 admission. However, those applying for fall 2025 admission and beyond will need to consider this as they are planning their courses. ( NOTE : IGETC will continue to be used to meet the L&S essential skill and 7-course breadth requirements, which are separate from admission requirements.)

Check this page for more details about this changing policy.

More Transfer Admissions Resources

  • Transfer Information by College
  • Transfer Courses for Reading & Composition
  • Transfer Applicant Resources
  • Transfer Applicant Checklist

Colleges Rates and Requirements

Find the right college for you., core college requirements for competitive acceptance rates.

As you start thinking about which colleges to apply to and how to put together your college applications, don’t forget to familiarize yourself with current admissions requirements and acceptance trends. You may have seen recent headlines about college acceptance rates and how low they were for students who applied to the most selective colleges and universities. It’s important to remember that while admissions requirements for the most competitive schools didn’t change, the number of students applying to these types of institutions has gradually increased. As a result, acceptance rates of colleges, particularly elite universities, decreased. You should also keep in mind that due to the covid-19 pandemic, most institutions saw a spike in applications. This has caused acceptance rates to further decrease.

The headlines shouldn’t deter you from moving ahead with the application process. Although it might feel seem like there’s more competition than ever before, it’s important to remember two things: Acceptance rates vary among colleges, and most colleges accept two-thirds of applicants. Once you understand what college entrance requirements are and how to interpret college admission rates, you'll be better prepared to find the right school for you.

Understand These Key Requirements for College Applications.

Each college uses its own formula when evaluating applicants, and these practices vary from school to school. In addition, many colleges over the last few years have begun instituting "test optional" and "test flexible" policies for the SAT and ACT. Despite these factors, colleges still look for certain key requirements. You can learn more about admissions requirements for individual colleges in College Search .

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Standard Core Curriculum and Beyond

All colleges emphasize GPA requirements, but they focus particularly on performance in core subject areas such as mathematics, science, English, and history. Colleges look at your grades, curriculum, and the courses you take as indicators of your ability to be successful in college. To get a better understanding of which colleges might be the best fit for you, research the GPA requirements for colleges you’re interested in. Also look at the range of GPAs accepted at those institutions on the BigFuture College Search tool. Consider taking more advanced coursework such as AP courses if it fits with your career goals and if your school offers them.

Extracurriculars

Extracurriculars are where you can really stand out, especially from others with similar grades. Extra academic activities show off your personal strengths and interests to admissions officers. Ideally, they want to see students who were deeply involved in school activities outside of the classroom and held leadership positions. Learn more about how extracurriculars matter to you and colleges .

Application Essay

For colleges that require it, the application essay can be a very important part of your application and is your pitch to the university. This is your opportunity to show the school of your dreams the unique individual you are, something that may not necessarily be conveyed in your transcript. It indicates how your talents will contribute to their community. Find tips for writing your college essay here.

Standardized Test Scores

Though the trend in some U.S. colleges has been to put less emphasis on SAT scores, make no mistake: They still play an important role in the college admissions process. Test scores are still used by many colleges for course placement and merit aid. High test scores can also help you stand out and strengthen your college application. If you’re not sure if you should submit your scores, talk to your school counselor or the college’s admissions officer for guidance.

Letters of Recommendation

Although not required by all colleges, letters of recommendation can give admissions counselors insight into who you are beyond just your grades and activities. If letters are required by the institutions you’re applying to, the college will let you know who they want letters from. It’s usually a teacher or counselor. Pick someone who knows you well.

Keep on Top of College Application Deadlines.

Application deadlines can sneak up on high school seniors like a tiger in the night. It’s of utmost importance that you double-check your prospective school’s application deadlines and submit everything you need sooner rather than later. Most college application deadlines fall into the following categories:

Understand the College Application Platform.

There are two main types of college applications : The Common Application and the Coalition Application, which allow students to apply to multiple schools using a single application platform. You should check with the institutions you’re interested in applying to see which application platform they prefer.

How Do College Acceptance Rates Work?

A college’s acceptance rate is actually a ratio. It's the total number of applicants in relation to the number of students who were accepted. For example, Harvard received applications from 61,220 students in 2022─the highest-ever number of applicants to the school. Of those, only 1,214 received admission, leading to the school’s lowest-ever acceptance rate of 3.19%.

This illustrates the point earlier that college acceptance rates are on a decline as the number of applicants increases, saturating the pool with more competition than ever before.

Acceptance rates are based on the number of spots available at a college. This is a set number of applicants who can be admitted to that class of graduates, and it's not subject to change based on the volume of applicants. As you can imagine, more competitive schools, such as Ivy League colleges and universities, have fewer spots available and are thus affected more by the number of applicants.

This same logic applies to private and public colleges. Public colleges, which are characteristically larger institutions, will admit greater numbers of students, leading to higher acceptance rates. However, public colleges have also been impacted by a larger number of applicants. When you’re building your college list, it’s advisable to include a balance of reach, match, and safety schools to improve your chances of acceptance.

It's important to keep in mind that college admission rates don’t necessarily reflect the quality of education or the quality of students who apply, and you shouldn’t be discouraged from applying to schools based on these numbers.

What is the Difference Between Admission Yield and Enrollment Rate?

Admission yield is the percentage of students who accepted enrollment into a college after being granted admission. These vary significantly from school to school. For example, the University of California, Berkeley’s yield rate for 2022 was just 40% while the yield rate for Yale was a whopping 83%.

As students apply to greater numbers of colleges and have more options, yield rates decline.

Review the Latest College Acceptance Rate Stats.

Students faced competitive acceptance rates in 2022. Common Application public colleges and universities saw a 24% surge of applicants since 2019-20 and 17% for private institutions. Meanwhile, the acceptance rates continue to decline. For example, Emory University’s acceptance rate fell 8 percentage points between 2020 and 2022.

Students who are eyeing colleges with highly competitive acceptance rates must focus more than ever on the things that will set them apart: exceptional performance beyond the standard core curriculum, strong extracurricular participation, powerful application essays, letters of recommendation, and excellent standardized test scores. However, even with all of these differentiators, it’s important to remember that none of these can guarantee acceptance, especially at selective institutions. Be sure to build a balanced college list that gives you options.

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University of California, Berkeley

Essay requirements.

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Rather than having to write one longer essay, applicants to the University of California, Berkeley and all other UC schools submit four shorter essays (up to 350 words) in response to prompts freely selected from a list of eight Personal Insight Questions . The questions are wide ranging, designed to help you introduce yourself to the school and tell them about your aptitudes, leadership qualities, community service, or other extracurricular activities, interests, or skills.

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Short Answer Questions

You must respond to four of the eight prompts offered, and each response can have a maximum of 350 words. See the Personal Insight Questions page provided by UC Admissions for additional guidance.

350 words maximum

Describe an example of your leadership experience in which you have positively influenced others, helped resolve disputes or contributed to group efforts over time.

Every person has a creative side, and it can be expressed in many ways: problem solving, original and innovative thinking, and artistically, to name a few. Describe how you express your creative side.

What would you say is your greatest talent or skill? How have you developed and demonstrated that talent over time?

Describe how you have taken advantage of a significant educational opportunity or worked to overcome an educational barrier you have faced.

Describe the most significant challenge you have faced and the steps you have taken to overcome this challenge. How has this challenge affected your academic achievement?

Think about an academic subject that inspires you. Describe how you have furthered this interest inside and/or outside of the classroom.

What have you done to make your school or your community a better place?

Beyond what has already been shared in your application, what do you believe makes you a strong candidate for admissions to the University of California?

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How To Format & Structure Your College Application Essay

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Everything You Need To Know About The Supplemental Essays

Supplemental essays are required by many highly selective institutions in addition to the personal essay included in your Common Application. You can learn all about what they are and why they’re important here.

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Statement from Dean Erwin Chemerinsky (4/10/24)

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I write this with profound sadness. Since becoming a dean, my wife and I have invited the first-year students to our home for dinner. We were asked this year by the presidents of the third year class to have the graduating students over for dinner, because they began in Fall 2021 when COVID prevented us from having dinners for them. We were delighted to oblige and designated three nights – April 9, 10, 11 – that graduating students could choose among. I never imagined that something we do to help our community would become ugly and divisive.

The week before the dinners, there was an awful poster on social media and bulletin boards in the law school building of a caricature of me holding a bloody knife and fork and with blood around my lips, with the words in large letters: “No dinner with Zionist Chem while Gaza starves.” I never thought I would see such blatant antisemitism, with an image that invokes the horrible antisemitic trope of blood libel and that attacks me for no apparent reason other than I am Jewish. Although many complained to me about the posters and how it offended them, I felt that though deeply offensive, they were speech protected by the First Amendment. But I was upset that those in our community had to see this disturbing, antisemitic poster around the law school.

The students responsible for this had the leaders of our student government tell me that if we did not cancel the dinners, they would protest at them. I was sad to hear this, but made clear that we would not be intimidated and that the dinners would go forward for those who wanted to attend. I said that I assumed that any protest would not be disruptive.

On April 9, about 60 students came to our home for the dinner. All had registered in advance. All came into our backyard and were seated at tables for dinner. While guests were eating, a woman, who led the group responsible for the posters, stood up with a microphone that she had brought, stood on the top step in the yard, and began a speech, including about the plight of the Palestinians. My wife and I immediately approached her and asked her to stop and leave. The woman continued. When she continued her speech, there was an attempt to take away her microphone. Repeatedly, we said to her, that you are a guest in our home, please stop and leave. Our home is not a forum for free speech. Indeed, even if this were held in the law school building, there would be no First Amendment right to disrupt the event. About 10 students were with her and ultimately left as a group.

The dinner, which was meant to celebrate graduating students, was obviously disrupted and disturbed. I am enormously sad that we have students who are so rude as to come into my home, in my backyard, and use this social occasion for their political agenda.

The dinners went forward on Wednesday and Thursday. On Thursday night, about 15 people came to our home and stood on the street in front of it, and then on the path directly next to our backyard. They chanted (some chants were quite offensive) and yelled and banged drums to make noise to disturb the dinner. The dinner continued.

I have spent my career staunchly defending freedom of speech. I have spent my years as a dean trying hard to create a warm, inclusive community. I am deeply saddened by these events and take solace that it is just a small number of our students who would behave in such a clearly inappropriate manner.

Dean and Jesse H. Choper Distinguished Professor of Law University of California, Berkeley School of Law

Updated April 13, 2024

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Fall 2024 course descriptions, chinese language and literature courses, chinese 1a: elementary chinese.

The course is designed for students who are of non-Chinese origin and were not raised in a Chinese-speaking environment; or who are of Chinese origin but do not speak Chinese and whose parents do not speak Chinese. The course develops beginning learners’ functional language ability—the ability to use Mandarin Chinese in linguistically and culturally appropriate ways  at the beginning level. It helps students acquire communicative competence in Chinese while sensitizing them to the links between language and culture.

Chinese 1B: Elementary Chinese

The course is designed for students who are of non-Chinese origin and were not raised in a Chinese-speaking environment, or who are of Chinese origin but do not speak Chinese and whose parents do not speak Chinese. The course continues to focus on training students in the four language skills--speaking, listening, reading, and writing with a gradually increasing emphasis  on basic cultural readings and developing intercultural competence.  Prerequisites:  Chinese 1A.  

Chinese 1X: Accelerated Elementary Chinese for Heritage Speakers

This course is designed specifically for Mandarin heritage students who possess speaking skill but little or no reading and writing skills in Chinese. The course utilizes students’ prior knowledge of listening and speaking skills to advance them to the intermediate Chinese proficiency level in one semester. Close attention is paid to meeting Mandarin heritage students’ literacy needs in meaningful contexts while introducing a functional vocabulary and a systematic review of structures through culturally related topics. The Hanyu Pinyin (a Chinese Romanization system) and traditional/simplified characters are introduced.  Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor.

Chinese 3A: Elementary Cantonese

Elementary Cantonese 3A is designed for non-Chinese heritage learners with no prior knowledge of Cantonese, a regional variety of Chinese, introducing students to its use through oral, written and visual texts related to daily life. Topics include meeting people, shopping, leisure activities, telling the time, discussing daily routines, describing people and family members, and transportation, and students will compose texts in Cantonese that show the relationship between language and culture. Finally, the course develops students’ awareness of socio-culturally situated language use and their ability to compare and negotiate similarities and differences between the target culture and their own culture.

Chinese 3X: Elementary Cantonese for Heritage Speakers

This course is designed for native and heritage Mandarin speakers. These students share the knowledge of standard Chinese writing system with Cantonese speakers. They have an interest in speaking Cantonese and learning a Chinese subculture shared among Cantonese speakers. This course will introduce students to its use through oral, written and visual texts related to daily life. Topics include meeting people, shopping, leisure activities, telling the time, discussing daily routines, describing people and family members, transportation, and students will compose texts in Cantonese. Students will focus on vocabulary, linguistic knowledge, culture through expression analysis, and practical use of language.  Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor.

Chinese 4A: Elementary Taiwanese

Elementary Taiwanese is designed to allow learners with no prior knowledge of Chinese language to build familiarity with Taiwanese (or Southern Min), a regional variety of Chinese, through oral, written and visual texts related to daily life. This course is the first part of a two-semester sequence designed to equip students with the basic language skills needed in everyday life situations. There are no prerequisites for this course. The course develops students’ awareness of socio-culturally situated language use and their ability to compare and negotiate similarities and differences between the target culture and their own culture.

Chinese 7A: Introduction to Premodern Chinese Literature and Culture

The first in a two-semester sequence, introducing students to Chinese literature in translation. In addition to literary sources, a wide range of philosophical and historical texts will be covered, as well as aspects of visual and material culture. 7A covers early China through late medieval China, up to and including the Yuan Dynasty (14th century);  the course will also focus on the development of sound writing.

Chinese 10A: Intermediate Chinese

The course is designed for students who are of non-Chinese origin and were not raised in a Chinese-speaking environment, or who are of Chinese origin but do not speak Chinese and whose parents do not speak Chinese. The course deals with lengthy conversations as well as narrative and descriptive texts in both simplified and traditional characters. It helps students  to express themselves in speaking and writing on a range of topics and raises their awareness of the connection between language and culture to foster the development of communicative competence.  Prerequisites:  Chinese 1 or Chinese 1B; or consent of instructor

Chinese 10X: Intermediate Chinese for Mandarin Speakers

Chinese 100a: advanced chinese.

The course takes students to a higher level of competence in Chinese language and culture and develops students’ critical linguistic and cultural awareness. It surveys social issues and values on more abstract topics in a changing China. Through the development of discourse and cultural knowledge in spoken and written Chinese, students learn to interpret subtle textual meanings in texts and  contexts as well as reflect on the world and themselves and express themselves using a variety of genres.  Prerequisites:  Chinese 10 or Chinese 10B.

Chinese 100XA: Advanced Chinese for Heritage Learners

This course advances students’ linguistic and cultural competence through the development of critical literacy skills. It guides students to become more sophisticated language users equipped with linguistic, pragmatic, and textual knowledge in discussions, reading, writing, and translation. Students reflect on the world and themselves through the lens of the target language and culture and  become more competent in operating between English and Chinese and between American culture and Chinese culture. Students learn to recognize a second version of Chinese characters.  Prerequisites:  Chinese 10X; or consent of instructor

Chinese 102: Fourth-Year Chinese Readings: Chinese Readings: Social Sciences and History

The course is designed to further develop students’ advanced-mid level language proficiency and intercultural competence. It uses authentic readings on Chinese social, political, and journalistic issues, supplemented by newspaper articles. To develop students’ self-learning abilities and help them to link the target language to their real world experience, students’ agency in learning is promoted  through critical reading and rewriting and through comparing linguistic and cultural differences.  Prerequisites:  Chinese 100B or Chinese 100XB; or consent of instructor.

Chinese 110A: Literary Chinese

Chinese 111: fifth-year readings: reading and analysis of advanced chinese texts, chinese c116: buddhism in china.

This course is an introduction to the history of Buddhism in China from its beginnings in the early centuries CE to the present day. Through engagement with historical scholarship, primary sources in translation, and Chinese Buddhist art, we will explore the intellectual history and cultural impact of Buddhism in China. Students will also be introduced to major issues in the institutional history of Buddhism, the interactions between Buddhism and indigenous  Chinese religions, and the relationship between Buddhism and the state. Previous study of Buddhism is helpful but not required.

Chinese 155: Readings in Vernacular Chinese Literature

The primary goal of this course is to provide students with the tools for in-depth reading of one of the most famed of Chinese novels,  The Story of the Stone (Honglou meng) .  Our focus this semester is how this novel treats character, both major and minor.   Honglou  meng 's   rich world is composed of hundreds of characters, a bewildering array that forms a sharp distinction to the more condensed worlds of the contemporary novels that have formed our habits of reading.  We will ask how the novel structures relationships among this cast of hundreds, and how as it progresses it spotlights different aspects of its complex social world.   Most importantly, we will ask how the novel both encourages and discourages interpretation.

Chinese 156: Modern Chinese Literature

Modern Chinese literature was, from the very start, a revolutionary project. In reinventing the Chinese language, 20th century writers such as Lu Xun attempted to fundamentally rewrite Chinese social and political realities. It was also a pedagogical project: instructing readers not only about how to be "Chinese" in a time of imperial incursion and political turmoil, but how to be "modern" in all aspects of their lives, from growing up, to falling in love, to changing the world, to dying. To a shocking degree, the project succeeded. In this course, we will explore the historical world out of which modern Chinese literature emerged; and how this linguistic revolution helped to produce modern China, focusing in particular on the problems of gender, youth, and social marginality. We will read short stories and essays in Chinese by many of the greatest writers and public intellectuals of the twentieth century, including Lu Xun, Shen Congwen, Ding Ling, Eileen Chang, and others. We will also watch and analyze a select group of cinematic masterworks from the same period. We will conclude the semester with a set of stories and films produced in the aftermath of war and the communist revolution of 1949 that reveal the continuing resonance, as well as showing the tragic limits of this project's utopian aspirations, and perhaps even questioning the coherence of "China" and "Chineseness" as its organizing principle. 

Chinese 179: Exploring Premodern Chinese Novels

Vernacular fiction in late imperial China emerged at the margins of official historiography, traveled through oral storytelling, and reached sophistication in the hands of literati. Covering the major genres and masterpieces of traditional Chinese novels including military, martial arts, libertine, and romantic stories, this course investigates how shifting boundaries brought about significant transformations of Chinese narrative at the levels of both form and content.  Prerequisites : None.

Chinese 220: Seminar in Philological Analysis of Ancient Chinese Texts

Course description coming soon

Chinese C223: Readings in Chinese Buddhist Texts

This seminar is an intensive introduction to various genres of Buddhist literature in classical Chinese, including translations of Sanskrit and Central Asian scriptures. Chinese commentaries, philosophical treatises, hagiographies, and sectarian works. It is intended for graduate students who already have some facility in classical Chinese. It will also serve as a tools and methods course.

Chinese 282: Modern Chinese Film Studies

In recent years, the proliferation and ubiquity of screens across the globe has raised new questions about the ontology, archaeology, and ecology of media. What is a screen? Is it a technical device, a material surface, an optical portal, a spatial construct, or a living environment? Or is it a psychic mechanism, a social interface, a cultural articulation, and a political instrument? How are these questions considered beyond the dominant scope of Europe and North America?

East Asian Languages and Cultures Courses

Ea lang r1b: reading and composition in the east asian humanities.

Fall 2024 course description coming soon

EA Lang C50: Introduction to the Study of Buddhism

This course will provide students with a basic understanding of the history, teachings, and practices of the Buddhist tradition. We will begin with a look at the Indian religious culture from which Buddhism emerged, and then move on to consider the life of the Buddha, the early teachings, the founding of the monastic order, and the development of Buddhist doctrinal systems. We will then turn to the rise of Mahāyāna Buddhism, and the transformation of Buddhism as it moved from India to China, Japan, Tibet and the countries of Southeast Asia. We will end with a brief look at contemporary controversies over, (1) the tulku (reincarnate lama) system in Tibet; (2) the ordination of Buddhist nuns in Southeast Asia; and (3) the rise and popularity of mindfulness meditation in America. Readings will cover a variety of primary and secondary materials, as well as two short novels, and we will make use of films and videos.  There are no prerequisites for this course—everyone is welcome. But the course does demand a great deal of time and effort on the part of  students. There is a lot of reading as well as a short written assignment or quiz each week,  and attendance at all lectures and discussion sections is mandatory. Students should only enroll if they can commit the required time and energy to the course.

EA Lang 109: History of the Culture of Tea in China and Japan

In this course we compare the cultural traditions of tea in China and Japan. In addition, using tea as the case study, we analyze the mechanics of the flow of culture across both national boundaries and social practices (such as between poetry and the tea ceremony). Understanding the tea culture of these countries informs students of important and enduring aspects of both cultures, provides an opportunity to discuss the  role of religion and art in social practice, provides a forum for cultural comparison, and provides as well an example of the relationship between the two countries and Japanese methods of importing and naturalizing another country's social practice. Korean tea traditions are also briefly considered.  

EA Lang 116: Modern East Asian Fiction

Ea lang 119: history of heaven.

Higher Learning begins with the study of heaven. As the source of orientation in space and time, heaven provides humanity the foundation for its knowledge and political order. To understand what knowledge is or how politics function, we need a basic understanding of the ways of heaven. This course examines the function heaven serves in the founding of order against the void in nature through the formation of conventional systems of time and space  and the role heaven has played in the promulgation of governments. From a cross-cultural, interdisciplinary perspective that covers the course of Eurasian history and using primary sources in translation, we will see heaven unfold through the developments that leave us with the world we know today.

EA Lang 200: Proseminar in East Asian Languages and Cultures

This proseminar in literary theory and methods will serve as an intensive crash course in the interpretative practice known as “close reading,” open to any student who may foreseeably benefit from such practice. While the dominant trend in cultural studies East and West has moved away from formal analysis to prioritize content and context, we will reassess the potential merits of close reading by considering a given work’s aesthetic and medium specificity as we collectively exercise our interpretive muscles. Toward this end, we will pair influential literary-critical texts from scholars in various language areas with a range of East Asian fiction, poetry, painting, music, film and photography on which students will conduct weekly close reading exercises.

Japanese Language and Literature Courses

Japan 1a: elementary japanese.

Japanese 1A is designed to develop basic Japanese language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students will learn the Japanese writing system: hiragana, katakana and approximately 150 kanji. At the end of the course, students should be able to greet, invite, compare, and describe persons and things, activities, intensions, ability, experience, purposes, reasons, and wishes.  Grades will be determined on the basis of attendance, quiz scores, homework and class participation.

Japan 1B: Elementary Japanese

Japanese 1B is designed to develop basic skills acquired in Japanese 1A further. Students will learn approximately 150 new kanji. At the end of the course students should be able to express regret, positive and negative requirements, chronological order of events, conditions, giving and receiving of objects and favors, and to ask and give advice. Grades will be determined on the basis of attendance, quiz scores, homework  and class participation.  Prerequisite : Japanese 1A 

Japan 7A: Introduction to Premodern Japanese Literature and Culture

A survey of pre-modern Korean literature and culture from the seventh century to the 19th century, focusing on the relation between literary texts and various aspects of performance tradition. Topics include literati culture, gender relations, humor, and  

Japan 10A: Intermediate Japanese

The goal of this course is for the students to understand the language and culture required to communicate effectively in Japanese. Some of the cultural aspects covered are; geography, speech style, technology, sports, food, and religion. Through the final project, students will learn how to discuss social issues and their potential solutions. In order to achieve these goals, students will learn how to integrate the basic linguistics knowledge they acquired in J1, as well as study new structures and vocabulary. An increasing amount of reading and writing, including approximately 200 new kanji, will also be required.  Prerequisites:  Japan 1 or Japan 1B.

Japan 100A: Advanced Japanese

This course will develop further context-specific skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. It concentrates on students using acquired grammar and vocabulary with more confidence in order to express functional meanings, while increasing overall linguistic competence. Students will learn approximately 200 new Kanji. There will be a group or individual project. Course materials include  the textbook supplemented by newspapers, magazine articles, short stories, and video clips which will provide insight into Japanese culture and society.  Prerequisites:  Japan 10B.

Japan 101: Fourth Year Japanese: Aspects of Japanese Society

Students develop their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills further to think critically, to express their points of view, and to understand Japanese culture and society in depth The readings are mainly articles on current social issues from Japanese newspapers, magazines, and professional books as sources of discussions. Students are required to write short essays on topics related to the reading materials.   Prerequisites :  Japan 100, Japan 100B, or Japan 100X; or consent of instructor.

Japan C115: Buddhism and Its Culture in Japan

This course provides a critical survey of prominent and other noteworthy expressions of Buddhist thought and culture in Japanese history. The Japanese experience of Buddhist teachings, practices and institutions, as well as aesthetic expressions in painting, sculpture, architecture, garden design, literature, and theatre will be examined against the backdrop of the transmission of all these forms of Buddhist culture from India to China to Korea to Japan. Special attention will also be given to the fusion of Buddhist and “native” Japanese sensibilities in theater (Noh, Kabuki, and Bunraku) and popular art such as ukiyo-e prints and manga.  Prerequistes : None.

Japan 120: Introduction to Classical Japanese

An introduction to classical Japanese (bungo), the premodern vernacular, which was used as Japan's literary language until well into the 20th century and remains essential for a thorough grounding in Japanese literature and culture. Prerequisites:  Japanese 10 or Japanese 10B.

Japan 155: Modern Japanese Literature

This course is an introduction to Japanese modernism through the reading and discussion of representative short stories, poetry, and criticism of the Taisho and early Showa periods. We will examine the aesthetic bases of modernist writing and confront the challenge posed by their use of poetic language. The question of literary form and the relationship between poetry and prose in the works will receive special attention.  Prerequisites:  Japanese 100A (may be taken concurrently).

Japan 161: Introduction to Japanese Linguistics

This course deals with issues of the usage of the Japanese language and how they have been treated in the field of linguistics. It concentrates on pragmatics, modality/evidentiality, deixis, speech varieties (politeness, gender, written vs. spoken), conversation management, and rhetorical structure. Students are required to have intermediate knowledge of Japanese. No previous linguistics training is required.  Prerequisites : Japan 10, Japan 10B, or Japan 10X; or consent of instructor.

Japan 164: Reading Japanese Texts Using Advanced Grammatical Analysis

This course is designed for those at high-intermediate to low-advanced level of fluency in Japanese to further develop their reading proficiency through detailed grammatical analyses of selected texts. Although adequate knowledge of both vocabulary and grammar is essential for understanding the text, often in foreign-language learning, vocabulary typically receives more emphasis than grammar. Through assigned texts, students learn through a hands-on approach how words are combined to form a phrase, how phrases are combined to form a clause, how clauses are combined to form a sentence, how sentences are combined to form a text. Readings are selected from modern Japanese writing on current affairs, social sciences, history, and literature.  Prerequisites : Japan 10B; or consent of instructor

Japan 170: Classical Japanese Literature in Translation

Japan 173: modern japanese literature in translation.

This course surveys modern Japanese fiction and poetry in the first half of the 20th century. Topics will vary.

Japan 188: Japanese Visual Culture: Introduction to Anime

This course is a lecture and discussion course focusing on Japanese animation, or anime, as a medium from its earliest forms to contemporary works. We will think through issues of digital culture, seriality, transnational circulations, and the relation between anime, manga (comics), gaming and cinema; limited and full animation; cultural disaster and the post-war; bodies and sexuality, and queer/yaoi (BL) and otaku culture, as well as anime's place within contemporary media theory. We will view works by Miyazaki Hayao, Kon Satoshi, Anno Hideaki, Oshii Mamoru, and many others.

Japan 240: Classical Japanese Texts

Fall 2024 Course Description coming soon

Japan 255: Seminar in Prewar Japanese Literature

Korean language and literature courses, korean 1a: elementary korean.

This course is designed for non-heritage students who have absolutely no prior knowledge of the Korean language. Students will learn written and spoken Korean on self-related and day-to-day topics, and present information both in oral and written forms using formulaic and memorized expressions. They will also engage in simple conversational exchanges on a variety of daily topics.  Prerequisites : None.

Korean 1AX: Elementary Korean for Heritage Speakers

This course is designed for students who already have elementary comprehension and speaking skills in Korean and have minimum exposure to reading and/or writing in Korean.  Prerequisites : Consent of instructor.

Korean 1B: Elementary Korean

This is a continuing course for non-heritage students who have completed K1A or demonstrated an equivalent proficiency level. Students will enhance and broaden their linguistic and cultural competence by learning more essential grammatical structures, daily life expressions and speech acts. The course is also intended to introduce certain cultural aspects through media sources and various activities.  Prerequisites : Korean 1A; or consent of instructor.

Korean 7A: Introduction to Premodern Korean Literature and Culture

A survey of pre-modern Korean literature and culture from the seventh century to the 19th century, focusing on the relation between literary texts and various aspects of performance tradition. Topics include literati culture, gender relations, humor, and material culture. Texts to be examined include ritual songs, sijo, kasa, p'ansori, prose narratives, art, and contemporary media representation  of performance traditions. All readings are in English.

Korean 10A: Intermediate Korean

With equal attention given to speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural aspects of the language, students will further develop their language skills for handling various everyday situations.  Prerequisites : Korean 1B; or consent of instructor.

Korean 10AX: Intermediate Korean for Heritage Speakers

This is an intermediate course for students whose Korean proficiency level is higher in speaking than in reading or writing due to Korean-heritage background. Students will elaborate their language skills for handling various everyday situations.  Prerequisites : Korean 1BX; or consent of instructor.

Korean 100A: Advanced Korean

This is a third-year course in modern Korean with emphasis on acquisition of advanced vocabulary and grammatical structure. Equal attention will be given to all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  Prerequisites : Korean 10B; or consent of instructor.

Korean 100AX: Advanced Korean for Heritage Speakers

This is a third-year course in modern Korean with emphasis on acquisition of advanced vocabulary and grammatical structure.  Prerequisites : Korean 10BX; or consent of instructor.

Korean 101: Fourth-Year Readings: Korean Literature

This is an advanced course of reading and textual literary analysis in Korean. Advanced reading and writing skills and practice in the use of standard reference tools will also be introduced.

Korean 101: Korean Language in Popular Media

This course is uniquely designed for students who are interested in enhancing their proficiency level up to high-advanced or superior level through the lens of Korean popular media. By analyzing various media such as movies, documentary, TV shows, K-Pop songs, and news articles, students will broaden their knowledge and understanding about Korean society and culture in a deeper level, which is vital in advancing proficiency.

Korean 105: Business Korean

This course is for students wanting to acquire high-advanced and superior level Korean proficiency in Korean business settings through the nuances of job-related communication and cultural expectations. Students master appropriate workplace terminology, expressions, and professional style spoken and written form. They complete job a search, plan a new product, present and negotiate the product status, and finally present the product externally.

Korean 111: Fifth-Year Korean: Korean Culture and History

This course is designed to help advanced Korean students understand the influence of history and politics on contemporary Korean culture. Students will analyze contrastive views on historical events reflected in writings and media. Structured as a seminar format, students will take active roles in a class by sharing their inquiries and findings on course materials. A superior level of speaking and writing competence will be promoted based on advanced reading and listening competence. Prerequisites: Korean 101 or Korean 102; or consent of instructor.

Korean 150: Modern Korean Poetry

This course will examine the works of major poets in the first half of the 20th century and will consider the formation of modern Korean poetry. Particular attention will be given to the ideas of lyricism, modernism, and the identity of a poet in the context of the colonial occupation of Korea. Prerequisite: Korean 100A or Korean 100AX.

Korean 186: Introduction to Korean Cinema

This course offers a historical overview of Korean cinema from its colonial development to its present renaissance. It covers Korean film aesthetics, major directors, film movements, genre, censorship issues, and industrial transformation as well as global circulation and transnational reception. In an effort to read film as sociocultural texts, various topics will be discussed. All readings are in English.

Korean 188: Cold War in Korea: Literature and Film

Cold War Culture in Korea: Literature and Film. This course examines the formation and transformation of global Cold War culture in South Korean literature and film of the 20th century. It pays close attention to representations of the Korean War and its aftermath in literature and cinema, but opens up the field of inquiry to encompass larger sociocultural issues related to the Cold War system manifest in literature and cinema.  Prerequisites : None.

Mongolian Language and Literature Courses

Mongoln 110: literary mongolian.

This course introduces students to Literary Mongolian, its phonetics, grammar, vertical writing system and its relation to living spoken language. The course emphasizes reading texts in the Mongol vertical script. As foundation, students receive a basic introduction to Mongolian phonology and grammar as well as learn the Mongol vertical script writing system and a standard system of transcription.  After a brief period of introduction students immerse in reading texts. Class time is devoted to reading comprehension, translation, and analysis. Although texts may be drawn to suit student interest, the standard course repertoire will consist of works of Mongolian Buddhist literature and history.

Mongoln C117: Mongolian Buddhism

This course covers the history of Mongolian Buddhism from its inception in the Yuan dynasty to the present. The importance of Mongolian Buddhism to the greater dharma lies not only with the ways of its priests but also with the means of its patrons, the Mongol aristocracy, in forging a distinctive tradition in Inner Asia and disseminating it throughout the world. While maintaining a  historical thread throughout, this course will examine in detail some of the tradition’s many facets, including Mongolian-Buddhist politics, the politics of incarnation, the establishment of monasteries, economics, work in the sciences, astral science and medicine, ritual practice, literature, sculpture and painting, music and dance, and more.

IMAGES

  1. 006 Essay Example Berkeley Application Uc Transfer Examples M ~ Thatsnotus

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  2. Descartes vs berkeley perception essay sample

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  3. APUSH UNIT FIVE ESSAY REQUIREMENTS

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  4. How to Get In: UC Berkeley Admissions Requirements

    berkeley essay requirements

  5. 006 Essay Example Berkeley Application Uc Transfer Examples M ~ Thatsnotus

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  6. Would you like to write an impressive Berkeley Statement of Purpose of

    berkeley essay requirements

VIDEO

  1. Six Things Your Essay MUST Do!

  2. Certificate Program in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages Online Information Session

  3. GEORGE BERKELEY

  4. 🎓 College Overview: UC Berkeley 🏫

  5. (Video 5 of 6) UC Berkeley Pre-College Scholars Program Residential Track: Admissions

  6. Academic statement of purpose/personal statement essays

COMMENTS

  1. First-Year Requirements

    Students who apply to Berkeley should meet the following minimum requirements: Meet the A-G subject course requirements. (Review the A-G Policy Resource Guide) Have a 3.0 GPA in A-G courses taken in the 10th and 11th grade years. (3.4 GPA for non-residents) *These minimum requirements follow the University of California (UC) minimum requirements.

  2. Berkeley Writing Assessment

    Entry-Level Writing and the Berkeley Writing Assessment. The Entry Level Writing Requirement (ELWR) is a reading and writing proficiency requirement. It is a prerequisite to the Reading and Composition (R&C) requirement. ... Each student essay will be read by two raters, working independently, to assign it a score from 1-6. The two scores are ...

  3. Requirements

    A score of 8 or above on the BWA satisfies Entry Level Writing. . To meet this requirement by coursework, you must earn a grade of C or higher in COLWRIT R1A. Once you have started classes at Berkeley, you may not use a transfer course to satisfy Entry Level Writing. Additionally, completion of Entry Level Writing is required before opting to ...

  4. Entry Level Writing Requirement < University of California, Berkeley

    A grade of C or higher will satisfy both Entry Level Writing and Part A of the Reading and Composition requirement. Once an Admitted student begins courses at Berkeley, and the requirement has not otherwise been met, students must complete COLWRIT R1A. A grade of C or higher is will satisfy both Entry Level Writing and Part A of the Reading and ...

  5. How to Get In: UC Berkeley Admission Requirements

    UC Berkeley ACT Requirements. Just like for the SAT, UC Berkeley likely doesn't have a hard ACT cutoff, but if you score too low, your application will get tossed in the trash. Average ACT: 31. The average ACT score at UC Berkeley is 31. This score makes UC Berkeley Strongly Competitive for ACT scores.

  6. Entry Level Writing Requirement

    The University of California's Entry Level Writing Requirement is a writing proficiency expectation for first year success. The ability to read carefully, analyze what you've read, and write effective essays is an essential part of thriving at UC. All students entering UC as freshmen must fulfill the Entry Level Writing Requirement, either ...

  7. PDF UC Berkeley Guide To Admissions 2023

    Applicants must have a minimum 60 UC transferable semester units (90 UC transferable quarter units) by the end of the spring prior to fall matriculation. Applicants must also have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all transferable college-level coursework for most majors. Some majors (e.g. engineering) require higher GPAs in major preparation coursework.

  8. Supplemental Essay Prompts

    Required Essay: (350 words maximum) Your supplemental essays must be submitted by 11:59 pm PST on December 15, 2023. Describe how the Management, Entrepreneurship, & Technology Program in Engineering and Business at UC Berkeley will help you to achieve your goals. Share with us the world you come from (for example, your family, school ...

  9. Berkeley Writing Assessment: General Questions

    Berkeley Writing Assessment. The Entry Level Writing Requirement (ELWR) is a reading and writing proficiency requirement. It is a prerequisite to the Reading and Composition (R&C) requirement. R&C is a two-part (A & B) college-level reading and writing requirement assigned to all Berkeley undergraduates. Check the Berkeley Guide to review ...

  10. Crafting Your Berkeley Application Essay: A ...

    What are the specific requirements for the Berkeley application essay? What are the particular requirements for the essay portion of the Berkeley application? The University of California (UC) system , including Berkeley, uses a unique set of personal insight questions as part of the application process.

  11. Admissions

    Admissions overview. The University of California, Berkeley, is the No. 1 public university in the world. Over 40,000 students attend classes in 15 colleges and schools, offering over 300 degree programs. Set the pace with your colleagues and community, and set the bar for giving back.

  12. Admissions Essays

    We encourage you to reflect on your experiences, values, and passions so that you may craft thoughtful and authentic responses that demonstrate your alignment with our principles. Below are the required essays, supplemental essays, and optional essays for the Fall 2023-2024 application cycle. Required Essay #1. Required Essay #2.

  13. University of California, Berkeley

    Please respond to any 4 of the 8 questions below.We realize that not all questions apply to all applicants, so be sure to select the 4 questions that you believe give us the best information about you.All 8 questions are given equal consideration in the application review process. Responses to each question should be between 250-350 words.

  14. Freshman Admissions

    Begin with a visit to admissions.berkeley.edu to become familiar with admission requirements and the selection process. From there, ... and you may receive a request to record a video essay. Video essay requests are by invitation only and will be requested starting in November. Videos must be submitted by 11:59 pm PST on January 12, 2024. ...

  15. Application Process

    Our application process varies depending on which pathway you choose. Select an option below to learn more about which pathways are available to you and how to apply.

  16. Writing the Statement of Purpose

    Essential Tips. 1. What the admissions committee will read between the lines: self-motivation, competence, potential as a graduate student. 2. Emphasize everything from a positive perspective and write in an active, not a passive voice. 3. Demonstrate everything by example; don't say directly that you're a persistent person, show it. 4.

  17. Personal insight questions

    Remember, the personal insight questions are just that—personal. Which means you should use our guidance for each question just as a suggestion in case you need help. The important thing is expressing who you are, what matters to you and what you want to share with UC. 1. Describe an example of your leadership experience in which you have ...

  18. University of California, Berkeley Essay Requirements

    Essay Requirements. Rather than having to write one longer essay, applicants to the University of California, Berkeley and all other UC schools submit four shorter essays (up to 350 words) in response to prompts freely selected from a list of eight Personal Insight Questions. The questions are wide ranging, designed to help you introduce ...

  19. High School Students

    Learn more about admission requirements and the selection process when applying to UC Berkeley. ... You'll receive an email from the UC Berkeley Office of Undergraduate Admissions within 5-7 business days after submitting your UC application. The supplement includes an essay question and a video interview upload.

  20. Admissions Requirements

    Application Requirements. Congratulations on taking the next step towards submitting your graduate application! To help you along the way, we've compiled a list of requirements to complete your graduate application. It's also important to check with the program to which you're applying, as they may have additional requirements specific to ...

  21. Application Requirements

    Three letters of recommendation. GRE scores (optional) Evidence of English language proficiency (TOEFL or IELTS scores) if applicable. Paid Application Fee of $135 if you are a U.S. citizen or U.S. permanent resident, and $155 otherwise. Please review UC Berkeley's Graduate Admissions information and Graduate Admissions Requirements for futher ...

  22. Transfer Requirements

    At UC Berkeley, the world's premier public university, you can excel beyond, exchange ideas and, ultimately, change the world. ... Students will have to complete University of California 7-course pattern to satisfy eligibility requirements for admission. Berkeley will still require a minimum 3.0 GPA (higher than the University of California's ...

  23. Colleges Rates and Requirements

    All colleges emphasize GPA requirements, but they focus particularly on performance in core subject areas such as mathematics, science, English, and history. ... Application Essay. ... Berkeley's yield rate for 2022 was just 40% while the yield rate for Yale was a whopping 83%. As students apply to greater numbers of colleges and have more ...

  24. University of California, Berkeley Essay Requirements

    Learn about University of California, Berkeley essay requirements and gain insight into how to craft a compelling essay that showcases your unique voice and perspective. Our expert guidance can help you stand out in the admissions process and take the first step towards your dream education.

  25. Transfer Students

    The supplemental application will appear in your MAP@Berkeley Portal in early January. The supplement includes: a self-reported academic record, an essay question, optional activities and awards update, and; video interview upload; If you do not submit a complete Haas supplemental application by January 31, your admission will be denied.

  26. Statement from Dean Erwin Chemerinsky (4/10/24)

    I write this with profound sadness. Since becoming a dean, my wife and I have invited the first-year students to our home for dinner. We were asked this year by the presidents of the third year class to have the graduating students over for dinner, because they began in Fall 2021 when COVID prevented us from having dinners for them.

  27. Fall 2024 Course Descriptions

    The reading and discussion will be based on essays or speeches by Chinese intellectuals and experts in related fields. ... At the end of the course students should be able to express regret, positive and negative requirements, chronological order of events, conditions, giving and receiving of objects and favors, and to ask and give advice ...