Boston College logo

  • Parents & Guardians
  • Faculty & Staff

BC.EDU LINKS

Boston College

  • Boston College
  • Campus Life
  • Jesuit, Catholic
  • Academic Calendar
  • BC Magazine
  • Directories
  • Offices, Services, Resources
  • Agora Portal
  • Maps & Directions
  • Graduate Programs

Lynch School of Education and Human Development

  • Boston College Law School
  • Boston College School of Social Work
  • Carroll School of Management
  • Clough School of Theology and Ministry
  • Connell School of Nursing
  • Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences
  • Woods College of Advancing Studies

To enhance the human condition, expand the human imagination, and make the world more just—that’s the mission driving the work of our faculty and students.

We put our mission into action through teaching, research, and service—informing policy, improving practice, and preparing students to serve diverse populations in a variety of roles.

And we define education expansively—as an opportunity to shape the future of humanity and our society. Toward that end, the Lynch School employs the Jesuit, Catholic holistic approach to student formation. We educate our students as whole people so they, in turn, can empower others to prosper and lead full lives.

Enhancing the Human Condition

We recognize that people develop and flourish across many interrelated dimensions: cognitively, emotionally, morally, socially, and spiritually. We prepare our students to transform others’ lives across each of these dimensions and at their intersections.

Expanding the Human Imagination

By providing us with new paradigms and new information, universities have the capacity to spur people to think differently, expanding our approaches to problems and potential solutions. Through education, we progress beyond conventional ways for understanding the world and discover unexpected patterns.

Making the World More Just

As a community of scholars and practitioners, we have an obligation to help people realize their aspirations, increase access to societal opportunities, and lift up those who have fewer advantages. We engage in individuals’ lives and build social contexts that promote justice, equality, and a sense of community.

APSY Courses

EDUC Courses

ELHE Courses

LREN Courses

MESA Courses

Lynch School Faculty

Lynch School Website

Introduction to Graduate Programs

Department of teaching, curriculum, and society, department of formative education, department of educational leadership and higher education.

  • Department of Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology

Programs in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology

Department of measurement, evaluations, statistics, and assessment, dual degree programs, certificate programs.

Consistently ranked among the top 25 schools of education and as the top-ranked Catholic school of education in the country, the Lynch School at Boston College offers 22 master’s programs, eight doctoral programs, and five dual-degree programs. Theory, research, and practice are integrated across programs, which also leverage the robust practicum opportunities available in schools, hospitals, mental health centers, and universities in the Boston metropolitan area. The Lynch School’s focus on expanding social justice is a hallmark of our programs and the work of our students and faculty.

Admission Information

Information about admission is available on the Lynch School website at  bc.edu/lynchschool . You may also write to: Boston College, Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid, and Student Services, Lynch School of Education and Human Development, Campion Hall 135, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3813, telephone 617-552-4214, or e-mail  gsoe@bc.edu .

The Lynch School admits students without regard to race, ethnicity, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, marital or parental status, national origin, veteran status, or disability. The Lynch School welcomes the presence of multiple and diverse cultural perspectives in its scholarly community.

Students must be formally admitted to the Lynch School Graduate Programs by a committee composed of faculty and administrators. Students may apply to degree programs or to study as a non-degree or certificate student. Consult the Lynch School admissions website for complete information.

Official notification of admission is made by a written announcement—an online offer of admission—from the Lynch School. Students should not presume admission until they receive this announcement. Admitted students are required to submit a non-refundable deposit of $250 by the date stipulated in the admission letter. The deposit is applied to tuition costs for the first semester of study.

Application Deadlines

All admission deadlines are posted on the Lynch School website at  bc.edu/lynchschool . In some cases, master’s program applications are considered beyond the deadline. While official deadlines are posted for summer/fall start, some programs may consider a spring start. Non-degree applications are considered for summer, fall, and spring start dates. Call the Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid, and Student Services at 617-552-4214 or e-mail  gsoe@bc.edu  for more information.

Deferral of Admission

Admission may be deferred for up to one year for those admitted to master’s degree programs. Deferral of admission to doctoral programs is at the discretion of the admitting faculty. Requests to defer admission must be submitted in writing to the Assistant Dean of Graduate Enrollment in the Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid, and Student Services and must be approved and confirmed by the Lynch School.

The number of students admitted to Lynch School graduate programs each year is dependent upon the number of deferred students who will be matriculating in a given year. For this reason, the Lynch School requires that students who wish to defer for a semester or a year indicate this at the point of admission and return the response form with a deposit of $250. This will hold a space in the following year’s class and will be credited toward the first semester of study.

Due to the volume of applications received each year by the Lynch School, there can be no assurances of deferred admission or that scholarship aid awarded at the original time of admission will remain available.

Admission for International Students

International Students (non-U.S. citizens who are not permanent U.S. residents) may find information about admission and an online application on the Lynch School website at  bc.edu/lynchschool . Prospective students may also write to: Boston College, Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid, and Student Services, Lynch School of Education and Human Development, Campion Hall 135, 140 Commonwealth Ave, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3813, telephone 617-552-4214, or e-mail  gsoe@bc.edu . All international student applicants for whom English is not their first language, or who do not hold a degree from an English-speaking university, must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) examination and request that their score be forwarded to the Lynch School of Education and Human Development by the Educational Testing Service ( ets.org ). The Lynch School of Education and Human Development’s TOEFL code is 3240. Ordinarily, the Lynch School expects a minimum score of 100 on the internet-based TOEFL or a minimum score of 7.0 on the IELTS. Information on exemptions from the English proficiency exams, as well as additional testing information, is contained in the graduate application materials available on the Lynch School website. Information about these examinations also may be obtained from the Educational Testing Service ( ets.org ).

Non-Degree Status

Students not seeking a degree, but interested in pursuing course work at the graduate level, may apply for admission as a Non-Degree Student. While there is no guarantee of later admission to a degree program, many individuals choose Non-Degree Status either to explore the seriousness of their interest in studying for an advanced degree and/or to strengthen their credentials for later application for degree status. Others are interested in taking graduate course work for personal enrichment or professional development. Included among those taking courses are school counselors, teachers, administrators, and psychologists who are taking classes as a means of fulfilling professional development requirements or continuing education units.

Students seeking Non-Degree Student status must submit the online application form on the Lynch School admissions web page.

Although there is no limit on the number of courses Non-Degree Students may take, no more than four courses (12 semester hours), if appropriate, may be applied toward a degree program in the Lynch School. Courses taken as a Non-Degree Student may be applied to a degree program only after official acceptance into a degree program and with the consent of the student’s advisor.

Due to space limitations, all courses may not be available to Non-Degree Students. Practicum coursework associated with teacher licensure or counseling psychology licensure is reserved for matriculated degree students in these programs. Students who wish to become certified or licensed must gain admittance to a graduate degree program in the desired area. Other courses are restricted each semester to maintain class size. Individuals considering Non-Degree Student status may seek advising from the Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid, and Student Services. Non-Degree Students are not eligible for University sponsored sources of financial aid or any financial aid that requires matriculation in a degree program.

Fifth Year/Early Admit Programs

The Fifth Year Program and Early Admit Program offer academically outstanding Boston College juniors a unique opportunity to begin graduate study during their undergraduate senior year, allowing them to graduate with a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in a shortened amount of time. All undergraduate juniors in the Lynch School of Education and Human Development, Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences, Connell School of Nursing, and Carroll School of Management are eligible to apply for these programs.

In consultation with an advisor, students have the ability to take up to two graduate-level courses in their senior year. In addition to the time advantage, there is a considerable savings involved. Students accepted in the Fifth Year/Early Admit program will be able to apply two approved graduate courses (6 credits) towards both their bachelor's degree (120 credits) and their master's degree (30 credits or more).

Upon successful completion from the undergraduate program, senior year coursework and the additional graduate-level courses are reviewed and a determination about formal admission into the graduate program is made. In the spring semester of their senior year, Fifth Year/Early Admit students will receive an official offer of admission to the Lynch School Graduate Program.

Students interested in the Fifth Year/Early Admit Program should contact the Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid, and Student Services in Campion Hall 135 or at 617-552-4214. Students can also e-mail  gsoe@bc.edu  and learn more at the  Fifth Year/Early Admit Program  page.

Financial Aid

Students admitted to Lynch School graduate programs are eligible to access several forms of financial aid opportunities, including Lynch School scholarships and fellowships, graduate assistantships, research assistantships, teaching fellowships, teaching assistantships, Federal loans and work-study, and private loans.

Lynch School scholarships and fellowships are tuition remission scholarships offered to incoming students that have been identified for being exceptionally promising in their chosen fields of study and for contributing to our student body’s diversity—including intellectual, economic, racial, cultural, geographical, and gender.

Scholarship and fellowship awards are offered at the time of the admission decision and are based solely on materials submitted in a completed application. No additional application or materials are required.

Applicants that have submitted a complete application by the December 1 or early January deadlines will receive the strongest consideration for these awards.

Many offices and departments in the Lynch School and across campus hire graduate students and provide assistantships for work in their area. The work varies by department, but may include a stipend, tuition remission, or both. The levels of stipend and/or tuition remission vary by individual roles. Because each individual assistantship is supervised by a specific department on campus, deadlines vary based on the needs and availability of individual supervisors and/or departments.

The University’s Financial Aid Office administers the Federal loan programs, which include Unsubsidized Stafford loans, Perkins loans, and work-study. If you are applying for any of these loan programs through Boston College, please consult the Office of Student Services Graduate Financial Aid web page.

Sources of external scholarship funding may be obtained through outside sources such as local civic organizations, religious organizations, educational and research foundations, or banks. Applicants are advised to do an internet search for potential external scholarships.

Urban Education Funding

Donovan Urban Teaching Scholars Program Donovan Urban Teaching Scholars is an intensive one-year master’s degree program in teacher preparation. Each year, the program recruits and supports a cohort of up to 30 graduate students. Students in this program:

  • Receive tuition remission covering a minimum of 50% to a maximum of 100% of tuition costs for the M.Ed. degree
  • May be eligible for the Sharp Urban Teaching Scholarship, which provides additional financial support to highly talented graduate students who are from underrepresented groups and are committed to teaching in urban schools.  

Details on the Donovan Urban Teaching Scholarship can be found on the Lynch School Donovan Program website.

Urban Catholic Teacher Corps (UCTC) Urban Catholic Teacher Corps is an academically rigorous and experientially rich, Catholic school teacher preparation program that prepares students to be excellent Catholic school teachers who are actively engaged in the ministry of teaching urban students in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston. Participants live together, actively engaging in an intentional faith-based living and learning community where faith is actively incorporated, individuals are loved and supported, and all experiences and perspectives are shared and respected. All students in this program:

  • Receive 100% tuition coverage for the M.Ed. degree in Curriculum and Instruction
  • Have all rent and utilities paid for in the required UCTC community housing.
  • Receive a $600 pre-tax stipend per month over the two years of program participation to cover living expenses. The Lynch School Catholic Education Award provides partial tuition assistance to students who are currently working in Catholic schools.  

There is a separate application and additional requirements for UCTC. Please note that the application deadline is also earlier than the normal deadline for teacher education programs.

Licensure and Program Accreditation

Many of the teacher education and administration programs offered by the Lynch School have been designed to comply with current standards leading to initial and professional licensure for educators in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Through the University’s accreditation by the Interstate Certification Compact (ICC), a program of study preparing for educator licensure in Massachusetts, will also provide graduates, through reciprocity, with facilitated opportunities for licensure in most other states. Licensure is granted by the state, and requirements for licensure are subject to change by the state. Students seeking licensure in Massachusetts must pass the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL). Especially in the case of out-of-state students, it is the responsibility of the student to plan a program that will lead to licensure in a given state. Staff in the Office of Field Placement and Partnership Outreach (Campion 102, 617-552-4206, prac@bc.edu ) can help with most teacher and administrator licensure questions. The teacher education programs at Boston College are accredited by both the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) and nationally by the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC).

Mental health and school counselor licensure questions should be addressed to the Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid, and Student Services at 617-552-4214. The 60-credit M.A. in Mental Health Counseling fulfills the educational requirements for licensure as a mental health counselor in Massachusetts, and the M.A. in School Counseling meets the educational requirements for licensure in school counseling in Massachusetts. Students seeking school counseling licensure in Massachusetts must pass the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL). Students are encouraged to check the requirements for the states in which they eventually hope to obtain licensure.

The School Counseling sequence is designed to meet the professional standards recommended by the Interstate Certification Compact (ICC), Massachusetts Department of Education. This sequence is designed to meet the educational requirements for licensure as a school counselor in the state of Massachusetts. Licensure is granted by the state Department of Education and requirements are subject to change by the state. Students seeking licensure in Massachusetts must pass the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure.

The 60 credit-hour Mental Health Counselor sequence of study reflects the professional standards recommended by the American Counseling Association and the Massachusetts Board of Allied Mental Health and Human Services Professionals. This sequence is designed to meet the pre-master’s educational requirements for licensing as a Mental Health Counselor in the state of Massachusetts. Licensing is granted by the Massachusetts Board of Allied Mental Health and Human Service Professionals and the requirements are subject to change by the state. Students, for all programs, should check the requirements in other states where they may choose to live and work.

The doctoral program in Counseling Psychology is fully accredited by the American Psychological Association.

Degree Programs

Through its various graduate programs, the Lynch School offers the M.Ed., M.A., M.S., M.A.T., M.S.T., Ph.D., and Ed.D. degrees. The Lynch School also offers programs leading to a Certificate of Advanced Educational Specialization (C.A.E.S.). Our graduate programs serve a dual purpose:

  • Research: Preparing students in research-based knowledge of their profession with specialized competence in the evaluation of educational and psychological innovations, and in basic and applied quantitative and qualitative research methodologies.
  • Practice: Preparing students to apply knowledge in appropriate areas of specialization to practice in both academic and nonacademic settings.  

Doctoral Degree Programs

General requirements for the degree of doctor of philosophy.

The Ph.D. is granted for distinction attained in a special field of concentration and demonstrated ability to modify or enlarge a significant subject in a dissertation based upon original research. Doctoral studies are supervised by the student’s advisor, department chairperson, and the Associate Dean of Students. The Ph.D. is granted in the Lynch School in the following areas:

  • Curriculum and Instruction
  • Formative Education
  • Higher Education
  • Counseling Psychology
  • Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Measurement, Evaluation, Statistics, and Assessment  

Upon admission to a doctoral program, the doctoral student will be assigned an academic advisor. The Doctoral Program of Study should be designed by students in consultation with their advisors during the first or second semester of coursework. A formal Program of Study must be filed with the student’s advisor and the Academic Department Office. Programs of Study for all programs are available on the Lynch School’s website at  bc.edu/lynchschool .

Doctoral students in the Lynch School, in addition to coursework, complete comprehensive exams before being admitted for doctoral candidacy. Doctoral students also complete a doctoral dissertation. Current information on policies and procedures regarding doctoral degree programs is provided online at the  Doctoral Policies and Procedures  page.

General Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Education

The Professional School Administrator Program (PSAP) provides an opportunity for full-time administrators to obtain their Massachusetts superintendent licensure and a Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree in Educational Leadership. The program is grounded in the core values of the Lynch School, with coursework focusing on leadership for learning, social justice, diversity, anti-racism, and community building.

The intensive, three-year program is taught by full-time university faculty and knowledgeable, skilled school leaders, with personalized support for students from mentor superintendents.

The Executive Ed.D. in Higher Education develops justice-minded leaders with the skills, mindsets, and technical knowledge to match the changing pace of higher education. The innovative, data-informed curriculum emphasizes socially just leadership that is transformational, mission-driven, and focuses on iterative design-thinking, which equips graduates with the skills and agility to effect lasting change.

Designed for experienced administrators, with a minimum of five to ten years of experience in higher education, this part-time, three-year program pairs online coursework during the academic year with in-person week-long summer residencies. The program culminates in a practice-based capstone project that integrates content across the curriculum.

Certificate of Advanced Educational Specialization (C.A.E.S.)

The C.A.E.S. course of study is designed for currently practicing educators who already have a master’s degree and seek a higher level of specialization in Curriculum and Instruction or professional licensure in administration. For further information on C.A.E.S. programs in Educational Leadership, Special Education, Reading/Literacy, and Curriculum and Instruction, contact Boston College, The Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid, and Student Services, Lynch School of Education and Human Development, Campion Hall 135, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3813, telephone at 617-552-4214, or e-mail  gsoe@bc.edu .

Master's Degree Programs

While candidates may apply to master’s programs while still completing an undergraduate degree, candidates must be graduates of an accredited college or university by their program’s start date. The Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid and Student Services, Campion 135, provides academic and financial aid services for master’s students throughout their studies in the Lynch School.

Master of Education Degree (M.Ed.)

The Master of Education is awarded in the following areas:

  • Early Childhood Education
  • Elementary Education
  • Secondary Education
  • Special Education*
  • Global Perspectives: Teaching, Curriculum, and Learning Environments
  • Educational Leadership and Policy
  • Jesuit Education in a Global World  

*The M.Ed. program in Special Education includes the following areas of concentration: Moderate Support Needs, Grades Pre-K–8 and Grades 5–12, Students with Extensive Support Needs Pre-K–12.

Master of Arts in Teaching and Master of Science in Teaching Degrees (M.A.T./M.S.T.)

M.A.T. and M.S.T. for Initial Licensure

The M.A.T./M.S.T. Initial Licensure programs are designed for students who have graduated with a major in liberal arts or sciences and who wish to prepare for teaching in the secondary school, for experienced teachers in secondary schools who do not yet hold a license, and for recent college graduates already prepared to teach at the secondary level who want to earn an additional area of expertise and/or licensure. These degrees are coordinated with the appropriate Graduate School of the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences department and require more coursework in Arts and Sciences than the M.Ed. degree in Secondary Teaching. Only one application to the Lynch School is necessary for admission.

Students may prepare in the following disciplines: Biology, Chemistry, Earth and Space Science, English, History, Mathematics, or Physics.

Programs are described under the section of this manual on programs in Teacher Education/Special Education and Curriculum and Instruction.

Master of Arts Degree (M.A.)

The Master of Arts degree is given in the following areas:

  • School Counseling
  • Mental Health Counseling
  • Research and Evaluation Methods  

Master of Science Degree (M.S.)

The Master of Science degree is given in the following area:

  • Applied Statistics and Psychometrics
  • Data Science

These programs are described in each departmental section of this catalog.

Course Credit

A minimum of 30 graduate credits is required for a master’s degree. Specific programs may require more credits. No formal minor is required. All graduate students cannot transfer more than six graduate credits from another institution. Only courses in which a student has received a grade of B or better, and which have not been applied to a prior degree, will be accepted. If approved, the transfer course and credit, but not the grade, will be recorded on the student’s academic record. Credit received for courses completed more than ten years prior to a student’s admission to his or her current degree program are not acceptable for transfer. A Masters Transfer Request Form should be completed and signed by the student’s academic advisor and then sent, along with an official transcript from the institution, to the Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid, and Student Services.

Programs of Study

In the second semester of matriculation, students must complete a Program of Study in consultation with their academic advisor and/or the Associate Director of Student Services in the Office for Graduate Admission, Financial Aid, and Student Services. Program of Study forms are available on the Lynch School website at the  Master's Program  page. These forms must be approved and filed with the Associate Dean of Students.

The Department of Teaching, Curriculum, and Society (TCS) prepares educational leaders for instructional and administrative roles in public and private schools, in institutions of higher education, and in related organizations. The intent is to provide a blend of scholarship, disciplined inquiry, and professional experiences that will develop the sound understanding, practical skills, ethical values, and social responsibilities that are required of competent educators.

Student programs are individualized under the guidance of a faculty advisor, with special consideration given to each student’s career goals and licensure requirements. The list of specific courses required for each program is available on the Lynch School website under Programs of Study.

Areas of Concentration

Programs and courses in Teacher Education are designed to prepare educators in the areas of elementary and secondary teaching, early childhood education, and special education. In addition, master’s programs are available in Curriculum and Instruction and Global Perspectives, along with a doctoral program in Curriculum and Instruction. Teacher preparation programs are designed for individuals interested in working in elementary and secondary schools, both public and private, as well as early childhood and special needs programs and facilities. The Lynch School prepares outstanding teachers in both theoretical and practical dimensions of instruction. The doctoral program in Curriculum and Instruction prepares students for college and university teaching, research positions, and/or school leadership positions.

Master’s candidates can include the Teaching English Language Learners (TELL). TELL prepares educators to teach bilingual learners in English-only classrooms, while the certificate requires students to complete EDUC7621 Bilingualism, Second Language and Literacy Development and EDUC6346 Teaching Bilingual Students, as well as requires students to work with English language learners in English-only or Dual-Language classrooms, respectively.

Endorsement of candidates for initial Massachusetts teaching licensure is a collaborative effort between the student’s Lynch School supervisor and cooperating teacher. The Lynch School offers graduate programs designed to prepare students for teaching licensure at the master’s and C.A.E.S. levels. A student seeking licensure must be admitted as a degree candidate. Programs are approved by the Interstate Certification Compact (ICC), allowing students easier access to licensure outside Massachusetts.

The following are licenses available from the state department of Massachusetts through completion of a Lynch School program:

  • Early Childhood Teacher
  • Elementary Teacher
  • Secondary Education Teacher of English, Mathematics, History, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Earth Science
  • Specialist Teacher of Students with Moderate Support Needs (pre-K–8, 5–12)
  • Specialist Teacher of Students with Extensive Support Needs (pre-K–12)  

Note: Students who plan to seek licensure in states other than Massachusetts should check the licensure requirements in those states. Students seeking licensure in Massachusetts must pass the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL).

Practicum Experiences

Practicum experiences are an essential part of the curriculum in licensure programs and should be planned with the respective faculty advisor early in the student’s program. Practicum experiences for licensure in Teacher Education are offered at the Initial Licensure level for Massachusetts. Students seeking licensure in Massachusetts also must pass the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL).

All field experiences for students enrolled in Lynch School degree programs are arranged and approved through the Office of Field Placement and Partnership Outreach (Campion 102, 617-552-4206, prac@bc.edu ).

The following are prerequisites for students who are applying for practica and clinical experiences:

  • GPA of B or better (3.0 or above)
  • Satisfactory completion of required pre-practica or waiver from the Assistant Dean, Field Placement
  • Completion of 80 percent of the course work related to required Education courses, including methods courses in the content area and courses required for initial licensure
  • Application in the Office of Field Placement and Partnership Outreach  

A full practicum is characterized by the five professional standards as required by the Massachusetts Department of Education. Student teachers must demonstrate competence in these five standards during their practicum experience: plans curriculum and instruction, delivers effective instruction, manages classroom climate and operation, promotes equity, and meets professional responsibilities.

If, for any reason, a student is unable to complete the full practicum, an extended practicum (additional time in the field) will be required by arrangement of the Assistant Dean, Field Placement.

Placement sites for local field experiences are in Boston and neighboring areas. Students are responsible for providing their own transportation to and from these schools. Transportation to schools often requires that the student have a car; however, some schools are accessible by public transportation. Carpooling is encouraged. If transportation cannot be independently arranged, students will be given preference for locations that are accessible via public transportation.

Teaching, Curriculum, and Society Programs

Master of education (m.ed.) in early childhood education.

The master’s degree program in Early Childhood Education focuses on developmentally appropriate practices and critical thinking skills. This program is appropriate for students who wish to be prepared to teach children who are typically developing as well as children with moderate disabilities in a general education, pre-K–2 classroom. Students can enter the program without teaching licensure. The prerequisite for either program is a college degree with an Arts and Sciences major or equivalent. Students who have majored in other areas, such as business or engineering, should consult the Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid and Student Services.

At completion of the program, students will be able to demonstrate:

  • The teacher candidate will promote the learning and growth of all students by providing high-quality and coherent instruction, designing and administering authentic and meaningful student assessments, analyzing the student performance and growth data, using the data to improve instruction, providing students with constructive feedback on an ongoing basis, and continuously refining learning objectives.
  • The teacher candidate will promote the learning and growth of all students through instructional practices that establish high expectations, create a safe and effective classroom environment, and demonstrate cultural proficiency.
  • The teacher candidate will promote the learning and growth of all students through ethical, culturally proficient, skilled and collaborative practice.
  • The teacher candidate will demonstrate an inquiry stance by collecting and reporting data on pupil outcomes for the purpose of assessing, teaching, and modifying instructional practice.
  • The teacher candidate will identify policies and practices that contribute to systemic inequities in education and be aware of how his or her own background experiences are influenced by these systems, and recognize a professional responsibility to promote and practice principles of social justice teaching.

Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Elementary Education

The Elementary Education program leads to licensure in grades 1–6. The program stresses a humanistic approach to teaching that is both developmentally appropriate and intellectually challenging. Graduate students participating in the Elementary Education program will learn to promote student development, how to teach for social justice, and how to reflect on practice to improve instruction. They will be prepared to work with students of a variety of backgrounds creating classroom environments that engage all students.

  • The teacher candidate will promote the learning and growth of all students through instructional practices that establish high expectations, create a safe and effective classroom environment, demonstrate cultural proficiency, and knowledge about language challenges in academic settings.
  • The teacher candidate will promote the learning and growth of all students through ethical, cultural proficient, skilled, and collaborative practice.
  • The teacher candidate will identify policies and practices that contribute to systemic inequalities in education and be aware of how his or her own background experiences are influenced by these systems, and recognize a professional responsibility to promote and practice principles of social justice teaching.  

The prerequisite for the program is a bachelor’s degree with an Arts and Sciences or interdisciplinary major or equivalent. No prior teaching licensure is required for admission. The program of study includes foundations and professional courses, and practicum experiences. Courses of study are carefully planned with the faculty advisor to ensure that both degree requirements and licensure requirements are fulfilled.

For the applicants seeking a master’s in Elementary Education, undergraduate transcripts will be audited for mathematics courses. It is expected that applicants have completed a two 3-credit mathematics course equivalent in Arts and Sciences. If applicants do not fulfill this requirement, they will be advised to take the needed courses.

Master's Programs (M.Ed., M.A.T., M.S.T., and C.A.E.S.) in Secondary Education

Students in secondary education can pursue either a Master of Education (M.Ed.), a Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.), or a Master of Science in Teaching (M.S.T.). These degree programs lead to (8–12) licensure in one of the following disciplines: Biology, Chemistry, Earth and Space Science, English, Foreign Language (Spanish or French), History, Mathematics, or Physics.

Upon completion of the program in Secondary Education graduates will be able to:

  • The teacher candidate will promote the learning and growth of all students by providing high-quality and coherent instruction, designing and administering authentic and meaningful student assessments, analyzing student performance and growth data, using this data to improve instruction, providing students with constructive feedback on an ongoing basis, and continuously refining learning objectives.
  • The teacher candidate will promote the learning and growth of all students through effective partnerships with families, caregivers, community members, and organizations.
  • The teacher candidate will promote the learning and growth of all students through ethical, culturally proficient, skilled, and collaborative practice.
  • The teacher candidate will promote an inquiry stance of critical reflection about personal practice through individual and collaborative inquiry in service of improving pupil academic, emotional, and social learning.  

The prerequisite for the program is a bachelor’s degree with a liberal arts major in the field of desired licensure or an equivalent. Students who do not have the prerequisite courses must take discipline area courses before being admitted into a degree program. All prerequisite courses must be taken before taking the practicum. Check with the Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid, and Student Services (617-552-4214; gsoe@bc.edu ) if you have questions.

In addition to required courses in the field of education, secondary education master’s degrees require a number of courses taken at the graduate level in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences department of specialization. M.Ed. students take a minimum of two graduate courses, and M.A.T./M.S.T. students take five graduate courses in their disciplinary area. Courses of study are carefully planned with a faculty advisor. All of the master’s programs leading to licensure in secondary education include practicum experiences in addition to coursework. M.A.T./M.S.T. applicants file only one application to the Lynch School. All Lynch School admissions requests should be addressed to Boston College, The Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid, and Student Services, Lynch School of Education and Human Development, Campion Hall 135, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3813, telephone 617-552-4214, or e-mail  gsoe@bc.edu .

Master of Education (M.Ed./C.A.E.S.) in Curriculum and Instruction

The master’s degree program in Curriculum and Instruction consists of a planned program with a minimum of 30 graduate credit hours. Four courses in Curriculum and Instruction are required. Programs of study are planned in consultation with a faculty advisor to meet each candidate’s career goals and needs. A variety of areas of concentration are available for students to select.

This degree program does not lead to licensure, nor are students in this program eligible to apply for supervised practicum experiences. This program is for:

  • U.S. students who already possess an initial license and want to enhance learning further in their area of licensure;
  • International students who wish to engage with foundational and leading edge thinking and thinkers on curriculum, pedagogy, and educational reform;
  • All candidates who want to explore new areas of interest such as policy, teacher leadership, teaching English Language Learners, universal design for learning, assessment, and special education;
  • Students interested in Curriculum Design and Instructional Design;
  • Private school educators, Boston College students enrolled in the fifth-year program, and educators from areas such as publishing, curriculum design, and museum education;
  • Classroom teachers who wish to become educational leaders in their schools and districts.  

At the completion of the program, students will be able to:

  • Develop and clarify their philosophy of education, in particular, their beliefs regarding the purposes and processes of effective curricular organization;
  • Become familiar with different ways to conceptualize a school curriculum and with major curriculum designers, both past and present;
  • Assess their own experiences with educational and curricular change as a means to gain greater insight into educational and institutional change processes writ large;
  • Examine approaches to multicultural education, anti-racist education, and inclusion that aim to transform the curriculum;
  • Explore the tensions and possibilities that face teachers day-in and day-out in the current social and political context;
  • Learn alternative strategies for assessment that provide multiple and authentic measures of student learning;
  • Analyze existing curricula in terms of various philosophical orientations;
  • Examine implications and applications of learning theories as drawn from teachers in elementary and secondary schools as well as from professionals working in higher education and contexts outside of formal schooling;
  • Consider how school curricula and pedagogical practices can be structured to promote social justice and democratic citizenship.

Special Education Licensure Programs

Master of education (m.ed./c.a.e.s.) in special education in moderate support needs, grades pre-k–8 and grades 5–12.

This program prepares teachers to work with students with mild to moderate disabilities (also known as high incidence disabilities) such as: attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, specific learning disability, emotional and behavioral disorders, and mild developmental disabilities—including autism spectrum disorders. Based on the program option they select, students will learn about assessment and instructional practices at the elementary or secondary schooling levels, consistent with teacher licensure options in Massachusetts and many other states.

The goal of the program is to prepare teachers to work in a variety of roles including: lead teacher, special education teacher, and learning specialist, as well as to collaborate with general education regular teachers and educators, other services providers and parents. The program leads to initial licensure. Students who have not earned general education licensure will be required to take additional courses. At completion of the program, students will be able to demonstrate:

  • How to develop learning goals and experiences responsive to the developmental and learning needs of students with special needs, including ways that are responsive to language, cultural, and family backgrounds;
  • How to work collaboratively with students and professional colleagues in a variety of instructional settings;
  • How to plan individually-appropriate curriculum through the IEP as well as in inclusive classroom settings;
  • How to use formal and informal assessments to plan instruction for pupils in ways that reduce bias and to monitor learning progress;
  • How to use evidence-based practices to advance the learning of students with disabilities. Practices will include uses of technology and augmentative and alternative communication;
  • How to plan for and work with students and colleagues for successful transition preparation;
  • How to use ethical and professional practices that respond to language, cultural, and familial diversity.  

Applicants who have completed a regular education preparation program can enter directly into the program. Applicants with no previous regular education preparation program must apply for both regular and special education programs. For this reason, students become licensed in regular and special education. Financial aid is available in the form of paid internship experiences in local school systems and in some private schools.

Master of Education (M.Ed./C.A.E.S.) in Special Education for Extensive Support Needs, Pre-K–12

The Boston College program in Severe and Multiple Disabilities prepares teachers to work with students who have moderate to severe intellectual disability, autism, and additional disabilities (such as visual impairment, deafness, cerebral palsy, and medical conditions). The program leads to eligibility for the Massachusetts teaching license in Severe Disabilities. A specialization in autism is available. No prior teaching license is required for admission. The Program of Study includes two routes, one for those who already have a teaching license (in any area) and one for those who do not. The Severe and Multiple Disabilities Program is founded on close linkages between current research and best practices in teaching. Students may be enrolled on a full or part-time basis. At completion of the program, students will be able to demonstrate:

  • How to teach to the strengths and needs of all students with severe disabilities, including those with additional sensory disabilities;
  • How to implement evidence-based practices and best practices to apply when assessing and teaching children with severe and multiple disabilities;
  • How to be fully competent in writing the appropriate sections of the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and as a participant in associated meetings;
  • How to select assessment instruments appropriate to each child and to conduct assessments to produce findings that support valued and meaningful instruction;
  • How to engage parents in the planning and generalization of their child’s educational program;
  • How to plan, implement, and evaluate comprehensive communication systems in collaboration with others;
  • How to teach content from the general curriculum as well as functional academics, skills of daily living, prevocational and vocational skills, play and social-emotional competencies to address the needs of the whole child;
  • How to keep meaningful data on student learning and behavior and to make data-based decisions;
  • How to create learning environments that promote engagement and learning;
  • How to promote the learning and growth of all students through ethical, culturally proficient, skilled, and collaborative practice.  

For those students employed in approved Intensive Special Needs programs, practicum requirements are individualized and may be completed within the work setting. The program of study expands on and builds upon a prerequisite education foundation through the development of competencies that are research and field-based and consistent with the highest professional standards of the field.

Dual Licensure Programs in Special Education

  • M.Ed. in Elementary Education and Extensive Support Needs
  • M.Ed. in Elementary Education and Moderate Support Needs
  • M.Ed. in Moderate and Extensive Support Needs
  • M.Ed. in Secondary Education and Moderate Support Needs

Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Global Perspectives: Teaching, Curriculum, and Learning Environments

This program is for teachers who see how the world is changing. They believe deeply in the mission and potential of equitable education and want to be able to prepare their students for the future. The program will explore educational viewpoints across a wide range of cultures and countries. Based on these perspectives, graduates will learn how to design effective curriculum to serve diverse and increasingly globalized student populations and improve the common good. Through conducting a problem-solving form of research involving one or more cycles of actions and reflection—drawing both on international research perspectives and generating solutions in local contexts—graduates will develop valuable collaborative action research skills. The program welcomes the participation of individuals or teams of educators ready to collaborate. Teachers and other educational professionals with a bachelor’s degree and two or more years of professional experience in schools and other educational related settings preferred. The program can be completed totally online. Graduates from the Global Perspectives program will learn to:

  • Develop self-knowledge, meaning, and a sense of purpose as an educator;
  • Create effective learning environments (through curriculum design and instructional practice) that reflect an increasingly globalized student population;
  • Identify, pose, and solve education problems, and assess opportunities;
  • Apply action research studies in response to authentic problems encountered in a variety of educational settings;
  • Contribute to and access a robust collaborative network of educators working to address today's educational challenges.

Teaching English Language Learners (TELL) Certificate Program

For candidates in a licensure program.

All students who successfully complete a teacher licensure program in the Lynch School will earn the required Massachusetts Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) Endorsement. This SEI endorsement meets state regulations for working with bilingual learners/English language learners as a core academic teacher in Massachusetts. In addition, however, Lynch offers the option of the Teaching English Language Learners (TELL) Certificate Program, a deeper and more extensive preparation for working with bilingual learners/English Language Learners. For candidates in a licensure program, this entails adding one course: EDUC7621 Bilingualism, Second Language and Literacy Development for graduates. All TELL certificate program participants are strongly encouraged to work with ELLs in their full practicum sites.

For Candidates in a Non-Licensure Program

Students who are not enrolled in a teaching licensure program may also complete the TELL certificate program. These students complete EDUC7621 Bilingualism, Second Language and Literacy Development as well as EDUC6346 Teaching Bilingual Students and are required to work with English language learners in an instructional setting. The TELL certificate program for students who are not enrolled in a licensure program is ideal for candidates seeking to work with English language learners abroad or in contexts in the United States where Massachusetts SEI Teacher Endorsement is not required. For more information please contact Dr. Mariela Paez,  paezma@bc.edu  or Dr. Anne Homza,  anne.homza@bc.edu .

Donovan Urban Teaching Scholars Program

The Donovan Urban Teaching Scholars program is open to master’s students specifically interested in urban teaching. To qualify for the program, students must be accepted into one of the Master of Education licensure programs in teaching listed above. All Donovan Scholars must complete a teacher education program in Early Childhood, Elementary, Secondary, or Moderate Special Needs. A cohort of 30 students is selected each year from students applying to an M.Ed. teacher licensure program and financially supported from the Donovan Scholars program, which provides a minimum of 50% tuition remission.

Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Jesuit Education in a Global World

Boston College’s new online master's program prepares students to be excellent teachers in the Ignatian tradition—reinforcing Jesuit values of social justice, formation, and reflection. Students emerge ready to thrive in traditional and non-traditional global education settings.

Jesuit Studies courses prompt students to learn about the Jesuit and Ignatian teaching traditions and inspirations, while Global Perspectives courses provide the international lens that will enable these educators to best meet the needs of their students. The breadth of content in the Global Perspectives courses also allows students to select courses based on their interests and needs.

This program consists of 12 courses for a total of 30 credits and may be completed in one and a half to two years. The program is fully online. Students have the option to take two electives that include in-person experiences. This degree program does not lead to licensure.

The C.A.E.S. course of study is designed for currently licensed educators who already have a master’s degree and seek a higher level of specialization in Curriculum and Instruction. For further information on the C.A.E.S. program in Curriculum and Instruction, contact Boston College, The Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid, and Student Services, Lynch School of Education and Human Development, Campion Hall 135,140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3813, telephone 617-552-4214, or e-mail gsoe@bc.edu .

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Curriculum and Instruction

The doctoral program in Curriculum and Instruction is for people who hold, or plan to assume, leadership positions in curriculum, instruction, and teacher education in schools, school systems, or other related instructional environments. It is also designed for candidates who are preparing for a career in curriculum and instruction or teacher education at the college, university, or staff development level.

Courses and related program experiences are designed to develop scholarly methods of inquiry in teaching, teacher education, curriculum development and evaluation, and professional development. There is a complementary emphasis on designing and researching effective instruction. Students who plan to work in school settings may pursue programs that will help them develop expertise in several areas of instruction such as mathematics, literacy, technology, science, history, or combinations thereof. Students who plan to work at the post-secondary level may pursue specialties in curriculum or teacher preparation in a specific subject area.

The program of study requires a research core that will familiarize students with quantitative and qualitative research methodology and develop the candidate’s expertise for analyzing and conducting research. Also required are advanced-level core courses in curriculum and teaching theory, research, and practice.

Upon graduation, Ph.D. students in our program should be able to:

  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of effective practices regarding college-level teaching and/or professional development with in-service teachers.
  • Students will demonstrate the ability to conduct original, empirical and/or conceptual research related to topics in curriculum and instruction.
  • Students will participate in regional, national and/or international conferences in the broad areas of curriculum and instruction.
  • Students will learn how to create an academic paper at the “publishable” level of quality on a topic related to the student’s area of specialization within the broad field of curriculum and instruction.  

Programs of study are carefully planned on an individual basis to help candidates meet their goals related to scholarship, professional, and career paths. Throughout their doctoral programs, candidates work closely with faculty in research and teaching activities related to one of four areas of specialization: Language, Literacy, and Culture; Critical Perspectives on Schooling: Race, Class, Gender, Disabilities Specialization; Leadership, Policy, and Educational Change; and Math, Science, and Technology.

An unprecedented​ ​venture in American higher education, the Department of Formative Education (DFE) is devoted to the interdisciplinary exploration of questions at once perennial and pressing: How do we educate whole persons for meaningful lives? How do we cultivate community? How do we nurture vision and values? In DFE, faculty ​conduct groundbreaking research​ ​on the cultivation of character, the expansion of imagination, and realization of purpose.

Through An Expansive View of Education, we propose that:

  • Education involves both knowing and doing: understanding the world and changing it.
  • Education goes beyond the transmission of discrete knowledge and skills to encompass the transformation of the whole person.
  • Education must address the full scope of our humanity: intellectual and practical, moral and civic, aesthetic and spiritual.
  • Education in school is just one aspect of a life-wide and lifelong formative process.
  • Education is not a technical matter of finding efficient means to given ends, but calls for judgment about the worthiness of the ends themselves.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Formative Education

Drawing faculty from the diverse disciplinary traditions of history and philosophy, anthropology and humanistic psychology, design thinking and the learning sciences, this program prepares future scholars and practitioners to examine the normative dimensions of formal and informal education, the development of the whole human being in sociocultural context, and the grand social challenges that now demand a fuller educational response.

The Ph.D. in Formative Education consists of 14 courses equal to 54 credits and includes an ongoing colloquium. Students with a master's degree are expected to complete the program in 4–5 years. Students without a master's degree are expected to complete the program in 5–7 years.

The Department of Educational Leadership and Higher Education prepares educational administrators and leaders of educational institutions ranging from pre-schools, to K-12, public, Catholic, charter schools to universities, to post graduate institutions. Graduates are prepared to bring perspectives from sociology, psychology, history, and philosophy, as well as social justice and public policy to their analysis and articulation of educational issues. Course work and field-based learning experiences develop reflective practitioners who integrate theory with practice. Courses in the department encompass these primary themes:

  • Social justice
  • Reflective practice
  • Partnerships and collegiality  

Courses in the various programs of study explore how economic, societal, political, and global forces change the way people think about schooling, educational leadership, and the post-secondary administration. To keep up with the constantly changing world there have been broad shifts in the knowledge and skills required of educational leaders today:

  • From technical skills to interpersonal skills
  • From command and direction to consensus building and motivating
  • From resource allocation to being accountable for learning processes and outcomes
  • From campus administrators to coordinator of institutional and community services
  • From policy recipient to shaping and informing policy  

These shifts have been reflected in courses throughout the Educational Leadership and Higher education programs. The list of specific courses required for each program is available on the Lynch School website under Programs of Study.

Programs in Educational Leadership

Master of education (m.ed.) in educational leadership and policy.

The Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Educational Leadership and Policy prepares graduates to assume leadership roles both within schools and within the greater community. Prospective applicants are diverse; they include educators, policymakers, religious officials, community-based organizers, and professionals seeking to make meaningful changes in the field of education. Often, applicants have a background in teaching and aspire to expand their leadership beyond the classroom. While teachers work directly with students, educational leaders work to determine the systems serving students.

The program, characterized by discernment and critical reflection, aims to educate the whole person to live a life of meaning and purpose. Drawing on social-justice values and leadership strategies, graduates will inform organizational cultures and processes, boldly improving equitable opportunities for traditionally marginalized students. Graduates, trained in critical inquiry and the use of evidence, will approach student development from a holistic perspective, engaging the whole community to support the whole child. The program can be completed fully online or as a hybrid program.

We serve both students who are seeking a master’s degree as well as students who are looking to obtain additional training but do not require a master’s degree.

The M.Ed. in Educational Leadership and Policy is a program approved and monitored by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education in Massachusetts (DESE). Formal learning outcomes were developed by the DESE and apply to all students, whether or not they are seeking licensure. They are as follows:

  • Instructional Leadership: The school leader promotes the learning and growth of all students and the success of all staff by cultivating a shared vision that makes effective teaching and learning the central focus of schooling.
  • Management and Operations: The school leader promotes the learning and growth of all students and the success of all staff by ensuring a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment, using resources to implement appropriate curriculum, staffing and scheduling.
  • Family and Community Engagement: The school leader promotes the learning and growth of all students and the success of all staff through effective partnerships with families, community organizations, and other stakeholders that support the mission of the school and district.
  • Professional Culture: The school leader promotes success for all students by nurturing and sustaining a school culture of reflective practice, high expectations, and continuous learning for staff.  

Graduates from the Educational Leadership and Policy program will learn to:

  • Practice critical self-reflection and discernment.
  • Foster an ethical, mission-driven school or educational environment/organization.
  • Create structures that advance organizational and professional learning.
  • Observe, assess, and support effective teaching and instructional practices.
  • Advance equity and agency across multiple constituencies.

Certificate of Advanced Educational Specialization Degree Program (C.A.E.S.)

The C.A.E.S. course of study is designed for currently practicing educators who already have a master’s degree and who do not plan to pursue a doctoral degree but seek a higher level of specialization or professional licensure in a particular field. For further information on the C.A.E.S. program in Educational Leadership, contact Boston College, The Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid, and Student Services, Lynch School of Education and Human Development, Campion Hall 135,140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3813, telephone 617-552-4214, or e-mail gsoe@bc.edu .

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Educational Leadership (PSAP)

The Lynch School offers a three-year accelerated doctoral program for practicing school administrators—the Professional School Administrators Program (PSAP). This program provides an opportunity for full-time administrators to obtain their superintendent licensure and a Doctor of Education in educational leadership. The Lynch School of Education partners with the Massachusetts Association of School Superintendents and Teachers21 to prepare future superintendents and school leaders for public, Catholic, charter, and independent schools. The program is grounded in the core values of the Lynch School, with coursework focusing on leadership for social justice, school reform, community building, and leadership for learning. Admission to this program is offered in alternate years and the next cohort will be admitted in 2019.

Students who complete the Ed.D. program (PSAP) are expected to demonstrate:

  • Competence in instructional leadership (district level leadership; ethics and equity; culturally proficient leadership; needs of diverse learners; collaborative; reflective; open to feedback; strong oral and written communication; self-directed; confident).
  • Competence in management and operations (planning and implementing change; budget development; human capital analysis; school committee relationships; strategic thinking; teaming skills).
  • Competence in family and community engagement (culturally proficient leadership; educational equity audit and diversity planning; professional development implementation; community relationships; crisis communication).
  • Competence in professional culture (self-awareness; culturally proficient leadership; team leadership; reflectiveness and self- assessment of leadership).
  • Competence in advanced level data collection, analysis, and interpretation of research in the field of educational leadership.  

Applicants must be currently practicing in their administrative area. More information is available from Boston College, The Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid, and Student Services, Lynch School of Education and Human Development, Campion Hall 135, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3813, telephone 617-552-4214, or e-mail gsoe@bc.edu .

Programs in Higher Education

Master of arts (m.a.) in higher education.

The master’s degree in Higher Education prepares students for entry-level and mid-level positions in student affairs as well as in other professional areas in colleges, universities, and policy organizations. The M.A. program consists of 30 credit hours of required and elective coursework and field experiences. Most students complete the program in two academic years. Students with substantial professional experience have the opportunity to complete the program full-time in one academic year and one summer. It is also possible to complete the program on a part-time basis. In addition to a core of foundational courses in higher education, the program offers students the opportunity to focus on one of the following concentrations:

  • Student Affairs: This concentration prepares students to work as professionals in functional areas of student affairs such as student activities, residence life, admissions, service learning, orientation, career services, and academic advising. Students gain an understanding of the foundations of higher education and student affairs and are able to link theory and practice through class projects and field experience placements.
  • Higher Education Administration: This concentration prepares students to work as professionals in colleges and universities, policy organizations, and advocacy organizations. Students gain an understanding of the foundations of higher education with a focus on law, policy, and administration and are able to link theory and practice through field experience placements.
  • Spirituality, Faith, and Formation: The top-ranked Catholic graduate school of education in the country, the Lynch School offers the only master’s degree in higher education that prepares students to shape the policies, practices, and intellectual life of Catholic colleges and universities while supporting the continuing formation of diverse students in their own journey of faith and spiritual development. This course of study integrates theories of student development, sociology of religion, institutional culture, leadership formation, policy development, and theological topics in a Catholic higher education setting.
  • International Perspectives: As the top-ranked Catholic graduate school of education in the country, the Lynch School offers the only master's degree in higher education that prepares you to shape the policies, practices, and intellectual life of Catholic colleges and universities while supporting the continuing formation of diverse groups of students. This concentration integrates theories of student development with the sociology of religion, institutional culture, leadership formation, policy development, and theology within a Catholic higher education setting.  

At the completion of the program, students must demonstrate:

  • Knowledge of the important issues facing higher education.
  • Knowledge of foundational, methodological and concentration content.
  • Demonstrated competence in communication skills, cooperation and teamwork, work quality and quantity, and job knowledge as assessed in the Field Experience Performance Review and Development Plan.  

Faculty advisors work with students on an individual basis to design programs of study and applied field experiences according to the individual student’s background, interests, and goals.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Higher Education

The doctoral program is designed to prepare experienced practitioners for senior administrative and policy-making posts and careers in teaching/research in the field of higher education. The program has several programmatic foci that permit students to specialize in an area of interest.

Among these are:

  • Administration and policy analysis in higher education
  • Student development and student affairs
  • International and comparative higher education
  • Finance and economics of higher education
  • Organizational culture and change
  • The academic profession

In addition, students may choose other topics which are relevant to the administration of post-secondary education and to research. Upon completing the program, students should demonstrate:

  • Knowledge of the important issues facing high education from a multi-disciplinary perspective (history, sociology, philosophy, psychology, economic, and political science).
  • Knowledge of theoretical and empirical knowledge in the field.
  • Knowledge of managerial and policy-making issues in the field.
  • Knowledge of research methodologies and research ethics and applications.

A special feature is the Center for International Higher Education, linking the Lynch School’s Higher Education program with Jesuit colleges and universities worldwide. This initiative, as well as other international efforts, provides a significant global focus to the higher education program.

The doctoral program requires 54 credit hours of coursework, 48 of which must be beyond the 7000 level. At least six credit hours of dissertation direction is needed. The Ph.D. program is organized into several tiers of study. These include a core of foundational studies in higher education; methodological courses; specialized elective courses in higher education and related fields, including research seminars; and research. In the context of a rigorous selection of courses, students are encouraged to pursue their own specific interests in higher education.

Executive Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Higher Education

The program leverages the resources of the Lynch School's prestigious Center for International Higher Education to integrate course topics into the global higher education context. As an extension of Boston College's scholarship in Catholic education, students have the option to pursue a concentration in Catholic Higher Education—currently the only graduate program with this unique degree concentration in the United States.

Designed for experienced administrators, with a minimum of 5–10 years of experience in higher education, this part-time, three-year program pairs online coursework during the academic year with in-person week-long summer residencies. The program consists of 14 courses for a total of 48 credits. The program culminates in a practice-based capstone project that integrates content across the curriculum.

Learning Outcomes

  • C ritically analyze contemporary issues in American and international higher education to guide data-informed decision making
  • Lead change and innovation in higher education through the effective mobilization of physical, financial, technological, and human resources
  • Develop a learner-centered, whole-person mindset that advances diversity, equity, and inclusion in higher education
  • Resolve complex challenges in higher education through the integration of design-thinking and strategic planning
  • Produce professional writing connected to scholarly and research literature that addresses current problems of practice in higher education
  • For those pursuing a concentration in Catholic Higher education: Articulate and strategically animate and assess the characteristics of a vibrant Catholic college and university in the twenty-first century

Department of Counseling, Developmental, and Education Psychology

The Department of Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology (CDEP) department promotes psychosocial well-being, positive social change, and social justice through innovative and rigorous teaching, research, and professional training in applied and counseling psychology. The department engages in psychological research and its applications to advance more equitable and socially just policies and practices in partnership with diverse local, national and global communities. CDEP programs prepare students to engage in culturally informed research and practice within and across disciplines and settings.

Programs in Counseling and Counseling Psychology

Programs in Counseling and Counseling Psychology have, as a mission, the preparation of mental health counselors and school counselors at the master’s level and counseling psychologists at the Ph.D. level for competent professional practice in schools, universities, and a variety of non-school health care delivery settings.

The primary focus of the multi-level program is the facilitation of healthy functioning in clients and a respect for individual and cultural differences. Competencies are developed in psychological theories of personality and behavior, human development, counseling strategies, and career development. Developmental concepts are integrated with supervised practice through field placements and varied instructional approaches.

The list of specific courses required for each program is available on the Lynch School website under Programs of Study.

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Mental Health Counseling

The Lynch School’s Master of Arts program in Mental Health Counseling prepares students for careers as mental health counselors and/or to pursue doctoral studies in psychology or other fields. A core component of the Master's in Psychology and Counseling Accreditation Council's (MPCAC)-accredited program, consistent with the University’s broader mission and Jesuit tradition, is an emphasis on social justice. Graduates are prepared to serve the mental health needs of individuals, groups, communities, and systems across contexts and cultures, and to promote and advocate for social change.

The program's training emphasizes both academic and applied experiences that incorporate developmental-contextual and multicultural frameworks to understand and promote mental health and well-being in diverse populations. Students receive a broad background in counseling and mental health theories, develop strong counseling skills, engage in reflective scholarship, gain core professional competencies, and master scientifically informed best practices. They graduate ready to practice contemporary counseling.

The Master of Arts degree in Counseling is a two-year program with two tracks:

  • The 60-credit hour program meets the educational requirements for licensure as a Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Graduates of this program are ready for entry-level counseling positions and, with postgraduate supervision and experience, prepared to obtain licensure and advanced skills/specialization. Students in the 60-credit sequence are expected to take one required course during the Summer Session. They may also take additional elective courses during the Summer Session if they wish to reduce their course load during the second year in the program. During the first year of the program students complete a year-long course, Foundations of Counseling I and II, which includes an intensive, counseling skills training lab experience. In the second year, students complete a combined Practicum-Internship experience of between 700 and 900 hours in a community setting while completing academic requirements.
  • The 48-credit program prepares students for further studies in counseling or fields in which a solid counseling foundation is valuable. Our graduates have gone on to pursue doctoral degrees in psychology and further studies in public policy, law, and business.

The program provides two options for concentration:

  • The new Integrated Behavioral Health (IBH) concentration serves as a pathway for students seeking to work as Mental Health Counselors in integrated medical settings. Our courses take a whole-person approach to health and are geared toward triaging clinical care, assessing social determinants of health, and utilizing short-term evidence-based psychotherapies. Integrated behavioral health care, a part of “whole-person care,” is a rapidly emerging emphasis of the practice of high-quality health care. Integrated behavioral health care blends care for medical conditions and behavioral health concerns that affect health and well-being in a single setting, or “medical home”. Students in this concentration will be required to complete a practicum in an integrated behavioral health setting where they will learn practical hands-on skills. The concentration can be taken by students in either the 48-credit or 60-credit track. Students should ensure they are registered for the Foundations of Counseling I & II courses specifically for Integrated Behavioral Health in their first year.
  • The Mental Health Counseling Urban Scholars Program builds on the Mental Health Counseling curriculum and clinical training. It will prepare you to work effectively with clients and partners in urban communities, including community mental health centers, public hospitals, and community-based clinics. Throughout your first year, you will receive unique training and monthly seminars on serving clients within urban clinical contexts. In the second year of the program, you will participate in a practicum in an urban mental health setting. MHC Urban Scholars are eligible to receive a scholarship of up to 50% tuition remission.

Each program requires students to complete a practicum experience. Please note: the Boston College M.A. in Mental Health Counseling meets licensure requirements in 47 states. The program does not meet licensure requirements in Kentucky or North Carolina. If you have any questions about licensure, please contact the Counseling Practicum Office at macounselingprac@bc.edu .

At completion of the program, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate foundational training in, and foster identification with, the field of counseling.
  • Become competent as practitioners and knowledgeable of the ways in which science influences practice and practice influences science.
  • Understand the nature of social justice in their professional work and to infuse this perspective into their practice.

Master of Arts (M.A.) in School Counseling

The School Counseling program is a 48-credit hour track that is accredited by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and that meets current Massachusetts requirements for initial licensure as a school counselor at the PreK-8 and/or the 5-12 grade levels. The M.A. in School Counseling is also accredited by the Master’s in Psychology and Counseling Accreditation Council (MPCAC) for the period of March 2017 through March 2027. The first year of the program is devoted primarily to course work; however, School Counseling students do spend one day a week at a school in their second semester to meet pre-practicum requirements. The second year of the program consists of a full-year, 600-hour practicum placement and the completion of remaining academic requirements. At completion of the program, students will be able to:

  • To demonstrate foundational training in, and foster identification with, the field of psychology generally, and counseling and school counseling, specifically.
  • Become competent as practitioners, and knowledgeable of the ways in which science influences practice and how practice can inform scientific investigation.
  • Promote social justice in their professional work.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Counseling Psychology (APA accredited)

The doctoral program in Counseling Psychology, through advanced course work and supervised internships, builds on prior graduate training and professional experience. Using a developmental framework and a scientist-practitioner model of training, the program helps students acquire the following competencies: ability to comprehend and critically analyze current literature in the field; understanding of major theoretical frameworks for counseling, personality, and career development; skills to combine research and scientific inquiry; knowledge and practice of a variety of assessment techniques; respect for and knowledge of diverse client populations; ability to provide supervision, consultation, and outreach; commitment to the ethical and legal standards of the profession including sensitivity to individual, gender, and cultural differences; and demonstrated competencies with a variety of individual and group counseling approaches in supervised internships.

At the completion of the program:

  • Students demonstrate foundational knowledge, and identification with, the field of psychology, generally and counseling psychology, specifically.
  • Students demonstrate competency as theorists, researchers, and scholars, who are knowledgeable of the ways in which practice influences science.
  • Students demonstrate competency as practitioners and are knowledgeable of the ways in which science influences practice.
  • Students demonstrate social justice practices in their professional work.  

The doctoral program in Counseling Psychology accepts applications from applicants with a master’s degree prior to applying as well as from applicants who wish to pursue their doctoral education directly after their undergraduate education (Direct Admit). The doctoral program (Ph.D.) in Counseling Psychology is accredited by the American Psychological Association (Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation, 750 First Street, NE, Washington, DC 20002; 202- 336-5979) and is designed to qualify candidates for membership in that organization and Division 17 (Counseling Psychology). The program is designed to provide many of the professional pre-doctoral educational requirements for licensure as a Psychologist in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and for inclusion in the National Register of Health Care Providers. Licensure requirements in Massachusetts include an additional year of post-doctoral supervised experience.

The entering doctoral student who has not completed all of the educational prerequisites for the M.A. in Counseling must complete them during the initial year of enrollment in the doctoral program. Decisions regarding this aspect of the student’s coursework will be based on a review of the student’s background by the assigned advisor and the director of doctoral training.

Once admitted, doctoral students are required to complete courses in each of the following broad areas that fulfill the basic professional training standards: scientific and professional ethics and standards, research design and methodology, statistical methods, psychological measurement, history and systems of psychology, biological bases of behavior, cognitive-affective bases of behavior, social bases of behavior, individual differences, and professional specialization.

The Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology requires a minimum five years of full-time academic study, doctoral comprehensives, and advanced practica, including a year of full-time internship and successful defense of a dissertation. Other departmental requirements for the Ph.D. are discussed above.

The theoretical orientation of the programs in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology is development and learning in sociocultural context. The programs are designed to develop expertise in integrating theory, research, and application to the development of children, adolescents, and adults.

Two degrees are offered: the master’s degree in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology and the doctoral degree in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology.

The doctoral program in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology accepts applications from applicants with a baccalaureate or master’s degree in psychology or a related field. Most applicants have some research experience as well as practice/education experience in the field.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology

We prepare graduate students to serve diverse populations in a variety of professional roles as teachers and researchers in colleges and universities and as researchers and leaders in applied settings, including schools, government agencies, and health and human services organizations. Faculty situate their work within the mission of the Lynch School, which is to improve human well-being through teaching, research, and service.

The focus of the Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology Program is on development and learning in sociocultural context. Areas of program expertise within the study of child development and child functioning include cognitive and socioemotional development from the preschool years through adolescence. We also have expertise on adult functioning in community settings. Development is examined, in both research and curriculum, across multiple, interactive contexts or levels.

These levels include:

Individual Functioning

  • Basic Processes
  • Individual Differences
  • Developmental Disabilities
  • Biological Bases of Behavior  

Interpersonal Processes

  • Family Relationships
  • Peer Relationships
  • Parenting  

Community, Cultural, and Public Policy

  • Schools and Learning Environments
  • Race and Ethnicity

Upon completion of the Ph.D. program, graduates will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the major concepts and theories in the field of child development.
  • Critically evaluate existing research and integrate research findings across studies.
  • Analyze applied and theoretical issues related to child development from different theoretical perspectives and based on prior research findings.
  • Develop research questions reflecting basic and applied issues in the areas of education, social policy, and human/community development.
  • Use appropriate methodology to design empirical studies addressing research questions.
  • Use a variety of quantitative and qualitative techniques for analyzing data.
  • Communicate research findings clearly and accurately in publications and presentations for both professional and lay audiences.
  • Teach courses in the field and the college and graduate level.  

The range of careers available to Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology graduates with a Ph.D. includes university teaching, research, advocacy, consultation, and positions in business, governmental agencies, and human service organizations.

The program guidelines promote active engagement in research with faculty mentors for all students throughout their doctoral program. In addition to this mentored training, the curriculum requires that students take core courses in (1) social, affective, and cognitive development and the contexts of development; (2) qualitative and quantitative research methods and statistics; (3) professional development and teaching preparation; and, (4) application to practice and policy. In addition, students develop expertise in targeted areas of psychology through selected elective courses and through their research and practice experiences. Finally, students with a particular interest in human rights and social justice can obtain a Certificate through the BC-based Center for Human Rights and International Justice.

Studies in Measurement, Evaluation, Statistics, and Assessment are designed to prepare researchers with specialized competence in testing, assessment, applied statistics, the evaluation of educational programs, and research methodology for the social sciences and human services.

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Research and Evaluation Methods

The Measurement, Evaluation, Statistics and Assessment (MESA) program at the Lynch School combines the study of research design, statistical methods, and testing and assessment with a research focus on major contemporary education policy issues. The program is designed to prepare students for research and academic careers in education, social sciences, and human services.

Upon completion of the M.A., graduates should be able to:

  • Understand the theory of research, evaluation, statistics, measurement and assessment methodology.
  • Critically analyze published quantitative and qualitative research.
  • Interpret and report quantitative and qualitative designs, procedures, and results.
  • Communicate research findings effectively.  

The master’s program prepares graduate students with fundamental skills in testing, assessment, the evaluation of educational innovations, and in quantitative and qualitative social science research methods. A minimum of 30 credit hours and satisfactory performance on a comprehensive examination are required for the M.A. degree.

Master of Science (M.S.) in Applied Statistics and Psychometrics

The Applied Statistics and Psychometrics program at the Lynch School combines the study of research design, statistical methods, and testing and assessment with a research focus on major contemporary education policy issues. The program is designed to prepare students for research and academic careers in education, social sciences and human services.

Upon completion of the M.S., graduates should be able to:

  • Understand the theory of applied statistics and psychometrics.
  • Conduct analyses using advanced procedures such as multiple regression, multivariate models, hierarchical linear modeling, causal modeling, and longitudinal analyses.
  • Design, conduct, analyze, interpret and report both Classical Test Theory and Item Response Theory analyses.

The MESA Master of Science meets the need for quantitative specialists to conduct statistical analyses, design quantitative research studies, and develop measurement scales for educational, social, behavioral, and health science research projects. This program meets the increasingly higher expectations of applied research organizations and funding agencies, (e.g., the Institute for Education Sciences and the National Science Foundation), for master’s-level specialists trained in quantitative designs, statistical procedures, and measurement methodology applicable to a wide variety of projects. A minimum of 30 credit hours and satisfactory performance on a comprehensive examination are required for the M.S. degree.

Master of Science (M.S.) in Data Science

In an era when data-driven decisions and systems influence every sector of business and society, talented professionals who bring an ethical framework to data science are more in demand than ever. The online M.S. in Data Science program empowers you to apply technical methods, employ an ethical lens, and utilize relevant management skills to address the needs of organizations and communities, preparing both experienced professionals and recent college graduates for rewarding careers in one of the world’s fastest-growing fields.

This program will enable you to:

  • Approach data science with a human-centered mindset by centering ethics, bias, and security and privacy issues that can influence findings and subsequent decision-making.
  • Apply ethical problem-framing and problem-solving methods to evaluate organizational and project needs, identify potential issues, and understand production-level solutions within a team focused on meeting their organization’s or client’s strategic goals.
  • Develop appropriate formalizations of project goals and apply statistical, mathematical, and data processing approaches to complex data analytic problems.
  • Develop data engineering and applied database management skills while considering ethics, accountability, and data privacy and standards.
  • Code in industry-standard programming languages for data science, machine learning, and statistical computing to solve a wide range of data mining and data science problems. 
  • Apply their experience with statistical analysis, machine learning, and deep learning tools to real-world scenarios to uncover critical insights in data projects for improved decision-making.
  • Interpret data and represent findings visually, orally, and in writing through visualizations, reports, and evidence-based storytelling techniques that ask the right questions and provide persuasive narratives to build consensus and improve outcomes.

The program consists of 12 courses for a total of 36 required credits. It is designed as a 2-year fully online program that is completed on a part-time basis of 2 courses per semester. Currently, the open is only available for a fall semester start. In order to ensure that all students graduating from the master's program have a fundamental understanding of the field that they are about to enter, they are required to complete a capstone project as well as a comprehensive examination covering the broad areas of the core courses.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Measurement, Evaluation, Statistics, and Assessment

This program prepares researchers with specialized competence in testing, assessment, the evaluation of educational innovations, and in quantitative and qualitative social science research methodology.

A student without a master’s degree may apply directly to the doctoral program in Measurement, Evaluation, Statistics, and Assessment; however, note that this Direct Admit option is appropriate only when the applicant has demonstrated exceptional academic achievement and has acquired relevant research experience.

Emphasis is on the research methodology and data analysis and includes advanced coursework in research design, statistical methods, and testing and assessment as well as seminars in statistical and measurement topics. MESA students have the opportunity to tailor coursework to their particular interests and background. The doctoral degree requires a minimum of 54 credits beyond a master’s and satisfactory completion of comprehensive exams and a dissertation. Students are expected to develop an understanding of modern techniques of test construction and evaluation, design of research and experiments, univariate and multivariate statistical analysis of data, and psychometric theory. Training and experience are provided in the use of specialized computer software for statistical analysis.

Upon completion of the Ph.D., graduates should be able to:

  • Construct both cognitive and affective measurement instruments and assessments.
  • Conduct original empirical research related to topics in education, evaluation, statistics, measurement, assessment, and policy.

Since the important issues in these areas require more than technical solutions, the program also attends to non-technical social, ethical, and legal issues. Care is taken to design programs of study and experience according to the individual student’s needs, interests, and goals. Students may choose an additional concentration in Developmental and Educational Psychology, Educational Policy and Reform, Curriculum and Instruction, Educational Leadership, or other areas.

Graduates of the program are qualified for academic positions in university departments of education and social sciences. They also are qualified for research and testing specialist positions in universities, foundations, local education agencies, state and regional educational organizations, and in research and development centers.

The Lynch School offers five dual degree programs in collaboration with the Boston College Law School, the Carroll School of Management, and the School of Theology and Ministry (STM).

Dual Degree Programs—Law and Education

The dual degree programs in law and education are designed for students interested in serving the combined legal and educational needs of students, families, and communities in our nation. They reflect the University’s mission to promote social justice and to prepare men and women for service to others. The programs prepare students to meet the needs of individuals who have traditionally not been well served by the nation’s schools. The programs are designed to serve the needs of persons who wish to combine knowledge about education and applied psychology with legal knowledge and skills to better serve their clients and constituencies. The programs offer an opportunity to further the University’s goals in promoting interdisciplinary inquiry and integrating the work of service providers.

Students admitted to the program may expect to receive both a master’s degree in Education (M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction or Educational Leadership or M.A. in Higher Education) and the Juris Doctor (J.D.) degrees in approximately three and a half years, or three years and two summers, rather than the four or more years such degrees would normally entail if taken separately. Students must matriculate and spend at least one semester of residence in the Lynch School.

Students seeking to pursue the J.D./M.Ed. or J.D./M.A. dual degree must file separate applications to, and be admitted by, both their intended Education program in the Lynch School and the Boston College Law School. Any student seeking licensure or human services licensure must meet all of the requirements in the Lynch School for that licensure. Students seeking licensure in Massachusetts must pass the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL).

All Lynch School admissions requests should be addressed to: Boston College, The Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid, and Student Services, Lynch School of Education and Human Development, Campion Hall 135, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3813, telephone 617-552-4214, or e-mail gsoe@bc.edu . The BC Law School accepts applications from mid-September through March 31 for the class entering in August. Contact them directly for further information at Office of Admissions, BC Law School, 885 Centre Street, Newton Centre, MA 02459, 617-552-8550.

Dual Degree Program—Higher Education and Business Administration (M.A/M.B.A.)

Dual degree program—higher education and business administration (m.a./m.b.a.).

This dual degree program will provide students in higher education with an opportunity for professional training in resource management. The M.B.A./M.A. program will prepare students to assume leadership positions in such areas as financial management, resource planning, and technology management in major universities and policy-making institutions in post-secondary education.

Students admitted to the program may expect to receive both a master’s degree in education (M.A. in Higher Education Administration) and the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) degrees in three academic years and two summers. Students seeking to pursue the M.B.A./M.A. dual degree must file separate applications to, and be admitted by, both the Higher Education program in the Lynch School of Education and Human Development and the Carroll School of Management.

All Lynch School admissions requests should be addressed to: Boston College, The Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid, and Student Services, Lynch School of Education and Human Development, Campion Hall 135, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3813, telephone 617-552-4214, or e-mail gsoe@bc.edu . All M.B.A. admissions requests should be addressed to the Office of Graduate Admissions, Carroll School of Management, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3813, 517-552-3920.

Dual Degree Program—Counseling Psychology/Theology and Ministry (M.A./M.A.)

The dual M.A. in Theology & Ministry/M.A. in Counseling Psychology program was developed by the School of Theology and Ministry and the Lynch School. It is designed for individuals who wish to pursue graduate studies that combine theories and practice in counseling and psychology with studies in religion and exploration of the pastoral dimensions of caregiving.

It combines the core studies and faculty resources of the existing M.A. in Theology & Ministry (Pastoral Care and Counseling Concentration), and the M.A. in Mental Health Counseling. It prepares students to seek licensing as professional mental health counselors while also providing them with theoretical foundations for integrating pastoral ministry and counseling techniques. Students seeking to pursue the dual M.A./M.A. program must file separate applications to, and be admitted by, both the Lynch School master’s program in Counseling and the School of Theology and Ministry. Any student seeking mental health licensure or school counseling licensure must meet all of the requirements in the Lynch School for that licensure.

All Lynch School admissions requests should be addressed to the Office of Graduate Admissions, Financial Aid, and Student Services, Campion 135, Lynch School, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467- 3813, 617-552-4214. All Pastoral Ministry admissions requests should be addressed to the School of Theology and Ministry, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3921, 617-552-6506.

Students and professionals can enhance their knowledge and advance their careers through several certificate programs. Each program can be completed on its own or as part of a master’s degree. Interested applicants or current students may read detailed descriptions on the Lynch School Certificate Programs web page. All Lynch School Certificate and Specialization Programs requests should be addressed to: Boston College, The Office of Graduate Admission, Financial Aid, and Student Services, Lynch School of Education and Human Development, Campion Hall 135, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3813, telephone 617-552-4214, or e-mail  gsoe@bc.edu .

Certificate Programs Offered:

  • Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Child and Family Mental Health
  • Early Child Policy and Leadership
  • Educational Policy Development
  • Global Perspectives in Curriculum and Instruction
  • Human Rights and International Justice (interdisciplinary)
  • Inclusive Instructional Design
  • International Higher Education
  • Institutional Research
  • Positive Youth Development
  • Social Justice Leadership
  • Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
  • Teaching ELL
  • Traumatic Stress Studies and Intervention

University Catalog Office of Student Services Lyons Hall 103

  • Request Info
  • Admissions Overview
  • Visit UMass Boston
  • Financial Aid
  • First-Year Students
  • Transfer Students

Graduate Students

  • International Students
  • Academics Overview
  • Majors & Programs
  • Online Learning
  • Colleges & Schools
  • Academic Calendar
  • Healey Library
  • Student Equity, Access & Success
  • Global Programs
  • Study Abroad
  • Fellowships
  • Campus Life Overview
  • Student Groups & Activities
  • Housing & Dining
  • Health & Wellness
  • Diversity & Inclusion
  • Safety & Security
  • Orientation & New Students
  • Research Overview
  • Community-Driven Research
  • Recognizing Excellence
  • Student Research
  • Centers & Institutes
  • Core Facilities
  • Research & Sponsored Programs
  • About Overview
  • Leadership & Administration
  • Mission & Vision
  • Facts & Figures
  • Accreditation & Rankings
  • History of UMass Boston
  • Student Consumer Information
  • Athletics Overview
  • Recreation at UMass Boston
  • Current Students
  • Parents & Families
  • Faculty & Staff

UMass Boston

Three graduate students look over Savin Hill cover from terrace on campus.

  • Apply as a Graduate Student
  • Graduate Students & Assistantships
  • Faculty Resources
  • Cost & Financial Aid
  • Graduate Student Resources & Assistantships
  • Program-Specific Requirements
  • International Graduate Students

Empower Your Future

Discover limitless possibilities for academic and professional growth through UMass Boston's suite of graduate programs.

With a strong emphasis on academic excellence, we offer rigorous and dynamic programs in diverse disciplines such as business, healthcare, social sciences, and humanities. Learn from renowned faculty who are experts in their fields, providing you with a top-notch education that is both relevant and impactful. Experience a vibrant campus community and chart your path to success.

graduate student with laptop

Diverse & Innovative Programs

Choose from 100+ specialized graduate programs at UMass Boston in business, education, health sciences, humanities, social sciences, and STEM. Gain the knowledge, skills, and practical experience to excel in your field and career.

  • Master's Programs
  • Doctorate Programs
  • Certificate Programs
  • Online Programs

Get the Facts

Explore the following key statistics and gain valuable insights into our programs, enrollment figures, and student success rates.

Student in the campus center

Your Path to Success

Apply to UMass Boston and take the first step toward an exceptional education that aligns with your aspirations. Explore our programs, learn about cost and financial aid options, and start your application today.

  • Apply Now to Join UMass Boston
  • Learn About Cost & Financial Aid Options
  • Learn About UMass Boston's Outstanding Research Opportunities

City of Boston Skyline

Why UMass Boston?

UMass Boston offers a dynamic college experience in the historic and innovative City of Boston. Our students engage in groundbreaking projects and benefit from a diverse and inclusive community. With 200+ academic programs, renowned faculty, and generous financial aid options, UMass Boston provides a quality education that's affordable and valuable—preparing students for success in a global society.

Graduate Student Smiling

Invest in Your Future

Affordable tuition and robust financial aid options make UMass Boston an excellent choice for graduate students. We offer competitive tuition rates and a range of financial aid options, including scholarships, grants, and assistantships. Our goal is to ensure that finances are not a barrier to your academic success.

  • Financial Aid

100+ Graduate Programs. Endless Opportunities.

For balancing big ambitions with busy schedules—earn your advanced degree at boston’s only public research university..

UMass Boston offers more than 100 graduate programs known for their quality and value.

Whether you’re looking to advance your career or make the leap to a new one, our master’s, doctoral, and certificate programs can make your aspirations achievable. What motivates you?

  • Affordability. A UMass Boston master's or graduate certificate costs roughly half the price of the equivalent from a private university if you live in Massachusetts. New England residents receive a tuition break of up to $12,000.
  • Flexibility.  Many programs are designed for working professionals, with classes that meet as little as once a week in the evening. Many courses are offered in online and remote formats.
  • Opportunity.  Access our connections with hundreds of companies and organizations based in the Boston Area. Expand your network and explore internships and career paths.
  • Diversity.  Join a learning community among the most diverse in the U.S., with a large percentage of peers who identify as BIPOC, and an academic focus on equity.

44%+ of grad students identify as BIPOC—among the most in the U.S.

Up to 50% more affordable than grad programs at private universities

60%+ of UMass Boston grad students are women

Explore Graduate Programs

Advance your business career with an innovative degree or certificate from UMass Boston's AACSB-accredited business school.

  • Accounting MS
  • Business Administration MBA
  • Business Administration PhD
  • Business Analytics Certificate
  • Business Analytics MS
  • Clean Energy & Sustainability Certificate
  • Contemporary Marketing Certificate
  • Cybersecurity Management Certificate
  • Information Technology MS
  • Investment Management & Quantitative Finance Certificate

Request Info

Education & Counseling

Ready to level-up your education career? We offer programs for people who want to work toward teaching licensure or school administration, counseling, psychology, and instructional design.

  • Applied Behavior Analysis for Special Populations Certificate
  • Autism Endorsement Certificate
  • Counseling Psychology PhD
  • Counseling MEd/CAGS
  • Critical & Creative Thinking Certificate
  • Critical & Creative Thinking MA
  • Early Childhood Education & Care PhD
  • Early Childhood MEd
  • Early Education Research, Policy & Practice Certificate
  • Educational Administration MEd/CAGS
  • Elementary Education MEd
  • Higher Education EdD/PhD
  • Instructional & Learning Design Certificate
  • Instructional Design MEd
  • Instructional Technology Design Certificate
  • Mental Health Counseling MS
  • Middle/Secondary Education MEd
  • School Psychology MEd/EdS
  • School Psychology PhD
  • Special Education Certificate
  • Special Education MEd
  • Teach Next Year MEd
  • Urban Education, Leadership & Policy Studies EdD/PhD

Environment & Urban Planning

Be part of the next generation of urban planners and scientists working to create equitable communities and protect against climate change.

  • Environmental Sciences MS
  • Environmental Sciences PhD
  • Environmental Sciences Professional PSM
  • Marine Science & Technology MS
  • Marine Science & Technology PhD
  • Urban Planning & Community Development MS

Global Inclusion & Social Development

Improve human and collective well-being through interventions in social policy, public policy, service delivery, and nonprofit activity.

  • Assistive Technology for Individuals with Visual Impairments Certificate
  • Cortical/Cerebral Visual Impairment Certificate
  • Global Inclusion & Social Development MA
  • Global Inclusion & Social Development PhD
  • Human Rights Certificate
  • Orientation & Mobility Certificate
  • Rehabilitation Counseling Certificate
  • Rehabilitation Counseling MS
  • Transition Leadership Certificate
  • Vision Rehabilitation Therapy Certificate
  • Vision Studies MEd

Language, Arts & Social Sciences

Explore programs in the humanities, fine arts, and social sciences. Learn how to analyze and interpret information effectively, and become a better communicator and creative problem solver.

  • American Studies MA
  • Applied Economics MA
  • Applied Linguistics MA
  • Applied Linguistics PhD
  • Applied Sociology MA
  • Clinical Psychology PhD
  • Creative Writing MFA
  • Critical Ethnic & Community Studies MS
  • Developmental & Brain Sciences PhD
  • Dual Language Certificate
  • Historical Archaeology MA
  • History Certificate
  • Latin & Classical Humanities MA
  • Public History Certificate
  • Sociology PhD
  • Survey Research Certificate

Nursing & Health

Further your nursing career with our programs focused on health equity, social justice, and population-based health.

  • Exercise & Health Sciences MS
  • Exercise & Health Sciences PhD
  • Nurse Educator Certificate
  • Nursing DNP
  • Nursing PhD
  • Nursing Post-Master's Certificate

Policy & Global Studies

Become part of the next generation of policymakers, decision makers, and leaders working to effect change in local and global communities.

  • Conflict Resolution Certificate
  • Conflict Resolution MA
  • Gender, Leadership & Public Policy Certificate
  • Gerontology Certificate
  • Gerontology: Management of Aging Services MS
  • Gerontology: Research Policy MS
  • Gerontology PhD
  • Global Governance & Human Security MA
  • Global Governance & Human Security PhD
  • International Relations MA
  • Public Administration MPA
  • Public Policy PhD

Science & Math

Be part of an exciting public research university that focuses on innovation and collaboration among students and faculty to perform experiments and research sponsored by organizations, including the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and NASA.

  • Applied Physics MS
  • Biology PhD
  • Biomedical Engineering & Biotechnology PhD
  • Biotechnology & Biomedical Science MS
  • Biotechnology Professional PSM
  • Biotechnology Certificate
  • Chemistry MS
  • Chemistry PhD
  • Computational Sciences PhD
  • Computer Science MS
  • Computer Science PhD
  • Database Technology Certificate
  • Integrative Biosciences PhD

education graduate programs in boston

An accessible degree at an incredible value.

  • Accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education (NECHE).
  • 36 fully online and hybrid programs offered.
  • Many programs waive GRE/GMAT requirements.

Take the next step.

Ready to get started? Connect with UMass Boston today and start focusing on your future.

education graduate programs in boston

  • Faculty & Staff Resources
  • Master’s and Professional Education
  • PhD Education
  • International Student Experience
  • PhD Program Profiles

Find Your Program

  • Graduate Admission
  • Financial Aid
  • PhD Funding
  • Living in Boston
  • Health & Wellness
  • Student Groups & Associations
  • Kids & Family
  • Master’s and Professional Students
  • PhD Students
  • Events and Programs
  • Offices and Initiatives

education graduate programs in boston

Admission & Funding

Unleash your potential, admission & funding, you have a vision..

You’re ready to take a deep dive into the subjects you are most passionate about. Ready to prepare for professional life, boost your career, push yourself to new frontiers of knowledge. In short, you’re ready to take on the challenge of graduate school. Looking for a program ? Ready to apply ? Curious about funding ? You’re in the right place.

At Boston University, you’ll find nearly 400 graduate programs , where opportunities for collaborative learning abound. You’ll find three campuses, all in Boston, a thriving city that is rich with history yet firmly future-facing. You will find on-campus and online programs, full-time and part-time, master’s, doctoral, and professional degrees. You’ll find an academic community comprised of great minds from all over the globe, united in a shared mission of learning and advancement.

We also recommend that you use our Program Finder tool to find the right program for you, or find information about funding your degree . When you’re ready to apply, check out our Graduate Admission page, which links you to individual school and college admissions pages.

education graduate programs in boston

Take a look at our graduate program offerings to see what's right for you.

education graduate programs in boston

Ready to Apply?

Our admissions page links you to individual school sites and information.

education graduate programs in boston

Scholarships, Awards, and Grants

Find more funding options.

  • Explore UMass Programs
  • Find a UMass Campus
  • Affordability Calculator
  • Student Outcomes
  • Transfer Students
  • Out-of-State Students
  • International Students
  • Request Info
  • About the UMass System
  • Quick Facts
  • Affordability
  • Tuition & Fees
  • Why Massachusetts?
  • President Meehan
  • Employee Handbook
  • Office of the President Website
  • Support UMass
  • Regional Alumni Events
  • Industry Partnerships
  • Core Research Facilities
  • Workforce Development
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Press Releases
  • Media Resources
  • UMass Amherst
  • UMass Boston
  • UMass Dartmouth
  • UMass Lowell
  • UMass Global

UMass Boston's Graduate Programs in Education Jump 29 Spots in U.S. News Ranking

  • share on Twitter
  • share on Facebook
  • share on Linkedin
  • share via Email

UMass Boston's graduate programs in education jump 29 spots in U.S. News ranking

UMass Boston’s graduate programs in education jumped 29 spots to No. 66 in the 2020 edition of  U.S. News & World Report’s Best Graduate Schools , released Tuesday.

Five  UMass Boston programs  have new top 100 rankings:

  • Rehabilitation Counseling  – No. 15
  • Graduate programs in education  – No. 66
  • Doctor of Nursing Practice  – No. 72
  • Master’s programs in public affairs  – No. 74
  • Master of Nursing  – No. 83

“We are all very proud of the recognition our campus is enjoying,” said Interim Chancellor Katherine S. Newman. “Our first-rate faculty and extraordinary students work hard every day to merit these accolades.  It is wonderful to know that the rest of the world has registered their achievements.”

Rankings are based on student acceptance rate, program size, number and strength of faculty, and research activity, the latter of which College of Education and Human Development Dean Joseph Berger attributes to the big jump from the  2019 edition .

“It’s gratifying that the high-quality and inclusive excellence of our faculty and students is being recognized,” Berger said. “In part, this ranking recognizes the extent to which our faculty and students are engaged in their work. Our growing reputation builds on our engagement in deeply embedded partnerships and increased success in research productivity.”

The master’s program in rehabilitation counseling moved up 9 spots from the  2017 edition of Best Graduate  Schools , when the program was ranked No. 24.

“I am so pleased about this recognition as it is a reflection of our faculty and students,” School for Global Inclusion Dean William Kiernan said. “The program has a very strong focus on both employment and mental health services and supports. The role of the rehabilitation counselor is central to the return to or access to employments of adults with disabilities.”

The deadline for summer admission into the rehabilitation counseling program is April 1.  Other application deadlines for summer and fall are posted here .

To see the full list of rankings, visit the U.S. News & World Report  website .

  • Campus Overview
  • Explore Programs
  • www.umass.edu
  • www.umb.edu
  • www.umassd.edu
  • www.uml.edu
  • www.umassmed.edu
  • www.umassd.edu/law
  • www.umassglobal.edu

education graduate programs in boston

Master of Arts in Teaching in Secondary Education — Boston

This Master of Arts in Teaching in Secondary Education is designed to enhance your foundational skills, broaden your perspectives, and strengthen your ability to inspire and educate.

  • REQUEST INFO

Take a Quick Look

We’re committed to creating an education as unique as your career path. So, whether your goal is a new career or moving up in your field, our innovative programs will get you going your way.

Customize your plan

We work with you to map your path to your goal.

Learn from experience

From real-world case studies to employer-based projects, we prepare you to manage what comes next.

Choose your focus

Whatever you’re passionate about, you’ll find the classes to sharpen your specialty.

Study anywhere, on your time

Part-time or full-time, we move at your speed, to get you where you’re going.

Full-Time, Part-Time

Entry Terms

Fall, Summer, Winter

Completion Time

12-18 months

F1 Visa Eligible

Designed for aspiring teachers and career-changers with a strong background in their chosen content area (bachelor's degree or equivalent) the Master of Arts in Secondary Education provides an appreciation for and an understanding of the diverse educational needs, social concerns, and cultural values of today's secondary schools.

This MAT in Secondary Education will enhance your foundational skills, broaden your perspectives, and strengthen your ability to inspire and educate. Upon completing this master's degree, which includes pre-practicum/early field work observations and a full term of student teaching, you will be well positioned to make a meaningful impact in your school, in your community, and in the lives of your students.

The MAT+ option provides qualifying students with the opportunity to complete a Master of Arts in Teaching with further study in a selected area of expertise. Currently, students can take additional course work to earn either an additional license in special education (teacher of students of moderate disabilities, preK-8, or 5-12), or an additional license in ESL (teacher of English as a second language, preK-8, or 5-12). Teacher candidates may also plan a program of study that allows for triple licensure in consultation with the program director.

More Details

Unique features.

  • MAT+ option
  • Students partake in pre-practicum/early field work observations, teaching practicum and seminars, and a full term of student teaching
  • Choose from elective courses covering a broad range of skills and approaches, including literacy, behavior management, and special education strategies
  • Boston location on flagship campus, a hub for education, healthcare, finance, business, biotechnology, and the life sciences

Program Objectives

  • Gain political, social, and historical perspectives on education
  • Explore the richly complex environments of schools and communities
  • Develop a working understanding of teaching and learning in diverse settings
  • Investigate how humans learn, acquire knowledge, and make sense of their experiences
  • Examine theories of teaching and explore how best to teach for understanding and learning achievement
  • Research methods and materials, pedagogies, and assessment strategies that foster integrated learning

Scholarships

  • MacFarland Scholarship – New, incoming students who are working or have the intention of working as an educator in a public school at the elementary or secondary level, within an urban area, are eligible to receive a scholarship award of up to $10,000

Accreditation Description

The Master of Arts in Secondary Education (grades 8-12) has been approved for initial licensure by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education in the following content areas: biology, chemistry, English, history, mathematics, and physics.

Career Outlook

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of teachers is expected to grow approximately 13 percent—the average pace for all occupations. Teachers who specialize in fields such as mathematics, science, and bilingual education or are willing to work urban districts, rural areas, or states with increasing populations will be in greater demand. Most job openings will result from the need to replace the large number of teachers who are expected to retire between now and 2018.

Accreditation

Experiential / co-op opportunities.

Northeastern's signature experience-powered learning model has been at the heart of the university for more than a century. It combines world-class academics with professional practice, allowing you to acquire relevant, real-world skills you can immediately put into action in your current workplace.

education graduate programs in boston

This makes a Northeastern education a dynamic, transformative experience, giving you countless opportunities to grow as a professional and person.

Learn About Getting Real World Experience

Get Set With a Custom Course Plan

Please note: The following is a sample curriculum and is subject to change. Enrolled students should reference the academic catalog for current program requirements.

General Requirements

4.00
4.00
2.00
2.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
3.00
3.00
1.008.00

Complete one of the following courses:

4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00

Elective Courses

Complete 4 quarter hours from the following:

2.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00

Looking to deepen your knowledge and expertise?

The MAT+ offers qualifying students the opportunity to complete a MAT with further study in a selected area of expertise. Currently, students can take additional course work to earn either an additional license in special education (teacher of students of moderate disabilities, PreK–8 or 5–12) or an additional license in ESL (teacher of English as a Second Language, PreK-8 or 5-12).

Concentrations

Mat+ in special education.

The MAT+ provides qualifying students with the opportunity to complete a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) with further study in a selected area of expertise. Currently, students can take additional course work to earn either an additional license in special education (teacher of students of moderate disabilities, PreK-8 or 5-12) or an additional license in ESL (teacher of English as a Second Language, PreK-8 or 5-12). Teacher candidates may also plan a program of study that allows for triple licensure in consultation with the program director.

The special education course requirements are: 

4.00
4.00
4.00
4.00
0.004.00

MAT+ in English as a Second Language (ESL)

This Commonwealth of Massachusetts-approved MAT+ program consists of five courses, some of which may be taken as electives in the MAT program.

The English as a Second Language course requirements are:

Now Let's Talk Admissions

You know where you are headed and you've seen how our program will lead you there. So let's get going. Here's what you need to know before you enroll.

Application Requirements

  • Online Application 
  • Professional Resumé 
  • Unofficial Undergraduate Transcripts: Upon admission to the program, you must provide the official undergraduate transcript(s) in a stamped and sealed envelope from the institution(s), stating degree conferral and date.
  • Two Letters of Recommendation: From individuals who have either academic or professional knowledge of your capabilities such as a faculty member, colleague, or mentor, preferably one from your current employer.
  • Statement of Purpose: Northeastern University's Graduate School of Education teacher-preparation programs are dedicated to cultivating educators committed to equity for all students. How does this mission align with your own professional goals? What skills and characteristics do you believe are necessary to be successful in teaching? Please be aware that the university's academic policy on plagiarism applies to the applicant's statement of purpose.
  • MTEL Exam: It is NOT required that students have passed any MTEL exams to apply to and be accepted into the program. Students will need to pass all required MTEL exams to earn their teacher license, but they can take the MTEL exams during the MAT program.
  • Prerequisites: Applicants for the MAT Secondary need to have an undergraduate degree or significant coursework in the subject they want to teach or have passed the required content MTEL.
  • If a student is in their last term of their bachelor’s degree program or holds a conferred bachelor’s degree from a U.S. institution OR an English-speaking international institution in an English-speaking country, we will waive the requirement to submit an English language proficiency score.
  • TOEFL, IELTS, Pearson (PTE) or NU Global Exam score

International Requirements

Are You an International Student? Find out what additional documents are required to apply.

Admissions Details Learn more about the College of Professional Studies admissions process, policies, and required materials.

Financing Requirements

Finance Your Education We offer a variety of resources, including scholarships and assistantships.

How to Apply Learn more about the application process and requirements.

Your Head Start on a Master’s Degree

The PlusOne Accelerated Master’s Program provides motivated students with the opportunity to start earning their master’s degree while pursuing their undergraduate education.

Here is the PlusOne pathways for secondary education.

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCE and HUMANITIES (CSSH)

Secondary Teaching (Gr 8-12):

  • Must major in English or History.
  • Political Science may  be eligible. Please speak with education advisor before proceeding.

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE (COS)

  • All COS majors EXCEPT Psychology and Linguistics

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND MEDIA DESIGN (CAMD)

Secondary Education (Gr 8-12):

  • Combined majors that include English or History.

View the MAT PlusOne for more information

Cost and Tuition

Avg institutional aid, % receiving aid.

Estimated Total Tuition

This is an estimate based on the tuition rates for Academic Year 2024-2025 and does not include any fees or other expenses. Some courses and labs have tuition rates that may increase or decrease total tuition. Tuition and fees are subject to revision by the president and Board of Trustees at any time. Select programs at select campuses offer additional scholarships of up to 25% off the listed price for domestic students studying on campus. For more detailed information, please visit Student Financial Services .

For students interested in pursuing financial assistance or educational loans, additional educational costs, known as Cost of Attendance (COA) components, can be included in the calculation of aid and loan eligibility. Components may include food, housing, books, course materials, supplies, equipment, transportation, personal expenses, and the cost of obtaining a first professional licensure. You can find comprehensive details on the  Student Financial Services website. Please keep in mind that COA can vary significantly depending on academic program, enrollment intensity, and individual circumstances.

Application Deadlines

Our admissions process operates on a rolling basis; however, we do recommend the application guidelines below to ensure you can begin during your desired start term:

Domestic Application Guidelines

International Application Guidelines *

*International deadlines are only applicable if the program is F1 compliant.

Student Body Profile

Below is a look at where our Education & Learning alumni work, the positions they hold, and the skills they bring to their organization.

Where They Work

  • Boston Public Schools
  • Chicago Public Schools
  • NYC Department of Education
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Tufts University

What They Do

  • Community and Social Services
  • Business Development
  • Human Services
  • Entrepreneurship

What They're Skilled At

  • Public Speaking
  • Curriculum Development

Learn more about Northeastern Alumni on  Linkedin .

Related Programs

Special education — master's — boston, ma.

Learn more about Special Education

Learning and Instruction — Master's — Online

Learn more about Learning and Instruction

Elementary Education — Master's — Boston, MA

Learn more about Elementary Education

Let's Go For Your Goals

With our innovation, flexibility, and expertise, we know we can get you there.

Back to Top

  • Preparing to Apply
  • How to Apply
  • After Applying
  • Why Penn State?
  • Military and Veteran Students
  • Frequently Asked Questions

Degree Programs

  • Academic Dates and Deadlines
  • Policies for Students
  • Theses and Dissertations
  • Integrated Undergraduate-Graduate Plans
  • Commencement
  • Planning Your Finances
  • External Funding Opportunities
  • Information for Graduate Assistants
  • Student Recognition Awards
  • Funding FAQ
  • Professional Development
  • New Students
  • From the Dean
  • Advising and Mentoring Tips
  • Academic Support
  • Student Support FAQs
  • Addressing Concerns
  • Well-Being Resources
  • Office of Graduate Educational Equity Programs (OGEEP)
  • Graduate School Open House
  • Programs and Initiatives
  • McNair Scholars Program
  • Summer Research Opportunities Program (SROP)
  • Resources and Partners
  • Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education and Dean
  • Vision, Mission, and Strategic Plan
  • By the Numbers
  • Contact the Graduate School
  • Resource Library

This dialog contains the full navigation menu for gradschool.psu.edu.

The Graduate School

  • Student Support

Information For

  • Alumni and Friends
  • Veterans and Military Service Members
  • Corporate Connections & Partnerships

Helpful Links

  • Graduate Education Policies
  • Student Teaching Certificate
  • Graduate Exhibition
  • Three Minute Thesis
  • Accelerate to Industry

For Faculty and Staff

  • Graduate Council
  • Graduate Education Resource Portal

search icon

Social Media

Students gathered around with pipette

Penn State offers more than 300 graduate degree programs across 200 fields of study, in addition to graduate certificates. You can learn about all graduate programs, and get contact information, through the University's Graduate Bulletin.

Legal Statements

  • Non-Discrimination
  • Equal Opportunity
  • Accessibility
  • The Pennsylvania State University © 2024

Purdue University

The 100% online Graduate Certificate in Microelectronics and Semiconductors offers an entry point for professional engineers and technology professionals to obtain critical skills and expertise in an essential industry. Students can select from a variety of courses in semiconductor materials, advanced semiconductor device design and modeling, integrated circuit and system design, and advanced packaging and heterogeneous integration. 

Endorsed by Purdue's renowned  Semiconductor Degrees Program (SDP) and backed by industry-leading companies, our program stands out as the sole degree program exclusively dedicated to semiconductors and microelectronics within a top 10 nationally ranked engineering college. Delivered through online modalities, this certificate program accommodates the schedules of working professionals, offering practical, focused training that can be immediately applied to the workforce. Professionals interested in other online semiconductor graduate opportunities can also review the online Master's in Microelectronics & Semiconductors . 

Certificate Requirements

The Graduate Certificate in Microelectronics and Semiconductors requires 9 credit hours. The certificate has these three focus areas; students can take courses from multiple focus areas to meet the concentration requirements:

  • Circuit Design  (CD)
  • Devices and Manufacturing (DM)  
  • System Design (SD)

Required Courses - 3 Credit Hours

Choose 1 of the following courses:

  • ECE 55900 - MOS VLSI Design (3 credits)
  • ECE 60600 - Solid State Devices I (3 credits) 

Take all three of the following courses

  • ECE 59500 - Semiconductor Fundamentals (1 credit)
  • ECE 50631- Fundamentals of Current Flow (1 credit)
  • ECE 59500 - Fundamentals of Transistors

Electives - 6 Credit Hours

  • ECE 51216 Digital Systems Design Automation (3 credits)

Select 6 credits from the following courses: 

  • ECE 50632 Intro to Quantum Transport (1 credit)
  • ECE 50633 Boltzman Law: Physics to Machine Learning (1 credit)
  • ECE 51214 CMOS Analog IC Design (3 credits)
  • ECE 51220 Applied Algorithms (3 credits)
  • ECE 52600 Fundamentals of MEMS & Micro-Integrated Systems (3 credits)
  • ECE 55200 Introduction To Lasers (3 credits)
  • ECE 56500 Computer Architecture (3 credits)
  • ECE 56800 Embedded Systems (3 credits)
  • ECE 59500 Fundamentals of Transistors (1 credit)
  • ECE 59500 Introduction to Lithography (1 credit)
  • ECE 59500 Applied Quantum Computing I Fundamentals (1 credit)
  • ECE 59500 Applied Quantum Computing II Hardware (1 credit)
  • ECE 59500 Applied Quantum Computing III Algorithm and Software (1 credit)
  • ECE 59500 Data Analysis, Design of Experiments and Machine Learning (1 credit)
  • ECE 59500 Intro To Electronics Packaging & Heterogeneous Integration (3 credits)
  • ECE 59500 VLSI Testing (1 credit)
  • ECE 60420 Radio Frequency Integrated Circuits (3 credits)
  • ECE 60422 Primer on RF Design (1 credit)
  • ECE 60423 RF System Design (1 credit)
  • ECE 60424 RF Design, Passive and Active Components (1 credit)
  • ECE 61200 Advanced VLSI Devices (Nanoscale Transistors) (3 credits)
  • ECE 68800 VLSI Testing and Verification (3 credits)
  • ECE 69500 Advanced VLSI Design (3 credits)
  • ECE 69500 System-on-chip Design (3 credits)
  • ECE 69500 Advanced IoT Design & Applications (3 credits)
  • ECE 69500 Flexible and Stretchable Electronics (3 credits)

Admissions Requirements

Criteria for admissions.

  • Bachelor's degree in an appropriate area (Engineering, Science, Mathematics, or Technology)
  • Minimum cumulative GPA of a 3.0 or equivalent (A=4.0)

Application Requirements

  • Transcripts from all universities attended, including transfer credits
  • Academic Statement of Purpose
  • Personal History Statement
  • A professional resume
  • Full admissions requirements

Application Deadlines

For Fall Start: 

For Spring Start: 

For Summer Start: 

Resident of Indiana

  • $1,139 per credit
  • $10,251 total

Nonresident of Indiana

  • $1,459 per credit
  • $13,131 total

Further information available.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can purdue non-degree courses be used for the microelectronics and semiconductors certificate.

Yes. Students can take a maximum of 12 credit hours as a non-degree student and utilize them for a certificate or advanced degree program. Students should ensure they are selecting courses that fit within their desired program’s curriculum.

Can the Microelectronics and Semiconductors certificate courses be used for a master's degree?

Yes. Students can usually utilize the courses they took within their certificate program for a master’s degree program. Check with the department of your intended degree program for specifics.

Acceptance into the certificate program does NOT assure admission to the Graduate School of Purdue University to pursue an advanced degree. Those who wish to pursue a degree program along with the certificate will need to fill out two separate applications, each with a different semester start term.

  • College of Education
  • Location Location
  • Contact Contact
  • Colleges and Schools

Graduate Programs

Two women working in a library

Our graduate degree programs prepare you to make an impact in the world of education through rigorous course work, extensive practical experiences and advanced research and learning opportunities.

Graduate Degree Programs

Art Education
Counselor Education



Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
(Advanced Teaching Studies)


.
Educational Foundations and Inquiry
Educational Research and Measurement
Educational Technology
Elementary Education
Foreign Language Education
Higher Education Administration
Language and Literacy
Music Education
Physical Education
School Leadership
Secondary Education
Special Education
Theatre Education

Challenge the conventional. Create the exceptional. No Limits.

Suffolk University

  • Find a Program
  • Search Toggle
  • Suffolk University
  • Wednesday, September 18

Recognition of Years of Service Awards

Wednesday, September 18, 2024 2pm to 6pm

  • Share Recognition of Years of Service Awards on Facebook
  • Share Recognition of Years of Service Awards on Twitter
  • Share Recognition of Years of Service Awards on LinkedIn

education graduate programs in boston

About this Event

120 Tremont Street, Boston, MA 02108

We are thrilled to announce the Recognition of Years of Service Awards event. It's time to celebrate and honor the dedication and commitment of our remarkable colleagues who have reached significant milestones in their service to the University from 2020 to 2024. 

Join us on Wednesday, September 18th, from 2:00 PM to 6:00 PM, as we come together as a community to acknowledge and congratulate those who have dedicated these remarkable years of service—10, 20, 30, 40, and even 50 years—at our institution. 

This event is a testament to the unwavering dedication and hard work of our  colleagues and we invite the entire Suffolk community to join us in commemorating and celebrating their achievements.. 

Save the date, please mark your calendars, and stay tuned for further details on this special occasion! 

Food will be provided, so please ensure you register for the event if you plan to attend, to help us estimate the number of attendees!

Event Details

A bridge from undergraduate to graduate studies

Post-baccalaureate program help students transition to the next academic level.

Five SEAS post-baccalaureate students with staff members Edward Alexander, Kathryn Hollar and Paula Nicole Booke

Five SEAS post-baccalaureate students with staff members Edward Alexander, Kathryn Hollar and Paula Nicole Booke

The graduate and undergraduate student experience isn’t the same. Undergraduates spend the majority of their four years in classrooms. But for graduate students — especially those pursuing PhDs in engineering and applied sciences — most of the work is in the lab.

The focus on laboratory research can make pursuing advanced degrees feel daunting for some students.

“I’d always had a love for math, science and experimentation, but when COVID happened, they shut down the school, so I wasn’t able to do any hands-on experiments, “ said Shekinah Newson.

After graduating in 2021, Newson joined the inaugural cohort of post-baccalaureate students at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS). The post-baccalaureate program , offered through the SEAS Office of Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging and Office of Education Outreach and Community Programs, acts as a bridge from undergraduate to graduate school. The program allows students to gain laboratory research experience with SEAS faculty, while continuing to take courses that will prepare them for their graduate studies.

Post-baccalaureate students typically stay for 1-2 years, but have the option to stay on for a third.  So far six students have completed the program, five of whom have gone onto graduate school.

“I’m super glad I did it, because now I’ve honed in the research skills that I started to develop as an undergraduate,” said Maggie Vallejo, a former environmental science and engineering undergraduate concentrator at SEAS. “I definitely think more like a researcher, and I better understand that research isn’t linear.”

Vallejo’s undergraduate advisor was Jim Anderson, Philip S. Weld Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry, and she returned to the Anderson Research Group for her post-baccalaureate studies. Her senior capstone project involved predicting power losses in solar cells aboard stratospheric aircraft, and as a post-baccalaureate researcher, she transitioned to analyzing lithium-ion battery cell performance.

Harvard SEAS post-baccalaureate student Maggie Vallejo in the lab of Jim Anderson

Post-baccalaureate student Maggie Vallejo in the lab of Jim Anderson, Philip S. Weld Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry

“During the application process, I made sure Professor Anderson was OK with me just staying in his lab,” she said. “I was interested in the work I was already doing, and I knew the people in the lab, so I figured why not just stay.”

Vallejo spent both years of her program with the same professor, but that isn’t required. The program is meant to help students focus their academic goals, and sometimes that focus clarifies that the lab a student started in isn’t exactly what they want moving forward. Dawn Bordenave, another member of the inaugural cohort, spent each of her first two years in different labs before settling into the lab of Joanna Aizenberg, Amy Smith Berylson Professor of Materials Science and Professor of Chemistry & Chemical Biology.

Bordenave is part of Aizenberg’s research into the improvement of ventricular catheter design for treatment of hydrocephalus, a potentially deadly disorder in which fluid builds up in the cavities deep within the human brain. Her specific part of the project is to develop low-cost methods of constructing the catheter in the lab, making it much easier to physically test new designs before beginning clinical trials.

“After spending time in other labs, I realized that I wanted to do something different that was a little closer to my goal of designing medical devices,” Bordenave said. “The program is very flexible. If the research, lab or mentor you start off with isn’t close to what you want and you want to change, that’s definitely an option. The Aizenberg Lab was the best fit for me.”

Newson, who completed the program last month, worked in the Harvard Biodesign Lab, led by Conor Walsh, Paul A. Maeder Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences, as well as the lab of Michael Brenner, Michael F. Cronin Professor of Applied Mathematics and Applied Physics and Professor of Physics. With Walsh, she worked on the soft robotics toolkit, an educational package for teaching robotics to younger students. With Brenner, she helped developed a non-invasive method to measure range of motion

“This innovative educational resource empowers people to learn about robotics through engaging, hands-on activities,” Newson said. “To be able to build a toolkit that allows a child to both play and learn at the same time is amazing. I wish I had something like that when I was growing up.”

Newson, Bordenave and Vallejo will all be leaving SEAS for graduate programs at other universities. Newson will pursue a master’s degree in robotics at Boston University, and Bordenave and Vallejo are both heading to Cornell University: Bordenave for a master’s degree in biomedical engineering, Vallejo for an M.S./Ph.D. program in civil and environmental engineering.

“It was fantastic having Shekinah as part of our research group,” Walsh said. “She got involved in a number of projects, including one focused on using soft robotics in education and STEM outreach. It is very exciting that she will be going on to do an MS in robotics at BU as a next step. Her passion for learning and growing her engineering skill set has been a great example for us all.”

Eva Langenbrunner joined the program last fall and will be back to work in the Harvard Microrobotics Lab, led by Robert Wood, Harry Lewis and Marlyn McGrath Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences. She’s developing materials that can fold into origami-like shapes using soft robotic actuators.

“Post-baccalaureates programs are really great because they teach you how to be a successful grad student,” she said. “The program goes over how to properly write research articles, which is something no one in undergrad teaches you how to do, but then you get to grad school and they expect you to know it. The biggest thing I learned here was how to structure a research project from beginning to end.”

Harvard SEAS post-baccalaureate student Katie Barajas working in the lab of professor Marko Lončar

Post-baccalaureate student Katie Barajas working in the lab of Marko Lončar, Tiantsai Lin Professor of Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics at SEAS

Langenbrunner will be joined by new post-baccalaureate Jonathan Chinana, a Navajo Technical University (NTU) graduate who first came to SEAS for the Research Experience for Undergraduates program in the summer of 2022 . Michael Nelwood, another NTU graduate, finished his post-baccalaureate studies in the lab of Jennifer Lewis, Hansjörg Wyss Professor of Biologically Inspired Engineering. He’s now working as a lab tech in the Lewis Lab.

Katie Barajas has spent the last two years with the Harvard Quantum Initiative, working in the lab of Marko Lončar, Tiantsai Lin Professor of Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics. She’ll continue with the Lončar Group as an applied physics Ph.D. student this fall. Her research focuses on the fabrication of nanostructures in specially lab-grown diamonds. These diamonds have a silicon atom implanted in place of two carbon atoms. These defects are called “silicon vacancy centers,” and they could potentially be used to transmit information in a quantum computer.

“It wasn’t until late in my undergrad career that I learned about the field of quantum optics. If I wanted to pursue a degree in that field, I needed more research experience,” she said. “That persuaded me to do the post-baccalaureate program. I’m in a much better place than when I was coming out of undergrad. This program has given me the confidence to say I can be a scientist and pursue scientific research, and that’s a testament to the people I’ve worked with.”

Topics: Academics , Applied Physics , Bioengineering , Diversity / Inclusion , Environmental Science & Engineering , Materials Science & Mechanical Engineering , Optics / Photonics , Quantum Engineering , Robotics

Cutting-edge science delivered direct to your inbox.

Join the Harvard SEAS mailing list.

Press Contact

Matt Goisman | [email protected]

Related News

Quantum Noir organizer William Wilson, executive director of Harvard’s Center for Nanoscale Systems

Uncovering ‘hidden curriculum’ for those historically on outside

Quantum Noir fosters sense of community among individuals of color involved in quantum science and engineering

Diversity / Inclusion , Materials , Quantum Engineering

Four Harvard faculty sitting in front of a room filled with people sitting

Scientists at Harvard describe their worst climate fears

SEAS researchers participate in Harvard Climate Action Week panel entitled “What Could Go Wrong?”

Climate , Environmental Science & Engineering

Two square platforms each with a voltage meter reading 0 to 240, display gold electrons moving in response to an electric field

A quantum world on a silicon chip

Researchers develop a platform to probe, control qubits in silicon for quantum networks

Applied Physics , Quantum Engineering

Northeastern University Graduate Programs

College of Professional Studies

Secondary education.

This Master of Arts in Teaching in Secondary Education is designed to enhance your foundational skills, broaden your perspectives, and strengthen your ability to inspire and educate.

Designed for aspiring teachers and career-changers with a strong background in their chosen content area (bachelor's degree or equivalent) the Master of Arts in Secondary Education provides an appreciation for and an understanding of the diverse educational needs, social concerns, and cultural values of today's secondary schools.

This MAT in Secondary Education will enhance your foundational skills, broaden your perspectives, and strengthen your ability to inspire and educate. Upon completing this master's degree, which includes pre-practicum/early field work observations and a full term of student teaching, you will be well positioned to make a meaningful impact in your school, in your community, and in the lives of your students.

The MAT+ option provides qualifying students with the opportunity to complete a Master of Arts in Teaching with further study in a selected area of expertise. Currently, students can take additional course work to earn either an additional license in special education (teacher of students of moderate disabilities, preK-8, or 5-12), or an additional license in ESL (teacher of English as a second language, preK-8, or 5-12). Teacher candidates may also plan a program of study that allows for triple licensure in consultation with the program director.

More Details

Unique features.

  • MAT+ option
  • Students partake in pre-practicum/early field work observations, teaching practicum and seminars, and a full term of student teaching
  • Choose from elective courses covering a broad range of skills and approaches, including literacy, behavior management, and special education strategies
  • Boston location on flagship campus, a hub for education, healthcare, finance, business, biotechnology, and the life sciences

Program Objectives

  • Gain political, social, and historical perspectives on education
  • Explore the richly complex environments of schools and communities
  • Develop a working understanding of teaching and learning in diverse settings
  • Investigate how humans learn, acquire knowledge, and make sense of their experiences
  • Examine theories of teaching and explore how best to teach for understanding and learning achievement
  • Research methods and materials, pedagogies, and assessment strategies that foster integrated learning

Scholarships

  • MacFarland Scholarship – New, incoming students who are working or have the intention of working as an educator in a public school at the elementary or secondary level, within an urban area, are eligible to receive a scholarship award of up to $10,000

Accreditation Description

The Master of Arts in Secondary Education (grades 8-12) has been approved for initial licensure by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education in the following content areas: biology, chemistry, English, history, mathematics, and physics.

Career Outlook

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of teachers is expected to grow approximately 13 percent—the average pace for all occupations. Teachers who specialize in fields such as mathematics, science, and bilingual education or are willing to work urban districts, rural areas, or states with increasing populations will be in greater demand. Most job openings will result from the need to replace the large number of teachers who are expected to retire between now and 2018.

Looking for something different?

A graduate degree or certificate from Northeastern—a top-ranked university—can accelerate your career through rigorous academic coursework and hands-on professional experience in the area of your interest. Apply now—and take your career to the next level.

Program Costs

Finance Your Education We offer a variety of resources, including scholarships and assistantships.

How to Apply Learn more about the application process and requirements.

Requirements

  • Online Application 
  • Professional Resumé 
  • Unofficial Undergraduate Transcripts: Upon admission to the program, you must provide the official undergraduate transcript(s) in a stamped and sealed envelope from the institution(s), stating degree conferral and date.
  • Two Letters of Recommendation: From individuals who have either academic or professional knowledge of your capabilities such as a faculty member, colleague, or mentor, preferably one from your current employer.
  • Statement of Purpose: Northeastern University's Graduate School of Education teacher-preparation programs are dedicated to cultivating educators committed to equity for all students. How does this mission align with your own professional goals? What skills and characteristics do you believe are necessary to be successful in teaching? Please be aware that the university's academic policy on plagiarism applies to the applicant's statement of purpose.
  • MTEL Exam: It is NOT required that students have passed any MTEL exams to apply to and be accepted into the program. Students will need to pass all required MTEL exams to earn their teacher license, but they can take the MTEL exams during the MAT program.
  • Prerequisites: Applicants for the MAT Secondary need to have an undergraduate degree or significant coursework in the subject they want to teach or have passed the required content MTEL.
  • If a student is in their last term of their bachelor’s degree program or holds a conferred bachelor’s degree from a U.S. institution OR an English-speaking international institution in an English-speaking country, we will waive the requirement to submit an English language proficiency score.
  • TOEFL, IELTS, Pearson (PTE) or NU Global Exam score

Are You an International Student? Find out what additional documents are required to apply.

Admissions Details Learn more about the College of Professional Studies admissions process, policies, and required materials.

Admissions Dates

Our admissions process operates on a rolling basis; however, we do recommend the application guidelines below to ensure you can begin during your desired start term:

Domestic Application Guidelines

International Application Guidelines *

*International deadlines are only applicable if the program is F1 compliant.

Industry-aligned courses for in-demand careers.

For 100+ years, we’ve designed our programs with one thing in mind—your success. Explore the current program requirements and course descriptions, all designed to meet today’s industry needs and must-have skills.

View curriculum

Northeastern's signature experience-powered learning model has been at the heart of the university for more than a century. It combines world-class academics with professional practice, allowing you to acquire relevant, real-world skills you can immediately put into action in your current workplace. This makes a Northeastern education a dynamic, transformative experience, giving you countless opportunities to grow as a professional and person.

Learn About Getting Real World Experience

Our Faculty

Northeastern University faculty represents a broad cross-section of professional practices and fields, including finance, education, biomedical science, management, and the U.S. military. They serve as mentors and advisors and collaborate alongside you to solve the most pressing global challenges facing established and emerging markets.

By enrolling in Northeastern, you’ll be connected to students at our 13 campuses, as well as 300,000-plus alumni and more than 3,500 employer partners around the world. Our global university system provides you with unique opportunities to think locally and act globally and serves as a platform for scaling ideas, talent, and solutions.

Below is a look at where our Education & Learning alumni work, the positions they hold, and the skills they bring to their organization.

Where They Work

  • Boston Public Schools
  • Chicago Public Schools
  • NYC Department of Education
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Tufts University

What They Do

  • Community and Social Services
  • Business Development
  • Human Services
  • Entrepreneurship

What They're Skilled At

  • Public Speaking
  • Curriculum Development

Learn more about Northeastern Alumni on  Linkedin .

Related Articles

education graduate programs in boston

Top Higher Education Conferences To Attend in 2024

education graduate programs in boston

5 Culturally Responsive Teaching Strategies

education graduate programs in boston

EdD vs. PhD in Education: What’s the Difference?

--> Master's Save
COMMITMENT DURATION TYPE
 
--> Master's Save
COMMITMENT DURATION TYPE
 
--> Master's Save
COMMITMENT DURATION TYPE
 

An official website of the United States government

Here's how you know

Official websites use .gov A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS. A lock ( Lock Locked padlock ) or https:// means you've safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Active funding opportunity

Nsf 24-588: nsf epscor graduate fellowship program (egfp), program solicitation, document information, document history.

  • Posted: July 3, 2024

Program Solicitation NSF 24-588



Directorate for STEM Education
     Division of Graduate Education

Office of Integrative Activities

Directorate for Technology, Innovation and Partnerships

Directorate for Biological Sciences

Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering

Directorate for Engineering

Directorate for Geosciences

Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences

Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences

Full Proposal Deadline(s) (due by 5 p.m. submitting organization's local time):

October 02, 2024

June 02, 2025

June 01, 2026

Important Information And Revision Notes

The NSF EPSCoR Graduate Fellowship Program (EGFP) is a new three-year pilot program that responds directly to input from recent studies and legislation, including the Envisioning the Future of NSF EPSCoR report and the CHIPS and Science Act (Public Law 117-167) . The EGFP is intended to advance graduate talent recruitment, development, and retention at graduate institutions in the eligible EPSCoR states and territories , hereafter referred to as EPSCoR jurisdictions. Through the EGFP's investments, NSF intends to help build additional capacity for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) research and in turn promote innovation and economic growth in EPSCoR jurisdictions and across the Nation.

EGFP is designed to enhance the STEM research capacity and competitiveness of EPSCoR jurisdictions by providing funding to graduate degree-awarding institutions that will allow them to recruit NSF EPSCoR Graduate Fellows. Awardee institutions will select fellowship recipients, the NSF EPSCoR Graduate Fellows, from the pool of exceptional talent who received Honorable Mention from the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) no more than three years prior to the proposal due date. NSF will provide the mechanism for awardee institutions to connect with GRFP Honorable Mention recipients through the NSF Education and Training Application (ETAP) system .

Any proposal submitted in response to this solicitation should be submitted in accordance with the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) that is in effect for the relevant due date to which the proposal is being submitted. The NSF PAPPG is regularly revised and it is the responsibility of the proposer to ensure that the proposal meets the requirements specified in this solicitation and the applicable version of the PAPPG. Submitting a proposal prior to a specified deadline does not negate this requirement.

Summary Of Program Requirements

General information.

Program Title:

NSF EPSCoR Graduate Fellowship Program (EGFP)
The NSF EPSCoR Graduate Fellowship Program (EGFP) provides an opportunity for applicants who received the distinction of GRFP Honorable Mention no more than three years before the proposal due date to be named NSF EPSCoR Graduate Fellows and obtain financial support for their graduate education at an institution in an EPSCoR jurisdiction. EGFP aims to enhance the capacity and competitiveness of EPSCoR jurisdictions by providing funding to graduate degree-awarding institutions to support NSF EPSCoR Graduate Fellows as they pursue graduate degrees in the disciplines specified by the NSF Directorates and Office that are participating in the EGFP funding program. Fellows may pursue degrees in field that differ from the field or sub-field of study that the GRFP Honorable Mention recipients previously listed in their GRFP application. EGFP awards will be made to institutions in EPSCoR jurisdictions. Awards will provide three years of stipend and associated cost-of-education allowance for each NSF EPSCoR Graduate Fellow. Stipends must be budgeted at the level of $37,000 per year per Fellow and cost-of-education allowances must be budgeted at the level of $16,000 per year per Fellow. A total of three years of support must be budgeted per Fellow. Each Fellow must be given up to five years to utilize the support. Awardees will administer the awards such that the Fellows receive the full stipend amount and the institution retains the full cost-of-education allowance during the three years that each Fellow receives support. All submissions must request support for a minimum of three Fellows.

Broadening Participation In Stem:

NSF recognizes the unique lived experiences of individuals from communities that are underrepresented and/or under-served in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and the barriers to inclusion and access to STEM education and careers. NSF highly encourages the leadership, partnership, and contributions in all NSF opportunities of individuals who are members of such communities supported by NSF. This includes leading and designing STEM research and education proposals for funding; serving as peer reviewers, advisory committee members, and/or committee of visitor members; and serving as NSF leadership, program, and/or administrative staff. NSF also highly encourages demographically diverse institutions of higher education (IHEs) to lead, partner, and contribute to NSF opportunities on behalf of their research and education communities. NSF expects that all individuals, including those who are members of groups that are underrepresented and/or under-served in STEM, are treated equitably and inclusively in the Foundation's proposal and award process.

NSF encourages IHEs that enroll, educate, graduate, and employ individuals who are members of groups underrepresented and/or under-served in STEM education programs and careers to lead, partner, and contribute to NSF opportunities, including leading and designing STEM research and education proposals for funding. Such IHEs include, but may not be limited to, community colleges and two-year institutions, mission-based institutions such as Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs), women's colleges, and institutions that primarily serve persons with disabilities, as well as institutions defined by enrollment such as Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs), Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs), and Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs).

"Broadening participation in STEM" is the comprehensive phrase used by NSF to refer to the Foundation's goal of increasing the representation and diversity of individuals, organizations, and geographic regions that contribute to STEM teaching, research, and innovation. To broaden participation in STEM, it is necessary to address issues of equity, inclusion, and access in STEM education, training, and careers. Whereas all NSF programs might support broadening participation components, some programs primarily focus on supporting broadening participation research and projects. Examples can be found on the NSF Broadening Participation in STEM website.

Cognizant Program Officer(s):

Please note that the following information is current at the time of publishing. See program website for any updates to the points of contact.

  • EGFP: Program Contact, telephone: (703) 292-2440, email: [email protected]
  • Narcrisha S. Norman, telephone: (703) 292-7965, email: [email protected]
  • Rebecca Shearman, telephone: (703) 292-7403, email: [email protected]
  • Jeanne R. Small, telephone: (703) 292-8623, email: [email protected]
  • 47.041 --- Engineering
  • 47.049 --- Mathematical and Physical Sciences
  • 47.050 --- Geosciences
  • 47.070 --- Computer and Information Science and Engineering
  • 47.074 --- Biological Sciences
  • 47.075 --- Social Behavioral and Economic Sciences
  • 47.076 --- STEM Education
  • 47.083 --- Office of Integrative Activities (OIA)
  • 47.084 --- NSF Technology, Innovation and Partnerships

Award Information

Anticipated Type of Award: Continuing Grant

Estimated Number of Awards: 5 to 35

Anticipated Funding Amount: $17,000,000

Proposals must request at least the amount of funding required to support three Fellows over three years ($477,000 total). It is anticipated that no proposals will request support for more than 20 Fellows over three years ($3,180,000 total). It is also anticipated that the average award size will allow five Fellows to be supported for three years ($795,000 total).

Number of awards and award sizes are subject to the availability of funds and quality of proposals submitted.

Eligibility Information

Who May Submit Proposals:

Proposals may only be submitted by the following: Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) that are accredited, have a campus located in an eligible EPSCoR jurisdiction at the time of proposal submission, and offer at least one master's and/or doctoral degree in a STEM discipline aligned with the topical focus area(s) described in this solicitation.

Who May Serve as PI:

As of the submission deadline, PIs, co-PIs, or other Senior/Key personnel must hold primary, full-time, paid, and continuing appointments at an institution that is eligible to submit in response to this solicitation (see above), with exceptions granted for family or medical leave, as determined by the submitting institution. Individuals holding term-limited appointments are not eligible.

Limit on Number of Proposals per Organization: 1

Each submitting organization is limited to one proposal per annual competition. Potential PIs are advised to contact their institutional office of research (or equivalent) regarding processes used to select proposals for submission. Institutions interested in supporting Fellows in multiple topical focus areas must submit a single proposal that addresses all topical areas of interest.

Limit on Number of Proposals per PI or co-PI: 1

An individual must not participate as PI, Co-PI, or Senior/Key Personnel on more than one proposal submitted for the same deadline.

Proposal Preparation and Submission Instructions

A. proposal preparation instructions.

  • Letters of Intent: Not required
  • Preliminary Proposal Submission: Not required
  • Full Proposals submitted via Research.gov: NSF Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide (PAPPG) guidelines apply. The complete text of the PAPPG is available electronically on the NSF website at: https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=pappg .
  • Full Proposals submitted via Grants.gov: NSF Grants.gov Application Guide: A Guide for the Preparation and Submission of NSF Applications via Grants.gov guidelines apply (Note: The NSF Grants.gov Application Guide is available on the Grants.gov website and on the NSF website at: https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=grantsgovguide ).

B. Budgetary Information

C. due dates, proposal review information criteria.

Merit Review Criteria:

National Science Board approved criteria. Additional merit review criteria apply. Please see the full text of this solicitation for further information.

Award Administration Information

Award Conditions:

Standard NSF award conditions apply.

Reporting Requirements:

Standard NSF reporting requirements apply.

I. Introduction

In 1950, Congress established NSF, five years after Vannevar Bush sent a report titled Science – the Endless Frontier to President Harry S. Truman outlining a plan to create a new agency that would contribute to the development of the Nation's scientific talent ( https://www.nsf.gov/about/history/EndlessFrontier_w.pdf ). Bush's report created a blueprint for U.S. scientific research. He made the point that" There are talented individuals in every segment of the population ". Bush further wrote that " ... it is recommended that provision be made for... graduate fellowships... ". These words are reminders that investments in transformative science and people with high potential are key for keeping the U.S. strong and competitive.

The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) acted on Bush's report and became NSF's first program. Since its inception, GRFP has received applications each year from exceptionally talented individuals who have the potential to make strong positive contributions to the U.S. STEM enterprise. Only a small subset of applicants are offered an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship every year. An additional elite group of applicants receive the distinction of being named an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Honorable Mention in recognition of their outstanding achievements and potential for future contributions in STEM. GRFP Awardees and Honorable Mentions together represent some of the nation's most promising STEM talent. Unfortunately, due to funding limitations, NSF has been unable to provide GRFP Honorable Mentions with financial support for graduate school.

The EPSCoR Graduate Fellowship Program (EGFP) aims to enhance the STEM capacity and competitiveness of EPSCoR jurisdictions by providing graduate degree-granting institutions with funding that can be used to provide fellowships to students who received a GRFP Honorable Mention. The EGFP program specifically seeks to empower IHEs from EPSCoR jurisdictions to attract and retain extremely high-quality graduate students.

This program is an opportunity for GRFP applicants who received the distinction of GRFP Honorable Mention to obtain financial support for their graduate education in STEM disciplines, including the discipline of STEM education research, at an institution in an EPSCoR jurisdiction. Eligible students must have received a GRFP Honorable Mention no more than three years prior to the deadline date for submission of proposals to the EGFP. Students who receive support through this program are known as NSF EPSCoR Graduate Fellows, and are referred to as Fellows for the remainder of this solicitation.

EGFP awards are made to institutions to support graduate students in specific fields of study. Institutions that receive funding through this program will be eligible to recruit and support meritorious GRFP Honorable Mentions to attend their institutions and pursue a graduate degree. Support from the EGFP program is only available for those fields specified by the NSF Directorates and Office participating in the EGFP. Students must be recruited for and pursue degrees in the field(s) addressed in each EGFP proposal.

As authorized in the CHIPS and Science Act (Sections 10325, 10387, 10383, and 10393), the EGFP program will help NSF to increase its investments in EPSCoR jurisdictions, while growing STEM talent and providing an opportunity to support the development of a ready workforce in critical and emerging technologies. EGFP investments in the future STEM workforce are intended to build capacity for STEM research in EPSCoR jurisdictions, which in turn is intended to promote innovation and economic growth in EPSCoR jurisdictions and across the Nation.

II. Program Description

STEM Topics and Areas Eligible for Consideration

The following NSF Directorates and Office are participating in this solicitation:

  • Directorate for Biological Sciences (BIO)
  • Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE)
  • Directorate for Engineering (ENG)
  • Directorate for Geosciences (GEO)
  • Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS)
  • Directorate for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences (SBE)
  • Directorate for STEM Education (EDU)
  • Directorate for Technology, Innovation and Partnerships (TIP)
  • Office of Integrative Activities (OIA)

Each participating Directorate and Office has identified specific topics or areas that align with their unique goals and the programs they support. These topics or areas may differ from the field or sub-field the Honorable Mention recipients previously listed in their GRFP applications.

The topics and area that will be considered for funding by each of the participating Directorates and Office are described below.

Directorate for Biological Sciences (BIO) : BIO will consider proposals that engage Fellows with research on any topic normally supported by the Directorate for Biological Sciences with an emphasis on proposals that combine biology and artificial intelligence, that advance the bioeconomy, and/or create solutions for a resilient planet. More information about BIO is available on the NSF.gov website. https://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=BIO .

Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) : CISE will consider proposals that engage Fellows with research on any topic normally supported by the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering. More information about CISE is available on the NSF.gov website. https://new.nsf.gov/cise .

Directorate for Engineering (ENG) : ENG will consider proposals that engage Fellows with research on any topic normally supported by the Directorate for Engineering. More information about ENG is available on the NSF.gov website. https://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=ENG .

Directorate for Geosciences (GEO) : GEO will consider proposals that engage Fellows with research on any topic normally supported by the Directorate for Geosciences. More information about GEO is available on the NSF.gov website. https://new.nsf.gov/about/directorates-offices#geo .

Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS) : MPS will consider proposals that engage Fellows with research on any topic normally supported by the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences. More information about MPS is available on the NSF.gov website. https://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=MPS .

Directorate for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences (SBE) : SBE will consider proposals that engage Fellows in any field or fields of study supported by the Directorate for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences. More information about SBE is available on the NSF.gov website. https://new.nsf.gov/sbe .

Directorate for STEM Education (EDU) : EDU will consider proposals that provide support for graduate students pursuing a master's or doctoral degree in STEM education. This includes degrees offered within STEM disciplines that involve discipline-based education research. More information about EDU is available on the NSF.gov website. https://new.nsf.gov/edu .

Directorate for Technology, Innovation and Partnerships (TIP) : TIP will consider proposals that engage Fellows in graduate curricula designed in collaboration with non-academic employers to address skills gaps in the ten key technology areas that are described in Sec. 10387 of the CHIPS and Science Act and correspondingly the focus of the Directorate. NSF recognizes that each of these key technology areas spans multiple fields of study and expects graduate program offerings to demonstrate such multi-disciplinary training. Graduate programs eligible for support must incorporate experiential learning and problem-solving components beyond traditional research activities typically expected of graduate programs in STEM fields. Industry- and policy-based experiential learning opportunities are strongly preferred. Proposals considered for funding by TIP must indicate how specific non-academic employers have been engaged in the development or modification of relevant graduate curricula. More information about TIP is available on the NSF.gov website. https://new.nsf.gov/tip/latest .

Office of Integrative Activities (OIA) : The Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) in OIA will consider proposals that provide support for graduate students pursuing a master's or doctoral degree in a STEM discipline aligned with an EPSCoR Research Infrastructure Improvement (RII) award within the jurisdiction. These submissions should focus on leveraging existing NSF EPSCoR RII investments to improve research, education, broadening participation, and economic development in the jurisdiction. Proposals should identify graduate student experiences that synergize with the currently funded RII project(s) in ways that engage in academic, government, and private sector partners, as appropriate. Currently funded RII projects may be found on NSF's website at this link , by exploring the websites of EPSCoR jurisdictions , or by contacting an NSF EPSCoR RII Program Director .

Institutional Responsibilities

Proposing institutions must be prepared to provide NSF EPSCoR Graduate Fellows with a high-quality graduate experience in the discipline(s) in which each Fellow will pursue a graduate degree. Institutions must provide clear evidence of an existing graduate program in the discipline(s) relevant to the proposal. Only proposals focusing on one or more of the topics or areas described above will be considered for funding. Other proposals will be returned without review. See the Full Proposal Preparation Instructions section for more information about the expected contents of a proposal.

Institutions receiving awards through this solicitation will be required to use the NSF Education and Training Application (ETAP) system to recruit prospective Fellows. Institutions may recruit potential Fellows from the pool of highly qualified individuals who received Honorable Mention recognition from the NSF GRFP no more than three years prior to the proposal submission deadline.

NSF conducts ongoing program monitoring and evaluation to determine how effective its programs are at achieving their goals. Proposing institutions must present a plan for ensuring that all project participants, including employees of the proposing institution, as well as supported Fellows, will comply with NSF's requests for information related to program-level evaluation, including requests to participate in surveys, interviews, and other methods for collecting evaluation data. Prospective Fellows offered funding through this program must be informed of and agree to this obligation prior to receiving support.

Proposing institutions should note that for this solicitation, a graduate student Mentoring Plan, prepared in accordance with the guidance contained in the PAPPG, must be included in the Other Supplementary Documents section of the proposal. In submission of each annual and final annual project report, the PI or co-PI is certifying that every graduate student receiving substantial support through this program had an Individual Development Plan (IDP) during the reporting period. NSF defines "substantial support" as support provided to an individual that is equal to one person month or more during the annual reporting period for the NSF award. Other requirements in the PAPPG that apply to all NSF research proposals and awards apply to EGFP proposals and awards.

Fellow Responsibilities

Prospective Fellows will connect with institutions offering fellowships via the NSF Education and Training Application (ETAP) system. In addition to completing an ETAP application, Fellows will also be required to submit any additional documentation required by the institution(s) offering fellowships to be considered for support. Prospective Fellows must have received the distinction of Honorable Mention from the NSF GRFP program no more than three years prior to the deadline date for the institution's proposal to the EGFP program. Fellows can apply to graduate programs that differ from those listed as field or sub-field in their previous GRFP application. To be eligible for ongoing support, fellowship recipients must be enrolled full-time in an eligible master's or doctoral degree-granting program and make ongoing satisfactory progress toward completion of their graduate degree. Fellows must remain enrolled in a degree program in the same discipline as when they were admitted by institution. Full-time enrollment must be certified by the awardee institution's registrar (or equivalent). Fellowships are granted by the institution and not portable to another institution. If a Fellow transfers to another institution, the Fellow will forfeit continued access to the fellowship.

III. Award Information

$17,000,000 available annually. Number of awards is approximate and subject to the availability of funds and quality of the proposals submitted.

IV. Eligibility Information

Additional Eligibility Info:

A proposing institution must provide clear evidence of an existing graduate program in the discipline(s) relevant to the proposal. All proposals must include a Letter of Collaboration from the submitting institution's Graduate School Dean, or from a person with similar responsibility and authority for the graduate programs that are relevant to the proposal.

V. Proposal Preparation And Submission Instructions

Full Proposal Preparation Instructions : Proposers may opt to submit proposals in response to this Program Solicitation via Research.gov or Grants.gov.

  • Full Proposals submitted via Research.gov: Proposals submitted in response to this program solicitation should be prepared and submitted in accordance with the general guidelines contained in the NSF Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide (PAPPG). The complete text of the PAPPG is available electronically on the NSF website at: https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=pappg . Paper copies of the PAPPG may be obtained from the NSF Publications Clearinghouse, telephone (703) 292-8134 or by e-mail from [email protected] . The Prepare New Proposal setup will prompt you for the program solicitation number.
  • Full proposals submitted via Grants.gov: Proposals submitted in response to this program solicitation via Grants.gov should be prepared and submitted in accordance with the NSF Grants.gov Application Guide: A Guide for the Preparation and Submission of NSF Applications via Grants.gov . The complete text of the NSF Grants.gov Application Guide is available on the Grants.gov website and on the NSF website at: ( https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=grantsgovguide ). To obtain copies of the Application Guide and Application Forms Package, click on the Apply tab on the Grants.gov site, then click on the Apply Step 1: Download a Grant Application Package and Application Instructions link and enter the funding opportunity number, (the program solicitation number without the NSF prefix) and press the Download Package button. Paper copies of the Grants.gov Application Guide also may be obtained from the NSF Publications Clearinghouse, telephone (703) 292-8134 or by e-mail from [email protected] .

See PAPPG Chapter II.D.2 for guidance on the required sections of a full research proposal submitted to NSF. Please note that the proposal preparation instructions provided in this program solicitation may deviate from the PAPPG instructions.

The following instructions are specific to proposals submitted to the EPSCoR Graduate Fellowship Program and supplement the NSF PAPPG.

  • Separately submitted collaborative proposals will not be accepted and will be returned without review.
  • Proposals that do not contain all items described below will be returned without review.

The following information is in addition to the guidance provided by the NSF PAPPG, which applies to all proposals submitted to NSF.

Cover Sheet: For planning purposes, use March 15 of the upcoming year as the award start date.

Project Summary: (1-page limit): The first sentence of the Project Summary should clearly identify the NSF Directorate(s) or Office that provides funding for research in the disciplinary area and topic that are the focus of the proposal and the number of graduate students for whom Fellowships will be provided. In the case that the proposal focuses on areas that are associated with more than one NSF Directorate or Office, the number of graduate students should be disaggregated by Directorate or Office. The remainder of the Project Summary should describe the proposed project. See the NSF PAPPG for additional instructions. The summary should be written in a manner that will be informative to STEM professionals working in related fields and understandable to a scientifically literate lay reader.

Project Description: The Project Description may not exceed 15 pages, including tables and illustrations.

Each proposal should provide an overview of the educational ecosystem represented by the proposing institution. This may include topics such as size, setting, areas of emphasis, number of undergraduate and graduate degree programs, collaborations with other educational institutions, connections to businesses and industry, or other topics that the proposal authors feel are relevant.

Each proposal must explicitly identify the STEM or STEM education research area(s) for which Fellows are sought, and the number of students for whom Fellowships will be provided (disaggregated by research area as appropriate).

For each relevant discipline, the proposal must provide credible evidence that the institution has the capacity to serve the number of students for whom support is requested. In addition, the institution must demonstrate in the proposal that they have the capability to provide students with a high-quality graduate experience. This means that, at a minimum, the graduate program(s) for which students are sought:

  • already exists;
  • is supported by a sufficient number of faculty who are willing to advise the students;
  • possesses or has access to the facilities and tools necessary to support high-quality research and mentoring in the relevant disciplines;
  • is within an institution that has a track record of effectively recruiting, retaining, and graduating STEM or STEM education graduate students and supporting them in finding employment after graduation;
  • is within an institution that has demonstrable experience on-boarding new STEM or STEM education research graduate students and promoting their sense of belonging by providing an introduction to the local community, ensuring awareness and access to resources available at the school, and facilitating peer mentoring and support among graduate students; and
  • is within an institution that has experience providing professional development for STEM or STEM education graduate students and mentoring them to successful completion of the graduate degrees.

Most of the project description portion of the proposal should focus on providing a complete description of the characteristics of the graduate program that selected Fellows will experience, from matriculation through graduation. Alignment of the graduate program with one or more of those specified by the Directorates/Office collaborating to issue this solicitation must be clearly articulated. Discussion of the topics shown as bullet points in the preceding paragraph must be included. Additionally, each proposal should describe compelling characteristics of the relevant graduate degree program that can be highlighted as evidence of quality. Each proposal should also summarize what constitutes "satisfactory progress" toward completion of a STEM or STEM education research graduate degree in the relevant discipline(s) and describe how students are guided to make continuous satisfactory progress throughout their graduate program. The process by which students who are not making satisfactory progress are notified, given opportunities to improve, and, if no improvement occurs, are dismissed from the program(s) should be addressed.

Additional information may also be included as deemed appropriate in judging the overall potential of the institution to provide Fellows with a high-quality graduate experience. For example, proposals may include information about services and other resources offered to graduate students by relevant departments and/or colleges (or equivalent) and the institution. Proposal authors are encouraged to review the information in Section VI of this Solicitation (NSF Proposal Processing and Review Criteria), including the additional solicitation-specific review criteria.

The proposal must include a commitment to collaborate with NSF to prepare and disseminate institutional graduate admission resources via the NSF Education and Training Application (ETAP) system. A description of the process by which prospective Fellows' information submitted via ETAP will be reviewed, the additional application materials that will be requested from the prospective Fellows, and the process for making final decisions regarding which applicants will be offered fellowships, must be included. Proposing institutions are strongly encouraged to make the application process as simple and straightforward as possible for prospective Fellows because these individuals have already been pre-screened and received an Honorable Mention as a result of the NSF GRFP application and review process.

Other Supplementary Documents: All proposals must include the following two items, which must be uploaded into the Other Supplementary Documents section of the proposal:

  • a Letter of Collaboration from the submitting institution's Graduate School Dean, or from a person with similar responsibility and authority for the graduate programs that are relevant to the proposal; and
  • a graduate student Mentoring Plan applicable to all Fellows at the proposing institution. Proposers should follow the instruction for preparing and submitting a Mentoring Plan contained within the PAPPG.

Cost Sharing:

Inclusion of voluntary committed cost sharing is prohibited.

Other Budgetary Limitations:

Awards will support up to three years of stipends and associated cost-of-education allowances for Fellows. Stipends should be budgeted at the level of $37,000 per student per year and cost-of-education allowances should be budgeted at the level of $16,000 per student per fellowship year. The cost-of-education allowance provides payment in lieu of tuition and mandatory fees to the institution. A total of three years of support must be budgeted per student. Each student must be given up to five years to utilize the support. Both stipends and cost-of-education allowances must be listed as Participant Support Costs in the NSF proposal budget.

During the years in which students are receiving fellowship support, the institution is required to exempt Fellows from paying tuition and fees normally charged to students of similar academic standing, unless such charges are optional or are refundable (i.e., the institution is responsible for tuition and required fees in excess of the cost-of-education allowance). Acceptance of fellowship funds by the awardee institution indicates acceptance of and adherence to these and other terms and conditions as specified in this solicitation and the PAPPG. The cost-of-education allowance is provided to institutions in lieu of tuition and mandatory fees and it can be used for any purpose that the institution would normally use the revenue it collects via tuition and fees.

Each proposal should develop a three-year budget for the project in which all the funds requested are evenly distributed across the three project years. If the project is on track, the funding requested will be provided to each awardee institution as continuing grant increments during the three project years. The institution can use all the funding for Fellows during those years, or, if one or more Fellows chooses to defer their fellowship, the institution may request one or more no-cost extensions, as necessary, to allow each Fellow up to five years to utilize their three years of fellowship funding. All Fellows' requests for deferral must be approved by the institution. Awardee institutions' requests for no-cost extensions must be documented and approved as described in the PAPPG.

To reiterate, each Fellow will receive up to three years of support and that support may be utilized at any time during a five-year period. A Fellow's cost-of-education allowance, which is to be used at the discretion of the institution, can only be charged to the award during the same year that the Fellow receives a stipend.

Fellows receiving fellowship support must have full access to all resources and other benefits available at the institution to other graduate students supported at the "full-time" support level (normally 20 hours per week average expected commitment) as research or teaching assistants. Once a Fellow matriculates at an institution in a discipline supported by the institution's EGFP award, the Fellow cannot change their field of study to pursue a degree for which the institution has not received EGFP support.

If, for any reason, a supported Fellow leaves an institution, the institution should contact the cognizant NSF program officer. The potential next steps are: (1) the awardee institution recruits a new Fellow; or (2) NSF reduces the value of any upcoming continuing grant increments to reflect the reduction in number of Fellows supported by the institution and/or arranges for the return of some portion of the funds previously provided to the institution by NSF. If the institution receives permission from NSF to recruit a new Fellow and does not have sufficient funds remaining to provide a full three years of support to the incoming Fellow, they may request a supplement to their award. The availability of supplements is dependent upon the availability of funds at NSF. No commitments of NSF-provided funding should be made to incoming replacement Fellows beyond what the host institution is able to provide with the funds remaining in the project budget (including awarded supplements) at the time the commitment is being made. New Fellows must have received Honorable Mention from the NSF GRFP no more than three years prior to the date of submission of the institution's EGFP proposal. New Fellows must connect with the institution via NSF's ETAP system.

Support for no fewer than three Fellows can be requested in any proposal. This requirement does not apply to supplement requests.

D. Research.gov/Grants.gov Requirements

For Proposals Submitted Via Research.gov:

To prepare and submit a proposal via Research.gov, see detailed technical instructions available at: https://www.research.gov/research-portal/appmanager/base/desktop?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=research_node_display&_nodePath=/researchGov/Service/Desktop/ProposalPreparationandSubmission.html . For Research.gov user support, call the Research.gov Help Desk at 1-800-381-1532 or e-mail [email protected] . The Research.gov Help Desk answers general technical questions related to the use of the Research.gov system. Specific questions related to this program solicitation should be referred to the NSF program staff contact(s) listed in Section VIII of this funding opportunity.

For Proposals Submitted Via Grants.gov:

Before using Grants.gov for the first time, each organization must register to create an institutional profile. Once registered, the applicant's organization can then apply for any federal grant on the Grants.gov website. Comprehensive information about using Grants.gov is available on the Grants.gov Applicant Resources webpage: https://www.grants.gov/applicants . In addition, the NSF Grants.gov Application Guide (see link in Section V.A) provides instructions regarding the technical preparation of proposals via Grants.gov. For Grants.gov user support, contact the Grants.gov Contact Center at 1-800-518-4726 or by email: [email protected] . The Grants.gov Contact Center answers general technical questions related to the use of Grants.gov. Specific questions related to this program solicitation should be referred to the NSF program staff contact(s) listed in Section VIII of this solicitation. Submitting the Proposal: Once all documents have been completed, the Authorized Organizational Representative (AOR) must submit the application to Grants.gov and verify the desired funding opportunity and agency to which the application is submitted. The AOR must then sign and submit the application to Grants.gov. The completed application will be transferred to Research.gov for further processing. The NSF Grants.gov Proposal Processing in Research.gov informational page provides submission guidance to applicants and links to helpful resources including the NSF Grants.gov Application Guide , Grants.gov Proposal Processing in Research.gov how-to guide , and Grants.gov Submitted Proposals Frequently Asked Questions . Grants.gov proposals must pass all NSF pre-check and post-check validations in order to be accepted by Research.gov at NSF. When submitting via Grants.gov, NSF strongly recommends applicants initiate proposal submission at least five business days in advance of a deadline to allow adequate time to address NSF compliance errors and resubmissions by 5:00 p.m. submitting organization's local time on the deadline. Please note that some errors cannot be corrected in Grants.gov. Once a proposal passes pre-checks but fails any post-check, an applicant can only correct and submit the in-progress proposal in Research.gov.

Proposers that submitted via Research.gov may use Research.gov to verify the status of their submission to NSF. For proposers that submitted via Grants.gov, until an application has been received and validated by NSF, the Authorized Organizational Representative may check the status of an application on Grants.gov. After proposers have received an e-mail notification from NSF, Research.gov should be used to check the status of an application.

VI. NSF Proposal Processing And Review Procedures

Proposals received by NSF are assigned to the appropriate NSF program for acknowledgement and, if they meet NSF requirements, for review. All proposals are carefully reviewed by a scientist, engineer, or educator serving as an NSF Program Officer, and usually by three to ten other persons outside NSF either as ad hoc reviewers, panelists, or both, who are experts in the particular fields represented by the proposal. These reviewers are selected by Program Officers charged with oversight of the review process. Proposers are invited to suggest names of persons they believe are especially well qualified to review the proposal and/or persons they would prefer not review the proposal. These suggestions may serve as one source in the reviewer selection process at the Program Officer's discretion. Submission of such names, however, is optional. Care is taken to ensure that reviewers have no conflicts of interest with the proposal. In addition, Program Officers may obtain comments from site visits before recommending final action on proposals. Senior NSF staff further review recommendations for awards. A flowchart that depicts the entire NSF proposal and award process (and associated timeline) is included in PAPPG Exhibit III-1.

A comprehensive description of the Foundation's merit review process is available on the NSF website at: https://www.nsf.gov/bfa/dias/policy/merit_review/ .

Proposers should also be aware of core strategies that are essential to the fulfillment of NSF's mission, as articulated in Leading the World in Discovery and Innovation, STEM Talent Development and the Delivery of Benefits from Research - NSF Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years (FY) 2022 - 2026 . These strategies are integrated in the program planning and implementation process, of which proposal review is one part. NSF's mission is particularly well-implemented through the integration of research and education and broadening participation in NSF programs, projects, and activities.

One of the strategic objectives in support of NSF's mission is to foster integration of research and education through the programs, projects, and activities it supports at academic and research institutions. These institutions must recruit, train, and prepare a diverse STEM workforce to advance the frontiers of science and participate in the U.S. technology-based economy. NSF's contribution to the national innovation ecosystem is to provide cutting-edge research under the guidance of the Nation's most creative scientists and engineers. NSF also supports development of a strong science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce by investing in building the knowledge that informs improvements in STEM teaching and learning.

NSF's mission calls for the broadening of opportunities and expanding participation of groups, institutions, and geographic regions that are underrepresented in STEM disciplines, which is essential to the health and vitality of science and engineering. NSF is committed to this principle of diversity and deems it central to the programs, projects, and activities it considers and supports.

A. Merit Review Principles and Criteria

The National Science Foundation strives to invest in a robust and diverse portfolio of projects that creates new knowledge and enables breakthroughs in understanding across all areas of science and engineering research and education. To identify which projects to support, NSF relies on a merit review process that incorporates consideration of both the technical aspects of a proposed project and its potential to contribute more broadly to advancing NSF's mission "to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; to secure the national defense; and for other purposes." NSF makes every effort to conduct a fair, competitive, transparent merit review process for the selection of projects.

1. Merit Review Principles

These principles are to be given due diligence by PIs and organizations when preparing proposals and managing projects, by reviewers when reading and evaluating proposals, and by NSF program staff when determining whether or not to recommend proposals for funding and while overseeing awards. Given that NSF is the primary federal agency charged with nurturing and supporting excellence in basic research and education, the following three principles apply:

  • All NSF projects should be of the highest quality and have the potential to advance, if not transform, the frontiers of knowledge.
  • NSF projects, in the aggregate, should contribute more broadly to achieving societal goals. These "Broader Impacts" may be accomplished through the research itself, through activities that are directly related to specific research projects, or through activities that are supported by, but are complementary to, the project. The project activities may be based on previously established and/or innovative methods and approaches, but in either case must be well justified.
  • Meaningful assessment and evaluation of NSF funded projects should be based on appropriate metrics, keeping in mind the likely correlation between the effect of broader impacts and the resources provided to implement projects. If the size of the activity is limited, evaluation of that activity in isolation is not likely to be meaningful. Thus, assessing the effectiveness of these activities may best be done at a higher, more aggregated, level than the individual project.

With respect to the third principle, even if assessment of Broader Impacts outcomes for particular projects is done at an aggregated level, PIs are expected to be accountable for carrying out the activities described in the funded project. Thus, individual projects should include clearly stated goals, specific descriptions of the activities that the PI intends to do, and a plan in place to document the outputs of those activities.

These three merit review principles provide the basis for the merit review criteria, as well as a context within which the users of the criteria can better understand their intent.

2. Merit Review Criteria

All NSF proposals are evaluated through use of the two National Science Board approved merit review criteria. In some instances, however, NSF will employ additional criteria as required to highlight the specific objectives of certain programs and activities.

The two merit review criteria are listed below. Both criteria are to be given full consideration during the review and decision-making processes; each criterion is necessary but neither, by itself, is sufficient. Therefore, proposers must fully address both criteria. (PAPPG Chapter II.D.2.d(i). contains additional information for use by proposers in development of the Project Description section of the proposal). Reviewers are strongly encouraged to review the criteria, including PAPPG Chapter II.D.2.d(i), prior to the review of a proposal.

When evaluating NSF proposals, reviewers will be asked to consider what the proposers want to do, why they want to do it, how they plan to do it, how they will know if they succeed, and what benefits could accrue if the project is successful. These issues apply both to the technical aspects of the proposal and the way in which the project may make broader contributions. To that end, reviewers will be asked to evaluate all proposals against two criteria:

  • Intellectual Merit: The Intellectual Merit criterion encompasses the potential to advance knowledge; and
  • Broader Impacts: The Broader Impacts criterion encompasses the potential to benefit society and contribute to the achievement of specific, desired societal outcomes.

The following elements should be considered in the review for both criteria:

  • Advance knowledge and understanding within its own field or across different fields (Intellectual Merit); and
  • Benefit society or advance desired societal outcomes (Broader Impacts)?
  • To what extent do the proposed activities suggest and explore creative, original, or potentially transformative concepts?
  • Is the plan for carrying out the proposed activities well-reasoned, well-organized, and based on a sound rationale? Does the plan incorporate a mechanism to assess success?
  • How well qualified is the individual, team, or organization to conduct the proposed activities?
  • Are there adequate resources available to the PI (either at the home organization or through collaborations) to carry out the proposed activities?

Broader impacts may be accomplished through the research itself, through the activities that are directly related to specific research projects, or through activities that are supported by, but are complementary to, the project. NSF values the advancement of scientific knowledge and activities that contribute to achievement of societally relevant outcomes. Such outcomes include, but are not limited to: full participation of women, persons with disabilities, and other underrepresented groups in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM); improved STEM education and educator development at any level; increased public scientific literacy and public engagement with science and technology; improved well-being of individuals in society; development of a diverse, globally competitive STEM workforce; increased partnerships between academia, industry, and others; improved national security; increased economic competitiveness of the United States; and enhanced infrastructure for research and education.

Proposers are reminded that reviewers will also be asked to review the Data Management and Sharing Plan and the Mentoring Plan, as appropriate.

Additional Solicitation Specific Review Criteria

In addition to the standard NSF Intellectual Merit and Broader Impacts Criteria, reviewers will be required to carefully consider the extent to which the following aspects are addressed in proposals:

  • The capacity and exemplary characteristics of existing graduate education and research programs in the discipline(s) relevant to the proposed project at the proposing institution.
  • The effectiveness of graduate education and mentoring programs in the relevant discipline(s) at the proposing institution in retaining students to degree completion and preparing them for success in their future careers.
  • The extent to which the proposed project will enhance the capacity for research and/or contribute to innovation in the EPSCoR jurisdiction.

B. Review and Selection Process

Proposals submitted in response to this program solicitation will be reviewed by Ad hoc Review and/or Panel Review.

Reviewers will be asked to evaluate proposals using two National Science Board approved merit review criteria and, if applicable, additional program specific criteria. A summary rating and accompanying narrative will generally be completed and submitted by each reviewer and/or panel. The Program Officer assigned to manage the proposal's review will consider the advice of reviewers and will formulate a recommendation.

After scientific, technical and programmatic review and consideration of appropriate factors, the NSF Program Officer recommends to the cognizant Division Director whether the proposal should be declined or recommended for award. NSF strives to be able to tell proposers whether their proposals have been declined or recommended for funding within six months. Large or particularly complex proposals or proposals from new recipients may require additional review and processing time. The time interval begins on the deadline or target date, or receipt date, whichever is later. The interval ends when the Division Director acts upon the Program Officer's recommendation.

After programmatic approval has been obtained, the proposals recommended for funding will be forwarded to the Division of Grants and Agreements or the Division of Acquisition and Cooperative Support for review of business, financial, and policy implications. After an administrative review has occurred, Grants and Agreements Officers perform the processing and issuance of a grant or other agreement. Proposers are cautioned that only a Grants and Agreements Officer may make commitments, obligations or awards on behalf of NSF or authorize the expenditure of funds. No commitment on the part of NSF should be inferred from technical or budgetary discussions with a NSF Program Officer. A Principal Investigator or organization that makes financial or personnel commitments in the absence of a grant or cooperative agreement signed by the NSF Grants and Agreements Officer does so at their own risk.

Once an award or declination decision has been made, Principal Investigators are provided feedback about their proposals. In all cases, reviews are treated as confidential documents. Verbatim copies of reviews, excluding the names of the reviewers or any reviewer-identifying information, are sent to the Principal Investigator/Project Director by the Program Officer. In addition, the proposer will receive an explanation of the decision to award or decline funding.

VII. Award Administration Information

A. notification of the award.

Notification of the award is made to the submitting organization by an NSF Grants and Agreements Officer. Organizations whose proposals are declined will be advised as promptly as possible by the cognizant NSF Program administering the program. Verbatim copies of reviews, not including the identity of the reviewer, will be provided automatically to the Principal Investigator. (See Section VI.B. for additional information on the review process.)

B. Award Conditions

An NSF award consists of: (1) the award notice, which includes any special provisions applicable to the award and any numbered amendments thereto; (2) the budget, which indicates the amounts, by categories of expense, on which NSF has based its support (or otherwise communicates any specific approvals or disapprovals of proposed expenditures); (3) the proposal referenced in the award notice; (4) the applicable award conditions, such as Grant General Conditions (GC-1)*; or Research Terms and Conditions* and (5) any announcement or other NSF issuance that may be incorporated by reference in the award notice. Cooperative agreements also are administered in accordance with NSF Cooperative Agreement Financial and Administrative Terms and Conditions (CA-FATC) and the applicable Programmatic Terms and Conditions. NSF awards are electronically signed by an NSF Grants and Agreements Officer and transmitted electronically to the organization via e-mail.

*These documents may be accessed electronically on NSF's Website at https://www.nsf.gov/awards/managing/award_conditions.jsp?org=NSF . Paper copies may be obtained from the NSF Publications Clearinghouse, telephone (703) 292-8134 or by e-mail from [email protected] .

More comprehensive information on NSF Award Conditions and other important information on the administration of NSF awards is contained in the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) Chapter VII, available electronically on the NSF Website at https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=pappg .

Administrative and National Policy Requirements

Build America, Buy America

As expressed in Executive Order 14005, Ensuring the Future is Made in All of America by All of America's Workers (86 FR 7475), it is the policy of the executive branch to use terms and conditions of Federal financial assistance awards to maximize, consistent with law, the use of goods, products, and materials produced in, and services offered in, the United States.

Consistent with the requirements of the Build America, Buy America Act (Pub. L. 117-58, Division G, Title IX, Subtitle A, November 15, 2021), no funding made available through this funding opportunity may be obligated for infrastructure projects under an award unless all iron, steel, manufactured products, and construction materials used in the project are produced in the United States. For additional information, visit NSF's Build America, Buy America webpage.

C. Reporting Requirements

For all multi-year grants (including both standard and continuing grants), the Principal Investigator must submit an annual project report to the cognizant Program Officer no later than 90 days prior to the end of the current budget period. (Some programs or awards require submission of more frequent project reports). No later than 120 days following expiration of a grant, the PI also is required to submit a final annual project report, and a project outcomes report for the general public.

Failure to provide the required annual or final annual project reports, or the project outcomes report, will delay NSF review and processing of any future funding increments as well as any pending proposals for all identified PIs and co-PIs on a given award. PIs should examine the formats of the required reports in advance to assure availability of required data.

PIs are required to use NSF's electronic project-reporting system, available through Research.gov, for preparation and submission of annual and final annual project reports. Such reports provide information on accomplishments, project participants (individual and organizational), publications, and other specific products and impacts of the project. Submission of the report via Research.gov constitutes certification by the PI that the contents of the report are accurate and complete. The project outcomes report also must be prepared and submitted using Research.gov. This report serves as a brief summary, prepared specifically for the public, of the nature and outcomes of the project. This report will be posted on the NSF website exactly as it is submitted by the PI.

More comprehensive information on NSF Reporting Requirements and other important information on the administration of NSF awards is contained in the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) Chapter VII, available electronically on the NSF Website at https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=pappg .

VIII. Agency Contacts

Please note that the program contact information is current at the time of publishing. See program website for any updates to the points of contact.

General inquiries regarding this program should be made to:

For questions related to the use of NSF systems contact:

For questions relating to Grants.gov contact:

  • Grants.gov Contact Center: If the Authorized Organizational Representatives (AOR) has not received a confirmation message from Grants.gov within 48 hours of submission of application, please contact via telephone: 1-800-518-4726; e-mail: [email protected] .

IX. Other Information

The NSF website provides the most comprehensive source of information on NSF Directorates (including contact information), programs and funding opportunities. Use of this website by potential proposers is strongly encouraged. In addition, "NSF Update" is an information-delivery system designed to keep potential proposers and other interested parties apprised of new NSF funding opportunities and publications, important changes in proposal and award policies and procedures, and upcoming NSF Grants Conferences . Subscribers are informed through e-mail or the user's Web browser each time new publications are issued that match their identified interests. "NSF Update" also is available on NSF's website .

Grants.gov provides an additional electronic capability to search for Federal government-wide grant opportunities. NSF funding opportunities may be accessed via this mechanism. Further information on Grants.gov may be obtained at https://www.grants.gov .

About The National Science Foundation

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent Federal agency created by the National Science Foundation Act of 1950, as amended (42 USC 1861-75). The Act states the purpose of the NSF is "to promote the progress of science; [and] to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare by supporting research and education in all fields of science and engineering."

NSF funds research and education in most fields of science and engineering. It does this through grants and cooperative agreements to more than 2,000 colleges, universities, K-12 school systems, businesses, informal science organizations and other research organizations throughout the US. The Foundation accounts for about one-fourth of Federal support to academic institutions for basic research.

NSF receives approximately 55,000 proposals each year for research, education and training projects, of which approximately 11,000 are funded. In addition, the Foundation receives several thousand applications for graduate and postdoctoral fellowships. The agency operates no laboratories itself but does support National Research Centers, user facilities, certain oceanographic vessels and Arctic and Antarctic research stations. The Foundation also supports cooperative research between universities and industry, US participation in international scientific and engineering efforts, and educational activities at every academic level.

Facilitation Awards for Scientists and Engineers with Disabilities (FASED) provide funding for special assistance or equipment to enable persons with disabilities to work on NSF-supported projects. See the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide Chapter II.F.7 for instructions regarding preparation of these types of proposals.

The National Science Foundation has Telephonic Device for the Deaf (TDD) and Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) capabilities that enable individuals with hearing impairments to communicate with the Foundation about NSF programs, employment or general information. TDD may be accessed at (703) 292-5090 and (800) 281-8749, FIRS at (800) 877-8339.

The National Science Foundation Information Center may be reached at (703) 292-5111.

The National Science Foundation promotes and advances scientific progress in the United States by competitively awarding grants and cooperative agreements for research and education in the sciences, mathematics, and engineering.

To get the latest information about program deadlines, to download copies of NSF publications, and to access abstracts of awards, visit the NSF Website at .

2415 Eisenhower Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22314

(NSF Information Center)

(703) 292-5111

(703) 292-5090

Send an e-mail to:

or telephone:

(703) 292-8134

(703) 292-5111

Privacy Act And Public Burden Statements

The information requested on proposal forms and project reports is solicited under the authority of the National Science Foundation Act of 1950, as amended. The information on proposal forms will be used in connection with the selection of qualified proposals; and project reports submitted by proposers will be used for program evaluation and reporting within the Executive Branch and to Congress. The information requested may be disclosed to qualified reviewers and staff assistants as part of the proposal review process; to proposer institutions/grantees to provide or obtain data regarding the proposal review process, award decisions, or the administration of awards; to government contractors, experts, volunteers and researchers and educators as necessary to complete assigned work; to other government agencies or other entities needing information regarding proposers or nominees as part of a joint application review process, or in order to coordinate programs or policy; and to another Federal agency, court, or party in a court or Federal administrative proceeding if the government is a party. Information about Principal Investigators may be added to the Reviewer file and used to select potential candidates to serve as peer reviewers or advisory committee members. See System of Record Notices , NSF-50 , "Principal Investigator/Proposal File and Associated Records," and NSF-51 , "Reviewer/Proposal File and Associated Records." Submission of the information is voluntary. Failure to provide full and complete information, however, may reduce the possibility of receiving an award.

An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, an information collection unless it displays a valid Office of Management and Budget (OMB) control number. The OMB control number for this collection is 3145-0058. Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 120 hours per response, including the time for reviewing instructions. Send comments regarding the burden estimate and any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to:

Suzanne H. Plimpton Reports Clearance Officer Policy Office, Division of Institution and Award Support Office of Budget, Finance, and Award Management National Science Foundation Alexandria, VA 22314

National Science Foundation

  • Report a Concern
  • Calendar of Events, Dates, and Deadlines
  • Current Graduate Students
  • Alumni and Giving
  • Rankings and Recognition
  • All Graduate Programs at our Campuses

Graduate Degree Programs

  • Certificate Programs
  • Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs (OIGP)
  • University Academic Catalog
  • Course Information
  • Publications
  • Graduate Programs Office
  • Office of Graduate Assistance (OGA)
  • Guidelines for Graduate Student Mentoring and Advising
  • Prospective Students
  • Preparing for Graduate Studies
  • Graduate Program Requirements
  • Why Choose Purdue?
  • Tuition & Fees
  • How to Apply
  • Check Application Status
  • Transcript Upload Tips
  • Admitted Students
  • Visit Campus
  • Global Ambassadors
  • Purdue Graduate Student Center
  • International Students
  • Request Information
  • Fellowships
  • Professional Development
  • Information Management and Analysis
  • Data Requests
  • Database Project

The Persistent Pursuit of Higher Education

  • Current Students
  • Faculty and Staff

Take your next giant leap

  • Graduate Programs at Four Campuses
  • Tuition and Fees
  • Admissions FAQ

Our Commitment to Graduate and Professional Students

Our persistent pursuit of scholarly excellence is powered by our varied graduate and professional programs. Purdue is committed to maximizing the success of and support for graduate and professional students as well as postdoctoral scholars across all departments and colleges.

- Eric Barker, Associate Provost for Graduate Programs (Acting)

Students holding signs that read Together in their native language.

Professional Development Workshops

Conquer your Purdue experience, learn how to navigate the job market, or crack open some life hacks. Sign up for one of our 350+ free professional development workshops today!

VIew Workshops

All Events, Dates, and Deadlines

Students and Scholars: By the numbers

Graduate Students

education graduate programs in boston

Find more stats at the Data Dashboard

*Record high for category by count

Graduate Student Support

The Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Scholars provides a range of services, programs, and events to support the whole person—to empower graduate students to address the complex challenges of the day and build a better tomorrow together.

Six students studying outside while sitting around a round table

Empowering Students

Seeking funding? Apply for  travel, small research, or childcare grants  or get help writing  grant proposals and fellowship applications . Not finding the right fit? Earn a degree from one of our  interdisciplinary graduate programs . Students facing a sticky situation can consult with our  Office of Graduate Assistance .

The front of the Purdue Graduate Student Center building

Connecting Students

The  Purdue Graduate Student Center  is home to the  Purdue Graduate Student Government  and offers space to graduate students for meetings, studying, and socializing. Find support and like-minded peers in a  graduate student organization ,  cultural and resource center  or  diversity program . Students with families connect via our  Graduate Parent Support Network .

A graduate student receiving their master's hood at a Purdue commencement ceremony

Transforming Students

Advance your leadership, communication, professional, academic, and life skills. Attend one of our 350  professional development workshops ,  showcase your ability  to summarize your research, or publish your work in  InnovatED . Craft your  individual development plan . Explore your passions and make a successful transition to the job market.

IMAGES

  1. Bootcamps

    education graduate programs in boston

  2. Boston Education Collaborative

    education graduate programs in boston

  3. Boston University Graduate Programs

    education graduate programs in boston

  4. Online General Education Graduate Programs 2023+

    education graduate programs in boston

  5. Graduate Studies

    education graduate programs in boston

  6. Secondary Education Graduate Programs in Florida 2024+

    education graduate programs in boston

VIDEO

  1. Become a Nurse-Midwife or Nurse Practitioner at Frontier Nursing University

  2. 1910-1924: Redefining Americanism

  3. Division of Student Affairs

  4. Boston's Future Leaders Class of 2023 Graduation

  5. Georgia Southern University's College of Education Graduate Programs in Reading Education

  6. Apply to CUSEF Young Leaders Scholarship 2024 in Canada

COMMENTS

  1. Master of Education

    Boston University Wheelock College of Education & Human Development offers several diverse and interdisciplinary master of education (EdM) degree programs. Each program delivers a comprehensive curriculum that allows for the study of educational research and theory while deepening content knowledge within a selected program. Some EdM programs may lead to initial licensure upon completion of ...

  2. Graduate Education

    Explore diverse and innovative graduate programs at Boston University, a leading research institution with world-class faculty and resources.

  3. Masters in Education Programs in the Boston Area

    Top masters in teaching graduate schools in your area. Find the top graduate schools offering masters in teaching degrees and masters in teaching programs near you.

  4. Find Your Program

    The Graduate Certificate in Advanced Financial Technology equips you with the skills to compete in the most exciting new area of finance—FinTech. This 4-course program exposes you to the very latest developments in machine learning, artificial intelligence, distributed ledger (blockchain) technologies, cryptocurrencies, and crowd wisdom, all ...

  5. Master's Programs

    Master's Programs The Lynch School is consistently ranked among the top 25 schools of education and as the top-ranked Catholic school of education in the country. Theory, research, and practice are integrated across programs, which also leverage the robust practicum opportunities available in schools, hospitals, mental health centers, and universities in the Boston metropolitan area. The ...

  6. MAT in Elementary Education

    Designed for aspiring teachers and career-changers, the Master of Arts in Teaching in Elementary Education provides an appreciation for and an understanding of the diverse educational needs, social concerns, and cultural values of today's elementary and secondary schools. The comprehensive nature of the program enhances foundational practice ...

  7. University of Massachusetts--Boston Graduate Programs and Degrees

    Get information on the graduate programs at University of Massachusetts--Boston at US News. Find out what programs are offered and get admissions, tuition, and student information.

  8. Boston University Graduate Programs and Degrees

    Get information on the graduate programs at Boston University at US News. Find out what programs are offered and get admissions, tuition, and student information.

  9. Graduate Programs

    Graduate Programs Boston College's eight graduate schools offer master's, doctoral, and professional degrees in over ninety disciplines. As scholars at a R1 research institute, Boston College graduate students have the opportunity to engage in the highest level of research activity and intellectual discourse.

  10. Lynch School of Education and Human Development, Graduate Programs

    Introduction to Graduate Programs Consistently ranked among the top 25 schools of education and as the top-ranked Catholic school of education in the country, the Lynch School at Boston College offers 22 master's programs, eight doctoral programs, and five dual-degree programs.

  11. 2023-2024 Top Graduate Programs in the Boston Area

    Graduate School. ·. 160 reviews. Master's Student: During my time in the Computer Science program at Boston University, I had a multifaceted academic experience. The program offered a rigorous curriculum, beginning with foundational courses in programming, algorithms, and data structures.

  12. Special Education

    Overview. Adding special education to your professional portfolio opens doors to working with new groups of students in meaningful ways. The Master of Education in Special Education degree program will prepare you to anticipate and meet the needs of a broad range of students with specialized learning needs. This program is designed for teachers ...

  13. University of Massachusetts Boston Graduate Programs

    University of Massachusetts Boston is a public graduate school in Boston, Massachusetts. It has a mid-size graduate student body with an enrollment of 3,450 graduate students. Of the 45 graduate programs offered at University of Massachusetts Boston, only 1 is offered online or through graduate distance education programs. 64% of its graduate students are part-time graduate students.

  14. Boston College Graduate Programs and Degrees

    Get information on the graduate programs at Boston College at US News. Find out what programs are offered and get admissions, tuition, and student information.

  15. Graduate Students

    Graduate Students - UMass Boston. Explore the following key statistics and gain valuable insights into our programs, enrollment figures, and student success rates.

  16. 100+ Graduate Programs. Endless Opportunities.

    For balancing big ambitions with busy schedules—earn your advanced degree at Boston's only public research university. UMass Boston offers more than 100 graduate programs known for their quality and value. Whether you're looking to advance your career or make the leap to a new one, our master's, doctoral, and certificate programs can ...

  17. Admission & Funding

    At Boston University, you'll find nearly 400 graduate programs, where opportunities for collaborative learning abound. You'll find three campuses, all in Boston, a thriving city that is rich with history yet firmly future-facing. You will find on-campus and online programs, full-time and part-time, master's, doctoral, and professional degrees. You'll find an academic community ...

  18. Master of Arts in Teaching in Elementary Education

    The comprehensive nature of the program enhances foundational practice and theory and prepares graduates to excel as skilled leaders in education. Upon completing this master's degree, which includes pre-practicum/early field work observations and a full term of student teaching, you will be well positioned to make a meaningful impact in your ...

  19. UMass Boston's Graduate Programs in Education Jump 29 Spots in U.S

    UMass Boston's graduate programs in education jumped 29 spots to No. 66 in the 2020 edition of U.S. News & World Report's Best Graduate Schools, released Tuesday. Five UMass Boston programs have new top 100 rankings:

  20. Master of Arts in Teaching in Secondary Education

    This Master of Arts in Teaching in Secondary Education is designed to enhance your foundational skills, broaden your perspectives, and strengthen your ability to inspire and educate.

  21. Degree Programs

    Penn State offers more than 300 graduate degree programs across 200 fields of study, in addition to graduate certificates. You can learn about all graduate programs, and get contact information, through the University's Graduate Bulletin.

  22. Graduate Certificate in Microelectronics and Semiconductors

    Overview. The 100% online Graduate Certificate in Microelectronics and Semiconductors offers an entry point for professional engineers and technology professionals to obtain critical skills and expertise in an essential industry.

  23. Associate/Assistant Director of Athletics for Compliance in Lebanon, IL

    The school has approximately 2,000 full-time students and offers both undergraduate and graduate school programs. As a private, independent university, we are committed to providing a personalized education that allows student to reach their full potential.

  24. Graduate Programs

    Graduate Programs. Our graduate degree programs prepare you to make an impact in the world of education through rigorous course work, extensive practical experiences and advanced research and learning opportunities.

  25. Boston University Graduate Programs

    Boston University is a private graduate school in Boston, Massachusetts. It has a large graduate student body with an enrollment of 16,142 graduate students. Of the 145 graduate programs offered at Boston University, 20 are offered online or through graduate distance education programs. 33% of its graduate students are part-time graduate students.

  26. Recognition of Years of Service Awards

    Suffolk University in Boston is a private higher education institution offering full- and part-time undergraduate, graduate, and law programs. Suffolk University in Boston is a private higher education institution offering full- and part-time undergraduate, graduate, and law programs.

  27. A bridge from undergraduate to graduate studies

    The post-baccalaureate program, offered through the SEAS Office of Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging and Office of Education Outreach and Community Programs, acts as a bridge from undergraduate to graduate school. The program allows students to gain laboratory research experience with SEAS faculty, while continuing to take courses that will ...

  28. MAT in Secondary Education

    The Master's in Teaching in Secondary Education helps teachers learn to inspire and educate. Explore our program curriculum and learn about admissions.

  29. NSF 24-588: NSF EPSCoR Graduate Fellowship Program (EGFP)

    The NSF EPSCoR Graduate Fellowship Program (EGFP) provides an opportunity for applicants who received the distinction of GRFP Honorable Mention no more than three years before the proposal due date to be named NSF EPSCoR Graduate Fellows and obtain financial support for their graduate education at an institution in an EPSCoR jurisdiction.

  30. Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Students and Postdoctoral

    Graduate Student Support. The Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Scholars provides a range of services, programs, and events to support the whole person—to empower graduate students to address the complex challenges of the day and build a better tomorrow together.