depiction of a hazel, a plough and the sun. They represent legendary figures MacCuill, son of Hazel; MacCecht, Son of Plough; and MacGréine, Son of Sun

Dia dhuit, a chara!

1. Tags under posts fetch related posts. 2. The search page is super comprehensive. Abuse it. 3. Double-click any word for its translation.

Full guide can be found in the help section

(click anywhere to close)

depiction of a hazel, a plough and the sun. They represent legendary figures MacCuill, son of Hazel; MacCecht, Son of Plough; and MacGréine, Son of Sun

I collect and curate information on the Irish language. Skip to main content

  •   Vocabulary

Essential Vocabulary Reading Corner How Do I Say... Spellcheck & Conjugator People Directions Phrases

  •   Grammar

Masterposts Grammar Glossary Quizzes and Games The Genitive Case Lenition and Eclipsis Prepositions Tenses and Moods

  •   Etymology

Animals Culture Historical Events Intangibles The Language People Toponymy

  • →   Trivia
  • →   Resources
  • →   Help

Magnifying glass icon leading to search page

Phrases for Essays

A bheag nó a mhór To a greater or lesser extent

Ag dul i bhfeabhas Getting better

Ag dul in olcas Getting worse

Ag dul ó smacht Going out of control

Ar an gcéad dul síos / i dtús báire First of all

Ar fud na cruinne Throughout the world

Bheadh gaois Sholaimh de dhíth You’d need the wisdom of Solomon

Caithfidh mé a admháil I have to admit

Ceacht dóite foghlamtha A lesson learnt

Cead dom, cead duit Live and let live

Chun an fhírinne a rá To tell the truth

Conspóideach Controversial

Cuireann sé alltacht orm It horrifies me

Cur i gcás For example

D'fheadfadh sé bheith níos measa It could be worse

Dar liomsa In my opinion

Dul chun cinn Progress

Feictear domsa go bhfuil It seems to me that

Go bhfios dom As far as I know

Go bunúsach Basically

I bhfad níos forleithne ná riamh Much more widespread than ever

I láthair na huaire At present

I ndeireadh na dála At the end of the day

Idir an dá linn In the meantime

Ina theannta sin As well as that

Is ait liom It seems strange to me

Is é mo thuairim láidir It is my strong belief that

Is éagóireach an ní é It is unjust

Is fearr déanach ná choíche Better late than never

Is mithid do X rud a dhéanamh X must do something

Is oth liom a rá I hate to say / I’m sorry to say

Is iomaí gearán a dhéantar Many complaints are made about

Le blianta beaga anuas In recent years

Maidir le In relation to; as well as

Measaim I think

Ní hamháin sin, ach Not only that, but

Níl aon amhras ach go There is no doubt that

Níl gár a shéanadh There’s no point in denying it

Níl insint béil ar Words can’t describe

Níl sé ceart, cóir ná cothrom It’s not right, just nor fair

Ó mo thaithí féin Based on my own experience

Ó thús ama From the beginning of time

Sa lá atá inniu ann Nowadays

Sa todhchaí / amach anseo In the future

Tá ábhar machnaimh ann It’s something to think about

Tá saol an mhada bháin ag… …have a great life

Tráth dá raibh Once

Specific Topics

Achmhainní nádurtha Natural resources

Ag dul i ngleic le fadhb an bhruscair Tackling the litter problem

Ag crá agus ag creimeadh na tíre Tormenting the country

Blaiseadh dá gcultúr A taste of their culture

Caitear go dona le daoine People are treated badly

Ciníochas an-chaolchúiseach Very subtle racism

Cruatan an tsaoil the hardship of life

Dearcadh caolaigeanta Narrow-minded attitude

Deis chaillte Lost opportunity

Dul i ngleic leis an fhadhb To tackle the problem

Géarchéim Crisis, emergency

Na boic mhóra The ‘big wigs; political heavyweights

Níos minice ná a mhalairt More often than not

Réiteach na faidhbe Solution to the problem

Saineolaithe Experts

Sciúirse na ndrugaí The scourge of drugs

Tá údar imní ann There’s cause for worry

Táthar ag tuar It is being predicted

Teocht domhanda Global temperature

Taom scaoill A panic attack

Tír ilchultúrtha Multicultural country

Tréimhse stairiúil Historical period

Narratives and Fiction

Ag tiomáint go róghasta Driving too fast

Ar mhuin na muice On the pig’s back

Ar nós na gaoithe (fast) Like the wind

Chomh riméadach leis na gcuacha As happy as the cuckoos

Chomh sleamhain le bolg eascainne As slippery as an eel’s belly

Chomh tiubh géar is a thoicfadh leo As fast as they could

An lámh in uachtar The upper hand

Chuamar amú We got lost

Cúis áthais A reason to be happy

Díoscán rothaí agus coscán The screech of wheels and breaks

Gan aithne gan urlabhra Unconcsious

Go tobann / gan choinne Suddenly / without warning

I mbaol báis In danger of dying

In umar na haimléise In the depths of despair

Meangadh mór millteach A great big smile

Ní raibh duine ná deoraí le feiceál There was nobody to be seen

Níl fonn ná fiach orm X a dhéanamh I really don’t want to do X

Níl lá lochta agam orthu I don’t blame them at all

Níor chreid mé mo shúile I didn’t believe my eyes

Scréach ollmhór A great scream

Seimhlithe Terrified

Tá an saol ina chíor thuathail Life is in turmoil

More on native phrases

Dropdown menu icon

https://toingaeilge.com/post/190202950228/phrases-for-essays

Link icon, copy to clipboard

  • 6 Feb, 2017
  • foclóir

useful phrases in irish essays

⚠️Want a FREE 2024 Study Planner?

logo-nobackground-500.png

  • Feb 4, 2023

Leaving Cert Irish Essays: A Guide for Students

Updated: Feb 17

useful phrases in irish essays

Introduction

The Leaving Certificate Irish exam is a major challenge for students in Ireland, and one of the most difficult parts of the exam is the essay section. This section requires students to write a comprehensive and well-written essay in Irish on a topic of their choice. To help you prepare for this challenge, we have put together this guide to Leaving Cert Irish essays .

Choosing a Topic

The first step in writing a successful Leaving Cert Irish essay is choosing the right topic. The best topic is one that you are passionate about and that you have a good understanding of. It is also important to choose a topic that you can write about in a concise and structured manner. Here are a few tips to help you choose the right topic:

Choose a topic that you are familiar with

Choose a topic that you have a strong opinion on

Choose a topic that you can write about in a structured manner

Choose a topic that is relevant and up-to-date

useful phrases in irish essays

Research and Preparation

Once you have chosen a topic, the next step is to do research and preparation. This involves gathering information about your topic and organizing it into a structure that you can use to write your essay. Here are a few tips to help you with your research and preparation:

Gather information from a variety of sources, including books, websites, and news articles

Take notes as you research to help you organize your thoughts

Use a mind map or outline to organize your information into a structure that you can use to write your essay

Make sure that you understand the key points of your topic and that you can explain them in your own words

useful phrases in irish essays

Writing the Essay

Once you have done your research and preparation, it's time to start writing your essay. Here are a few tips to help you write a successful Leaving Cert Irish essay :

Start with a strong introduction that grabs the reader's attention and sets the tone for the rest of the essay

Use a clear and concise structure, with an introduction, body, and conclusion

Use examples and evidence to support your points

Use clear and concise language, and avoid using complex or technical terms unless necessary

End with a strong conclusion that ties together the main points of your essay

useful phrases in irish essays

The Leaving Cert Irish essay is a challenging part of the exam, but with the right preparation and attention to detail, you can write a successful essay. By following the tips in this guide, you can choose the right topic, do your research, and write a well-structured and well-written essay that will impress the examiners and help you achieve a high grade. Good luck with your essay!

Are you a Leaving Certificate student looking to improve your grades and reach your full potential?

Look no further! Our grinds service offers personalized tutoring from experienced and qualified teachers. Our tailored approach ensures that you receive the support and guidance you need to excel in your exams and achieve your goals.

With our help, you will be well-prepared and confident on the day of your exams. Don't miss out on this valuable opportunity – contact us today to learn more and start achieving your dreams!

Recent Posts

Leaving cert Biology Revision: Breathing System

Leaving cert Biology Revision: Characteristics of Life

Leaving cert Biology Revision: Reproduction

Leaving Cert Notes and Sample Answers

Irish: Ask a straight H1 student

We’re answering recurring questions from Snapchat ( six25points ) here. All answers relate to Higher Level Irish.

You may also like: Guide to Leaving Cert Irish (€)  and Irish HL Paper 1 and 2 timing

1. What is the best way to study for the essay question? Would you recommend learning phrases or complete essays?

leaving cert irish notes

2. Can I choose the poem I read in the Oral examination?

This part of the exam is often overlooked in preparation for the oral as people see it as ‘easy marks’

3. Can the Irish Oral examination be based around the content of the picture series (sraith pictiúr) you are given? For example, if my picture series is ‘cuairt ar aintín i Nua Eabhrac’ will i be asked about holidays, shopping, etc?

The important thing to remember is you lead the conversation in the Oral

For example, if you say you have a cousin in Australia, the examiner might ask you if you intend to pay them a visit. If you say you’re saving your money for the summer, the examiner might ask you about holidays. Anything you say in passing may be perceived as a hint to the examiner to ask you further questions on that topic.

4. Would you have any tips for the picture series (sraith pictiúr) element of the Irish Oral examination?

Say the picture number before you start on a new picture to keep you focused and to let the examiner know you have moved onto the next picture
  • Níl tuile dá mhéad nach dtránn. (Every bad thing comes to an end).
  • Imíonn an tuirse ach fanann an tairbhe. (the tiredness goes but the benefits stay)
  • Tús maith leath na hoibre (a good start is half the work)
  • Is maith an scéalaí an aimsir (time will tell)
  • Ní thagann ciall roimh aois (sense doesn’t come before age)
  • Is fearr súil le glas ná súil le huaigh (it’s better to be optimistic)
  • Ní neart go cur le chéile (there’s strength in unity)

Leaving Cert Irish Oral Tips

5. What topics should I prepare for the Irish Oral examination?

Never give one word answers.

6. Should I continue speaking in the Irish Oral examination or allow the examiner to ask questions?

Continue to expand on the question asked until the examiner interrupts.

7. What is the best way to prepare for the poetry and prose section of paper two?

8. grammar – when is ‘t’ used, for example ‘rithim an tsaoil’ vs ‘an saol’, 9. grammar- what is the rule for irish nouns beginning with ‘s’ in the tuiseal ginideach( genitive case) for example, ‘sochaí/suirbhé’.

If you are not sure how how to put a certain word into the genitive case in the exam, don’t guess, use a different word that you are more familiar with.
Masculine nouns beginning with ‘s’ don’t change after the word ‘an’, e.g. An sagart, an séipéal. But feminine nouns starting with ‘s’, take a ‘t’… an tseachtain, an tsaotharlann.

10. Would you have any predictions for the poetry or prose question?

11. our teacher provides us with excellent notes and were advised to learn everything off, is this a good method.

Always link back to the question.

12. I’m worried that my notes are too basic and not ‘flowery’ enough. I’ve been getting H1s all year but my work has only been corrected by my teacher. I fear that another examiner may not award me with the same mark. Should I be concerned? Is it possible to guarantee a H1 if you are not a native speaker?

  • ‘I’m healthy’ : Tá sláinte an bhradáin agam / Táim chomh folláin le breac
  • ‘Getting worse’ : ag dul ó ghiolla na sliogán go giolla na mbairneach
  • ‘He’s working ‘ : Tá sé i mbun oibre
  • ‘He did his best ‘ : Rinne sé a seacht ndícheall
  • ‘They did great work’: Rinne siad obair na gcapall / D’oibrigh said go dian dícheallach
  • ‘I hate it’ : Ní lú orm an diabhal ná é
  • ‘I don’t have any time to myself ‘: Ní bhíonn faill suí ná seasamh agam
  • ‘It cant be denied’: Ní féidir a shéanadh
  • ‘There’s no sense to it’: Níl ciall ar bith leis
  • ‘Forever and ever/always’: Fad is a bheidh an ghrian sa spéir
  • ‘She couldn’t decide’ : Bhí sí idir dhá chomhairle
  • ”The real truth’ : An fhírinne lom
  • ‘The climax came’: Tháinig an buaicphointe
  • ‘It’s clear we don’t have the same view’: Is léir nach é an dearcadh céanna atá againn go léir’
  • ‘I don’t have a clue..’: Níl a fhios agam ó thalamh am domhain
  • ‘First of all’ : Ar an gcéad dul síos/ I dtosach báire / Ar dtús

13. For question four on paper two, should I prepare ‘An Triail’ or spend my time preparing for the extra poetry?

625 points Leaving Cert Notes

  • Learn English - Index
  • English Course
  • Teaching Resources
  • Useful Videos
  • English Idioms
  • Corrected Writing Examples
  • Learn English from Spanish
  • Learn Arabic
  • Learn Spanish
  • Learn French
  • Learn Italian
  • Learn German
  • Learn Japanese
  • Learn Chinese
  • Learn Russian
  • View Complete List of 45+
  • Morse Code - Index
  • How to Learn Morse Code
  • Morse Code Translator
  • I Love You in Morse Code
  • Sign Language - Index
  • American Sign Language
  • British Sign Language
  • Find a Tutor
  • Irish Phrases
  • Learn Irish

Irish Phrases and Common Expressions

This page contains a table including the following: Irish phrases, expressions and words in Irish, conversation and idioms, Irish greetings, and survival phrases. It also helps if you simply want to know what to say when chatting in Irish!

Most of the sentences below are used for everyday life conversations, so they might come handy if you memorize them.

English Phrases Irish Phrases
 
Irish Greetings:
Hi! Hóigh!
Good morning! Dia duit ar maidin!
Good evening! Tráthnóna maith duit!
Welcome! (to greet someone) Fáilte romhat!
How are you? Cad é mar atá tú? / Conas atá tú?
I'm fine, thanks! Tá mé go maith, go raibh maith agat!
And you? Agus tú féin?
Good/ So-So. Go maith / measartha.
Thank you (very much)! Go raibh (míle) maith agat!
You're welcome! (for "thank you") Níl a bhuiochas ort!
Hey! Friend! Hóigh! Cara!
I missed you so much! Chronaigh mé thú an oiread sin!
What's new? Céard atá nuacht?
Nothing much Dada mórán.
Good night! Oíche mhaith duit!
See you later! Feicfidh mé roimh i bhfad thú!
Good bye! Slán! / Slán agat!
I'm lost Tá mé caillte.
Can I help you? An bhféadaim cuidiú a thabhairt duit?
Can you help me? An bhféadann tú cuidiú a thabhairt dom?
Where is the (bathroom/ pharmacy)? Cá bhfuil an (leithreas / chógaslann)?
Go straight! then turn left/ right! Téigh go díreach! Ansin cas ar chlé / dheis!
I'm looking for john. Tá mé ar lorg Seáin.
One moment please! Fan bomaite!
Hold on please! (phone) Fan go fóill!
How much is this? Cá mhéad atá air?
Excuse me ...! (to ask for something) Gabhaim pardún agat!
Excuse me! ( to pass by) Gabh mo leithscéal!
Come with me! Tar agam!
 
Do you speak (English/ Irish)? An bhfuil (Béarla / Gaeilge) agat?
Just a little. Go díreach beagán.
What's your name? Cad is aimn duit?
My name is ... Is mise ...
Mr.../ Mrs.…/ Miss… An tUasal ... / Bean ... / Iníon ...
Nice to meet you! Go mbeannaí Dia duit!
You're very kind! Tá tú an-chaoin!
Where are you from? Cárb as duit?
I'm from (the U.S/ Ireland) Is as (na Stáit Aontaithe / Éirinn) mé.
I'm (American) Is (Meiriceánach / Éireannach) mé.
Where do you live? Cá bhfuil tú i do chónaí?
I live in (the U.S/ Ireland) Tá mé i mo chónaí (sna Stáit Aontaithe / in Éirinn).
Did you like it here? Ar mhaith leat é seo?
Ireland is a wonderful country Tá Éire tír iontach.
What do you do for a living? Céard atá do ghairm?
I work as a (translator/ businessman) Tá mé ina (aistritheoir / fhear ghnó).
I like Irish Is maith liom Gaeilge.
I've been learning Irish for 1 month Tá mé ag foghlaim Gaelige le mí amháin.
Oh! That's good! Ó! Is go maith sin!
How old are you? Cén aois atá agat? / Ca haois thú?
I'm (twenty, thirty...) years old. Tá mé (fiche, tríocha ...) mbliana d'aois.
I have to go Ba chóir dom dul.
I will be right back! Beidh mé ar ais láithreach.
Good luck! Ádh mór ort!
Happy birthday! Breithlá shona duit!
Happy new year! Athbhliain shona duit!
Merry Christmas! Nollaig Shona!
Congratulations! Go maire tú!
Enjoy! (for meals...) Goile folláin duit!
I'd like to visit Ireland one day Ba mhaith liom Éire ar cuairt a thabairt uirthi aon lá amháin.
Say hi to John for me Beannaigh do Sheán agam.
Bless you (when sneezing) Dia leat!
Good night and sweet dreams! Oíche mhaith agus brionglóidí milse duit!
I'm Sorry! (if you don't hear something) Gabh mo leithscéal?
Sorry (for a mistake) Gabh mo leithscéal!
No Problem! Fadhb ar bith!
Can You Say It Again? Abair sin arís?
Can You Speak Slowly? An bhféadann tú labhair go mall?
Write It Down Please! Scríobh é síos le do thoil!
I Don't Understand! Ní thuigim!
I Don't Know! Níl a fhios agam!
I Have No Idea. Níl barúil agam.
What's That Called In Irish? Cén t-ainm atá ar "..." i nGaeilge?
What Does "gato" Mean In English? Céard a ciallaigheadh "..." i mBéarla?
How Do You Say "Please" In Irish? Conas a deir tú "..." i nGaeilge?
What Is This? Cad é seo?
My Irish is bad. Tá mo Ghaeilge olc.
I need to practice my Irish Ní mór dom mo Ghaeilge a chleacht.
Don't worry! Ná bí buartha!
Good/ Bad/ So-So. Maith / olc / measartha maith.
Big/ Small Mór / beag
Today/ Now Inniu / anois
Tomorrow/ Yesterday Amárach / inné
Yes/ No 1) repeat verb / ní + repeat verb from the question
2) Is ea / Ní hea
Here you go! (when giving something) Seo é!
Do you like it? An mhaith leat é?
I really like it! Is maith liom go fírinneach é!
I'm hungry/ thirsty. Tá ocras / tart orm. \
In The Morning/ Evening/ At Night. Ar maidin / tráthnóna / san oíche.
This/ That. Here/There Seo / sin. Seo / ann.
Me/ You. Him/ Her. Mise / tusa. Eisean / ise.
Really! Dáiríre!
Look! Féach!
Hurry up! Brostaigh ort! / Déan deifir!
What? Where? Céard? An áit?
What time is it? Cén t-am é?
It's 10 o'clock. 07:30pm. Tá sé a deich a chlog. / Tá sé leath tar éis seacht tráthnóna.
Give me this! Tabhair seo dom!
I love you! Tá mé i ngrá leat!
I feel sick. Tá masmas orm!
I need a doctor Tá dochtúir uaim.
One, Two, Three aon, dó, trí
Four, Five, Six ceathair, cúig, sé
Seven, Eight, Nine, Ten seacht, ocht, naoi, deich

I hope the content of this page was useful to you, and that you learned some Irish phrases, expressions and words. Make sure to memorize them to be able to use them in your daily conversation.

Useful Irish Phrases and Words You Might Need

A (Very!) Short Introduction to the Irish Language

useful phrases in irish essays

TripSavvy / Grace Heejung Kim 

Just how many Irish words do you need to get by in Ireland ? The simple answer: none. Literally everyone in Ireland speaks English, and the Irish language is seldom heard in everyday common usage except in the Gaeltacht (Irish-speaking areas mainly on the Western seaboard). But even here, English is generally the language used to communicate with any visitors.

Very few people still learn Irish as their first language so speaking Irish like the natives might fall beyond your linguistic abilities, however, it can be fun and helpful to learn a smattering of common words and Irish greetings.

You might, for instance, want to learn some Irish phrases and words in order to avoid coming across too touristy by wishing someone a "top o' the morning," which no Irish person would ever really say. In order to help you navigate Irish conversations, here is a helpful start. You won't actually get an Irish language course, but you will certainly notice that the local lingo can be quite different from plain English.

While you might not be able to actually hold a conversation in Irish , you should not feel too bad about that - almost no one can! Having said that, you can definitely spice up your English (and perhaps even find that Irish gift of the Blarney) with some Irish phrases and colloquialisms. This may actually endear the eachtrannach ("stranger"/"foreigner") to the locals. Just don’t expect them to buy you pints of Guinness to honor your effort.

Some useful phrases in Irish (that go beyond the essential words you should know in Irish), grouped by category:

Irish Greetings: Hello, Goodbye

  • Hello - Dia duit. (literally "may God be with you")
  • How are you? - Conas atá tú?
  • I am ... - Is mise ...
  • What's your name? - Cad es ainm duit?
  • What's the news? - Cén scéal?
  • Pleased to meet you - Tá áthas orm bualadh leat
  • Welcome - Fáilte
  • Goodbye (short and general form) - Slán
  • Goodbye (if you are leaving) - Slán leat
  • Goodbye (if you are staying) - Slán agat
  • See you (later). - Slán go fóill.
  • Stay safe, take care. - Tabhair aire.

Cheers in Irish

  • Cheers - Sláinte (Literal meaning: health!)
  • Cheers to the men and may the women live forever - Sláinte na bhfear agus go maire na mná go deo!

Small (but Important) Irish Words

Please note that while we have included "yes" and "no" here, this is not entirely correct. In fact, there are no such words in Irish, just approximations like "it is". This might have to do with the reluctance of the Irish to firmly commit to anything in life or just be a linguistic quirk; both theories have some merit.

  • It is - Sea (used more often than "tá")
  • It isn’t - Ní hea (used more often than "níl")
  • Please - Le do thoil.
  • Thank you - Go raibh maith agat
  • I’m sorry - Tá brón orm
  • Excuse me - Gabh mo leithscéal

Talking About the Irish Language (Or Not)

  • Do you speak Irish? - An bhfuil Gaeilge agat?
  • How do you say that in Irish? - Conas a déarfávsin as Gaeilge?
  • I understand (you) - Tuigim (thú)
  • I don't understand (you) - Ní thuigim (thú)
  • Say again, please. - Abair aris é, le do thoil. 

Reading Irish Signs

  • Mná - Women - yes, the big sign "MNÁ" on the lavatory door is not a mis-spelling of "MAN", so beware!
  • Oscailte - Open
  • Dúnta - Closed
  • As seirbis - Out of service
  • An lar - Town centre
  • Garda - Police (the official title in the Republic of Ireland only, in Northern Ireland the Police Service is translated as Seirbhís Póilíneachta )
  • Eolais - Information
  • Oifig Eolais - Tourist Information
  • Oifig an Phoist - Post Office
  • Páirceáil - Parking

Irish Blessings and Curses

  • Cáisc shona! - Happy Easter!
  • Go n-éiri an bóthár leat! - Have a good journey!
  • Go n-ithe an cat thú is go n-ithe an diabhal an cat! - May you be eaten by a cat that will be eaten by the devil! (the Irish version of "Go to hell!")
  • Imeacht gan teacht ort! - May you just leave and never come back! (the Irish version of "Bugger off!")
  • Nollaig shona! - Merry Christmas!
  • Oíche mhaith! - Good night!
  • Saol fada chugat! - A long life to you!
  • Sláinte! - Your health! (the Irish version of "Cheers!")
  • Sláinte is táinte! - May you be healthy and wealthy! (the Irish version of "All the best!")
  • Titim gan eiri ort! - Fall down and never rise again! (the Irish version of "Drop dead!")

Counting in Irish

  • 4 - ceathair
  • 11 - aon déag
  • 12 - dó déag
  • 30 - tríocha
  • 40 - daichead
  • 60 - seasca
  • 70 - seachtó
  • 1,000 - míle

Days of the Week

  • Monday - Dé Luain
  • Tuesday - Dé Máirt
  • Wednesday - Dé Céadaoin
  • Thursday - Déardaoin
  • Friday - Dé hAoine
  • Saturday - Dé Sathairn
  • Sunday - Dé Domhnaigh

Months of the Year

  • January - Eanair
  • February - Feabhra
  • March - Márta
  • April - Aibreán
  • May- Bealtaine
  • June - Meitheamh
  • July - Iúil
  • August - Lúnasa
  • September - Meán Fomhair
  • October - Deireadh Fomhair
  • November - Samhain
  • December - Nollaig
  • spring - an t-earrach
  • summer - an samhradh
  • fall - an fómhar
  • winter - an geimhreadh

And How Do You Pronounce These Irish Mouthfuls?

You might think "Ah, well, Ireland is next to Britain ... so even if the words are different the pronunciation should be much the same." But if you try to say Irish words using English rules for pronunciation you will probably be met with laughter or confused stares. Irish uses a lot of the same alphabet as English but this is only because a specially developed style of Irish writing failed to become standard.

Vowel Sounds

Irish uses the same five vowels as English, but the pronunciation is different at times; if there is an accent over the vowel it is a "long" vowel:

  • a is pronounced as in "cat", but á is pronounced as in "saw".
  • e is pronounced as in "wet", but é is pronounced as in "way".
  • i is pronounced as in "fit", but í is pronounced as in "fee".
  • o is pronounced as in "son", but ó is pronounced as in "slow".
  • u is pronounced as in "put", but ú is pronounced as in "school".

Vowels are also divided into "slender" (e, é, i and í) and "broad" (the rest), influencing the pronunciation of the consonants before them.

Consonant Sounds

As a general rule, all single consonants are said as they are in English, with some important exceptions. When you see more than one consonant together then there may be very interesting tongue-teasers hidden in them, such as:

  • bh - pronounced as in "village", it is similar to our v .
  • bhf - pronounced as in "wall", it is similar to our w .
  • c - always pronounced as in "cut", like a k .
  • ch - pronounced as in "loch".
  • d - pronounced as in "do" when followed by a "broad" vowel. - pronounced like the j in "joy" when followed by a "slender" vowel.
  • mh - pronounced like the w in "will" (again).
  • s - pronounced as a normal s when followed by a "broad" vowel. - pronounced like sh in "shop" when followed by a "slender" vowel. - pronounced like sh at the end of a word.
  • t - pronounced like a normal t when followed by a "broad" vowel. - pronounced like the ch in "child" when followed by a "slender" vowel.
  • th - pronounced just like the h in "home". - pronounced like the t in "bet". - pronounced not at all at the end of a word.

Other Oddities of Spoken Irish

While the above are good guidelines for speaking Irish, even people from neighboring villages in the gaeltacht (the Irish-speaking areas) don't always agree on the proper pronunciation.

You may notice that the Irish tend to roll their r more than other people, even when speaking English. At the same time, the horror of clustered consonants is obvious, the English "film" becoming "fillim" regularly. Oh, and a very good party trick is to have an Irishman read out "33 1/3" which may end up as "dirty tree and a turd".

Pulling It All Together

There also is a tendency to pull together several vowels and consonants into one sound—either through convention or laziness. Thus Dun Laoghaire is best pronounced " dunleary ". Which leads to the conclusion that...

Proper Irish Pronunciation Can Only be Learned by Interacting with Native Speakers

Trying to learn Irish from books is like trying to scale Mount Everest via virtual reality —not impossible but far from the real thing. Even with the help of tapes and CDs you simply will not come up the conversation standard. And, above all, avoid the dreaded Stage Irish of the standard tourists! It makes the real Irish cringe every time.

Fijian Words for Your South Pacific Vacation

Useful Words and Phrases in Norwegian

Useful Words and Phrases in Danish

Useful Finnish Words and Phrases for Travelers

Basic German Words and Phrases for Travelers

Italian for Travelers to Italy

7 Traditional Irish Foods

Every Stop You Need to Make on the Ring of Kerry

Basic Russian Vocabulary for Travelers

Driving in Ireland: What You Need to Know

Spanish Phrases You Need to Know in Peru

Driving in France

Hawaiian Christmas and New Year's Words and Phrases

Driving in Florence

13 Words You Need to Know Before You Go to Disneyland

Driving in London

Just added to your cart

Irish Language Store. Shop Gaeilge products. Learn Irish.

Irish Oral and Essay phrases.

Adding product to your cart

Digital download.

8 page PDF file containing phrases and sentence starters for the Irish Oral and Essay.

There is a section containing key verbs in the M.C, A.C, A.L agus A.F that can be used when making your points. 

There is also a section containing seanfhocail (proverbs).

Space has been left in some sections to allow you to add in more verbs & phrases.

  • Share Share on Facebook
  • Tweet Tweet on Twitter
  • Pin it Pin on Pinterest
  • choosing a selection results in a full page refresh
  • press the space key then arrow keys to make a selection

Omniglot - the online encyclopedia of writing systems & languages

  • Constructed scripts
  • Multilingual Pages

Useful Irish phrases

A collection of useful phrases in Irish, a celtic language spoken in Ireland.

Key to abbreviations: sg = singular (said to one person), pl = plural (said to more than one person).

tú / agat / leat / ort / duit are used for one person sibh / agaibh / libh / oraibh / daoibh are used more than one person

Jump to phrases

See these phrases in any combination of two languages in the Phrase Finder . If you can provide recordings, corrections or additional translations, please contact me .

English Gaeilge (Irish)

(sg)
Tá fáilte romhaibh (pl)

)
(sg)
(pl)
Dia is Muire dhuit (sg) -
(pl) -
(Mun)
(Con)
(Ul)


Reply to 'How are you?' (sg)
(pl)
(sg)
(pl)
(sg)
(pl)
(sg)
(pl)
(sg)
(pl) - Ul


(Mun)
(Ul)
(Con)

(sg)
(pl)
(sg)
(pl)
(sg)
(pl)
(sg)
(pl)




Slán agat ( )
Slán agaibh ( )
Slán leat ( )
Slán libh ( )
Feicfidh mé ar ball thú (sg - )
Feicfidh mé ar ball sibh (pl - )
Chífidh mé ar ball thú (sg - ) - Ulster
Chífidh mé ar ball sibh (pl - ) - Ulster



( )
( )
( )
( )

( )

( )

( )
( )
( )
Go n-éirí an bothar leat
( )
Níl a fhios agam
Níl fhios agam
An dtuigeann tú? (sg)
An dtuigeann sibh? (pl)

(Ul)

Abair sin arís, le do thoil

(sg)
(pl)
Irish? (sg)
(pl)
Yes, a little
( )

Irish Tá mé ag foghlaim Gaeilge
Irish? An bhfuil teanga ar bith eile agat seachas Gaeilge?
An bhfuil teanga ar bith eile agat diomaite den Ghaeilge?
Irish
Irish?
I would like ... Ba mhaith liom ...


Le do thoil (sg)
Le bhur dtoil (pl)
Más é do thoil é (sg)
Más é bhur dtoil é (pl)
(sg)
(pl)
(sg)
(pl)
(inf)
Reply to thank you

An dtagann tú anseo go minic?


( )
( )
( )
( )
( )
( )
( )
( )

(sg)
(pl)

( )
( )
( )
(sg)
(pl)

Comhghairdeas!
Go maire tú do nuacht!
St Patrick's Day Greetings Lá fhéile Pádraig sona dhuit (sg)
Lá fhéile Pádraig sona dhaoibh (pl)
Beannachtaí na Féile Pádraig dhuit (sg)
Beannachtaí na Féile Pádraig oraibh (pl)

Recordings and/or corrections by John O'Brien and Siobhán Ní Chathasaigh and Ruairí Ó hEithir

Download all the recordings (Zip, 2MB)

There are no exact equivalents of yes or no in Irish. The way you answer questions depends on the verbs used. For example, if you are asked "Ar mhaith leat damhsa liom?" (Would you like to dance with me?) you could reply with "Ba mhaith" (I would) or "Níor mhaith" (I wouldn't). This is a feature of Irish English as well. You could also use "aye" (yes), "nah" (no) or "cinnte" (sure) if you're not sure which reply is appropriate.

If you would like to make any corrections or additions to this page, or if you can provide recordings, please contact me .

Irish language | Gaelic script | Ogham alphabet | Phrases | Numbers: Modern Irish , Middle Irish , Old Irish | Colours | Family words | Terms of endearment | Time | Dates | Weather | Proverbs | Comparison of Celtic languages | Celtic cognates | Celtiadur | Tower of Babel | Tongue twisters | Songs | Learning materials | Books about Ogham | My podcast about Irish | Links

Other collections of Irish phrases (some with audio) http://www.irish-sayings.com/ http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~irelandlist/phrases.html http://www.learn-irish-language-software.com/phrases/FSIrish.htm

Irish learning software http://www.linguashop.com/irish-language

Phrases in Celtic languages

Breton , Cornish , Cumbric , Irish , Manx , Scottish Gaelic , Welsh , Welsh (Gwentian)

Phrases in other languages

728x90 (Best VPN)

Why not share this page:

Talk in Arabic - Learn Egyptian, Iraqi, Levantine, Sundanese, Moroccan, Algerian or Saudi Arabic

If you like this site and find it useful, you can support it by making a donation via PayPal or Patreon , or by contributing in other ways . Omniglot is how I make my living.

useful phrases in irish essays

Get a 30-day Free Trial of Amazon Prime (UK)

iVisa.com

  • Learn languages quickly
  • One-to-one Chinese lessons
  • Learn languages with Varsity Tutors
  • Green Web Hosting
  • Daily bite-size stories in Mandarin
  • EnglishScore Tutors
  • English Like a Native
  • Learn French Online
  •   Learn languages with MosaLingua
  • Learn languages with Ling
  • Find Visa information for all countries
  • Writing systems
  • Con-scripts
  • Useful phrases
  • Language learning
  • Multilingual pages
  • Advertising

Omniglot Blog

10 phrases you can use to spread the use of Irish

The growth of Irish starts with the smallest, most basic phrases.

Written by Katie Halpin-Hill

Voices - Advice

Young people share advice based on their experiences..

10-phrases-you-can-use-to-spread-the-use-of-irish-thumbanail

You can find this article as Gaeilge here . 

From first class until sixth year, most students in Ireland learn the language of our country – Irish. However, at the end of school, most students are not fluent. We learn Irish for twelve years; every single student should be fluent by the end of their final year in secondary school.

The reason that the Irish people do not speak Irish in their day-to-day lives is because it is not taught in a practical manner. People are not confident speaking it because Irish is taught as if it is a dead language. I think that the lack of emphasis on spoken Irish in English speaking schools is a big reason the language is being spoken less and less.

I went to an English-speaking primary school and an Irish-speaking secondary school. I can tell you first-hand that a lot of schools where English is the main language do not care about teaching Irish properly. Most do not understand the importance of it, or the rich history that is behind it. Irish is our country’s native language. We have to protect, encourage and grow it. We need to spread this love and this importance into the teaching of Irish. If Irish is going to survive, it’s so important that both teachers and students understand this.

As well as the weaknesses of the Irish education system, I think that a lot of people do not speak Irish in their daily lives because they think that their grammar must be perfect to speak it. The truth is that it is more important to have a love for it in your heart. You have to be proud of it, and speak it with that love. It doesn’t matter if your grammar isn’t great, if you speak it with that fondness; I promise you that it will improve naturally. Everyone makes mistakes, whether you are a beginner or a person who was raised through Irish. Mistakes are the only way you can learn after all!

The best way, in my opinion, to help with the revival of the Irish language is to bring  it into your everyday life. One way you can achieve this is to use simple phrases. Speak Irish to the people in the shop or supermarket when you do your shopping. The growth of Irish starts with the smallest, most basic phrases such as ‘go raibh maith agat.’ These phrases encourage people to speak more Irish.

To help you do this, I made a list of ten basic phrases that you can use to increases your use of Irish, and how you can use these phrases to do your bit to help the revival of our language.

1. Go raibh maith agat

‘Thank you’ (Guh rev mah ug-ut)

This is one of the most basic phrases in the Irish language, but the effect it can have on people is huge. Even words as simple as these can start a conversation in Irish.

2. Tá fáilte romhat

‘You are welcome.’ (Taw fawl-ta rowat)

You can use this phrase to reply to the previous sentence, and to encourage somebody else’s use of Irish.

3. Dún an doras

‘Close the door’ (Doon ahn dur-us)

As the winter months draw in, this phrase will be particularly helpful. Many people remember this from their school days, so it will also encourage older generations to make an effort with the Irish language.

4. An rud is annamh is iontach

‘The thing that is seldom is wonderful’ (Ahn rud is onn-av is oon-tuck)

You would be surprised as to how many times you can use this old Irish saying in normal conversation. It can be used in a serious conversation but it also can be used in a funny and entertaining way.

5. Conas atá tú?

‘How are you?’ (Kun-is a-taw to?)

This sentence is genuinely one of the most helpful phrases that you can use if you are trying to start a conversation in Irish. It can be used in an English-speaking setting as well however, if you want to introduce that little snippet of Irish.

6. Cá bhfuil an _______?

‘Where is the ______?’ (Caw vwil ahn ______?)

This sentence is pretty self-explanatory. You can fill the blank with any place or item. If you are unsure of what it is in Irish, a good online dictionary is: www.folcloir.ie

7. An teastaíonn tú/sibh bia a fháilt?

‘Would you/ye like to get food?’ (Ahn tast-ian to/shiv bee-a ah awlt?)

Anybody that knows me will know that this sentence will always be one of my personal favourites.

8. Tabhair dom an guthán

‘Pass me the phone.’ (To-wer dum ahn guh- awn)

You can replace the word ‘guthán’ with any item, such as ‘nuachtáin’ (newspaper) or ‘salann’ (salt).

9. Más é do thoil é

‘Please.’ (Mawsh ay duh hull ay)

The direct translation of this phrase is ‘if it is your will’, but it is more commonly used to say ‘please’.

10. An bhfuil Gaeilge agat?

‘Do you have Irish?’ (Ahn vwil Gway-ling ug-ut?)

Possibly the most important phrase on this list. If you use this, I can promise that the amount of people that will answer you in Irish will surprise you.

In the end, these phrases are just small things, but a lot of the time it is these small things that facilitate social change. We, as the people of Ireland, need to reclaim our language, and by using these ten simple sentences, you are really helping. Do not be afraid to speak Irish in everyday life. I know how scary the possibility of mistakes can be, but your Irish does not have to be perfect. Just remember – it is the small things that are the most important in terms of reviving the language of Ireland.

This article was written by a SpunOut.ie volunteer. Check out our  volunteering opportunities here  and get in touch if you’re interested in getting involved.

Related articles

3 ways I have made my school experience better as an autistic student

3 ways I have made my school experience better as an autistic student

Written by Isabelle Blum

Isabelle shares how she self-advocated to access accommodations independently as an autistic student in a mainstream Irish secondary school.

How you can support a blind person

How you can support a blind person

Written by Paul Geoghegan

Computer science student and guide dog owner Paul shares his advice on how to help a blind or vision impaired person.

Four ways to properly approach a wheelchair user

Four ways to properly approach a wheelchair user

Written by Iqura Naseem

Iqura shares her first hand advice on how to interact properly with a wheelchair user.

Our work is supported by

funders-logo1

Home

Location & Currency

  • Gaelscoileanna

Last added items

Subtotal: €0.00

5 0
4 0
3 0
2 0
1 1

newfile

'200' Useful Honours Irish Phrases/Vocabulary

  • Return Policy We accept returns Learn more
  • Description
  • Specification
  • Payment methods
  • Return Policy
  • SKU SKU 14213
  • Curricular Area(s) English

Product questions

We accept the following payment methods:

To replace this text with your store's actual info on payment methods, go to "Catalog -> Product tabs" and edit the Payment methods page.

Customers who bought this product also bought

Primary Language Curriculum PLC Fortnightly Plan Template and Sample for English and Irish

Primary Language Curriculum PLC Fortnightly Plan Template and Sample for English and Irish

Teaching plans.

Mash Image2

Gaeilge: Irish - Sample Lesson Plans. Over 100 Pages! ***Fantastic Resource*** Lessons on a range of themes.

SOCIAL DISTANCING WARM UP SONG

SOCIAL DISTANCING WARM UP SONG

Logomakr_0OzMYz

GAEILGE PHRASES!

Múinteoir sarah, customers who viewed this product bought.

Frásaí don Aiste: Essay Phrases Activity Pack (Set 2)

Frásaí don Aiste: Essay Phrases Activity Pack (Set 2)

Primary plans.

Frásaí don Aiste: Essay Phrases Activity Pack (Set 1)

Frásaí don Aiste: Essay Phrases Activity Pack (Set 1)

5th Class Fortnightly Planning/Cuntas Miosuil: April (PLC)

5th Class Fortnightly Planning/Cuntas Miosuil: April (PLC)

Muinteoir ní cheallaigh.

Caitheamh Aimsire - Gaeilge (Theme)

Caitheamh Aimsire - Gaeilge (Theme)

Passion for primary, thanks for being with us.

© 2008 - 2024 Mash. All rights reserved.

Powered by X-Cart

useful phrases in irish essays

useful phrases in irish essays

Microsoft 365 Life Hacks > Writing > What is an asyndeton?

What is an asyndeton?

When you walk into someone’s home for the first time, there’s a good chance you’ll see a “Live, Laugh, Love” sign hanging overhead. Although this slogan is widespread, you might not be familiar with the literary device exemplified by this phrase. Learn what an asyndeton is, explore common examples of its usage, and learn how to effectively utilize this literary device.

A group of signs saying live, laugh, love

What is the definition of an asyndeton?

An asyndeton is a literary device that removes conjunctions , such as “and,” “but,” and “or” to create a compelling and emphatic phrase. An asyndeton can also speed up a writer’s rhythm and change the tone of what is being said. Deriving from Greek, the word means “unconnected,” and it delivers that exact effect. An asyndeton makes a quote concise and straight to the point without adding extra words.

Get the most out of your documents with Word Banner

Get the most out of your documents with Word

Elevate your writing and collaborate with others - anywhere, anytime

What are the different types of asyndetons?

There are two common forms of asyndetons, which are the following:

Asyndeton between sentences and clauses

In this form, conjunctions are deliberately omitted between separate sentences or clauses , creating a rapid and impactful sequence of ideas. For example, “She laughed, she cried, she danced—all without restraint.”

Asyndeton between words and phrases

Here, conjunctions are intentionally left out within a single sentence or phrase, intensifying the sense of urgency or emphasis. An example could be, “Courage, determination, resilience—qualities that define a true leader.”

What are examples of different asyndetons?

Asyndetons are pervasive in literature, speeches, and everyday language, often imbuing phrases with a sense of urgency, drama, or emphasis. Some notable examples include:

  • Julius Caesar’s immortal words, “I came, I saw, I conquered,” which succinctly encapsulate the decisive actions of the Roman general.
  • “Live, laugh, love” is a popular phrase often used in home décor, adding a touch of warmth and positivity to many people’s bedrooms and living areas.
  • In William Golding’s Lord of the Flies, he writes: “We saw no houses, no smoke, no footprints, no boats, no people.” This asyndeton adds a dramatic effect in the second chapter of the book, showcasing the island is void of society.
  • “Reduce, reuse, recycle” is a common asyndeton and a phrase used for waste management and environmental sustainability.

How to use asyndetons effectively in your writing

Since asyndetons create emphasis, it’s best to use them selectively so they remain effective. Here are some tips to use this literary device effectively and intentionally:

  • Think about context: Consider the mood and situation of your writing to consider if leaving out conjunctions will be appropriate and make your point stronger.
  • Keep it clear: Even though asyndetons make writing simpler, make sure it’s still easy to understand. Every word should add something important to what you’re saying.
  • Try different structures: Play around with how you organize your sentences to make your asyndetons more powerful. Change up the length, rhythm, and where you place them to get the effect you want.

Asyndetons are used throughout language—in literary works, speeches, and common phrases—to add an emphatic effect. Add asyndetons into your writing to change tone, and rhythm, and to make your writing more concise. For more ways to improve your writing, learn more writing tips .

Get started with Microsoft 365

It’s the Office you know, plus the tools to help you work better together, so you can get more done—anytime, anywhere.

Topics in this article

More articles like this one.

useful phrases in irish essays

When to use 'while' vs. 'whilst'

“While” and “whilst” are usually interchangeable, but not always. See how they differ and learn how to use them effectively.

useful phrases in irish essays

What is touch typing (and why is it important)?

Learn about the benefits of touch typing and how it can help you type faster and more accurately.

useful phrases in irish essays

Is it “per say” or ‘per se’?

Address the misspelling of ‘per se’ to effectively communicate the intrinsic quality of something. Learn why it is commonly misspelled and how to use it correctly in your writing.

useful phrases in irish essays

Elicit vs. illicit: What’s the difference?

Learn the difference between illicit vs. elicit, two homophones that sound alike but mean different things, and write without confusion.

Microsoft 365 Logo

Everything you need to achieve more in less time

Get powerful productivity and security apps with Microsoft 365

LinkedIn Logo

Explore Other Categories

  • Share full article

Advertisement

Supported by

Guest Essay

Today’s Teenagers Have Invented a Language That Captures the World Perfectly

An illustration of a man with an open book and a pencil, sweating as a teenager stands behind him using a pointer stick to point to the word “cringe,” written on a large paper pad on the wall. They are surrounded by stacks of books.

By Stephen Marche

Mr. Marche is the author, most recently, of “The Next Civil War.”

My son just completed high school and when he leaves for college in the fall my life will change in ways I’m still struggling to contemplate. Among the things I’ll miss most are his lessons in teenage slang. My son has always been generous with me, and I’ve found the slang of his generation to be so much better and more useful than any that I’ve ever used. His slang has also offered me an accidental and useful portrait of how he and his generation see the world.

The primary value of slang has been to create linguistic shibboleths, a way to differentiate yourself quickly from other people. Sometimes the distinction was generational, sometimes it was racial, and sometimes it was ideological, but the slang itself was ultimately a form of social etiquette. From one generation to the next, the terms changed, but the meanings typically didn’t. New words were routinely adopted to express familiar concepts: one generation’s “cool” becomes another’s “dope” and so on.

Members of my son’s generation have a vastly superior approach to slang. They’ve devised a language that responds to the new and distinct reality they face.

Anyone with children, especially ones on the cusp of adulthood, has to reckon with the shameful fact that the world we’re leaving them is so much worse than the one we brought them into. My son’s slang reflects that: It’s a distinct language created for a society that’s characterized, online and off, by collapsing institutions, erosions in trust and a loss of faith in a shared sense of meaning.

“Mid” is an obvious example. I don’t think it even qualifies as teenage slang anymore — it’s too useful and, by now, too widespread. In my son’s usage, things that are mid are things that are essentially average or slightly below. You can’t really complain about them, but they produce no joy. They’re often the result of the refinement of market research to the exact level that tepid consumer acceptance is achieved. Everything in Starbucks falls into the category of “mid.” So does everything in an airport. It’s a brilliant, precise word for a world full of mild disappointments, where the corner bakery that used to do some things well and other things poorly has been reliably replaced by yet another Le Pain Quotidien.

“Glazed” has a similarly impressive precision. When my son describes something as glazed, it’s meant to signify not lying, exactly, or even exaggerating, but the act of positively spinning a judgment. “Glazed” indicates a gilding of information; sports commentary, for example, is 90 percent glaze. When Stephen A. Smith, the quintessential glazer, likens Anthony Edwards to Michael Jordan , a proper response might be “The Ant glazing is crazy.” But glaze is also the perfect description of the way social media works: The world you encounter online is perpetually glazed, with everything taking on an artificially positive, unreal and not entirely trustworthy gloss.

We are having trouble retrieving the article content.

Please enable JavaScript in your browser settings.

Thank you for your patience while we verify access. If you are in Reader mode please exit and  log into  your Times account, or  subscribe  for all of The Times.

Thank you for your patience while we verify access.

Already a subscriber?  Log in .

Want all of The Times?  Subscribe .

IMAGES

  1. Easy Guide To The +30 Words And Phrases In Irish

    useful phrases in irish essays

  2. Irish Essays Made Easy! Glance card

    useful phrases in irish essays

  3. Useful Words and Phrases in Irish Cant (Shelta)

    useful phrases in irish essays

  4. 30 Phrases And Phrases In Irish: Straightforward Information

    useful phrases in irish essays

  5. Mash > '200' Useful Honours Irish Phrases/Vocabulary

    useful phrases in irish essays

  6. Irish Essays Made Easy

    useful phrases in irish essays

VIDEO

  1. Irish phrases...day 1 #ireland #phraseoftheday #learn

  2. Irish phrases...day 10 #ireland #irish #northernireland #phraseoftheday #phrases #slang #learn

  3. Irish phrases/words that Americans don’t understand 🇺🇸🫶🏼 #irishamerican #america #ireland

  4. Top 10 Irish Phrases Ask Me Arse!

  5. Useful Phrases : Learning Irish Together Episode 5

  6. Avoid THIS in your Irish Essays

COMMENTS

  1. Mastering Irish Essay Phrases for Leaving Cert Success

    IntroductionIrish essay writing can be challenging for Leaving Certificate students, but mastering a few key phrases can make a big difference in your grade. In this blog post, we will cover some of the most commonly used Irish essay phrases that can help you to improve your writing and achieve success in your exams."Introductory Phrases"• Tá sé seo i gceist: This is the topic at hand ...

  2. IRISH ESSAY PHRASES Flashcards

    In the blink of an eye. Nós na gaoithe. As fast as the wind. Mhothaigh me lag. I felt weak. Torran. Noise. Study with Quizlet and memorise flashcards containing terms like Is maith is cumhin liom, Ar bís, Bhí an ghrian ag scoilteadh na gcloch and others.

  3. Mastering Irish Essay Phrases for Leaving Certificate Success -Tips and

    IntroductionIrish essay writing can be challenging for Leaving Certificate students, but mastering a few key phrases can make a big difference in your grade. In this blog post, we will cover some of the most commonly used Irish essay phrases that can help you to improve your writing and achieve success in your exams. "Introductory Phrases"• Tá sé seo i gceist: This is the topic at hand ...

  4. Phrases for Essays

    Phrases for Essays. A bheag nó a mhór To a greater or lesser extent. Ag dul i bhfeabhas Getting better. Ag dul in olcas Getting worse. Ag dul ó smacht Going out of control. Ar an gcéad dul síos / i dtús báire First of all. Ar fud na cruinne Throughout the world. Bheadh gaois Sholaimh de dhíth You'd need the wisdom of Solomon ...

  5. Irish Things, Irish Phrases for Essays!

    Here's a handy list of phrases you can use in your Irish essays at either Junior or Leaving Cert level. For Topical Essays (the Irish language, littering, racism, the economy etc) ar an gcéad dul síos/i dtús báire - first of all/in the first place chun an fhírinne a rá - to tell the truth feictear domsa - it seems to me

  6. Useful Irish essay phrases Flashcards

    Useful Irish essay phrases. Flashcards. Learn. Test. Match. Is minic. Click the card to flip 👆 ... Essay: Irish general essay words. 12 terms. Woofle_ LC Irish Prós & Poetry Essay Phrases. 38 terms. zoewalsh600. Irish essay vocab. 73 terms. dmcmone. Oisín i dTír na nÓg - Téamaí ...

  7. Useful phrases for Irish essay Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards containing terms like What is meant by the title, more often than not, Day after day and more.

  8. Leaving Cert Irish Essays: A Guide for Students

    Here are a few tips to help you write a successful Leaving Cert Irish essay: Start with a strong introduction that grabs the reader's attention and sets the tone for the rest of the essay. Use a clear and concise structure, with an introduction, body, and conclusion. Use examples and evidence to support your points.

  9. Frásaí don Aiste: Essay Phrases Activity Pack (Set 1)

    This pack contains the following. Reference sheet of 25 useful phrases for writing Irish essays, phrases are listed in Irish alongside an English translation. Memory game 1: Print and cut out flashcards, match the Irish phrases with the English translation. Memory game 2: PowerPoint of the phrases in Irish - pupils compete in pairs, display ...

  10. Irish: Ask a straight H1 student

    4. Your school (your subjects/ the school day/ school rules/ the leaving cert/education system/points system) 5. The future (what do you want to do next year and why / college) 6. Hobbies (sport /music /reading/cinema ) 7. Social media (do you use Facebook/twitter) 8.

  11. Irish Phrases and Common Expressions

    Useful information about Irish phrases, expressions and words used in Ireland in Irish, conversation and idioms, Irish greetings and survival phrases. Most of the sentences are used for the everyday life conversations, through them you can learn how to say specific sentences, so they might come handy if you memorize them.

  12. Common Irish Phrases and Words You Might Need

    Some useful phrases in Irish (that go beyond the essential words you should know in Irish), grouped by category: Irish Greetings: Hello, Goodbye . ... Irish uses a lot of the same alphabet as English but this is only because a specially developed style of Irish writing failed to become standard. Vowel Sounds .

  13. Irish Oral and Essay phrases.

    8 page PDF file containing phrases and sentence starters for the Irish Oral and Essay. There is a section containing key verbs in the M.C, A.C, A.L agus A.F that can be used when making your points. There is also a section containing seanfhocail (proverbs). Space has been left in some sections to allow you to add in more verbs & phrases.

  14. Useful Irish (Gaelic) phrases

    Useful Irish phrases. A collection of useful phrases in Irish, a celtic language spoken in Ireland. Key to abbreviations: sg = singular (said to one person), pl = plural (said to more than one person). tú / agat / leat / ort / duit are used for one person sibh / agaibh / libh / oraibh / daoibh are used more than one person Jump to phrases

  15. Write an Essay..

    mccgaeilge. Find Irish (Gaeilge) past exam papers broken into topics such as poetry or prose. Listen to Aural exams. Prepare for Irish oral with videos and notes on sraith pictiur.

  16. Irish Leaving Cert Aiste Vocab/Phrases Flashcards

    It is often seen. Is minic a deirtear. It is often said. Le gairid. Recently. Le déanaí/ar na mallaibh. Lately. Leaving Cert Irish vocab and phrases for essays Learn with flashcards, games, and more — for free.

  17. Leaving Cert help notes: Irish Essay phrases

    Irish Essay phrases These are some useful phrases that can be used in almost any essay! I will update this as I put up more essays. ... Labels: aiste, debate, díospóireacht, essay, essay question, examples, gaeilge, help, irish, phrases, sample, sample essay, useful. 35 comments: Unknown 7 February 2017 at 14:01. just a recommendation you ...

  18. Gaeilge Phrases & Sayings

    Find your own way around the Irish language with our list of common Gaeilge phrases and sayings, and strike up a conversation! Support; Newsletter; News; Contact; Shop. Shop; ... Phrases Menu Phrases Menu Dropdownlink. View Upcoming Immersion Programs ... A first Step in Spoken Irish $ 23.00; Please Select A Category Below. Bed & Bath. Good Bye ...

  19. 10 phrases you can use to spread the use of Irish

    2. Tá fáilte romhat. 'You are welcome.' (Taw fawl-ta rowat) You can use this phrase to reply to the previous sentence, and to encourage somebody else's use of Irish. 3. Dún an doras. 'Close the door' (Doon ahn dur-us) As the winter months draw in, this phrase will be particularly helpful.

  20. PDF Phrásai maithe don scéal Mé féin (Useful phrases for Irish story about

    (Useful phrases for Irish story about you.) English Gaeilge My name is (Michael) (Micheál) is ainm dom. I live in (Limerick) Tá cónai orm i (Luimní) I am (ten) years old Tá mé (deich) mbliana d'aois There are (four) in my family Ta (ceathrar) i mo chlann I have (two) sisters… Tá (beirt) deirfúir agam…

  21. '200' Useful Honours Irish Phrases/Vocabulary

    Complied in one document are 200 useful phrases and vocabulary that will enable you to write academic Gaeilge assignments to an Honours level or add an extra level of complexity to your oral language skills. This document is perfect for use at Leaving Cert Honours level or if you are completing a PME or Higher Diploma in Primary Education ...

  22. Posts

    Studyclix is Ireland's leading study website. We offer past state and mock exam papers organised by topic with marking schemes, notes and guides.

  23. JUNIOR CERT ESSAY PHRASES IRISH Flashcards

    Tús na haiste Learn with flashcards, games and more — for free.

  24. What is an asyndeton?

    Asyndetons are used throughout language—in literary works, speeches, and common phrases—to add an emphatic effect. Add asyndetons into your writing to change tone, and rhythm, and to make your writing more concise. For more ways to improve your writing, learn more writing tips.

  25. Today's Teenagers Have Invented a Language That Captures the World

    "Mid" is an obvious example. I don't think it even qualifies as teenage slang anymore — it's too useful and, by now, too widespread. In my son's usage, things that are mid are things ...