syracuse creative writing minor

Creative Writing Program Introduces New Undergraduate Degree

The Department of English’s signature creative writing program–home of the renowned M.F.A. in creative writing–will now offer a new bachelor of arts degree. Building on the nationally ranked master’s program, the new creative writing major and minor are open to students with an interest in developing their skills as writers and readers of creative nonfiction, fiction and poetry.

The new B.A. marks a milestone for the creative writing program, which previously only housed an M.A. (1962-1994) and M.F.A. (1994-present) since its founding in 1962. For the first time, talented undergraduate writers can enroll in the program, which concentrates on the craft and quality of literary writing. They will address the challenges of the literary process with their fellow writers under the guidance of highly accomplished faculty authors, including Mona Awad, Dana Spiotta, Jonathan Dee, Brooks Haxton, Bruce Smith, Matt Grzecki, Sarah Harwell and Christopher Kennedy.

The  creative writing major is 30 credits and combines a grounding in literary study with a workshop-style focus on writing. Students will learn to effectively use language to create complex and emotionally powerful experiences in the form of stories, poetry and creative nonfiction. Coursework will include literature, creative writing workshops and craft classes. Creative writing workshops focus on the students’ own creative work, while craft classes such as Reading and Writing Poetry and Fairytales in Fiction are classes where students “read like writers”–learning craft and literary techniques from the work of established writers. The creative writing minor  requires students to take 18 credits of craft classes and creative writing workshops.

Coran Klaver, associate professor and department chair of English, says students will benefit from a course of study designed specifically for undergraduate creative writers. “The new creative writing major continues to draw on the strengths of our literary and screen studies curriculum of the Department of English, while also providing undergraduate students with customized workshops and crafts courses,” Klaver says. “I am thrilled that our students will now have the ability to focus on their passion for creative writing through this new major, as well as to work more closely with our talented creative writing faculty members.”

Christopher Kennedy, professor of English and director of the M.F.A. program, says, “I’d like to thank College of Arts and Sciences Dean Karin Ruhlandt for the opportunity to create the undergraduate degree and Sarah Harwell for all her hard work to bring it to fruition.”

Students in the B.A. program can utilize myriad creative writing resources, including the well-established  Raymond Carver Reading Series , opportunities to meet with visiting writers and highly talented graduate students who will help guide undergraduates, and an undergraduate creative writing club called “Write Out.”

First-year students can also choose to live in the  Creative Writing Learning Living Community  (LLC), where they can meet fellow students and create friendships, network with faculty and established authors through public readings and LLC dinners, and explore their passion for reading and writing poetry, fiction, graphic novels, creative nonfiction or any other types of writing.

According to Sarah Harwell, associate director of the creative writing program, in addition to being authors, graduates with a creative writing degree can also go on to careers in the fields of publishing, public relations, marketing, advertising, web design, media design, branding, social media communications, teaching, publishing, editing, grant writing, journalism, technical writing, health care professions and computer science.

“Nearly every profession is in need of highly skilled writers to interpret technical fields to the general public, to create compelling stories, and to compress and synthesize information so that it is gripping and persuasive,” Harwell says.

The program is now accepting students. For more information about enrolling, email Sarah Harwell at  [email protected] .

Dan Bernardi

  • Teaching the Global Power of Sport, Olympics Through a Communication Lens Friday, July 12, 2024, By John Boccacino
  • 100 Black Men of Syracuse and Syracuse Stage Present ‘Citizen James, or the Young Man Without a Country’ by Kyle Bass Friday, July 12, 2024, By Joanna Penalva
  • Experts Available to Discuss NATO and China Thursday, July 11, 2024, By Vanessa Marquette
  • Newly Named Residence Halls to Welcome Students in 2024-25 Thursday, July 11, 2024, By Jennifer DeMarchi
  • University Employees Urged to Leave Campus by 3:30 p.m. Today, July 10, Due to Severe Weather, Tornado Watch Wednesday, July 10, 2024, By News Staff

More In Campus & Community

Newly named residence halls to welcome students in 2024-25.

As part of Syracuse University’s strategic housing plan and in response to student needs and feedback, two new residence halls will open their doors to students in the upcoming 2024-25 academic year. Orange Hall is the new name for the…

University Employees Urged to Leave Campus by 3:30 p.m. Today, July 10, Due to Severe Weather, Tornado Watch

Syracuse University employees are encouraged to leave campus no later than 3:30 p.m. today in anticipation of severe weather due to a Tornado Watch in effect for Central New York. Showers and thunderstorms are expected, with some expected to be…

West Campus Construction Update: Mid- to Late July 2024

The ongoing site work on the west side of campus has shifted again this week, leading to new street and sidewalk closures in the area. Starting on Monday, July 8, the south lane of Van Buren Street will be closed…

First Year Seminar’s Jimmy Luckman Advocates for an Inclusive College Experience

When Jimmy Luckman prepared to embark on his college journey at SUNY Brockport, he desperately sought a meaningful connection with the campus community, opting from the get-go to become involved with a multitude of activities. “I wanted to be a…

Alumni Association Announces Updates to Board of Directors and Generation Orange Leadership Council

The Office of Alumni Engagement and Annual Giving announced the newest members of the Syracuse University Alumni Association (SUAA) board of directors and its Generation Orange Leadership Council this week. These passionate alumni began their terms on July 1 and…

Subscribe to SU Today

If you need help with your subscription, contact [email protected] .

Connect With Us

For the media.

Creative Writing

Course overview link.

This three-credit course is designed to introduce the student to three types of creative writing—poetry, fiction, and mixed literary forms—and the craft and skills needed to write effectively in each. The course will focus on the techniques of evocative, compelling writing across all literary genres (e.g., narration, significant detail, lyricism, image, metaphor, voice, tone, structure, dialogue, characterization). Students will read and analyze work by authors from the various traditions and produce creative work in each genre. Students will produce their own creative work and receive feedback from their instructor and their peers. English 105 prepares students for upper-level creative writing courses in fiction and poetry.

ENG 105, for which there are no prerequisites/co-requisites, is relevant to anyone majoring in English as well as students from other colleges and disciplines unable to major in English but who have an interest in creative writing. This is a gateway course designed to introduce students to the various genres taught in the Creative Writing Track. Taking (and passing) ENG 105 is one way to fulfill the 100-level requirement for the Creative Writing major/minor.

All students who successfully complete the course will receive a Certificate of Completion and have the opportunity to request a Syracuse University credit transcript.

Course Objectives Link

Students will:

  • Be able to define terms and discuss formal concepts essential to the study of poetry, fiction, mixed literary genres, and the creative process.
  • Hone writing craft, style, and mechanics in the following genres: poetry, fiction, and mixed literary genres.
  • Develop strategies for revising and editing their writing, making use of concepts discussed in class and feedback from their instructor and their peers.
  • Read, analyze, and evaluate published work from the writer’s perspective.

Course Information Link

Course Prefix and Number: ENG 105

Format: Hybrid (2 weeks at Syracuse University, 4 weeks online)

Eligibility: Students must be of rising high school junior or senior status – or a 2023 high school graduate. 

Credit: 3 credits

Grading: A-F

  • Hybrid Residential-Online: $4,535
  • Hybrid Commuter-Online: $3,590

Program rates are subject to change and will be approved by the board of trustees.   Discounts and scholarships  are also available.

Program Information Link

Summer College – Hybrid: Combine on campus and online study. Experience Syracuse University on campus for two-weeks and complete the final four-weeks of your course online from the comfort of your own home – or wherever life takes you!

syracuse creative writing minor

“Syracuse University’s Summer College was a wonderful experience and opportunity I was fortunate to be accepted into.” -Matthew S., Summer College – Online Student, 2021

Course Dates and Details Link

ProgramCourse DatesClass Time (Eastern Time)Credit/NoncreditStatus
On Campus Session: Sunday, July 2 – Friday, July 14, 2023
Online Session: Monday, July 17 – Friday, Aug. 10, 2023

MTWThF;
10 a.m. – 12 p.m.,
1 p.m. – 3 p.m.

9 a.m. – 12 p.m.,
1 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Thursdays;
6 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
3 credits

*Field Trip Days are on July 5, July 10, and July 13

Course Requirements Link

Textbook requirements link.

Click here to purchase your required textbooks from The Campus Store!

Please note, students are responsible for acquiring textbooks for this course.  You will not be able to properly participate in this course if you do not get the proper materials.  We strongly encourage you order your books to be picked up from The Campus Store, so that you can stop by and pick them up on your move-in day. * If you are a sponsored student, you do not need to purchase your textbooks. *

Supply Requirements Link

Students will need one (1) marble composition notebook (or something similar) and writing utensils.

Technology Requirements Link

  • Laptop or desktop computer with a webcam
  • Reliable internet access
  • A space conducive to taking an online class (without distractions)

Typical Day Link

Tentative schedule link.

Students will engage in discussion of readings on an analytical and craft level, receive lectures about literary forms/moments/authors/histories relevant to an introductory creative writing course, engage in in-class analytical and creative exercises, and workshops to discuss and critique their writing.

4 – 6 hours of reading per week outside of class, depending on the genre and student’s reading speed, ~2 hours a week writing their own work outside of class and commenting on their peers work.

In-class hours split between analyzing discussing the readings, in-class creative and analytical prompts, and workshops centered on the work the produce outside of class.

Faculty Bios Link

Kimberly dawn stuart link.

Kimberly Dawn Stuart is a writer and teacher from New Orleans and recent graduate of the Syracuse University MFA program. She has taught in high schools and colleges in Louisiana and New York. She is a 2023 Fulbright recipient, the Co-Director of River Glass Books, a Teacher-Consultant for the Southeastern Louisiana Writing Project, and the Assistant Poetry Editor for Louisiana Literature . Her work as appeared in Rust + Moth , Anthropocene , and 8 Poems , among others.

|  Open Close primary navigation --> Collapse section  Collapse section  Collapse section  --> | (315) 443-2422 Like Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter
Syracuse University    
 
  
2023-2024 Undergraduate Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

The Creative Writing Minor in the English Department is designed for students who have an interest in developing their skills as writers and readers of creative nonfiction, fiction, and poetry but need to fulfill the requirements of other majors.  Students will take a series of six creative writing classes in order to learn to think as writers do, to understand the aesthetic and moral choices writers confront as they write, and become familiar with contemporary writing practices.  Through a mix of workshop, imitation classes and a topics course, students will have ample opportunity for frequent and extensive writing and rewriting under the guidance of the distinguished faculty of the nationally ranked MFA in Creative Writing.

Minor Requirements

The Creative Writing minor requires 18 credit hours of coursework (generally, six courses) distributed in the manner below.

3 credit hours must be from one of the following 100-level courses:

  • ENG 105 - Introduction to Creative Writing
  • ENG 121 - Introduction to Shakespeare
  • ENG 122 - Introduction to the Novel
  • ENG 151 - Interpretation of Poetry
  • ENG 155 - Interpretation of Nonfiction
  • ENG 174 - World Literature, Beginnings to 1000
  • ENG 175 - World Literature, 1000 to Present

3 credit hours must be from one of the following introductory workshops:

  • ENG 215 - Introductory Poetry Workshop
  • ENG 216 - Introductory Literary Nonfiction Workshop
  • ENG 217 - Introductory Fiction Workshop

Twelve credits (four courses) must be in courses numbered 300 or above (upper division).

3 credits must be from a “Reading and Writing” course:

  • ENG 301 - Practicum in Reading and Writing Prose
  • ENG 303 - Practicum in Reading and Writing Fiction
  • ENG 304 - Practicum in Reading and Writing Poetry

All minors are required to take the following 3 credit course:

Selected Topics: Creative Writing: ENG 300

Students must take two advanced workshops for a total of six credits.  Each workshop must be in a different genre and have a different numerical designation: ENG 401 Poetry/ 402 Nonfiction/ 403 Fiction.  Prerequisite: Introductory Workshop ENG 215 Poetry/ 216 Nonfiction/ 217 Fiction.

Note: WRT 422 may be substituted for ENG 402.

Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate credits do NOT count toward the lower division credit requirements Creative Writing minor. In addition, students must attain a grade of C- or better in order to count a course toward their minor credits.

Syracuse University

Minors/specializations.

Choosing a Minor

All Newhouse students must complete a minor or specialization in an area of study outside of the Newhouse School. This requirement allows you to study a subject other than communications in some depth. This subject might complement your major or career objectives. For instance, many Broadcast and Digital Journalists find a minor in Political Science valuable. Students in all majors who hope to practice international communications might find a minor in a foreign language helps them achieve this goal. A Newspaper and Online Journalism major who hopes one day to be a science writer might find a minor in Biology or Earth Science attractive. A Public Relations student who hopes to work in investor relations might find a Finance minor helpful. Or you can also choose a minor just because you are interested in the subject; it does not have to be related to your major. In either case, you can talk over your interests with your adviser who can help you make a decision.

You are required to complete one minor or specialization. But you are not limited to one minor if you have additional interests. It is wise to begin work on your minor requirement no later than the beginning of your junior year. Courses which you have taken as part of the Skills, Divisional requirements, Diversity or Global requirements may also be used to fulfill a portion of your minor requirement if they fit the minor program. No Newhouse courses may be used to fulfill your minor requirement.

You should note that minors are available in many schools and colleges at Syracuse. If you choose a minor outside of the College of Arts and Sciences, you will have to take almost all your elective credits in Arts and Sciences to reach the 65–credit Arts and Sciences minimum requirement.

Definitions

A minor is an official program of study, just like a major. It appears on your transcript and student record. It involves a minimum of 18 credits; some minors require more. Each minor has its own requirements.

View the list of minors available at Syracuse University>>

The requirements for each of the minors are listed in the Syracuse University Undergraduate Course Catalog 2014-2015.

Some students wish to study in an area where no official minor is available. If, for example, you have an interest in international relations, you may fulfill this requirement by completing a specialization. A specialization is an 18-credit requirement consisting minimally of six courses in one department, at least twelve credits of which must be in courses numbered 300-level or above. A SPECIALIZATION, UNLIKE A MINOR, IS NOT AN OFFICIAL PROGRAM, so it will not appear labeled on your transcript or student record, as would a minor, although the completed courses do appear on your transcript. The specialization is a substitute for a minor and allows you to fulfill this requirement by studying in an area where no official program exists.

Procedures for Declaring a Minor

Since minors are official programs, they are governed by specific departments at the University. The minor in Philosophy, for example, is governed by the Philosophy Department in the College of Arts and Sciences. This Department also provides advice to students who wish to pursue a minor in Philosophy. The cross-disciplinary minor in Russian and Central European Studies is directed by Professor Greenberg in the College of Arts and Sciences. (This information is again available in the Undergraduate Course Catalog along with the minor coordinator’s contact information.)

When you are ready to declare your minor, you should fill out a Declaration of Minor form, available in the Newhouse Undergraduate Records Office, 316 Newhouse 3. The form should include the following information:

  • It should declare your intentions, stating the minor you wish to pursue.
  • It should indicate any minors which you are pursuing concurrently or which you previously declared and now wish to delete.
  • It must be signed by your faculty adviser in Newhouse.
  • It must be signed by the department or person responsible for the minor. (Consult the Undergraduate Course Catalog for the name and location of the person.)
  • It must be approved by the Newhouse Undergraduate Advising and Records Office (316 Newhouse 3).

You can change your minor at any time by filing a subsequent form, as long as you have the signatures you need. This form will be kept in your student file, and when you are ready to graduate, if you have completed the minor, the minor will appear in your permanent student record.

Note: Most official minors may include no more than three hours of transfer credit or test credit, such as Advanced Placement .

Procedures for Declaring a Specialization

To declare a specialization, students will need to fill out a petition, available in the Newhouse Records office. The petition must include the following information:

  • It should declare your intentions, stating the specialization you wish to pursue.
  • It must list the courses with titles and credit hours which will comprise the specialization. (It may also list a range or a group of courses from which you will choose.)

Since a specialization is an unofficial program, you do not need the approval of the department involved, although you may still want to seek advice from the faculty in the department or the department chair. If your specialization is in a college other than the College of Arts and Sciences, the Newhouse Advising and Records Office will ask you to get approval from the person responsible for registration in these courses, usually the department chair. The purpose of the signature is to make sure that you will have access to the courses you hope to take, and so that you don’t discover late in your program that you cannot complete your specialization. The Newhouse Undergraduate Advising and Records Office can direct you if you have any questions.

You may amend your specialization petition at any time by filing a subsequent petition with different courses, as long as you have all the signatures you need. This petition will be kept in your student file, and when you are ready to graduate, if you have completed the courses outlined in your specialization, your “minor requirement” will be considered fulfilled.

List of Available Minors

The following minors are available to Newhouse students. Minors which require courses largely outside of the College of Arts and Sciences are noted. Application and admission requirements for each of the minors can be found in the Undergraduate Course Catalog . The Catalog also outlines the credit and course requirements for each minor.

  • Accounting (School of Management) *
  • Addiction Studies (College of Sport and Human Dynamics)
  • Advocacy and Public Rhetoric (courses in more than one college)
  • African American Studies
  • Animation (College of Visual and Performing Arts)
  • Anthropology
  • Applied Statistics (courses in more than one college)
  • Architecture (School of Architecture; courses from more than one college)
  • Art History
  • Art Photography (College of Visual and Performing Arts)
  • Asian/Asian American Studies
  • Bioprocess Science (College of Environmental Science and Forestry) *
  • Ceramics (College of Visual and Performing Arts) *
  • Child and Family Policy (College of Sport and Human Dynamics)
  • Child and Family Studies (College of Sport and Human Dynamics)
  • Chinese Studies
  • Classical Civilization
  • Cognitive Science (courses in more than one college)
  • Communication and Rhetorical Studies (College of Visual and Performing Arts) *
  • Communication Sciences and Disorders
  • Computer Engineering (College of Engineering and Computer Science)
  • Computer Gaming (College of Visual and Performing Arts)
  • Computer Science (College of Engineering and Computer Science)
  • Construction Management (College of Environmental Science and Forestry) *
  • Disability Studies (courses from more than one college)
  • Drama (College of Visual and Performing Arts)
  • Earth Sciences
  • Education Studies (School of Education)
  • Electrical Engineering (College of Engineering and Computer Science)
  • Energy Systems (College of Engineering and Computer Science)
  • Engineering and Computer Science Management (courses in more than one college)
  • English and Textual Studies
  • Entrepreneurship and Emerging Enterprises (School of Management) *
  • Environment and Society (courses in more than one college)
  • Exercise Science (School of Education)
  • Exercise Science: Dance (School of Education) *
  • Finance (School of Management) *
  • Food Studies (College of Sport and Human Dynamics)
  • Forensic Science
  • French and Francophone Studies
  • Gerontology (course from more than one college)
  • Global Enterprise Technology (School of Information Studies)
  • Global Political Economy
  • Global Securities Studies
  • Health and Wellness (College of Sport and Human Dynamics)
  • History of Architecture (courses from more than one college)
  • Information Management and Technology (School of Information Studies)
  • Information Technology, Design and Startups (courses in more than one college)
  • International Business (School of Management) *
  • Jazz Studies (College of Visual and Performing Arts)
  • Jewelry and Metalsmithing (College of Visual and Performing Arts) *
  • Jewish Education (Courses in more than one college)
  • Judaic Studies
  • Landscape Architecture Studies (College of Environmental Science and Forestry) *
  • Latin American Studies
  • Leadership/Stewardship Communication (courses from more than one college) *
  • Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Studies (courses from more than one college)
  • Linguistic Studies (courses in more than one college)
  • Logic (courses in more than one college)
  • Management Studies (School of Management) *
  • Marketing (School of Management) *
  • Mathematics
  • Medical Anthropology (courses in more than one college)
  • Medieval and Renaissance Studies
  • Middle Eastern Studies
  • Mindfulness and Contemplative Studies (School of Sport and Human Dynamics)
  • Music History and Cultures
  • Music Industry (College of Visual and Performing Arts)
  • Music Performance (College of Visual and Performing Arts)
  • Native American Studies (courses from more than one college)
  • Natural Resources and Environmental Policy (College of Environmental Science and Forestry) *
  • Nutrition (College of Sport and Human Dynamics)
  • Nutrition Science (College of Sport and Human Dynamics)
  • Painting (College of Visual and Performing Arts) *
  • Paper Science (College of Environmental Science and Forestry) *
  • Physical Computing (College of Visual and Performing Arts)
  • Physical Education (Coaching) (School of Education)
  • Policy Studies
  • Political Science
  • Private Music Studies (College of Visual and Performing Arts) *
  • Public Health (College of Sport and Human Dynamics)
  • Real Estate (School of Management) *
  • Recreation Resource and Protected Area Management (College of Environmental Science and Forestry) *
  • Religion and the Media
  • Religion and Society
  • Renewable Energy (College of Environmental Science and Forestry) *
  • Retail Management (School of Management) *
  • Russian and Central European Studies
  • Sculpture (College of Visual and Performing Arts) *
  • Social Welfare (College of Sport and Human Dynamics)
  • South Asian Studies
  • Sport Management (College of Sport and Human Dynamics) *
  • Strategic Management (School of Management) *
  • Sustainable Construction Management (College of Environmental Science and Forestry) *
  • Visual Culture (College of Visual and Performing Arts) *
  • Women’s and Gender Studies

Minors offered by the School of Management must be declared no later than April 1 of the sophomore year.

Minors offered by the State University of New York School of Environmental Science and Forestry will appear on your Syracuse transcript and affect your Syracuse GPA, but they cannot be used toward the SU residency requirement, which concerns students with substantial numbers of transfer, AP, CLEP, or other non-Syracuse credits. If you have seventy or more non-Syracuse credits, consult the Syracuse University Academic Rules and Regulations and your Newhouse adviser before declaring an ESF minor. Some ESF minors must be declared by the end of the sophomore year (Bioprocess Science, Paper Science, Renewable Energy). Some ESF minors require junior standing (Construction Management, Natural Resources and Environmental Policy). Check the online Syracuse University Undergraduate Course Catalog for details.

The minor in Communication and Rhetorical Studies must be declared by March 1 of the sophomore year.

The minor in Exercise Science: Dance must be declared by end of the sophomore year.

The minor in Leadership/Stewardship Communication must be declared by Oct. 15 of the junior year.

The minor in Music Industry must be declared before the beginning of the junior year. Earlier is encouraged.

The minor in in Sport Management must be declared by the first semester of junior year. Application deadlines are November 1 and April 1.

The minor in Visual Culture must be declared no later than the first semester of junior year. Application deadlines are October 15 for fall and March 1 for spring.

The minors in Ceramics , Jewelry and Metalsmithing , Private Music Study , and Sculpture must be declared by the beginning of the junior year.

The minor in Painting must be declared by the first semester of sophomore year.

Check with departments for other deadlines, GPA and course pre-requisite requirements. Some minors carry additional program fees each semester. Consult SU’s Tuition, Fees, and Related Policies on the Bursar’s website for specific information about minor fees under each college.

The requirements for each of the minors are listed in the Syracuse University Undergraduate Course Catalog 2015-2016.

Since a specialization is not an official program, you do not need the approval of the department involved, although you may still want to seek advice from the faculty in the department or the department chair. If your specialization is in a college other than the College of Arts and Sciences, the Newhouse Advising and Records Office will ask you to get approval from the person responsible for registration in these courses, usually the department chair. The purpose of the signature is to make sure that you will have access to the courses you hope to take, and so that you don’t discover late in your program that you cannot complete your specialization. The Newhouse Undergraduate Advising and Records Office can direct you if you have any questions.

  • Chinese Language
  • Disabilities Studies (courses from more than one college)
  • Jewish Studies
  • Private Music Study (College of Visual and Performing Arts) *

The requirements for each of the minors are listed in the Syracuse University Undergraduate Course Catalog 2016-2017.

To declare a specialization, students will need to fill out a petition, available in the Newhouse Advising and Records office . The petition must include the following information:

  • Animation and Visual Effects (College of Visual and Performing Arts)
  • Child and Family Policy (College of Sport and Human Dynamics; courses come from more than one college)
  • Cognitive Science (courses from more than one college)
  • Computer Gaming (College of Visual and Performing Arts; courses from more than one college)
  • Creative Leadership (University College; courses from more than one college)
  • Energy Systems (College of Engineering and Computer Science; courses from more than one college)
  • Engineering and Computer Science Management (courses from more than one college)
  • Environment and Society (courses from more than one college)
  • Exercise Science (School of Education; courses from more than one college)
  • Gerontology (courses from more than one college)
  • Global Enterprise Technology (School of Information Studies; courses from more than one college)
  • Information Technology, Design and Startups (courses from more than one college)
  • Jewish Education (courses from more than one college)
  • Knowledge Management (University College; courses from more than one college)
  • Linguistic Studies (courses from more than one college)
  • Logic (courses from more than one college)
  • Medical Anthropology (courses from more than one college)
  • Medieval and Renaissance Studies (courses from more than one college)
  • Mindfulness and Contemplative Studies (School of Sport and Human Dynamics; courses from more than one college)
  • Music Industry (College of Visual and Performing Arts; courses from more than one college)
  • Physical Computing (College of Visual and Performing Arts; courses from more than one college)
  • Rhetoric and Public Advocacy (courses from more than one college)

The minor in Communication and Rhetorical Studies and Leadership/Stewardship Communication must be declared by March 1 of the sophomore year.

The minors in in Sport Analytics , Sport Event Management , Sport Management and Sport Revenue Management and Operations must be declared by the first semester of junior year. Application deadlines are November 1 and April 1.

The minors in Ceramics and Sculpture must be declared by the beginning of the junior year.

The minor in Jewelry and Metalsmithing has a March 1 deadline of sophomore year for application.

The minor in Painting must be declared by the first semester of sophomore year; application deadline is March 1 of freshman year.

All Newhouse students must complete a minor or specialization in an area of study outside of the Newhouse School. This requirement allows you to study a subject other than communications in some depth. This subject might complement your major or career objectives. For instance, many Broadcast and Digital Journalists find a minor in Political Science valuable. Students in all majors who hope to practice international communications might find a minor in a foreign language helps them achieve this goal. A Newspaper and Online Journalism major who hopes one day to be a science writer might find a minor in Biology or Earth Science attractive. A Public Relations student who hopes to work in investor relations might find a Finance minor helpful. A Photography major who wants to work in the travel industry might find a Geography or Anthropology minor appealing. Or you can also choose a minor just because you are interested in the subject; it does not have to be related to your major. In either case, you can talk over your interests with your adviser who can help you make a decision.

The requirements for each of the minors are listed in the Syracuse University Undergraduate Course Catalog 2017-2018.

Since minors are official programs, they are governed by specific departments at the University. The minor in Philosophy, for example, is governed by the Philosophy Department in the College of Arts and Sciences. This Department also provides advice to students who wish to pursue a minor in Philosophy. The cross-disciplinary minor in Russian and Central European Studies is directed by Professor Greenberg in the College of Arts and Sciences. (This information is again available in the Undergraduate Course Catalog along with the minor coordinator’s contact information.) When you are ready to declare your minor, you should fill out a Declaration of Minor form, available in the Newhouse Undergraduate Records Office, 316 Newhouse 3. The form should include the following information:

  • Architecture (School of Architecture)
  • Child and Family Policy Studies (College of Sport and Human Dynamics; courses come from more than one college)
  • Human Development and Family Science (College of Sport and Human Dynamics)
  • Japanese Studies
  • Native American and Indigenous Studies (courses from more than one college)
  • TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages; courses from more than one college)
  • Theater (College of Visual and Performing Arts)

The minor in Information Management and Technology must be declared by junior year.

Minors offered by the School of Management must be declared no later than the end of sophomore year. Application deadlines are November 1 and April 1.

Minors offered by the State University of New York School of Environmental Science and Forestry will appear on your Syracuse transcript and affect your Syracuse GPA, but they cannot be used toward the SU residency requirement, which concerns students with substantial numbers of transfer, AP, CLEP, or other non-Syracuse credits. If you have seventy or more non-Syracuse credits, consult the Syracuse University Academic Rules and Regulations and your Newhouse adviser before declaring an ESF minor. Some ESF minors must be declared by the end of the sophomore year (Renewable Energy). Check the online Syracuse University Undergraduate Course Catalog for details.

The minor in Creative Leadership and in Knowledge Management must be started no later than first semester of junior year.

The minor in Energy Systems is limited to students earning a B.S. in Engineering and Computer Science. Others with a substantial background may be considered by petition.

The minors in Ceramics and in Jewelry and Metalsmithing must be declared by the beginning of the junior year.

The minor in Jewelry and Metalsmithing has an October 15 and March 1 deadline for application.

The requirements for each of the minors are listed in the Syracuse University Undergraduate Course Catalog 2018-2019.

  • Atrocity Studies and the Practice of Social Justice (School of Education; courses in more than one college)
  • Business (School of Management)
  • Data Analytics (School of Information Studies)

The requirements for each of the minors are listed in the Syracuse University Undergraduate Course Catalog 2019-2020.

  • Design Studies (Visual and Performing Arts)
  • Museum Studies (Visual and Performing Arts)
  • Professional and Technical Writing (University College)
  • Project Management (University College)
  • Sports Analytics
  • Sport Event Management
  • Sport Revenue Management and Operations
  • Accessibility
  • Skip to main content
  • Skip to main navigation

Creative Writing Minor

To minor in Creative Writing, students must complete 18 hours of study within in the English department. There are two tracks within the Creative Writing minor: poetry and fiction. Often students are introduced to poetry or fiction through their required English courses and then decide to minor in creative writing to further their study of the field.

Most degree programs at Baylor do not require a student to select a minor area of study, but students may choose to minor in a field that supplements their major or may choose to pursue an area of academic interest completely outside their major. For example, an English major may choose to minor in Creative Writing to supplement their major. Even though they are within the same department, minoring in Creative Writing would allow a student to take more courses in this specific vein of the field.

Courses a student might take include Advanced Creative Writing, Contemporary Poetry, or Modern American Novel.

For more information, please contact [email protected] , or call the English Office at (254) 710-1768. 

College of Arts & Sciences

Carroll Science 106

Department of English One Bear Place, #97404 Waco, TX 76798-7404

  • General Information
  • Academics & Research
  • Administration
  • Gateways for ...
  • About Baylor
  • Give to Baylor
  • Pro Futuris
  • Social Media
  • College of Arts & Sciences
  • Diana R. Garland School of Social Work
  • George W. Truett Theological Seminary
  • Graduate School
  • Hankamer School of Business
  • Honors College
  • Louise Herrington School of Nursing
  • Research at Baylor University
  • Robbins College of Health and Human Sciences
  • School of Education
  • School of Engineering & Computer Science
  • School of Music
  • University Libraries, Museums, and the Press
  • More Academics
  • Compliance, Risk and Safety
  • Human Resources
  • Marketing and Communications
  • Office of General Counsel
  • Office of the President
  • Office of the Provost
  • Operations, Finance & Administration
  • Senior Administration
  • Student Life
  • University Advancement
  • Undergraduate Admissions
  • Graduate Admissions
  • Baylor Law School Admissions
  • Social Work Graduate Programs
  • George W. Truett Theological Seminary Admissions
  • Online Graduate Professional Education
  • Virtual Tour
  • Visit Campus
  • Alumni & Friends
  • Faculty & Staff
  • Prospective Faculty & Staff
  • Prospective Students
  • Anonymous Reporting
  • Annual Fire Safety and Security Notice
  • Cost of Attendance
  • Digital Privacy
  • Legal Disclosures
  • Mental Health Resources
  • Web Accessibility

By continuing to use this site, you agree to the use of cookies in accordance with our privacy policy .

  • Academic Calendars
  • Human Resources

Writing and Tutoring

Your academic success is our goal, so we provide you with the tools to succeed.

Take advantage of the academic resources—available to students, faculty and staff—to make the most of your academic experience at Syracuse.

The Writing Center

The aim of the Writing Center is to help you become a stronger, more accomplished writer. Our consultants will work with you at any stage of your writing process in any form of support you choose.

Each semester hundreds of students visit our consultants to:

  • Interpret an assignment sheet, talk through ideas or discuss course readings
  • Keep writing styles focused, concise and organized
  • Acquire research strategies, integrate scholarly sources and apply proper documentation
  • Improve editing and proofreading skills, expand vocabulary and better understand technical conventions of academic writing

Center for Learning and Student Success

The Center for Learning and Student Success (CLASS) provides and facilitates academic support services for Syracuse students, including one-on-one tutoring, small-group tutoring and workshops, and academic integrity education and training. Through collaboration with academic departments and offices, CLASS coordinates programs and disseminates information about campuswide academic resources available to students. The center is located in Room 014 in the basement of Bird Library. Please stop in and see us.

Resources for students include:

  • Free group tutoring
  • Individual tutoring
  • Maximizing Your Learning sessions
  • Admissions and Aid
  • Student Life

English literature student wearing black sweatpants and a tie-dye shirt lays back on the grass while holding a book up and reading during an outdoor class.

English Major

Program overview.

Discover the power of stories. Whether you have a passion for reading or writing — or both — our English program will broaden your worldview and open the door to a world of possibilities.

Program Snapshot

Why this program & what you'll learn.

Literature taps into our deepest emotions and illuminates the human experience. As a student of English, you’ll immerse yourself in language, stories and ideas across disciplines.

Our flexible program allows you to design your own major. You can either follow a general program of English studies or focus on a particular interest, such as nonfiction writing, world literature or applied linguistics.

Whichever path you choose, you’ll work closely with faculty who will mentor you, advise you and collaborate with you on research. Our faculty publish widely in the field and have won honors for their teaching and research. They bring expertise in everything from children’s literature to creative writing to linguistics.

You’ll also have access to an exceptional collection of children’s literature. Our Lucile Clarke Memorial Children’s Library has more than 7,000 old and rare children’s books, and our Instructional Materials Center features a variety of contemporary works and teaching materials.

You can also expand your degree by adding an undergraduate certificate in Creative Writing .

Program Highlights

As a student of English literatures, language and writing, you can:

  • Study with award-winning faculty and published authors.
  • Submit your poetry, fiction or nonfiction work to Central Review , our literary journal.
  • Apply for scholarships designed specifically for students in the English department.
  • Find a community of writers by joining student groups such as the Fiction Collective, the Poets Collective​​, ​Word Hammer or the Writing Circle.
  • Hear from prominent poets and fiction writers who come to campus for readings and classroom visits.

Concentrations

American and british literature, applied linguistics, children's and young adult literature, creative writing, nonfiction writing, world literature, careers & outcomes.

The study of English builds highly marketable skills that make you a competitive job candidate in many sectors beyond writing and editing. Graduates go on to rewarding careers in business, law, education, government, publishing, public relations, healthcare, nonprofit organizations, science and technology, among others.

Career Projected Salary
College Professor/Instructor $80,840
Communications Director $78,854
Technical Writer $79,960
Writer/Author $73,150
Public Relations/Communications Specialist $67,440
English Language and Literature Professor $74,280

A person wearing a mustard-yellow shirt holds a pencil to a blank notebook on a wooden desk as if about to write.

Request Information about CMU

By submitting this form, I agree to receive calls, emails and/or text messages from Central Michigan University to discuss furthering my education.

Privacy Policy

|  Open Close primary navigation --> Collapse section  Collapse section  Collapse section  --> | (315) 443-2422 Like Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter
Syracuse University    
 
  
2023-2024 Graduate Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Mona Awad, Chanelle Benz, Jonathan Dee, Matt Grzecki, Sarah Harwell, Brooks Haxton, Mary Karr, Christopher Kennedy, George Saunders, Bruce Smith, Dana Spiotta

The MFA program in Creative Writing at Syracuse has long been regarded as one of the best in the country. Each year six students are admitted in poetry and six in fiction to work closely in small workshops with an accomplished group of writers. Coursework includes a strong emphasis on the study of literature. Six semesters are usually needed to complete the M.F.A.

Applicants must upload a sample of fiction or poetry with their online application through CollegeNet no later than December 15, as well as complete the online graduate application for graduate study.  Admission is based primarily on the writing sample, but also upon the academic record. Thus, letters of recommendation should address not only the student’s creative work, but also his or her general preparedness for advanced graduate study. Likewise, in their personal statements on the application for graduate study, students should state their reasons for pursuing an M.F.A. in creative writing as well as describe their own backgrounds as writers.

Submit online Graduate Application via ApplyWeb by DECEMBER 15th. 

  • FICTION APPLICANTS: UPLOAD your 20 page maximum writing sample with your CollegeNet application by DECEMBER 15.
  • POETRY APPLICANTS: UPLOAD your 10-12 POEMS with CollegeNet application by December 15 . Do NOT mail in your poetry writing sample.

Candidates must complete 48 credits of coursework, which includes 9 credits of workshop, a minimum of 9 credits in forms courses, a 3-credit second-year essay seminar, 12 to 15 credits in other English department courses, 6 to 9 credits of electives outside the department, and 6 credits for the preparation of the thesis (a collection of poems or stories or a novel).

For more information about our graduate programs, visit our department web site at english.syr.edu .

Student Learning Outcomes

1. Writing, editing and revision in student’s primary literary genre, leading to a creative manuscript of publishable quality

2. Reading in ways that contribute to a student’s writing

3. Analyzing and writing with care about literary texts

4. Responding thoughtfully and critically to work by other MFA students

5. Demonstrate writerly discipline by accepting criticism from professionals and rewriting accordingly, writing regularly, and developing a life-long reading list

6. Place their own work in the context of a broad range of issues and activities associated with a literary writer and the communities in which the writer lives and works

7. Teach composition and research writing to undergraduates and conduct one-on-one tutoring sessions in a Writing Center

MFA Graduate Awards

First year MFAs come in on a Creative Writing Fellowship award which carries no teaching duties. The award comes with a stipend and a 24 credit hour tuition scholarship.

Second and third year students are funded by teaching assistantships. Teaching assistantships include a 24 credit hour tuition scholarship and a stipend of $20,000. Second year TAs will have full responsibility for teaching/consulting in the department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition. They are expected to attend regular staff meetings and workshops and participate in a mentoring group. There is a review of each teaching assistant’s performance as a teacher. Third year students will teach in the English Department, courses to be determined on an as needed basis.

Orange Alert

Minor in professional and technical writing, catalog description.

Professional and technical writers are responsible for clearly and accurately communicating complex information to a variety of specialized audiences in fields as diverse as healthcare, law, science, technology, business and government. They also create usable, accessible publications and websites. The Minor in Professional and Technical Writing (PTW) offers students the opportunity to learn the theories and skills of professional communication. As a PTW minor, you’ll develop written, visual, and oral documents and publications as well as learn how they are used in local, national and international contexts.

Admissions Requirements

The PTW minor is the perfect minor for students studying in the STEM fields, education, business, and social sciences. The PTW minor is also a great fit for adult learners who wish to supplement their degree with a professionally-oriented qualification, and any student pursuing a career in technical writing/communication.

IMAGES

  1. Syracuse Summer College Creative Writing: Fiction and Poetry

    syracuse creative writing minor

  2. Senior Reading & Reception for Creative Writing Minor: 5 Years of the

    syracuse creative writing minor

  3. People

    syracuse creative writing minor

  4. Creative Writing's Teaching Moments : Arts and Sciences @ Syracuse

    syracuse creative writing minor

  5. Consider a creative writing minor!

    syracuse creative writing minor

  6. Writing Outside of the Box: The Creative Writing Minor

    syracuse creative writing minor

VIDEO

  1. Professional Writing Minor

  2. Creative Writing's Student Experience : Arts and Sciences @ Syracuse University

  3. Creative Writing in the Quad Day

  4. Syracuse University Library

COMMENTS

  1. Creative Writing, Minor

    The Creative Writing Minor in the English Department is designed for students who have an interest in developing their skills as writers and readers of creative nonfiction, fiction, and poetry but need to fulfill the requirements of other majors. Students will take a series of six creative writing classes in order to learn to think as writers ...

  2. Program: Creative Writing Minor

    Office of the Registrar, 106 Steele Hall Syracuse, NY 13244 | (315) 443-2422  Like Us on Facebook ... The Creative Writing Minor in the English Department is designed for students who have an interest in developing their skills as writers and readers of creative nonfiction, fiction, and poetry but need to fulfill the requirements of other ...

  3. Minor in Writing

    The minor in writing is available to all undergraduates at Syracuse University. Students must have credit for WRT 105 and WRT 205, or equivalent. Students may begin the minor before completing WRT 205. The minor in writing offers students the opportunity to develop expertise in writing for academic, professional, civic, and personal purposes.

  4. Program: Writing Minor

    The minor in writing is available to all undergraduates at Syracuse University. Students must have credit for WRT 105 or equivalent. Requirements. The minor requires 18 credits: WRT 255 - Advanced Argumentative Writing. 15 WRT credits numbered 300 or above, excluding WRT 320. A list of these courses can be found on the Writing and Rhetoric, BA ...

  5. Creative Writing B.A.

    Salt Hill is a nationally distributed literary journal publishing outstanding new fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction and art. For over a decade, the magazine has been edited and published by creative writing students. Students apply to intern at Salt Hill, and if chosen, gain valuable experience in running a literary magazine.

  6. B.A. in Creative Writing

    The Creative Writing Major in the English and Textual Studies Department is designed for students who want to be part of this tradition and have an intense interest in cultivating the skills, knowledge and inventiveness needed to write creative nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. This 30-credit major combines a grounding in literary study with a ...

  7. Students Learn Craft of Creative Writing With Stellar Faculty, New

    With the recent launch of a new undergraduate major and minor in creative writing, students have plenty of opportunity to hone their craft alongside such accomplished faculty. ... Syracuse's creative writing M.F.A. became a three-year program in 1992 and enjoys a long reputation as one of the country's oldest and best programs. In 2011, it ...

  8. English and Textual Studies Minor

    Office of the Registrar, 106 Steele Hall Syracuse, NY 13244 ... The Department of English offers programs in textual and cultural studies and in creative writing. Courses deal with both written and film/screen texts, and study such problems as the nature and implications of reading and interpretation, the production of meaning in language and ...

  9. Creative Writing Program Introduces New Undergraduate Degree

    The creative writing major is 30 credits and combines a grounding in literary study with a workshop-style focus on writing. Students will learn to effectively use language to create complex and emotionally powerful experiences in the form of stories, poetry and creative nonfiction. Coursework will include literature, creative writing workshops ...

  10. Writing and Rhetoric B.A.

    Syracuse University offers a writing and rhetoric major in the College of Arts and Sciences ... Writing minor Fátima Bings Martínez '24 worked as a research assistant for Project Mend, a journal showcasing the experience of incarceration, under the guidance of writing and rhetoric professor Patrick Berry. ... Creative Writing B.A. ...

  11. English and Textual Studies B.A.

    Take engaging and unique courses exploring how literature, creative writing and screen media intersect with environmental issues, gender and sexuality, critical race and ethnic studies and global cultures. ... The College of Arts and Sciences (A&S) is Syracuse University's first and largest college. As the home of the liberal arts, our ...

  12. A&S' Creative Writing Program Introduces New Undergraduate Degree

    The Department of English's signature creative writing program - home of the renowned M.F.A. in creative writing - will now offer a new bachelor of arts degree. Building on the nationally ranked master's program, the new creative writing major and minor are open to students with an interest in developing their skills as writers and ...

  13. Creative Writing

    Taking (and passing) ENG 105 is one way to fulfill the 100-level requirement for the Creative Writing major/minor. All students who successfully complete the course will receive a Certificate of Completion and have the opportunity to request a Syracuse University credit transcript. Course Objectives Link. Students will:

  14. Program: Creative Writing, BA

    Contact: Katherine Kidd, Director of Undergraduate Studies. [email protected]. 401 Hall of Languages. The Creative Writing Major in the English Department is designed for students who have an intense interest in developing their skills as writers and readers of creative nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. Students need to read widely and critically ...

  15. Creative Writing Minor

    Creative Writing Minor. Contact: Amber Gilmore, Undergraduate Coordinator. [email protected]. The Creative Writing Minor in the English Department is designed for students who have an interest in developing their skills as writers and readers of creative nonfiction, fiction, and poetry but need to fulfill the requirements of other majors.

  16. Minors/Specializations

    The requirements for each of the minors are listed in the Syracuse University Undergraduate Course Catalog 2014-2015. Some students wish to study in an area where no official minor is available. If, for example, you have an interest in international relations, you may fulfill this requirement by completing a specialization.

  17. CW Undergraduate Program

    CW Undergraduate Program. The creative writing major is 30 credits and combines a grounding in literary study with a workshop-style focus on writing. Students will learn to effectively use language to create complex and emotionally powerful experiences in the form of stories, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Coursework will include literature ...

  18. Creative Writing Minor

    Carroll Science 106. Department of English. One Bear Place, #97404. Waco, TX 76798-7404. (254) 710-1768. Apply Now Make a Gift Contact Us Location. To minor in Creative Writing, students must complete 18 hours of study within in the English department. There are two tracks within the Creative Writing minor: poetry and fiction.

  19. Writing and Tutoring Centers

    Keep writing styles focused, concise and organized. Acquire research strategies, integrate scholarly sources and apply proper documentation. Improve editing and proofreading skills, expand vocabulary and better understand technical conventions of academic writing. Make an appointment with one of our experts.

  20. Program: Professional and Technical Writing Minor

    Office of the Registrar, 106 Steele Hall Syracuse, NY 13244 | (315) 443-2422  Like Us on Facebook ... To declare a Writing minor, students should complete the Declaration of Minor form and either email it to [email protected] or bring the form to the Writing Department office (239 HBC Hall) for the signature of the minor coordinator. A copy of ...

  21. Creative Writing M.F.A. Program

    The three-year M.F.A. program in Creative Writing gives promising fiction writers and poets an opportunity to practice and study their art with dedicated fellow writers. We accept six students in fiction and six students in poetry each year. We have no non-fiction track.

  22. English Literatures, Language, and Writing

    Program Highlights. As a student of English literatures, language and writing, you can: Study with award-winning faculty and published authors. Submit your poetry, fiction or nonfiction work to Central Review, our literary journal.; Apply for scholarships designed specifically for students in the English department.

  23. Program: Creative Writing, MFA

    Student Learning Outcomes. 1. Writing, editing and revision in student's primary literary genre, leading to a creative manuscript of publishable quality. 2. Reading in ways that contribute to a student's writing. 3. Analyzing and writing with care about literary texts. 4. Responding thoughtfully and critically to work by other MFA students.

  24. Minor in Professional and Technical Writing

    The PTW minor is the perfect minor for students studying in the STEM fields, education, business, and social sciences. The PTW minor is also a great fit for adult learners who wish to supplement their degree with a professionally-oriented qualification, and any student pursuing a career in technical writing/communication.