what is persuasive essay and example

How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Detailed Guide

what is persuasive essay and example

A persuasive essay aims to cultivate students' capacity for convincing, arguing, and championing their points of view.

Writing a persuasive essay, alternatively called argumentative, employs logic and reasoning to demonstrate the superiority of one idea over another. Its primary objective is to convince a reader to embrace a specific perspective or to engage in a particular course of action.

In this article, you will find out about the definition of a persuasive essay, the difference between argumentative and persuasive essays, its core elements, and essential writing tips, as well as a couple of great examples.

What Is a Persuasive Essay

According to a persuasive essay definition, it is a type of academic writing assignment frequently given to students in schools, colleges, and universities. The purpose of persuasion in writing is to sway, motivate, or guide readers toward a specific viewpoint or opinion. The very act of attempting to persuade inherently acknowledges that multiple opinions on the subject can be presented.

The notion of an argument may often bring to mind images of two individuals engaged in heated, angry exchanges. However, in writing, an argument takes on a distinct form. It represents a well-reasoned viewpoint bolstered by supporting evidence and explanations. To argue in writing is to contribute to the advancement of knowledge and ideas in a constructive manner. Written arguments tend to falter when they resort to emotional outbursts rather than logical reasoning. While your readers may not always align with your argument, the objective is to encourage them to respect and contemplate your thesis or opinion as a valid one.

High school students are likely to write persuasive essays more frequently, particularly in English or composition classes. The frequency may vary but could be several times per semester. In higher education, the frequency of persuasive essays can depend on the major and specific courses. Students in disciplines like English, history, political science, or philosophy may encounter persuasive essays multiple times during a semester.

Why Writing Persuasive Essays Is Important for You

Persuasive writing is a fundamental skill taught to students at an early stage in their academic journey. It's an engaging and enjoyable form of writing that aims to initiate a discussion on a chosen subject. This writing approach challenges students to adopt a clear position on a particular topic or cause and employ compelling arguments to convince readers of the author's viewpoint.

When crafting a persuasive essay, students must diligently investigate the designated topic, analyze it thoroughly, and take a firm and argumentative stance. Subsequently, using logical arguments and persuasive language, students are tasked with dispelling biases and assuring readers that the author's viewpoint is the most valid. If at any point you find this task too challenging or time-consuming, our is exactly what you need to ace the assignment.

Argumentative vs Persuasive Essay

When students Google ' write my paper ,' they are usually confused by the difference between persuasive and argumentative essays. Although they are both types of academic writing that aim to convince the reader to adopt a particular point of view or take a specific action, there are also some key differences between the two:

Similarities

  • Persuasive Purpose: Both persuasive and argumentative essays have the primary goal of persuading the reader. They seek to influence the audience's beliefs, attitudes, or actions.
  • Clear Position: In both essays, the writer takes a clear and distinct position on a specific issue or topic. They present a thesis statement or a central claim that they support throughout the essay.
  • Use of Evidence: Both essays use evidence, reasoning, and logical arguments to support the author's viewpoint. They rely on facts, examples, statistics, and expert opinions to strengthen their case.
  • Counterarguments: Effective persuasive and argumentative essays acknowledge opposing viewpoints (counterarguments) and address them to strengthen their own position. This demonstrates a fair and thorough analysis of the topic.
  • Organizational Structure: Both essays generally follow a similar structure, including an introduction, body paragraphs that present evidence and arguments, and a conclusion that summarizes the key points and restates the thesis.

Differences

Audience and Tone:

  • Persuasive Essays: These essays often target a broader audience and may use a more emotional or persuasive tone to appeal to the reader's emotions and values.
  • Argumentative Essays: The audience for argumentative essays is typically more academic or formal, and the tone is more objective and relies on logical reasoning.

Emphasis on Emotion:

  • Persuasive Essays: They may use emotional appeals, storytelling, and rhetorical devices to connect with the reader's emotions and values.
  • Argumentative Essays: These essays prioritize logical reasoning and factual evidence over emotional appeals.

Use of Personal Experience:

  • Persuasive Essays: Writers might draw on personal anecdotes and experiences to make their case.
  • Argumentative Essays: Personal experiences are generally avoided in argumentative essays, as the focus is on empirical evidence and objective reasoning.

Purpose Beyond Convincing:

  • Persuasive Essays: While their primary purpose is persuasion, persuasive essays can also aim to motivate or call the reader to action.
  • Argumentative Essays: The primary goal of argumentative essays is to prove the validity of a point of view through logical and reasoned arguments.

While persuasive and argumentative essays share the goal of persuading the reader, they differ in their approaches, tone, and the extent to which they use emotional appeals. The choice between the two depends on the intended audience and the specific purpose of the essay. We also have a guide on how to write an argumentative essay in case you need assistance with this type of task.

Persuasive Essay Key Elements and Outline

If you've been wondering how to start a persuasive essay, you should incorporate one of the three fundamental elements known as the modes of persuasion. These concepts, first introduced by the philosopher Aristotle, synergize to form a convincing and impactful argument aimed at influencing the viewpoints of others.

  • Ethos: Represents a component of argument and persuasion where the writer establishes their credibility, expertise, and moral integrity. Readers tend to place greater trust in individuals with genuine knowledge, personal experience, or a respected position within a community. Including ethos, or ethical appeal, in your persuasive writing can effectively advocate for your perspective.
  • Pathos: Involves appealing to the emotions of the audience with the intent of eliciting feelings. Eliciting specific emotions within your readers can foster a connection between them and your narrative. This not only piques the readers' interest but also makes your writing more engaging and memorable.
  • Logos: Encompasses the rhetorical or persuasive appeal to the audience's logic and reason. A well-structured persuasive essay presents a series of logical arguments that persuade the reader to embrace the writer's position.

A gripping persuasive essay seamlessly integrates these three modes of persuasion to construct a persuasive and impactful argument. These modes, rooted in credibility, emotion, and logic, enhance the effectiveness of persuasive writing and its ability to sway the opinions of the audience. By the way, we have a strong guide on how to write a synthesis essay , which is another type of written task commonly assigned to students of all levels.

  • Font: Utilize Times New Roman or a legible font such as Georgia or Arial.
  • Font Size: Set the headline(s) to 16pt and the remaining text to 12pt.
  • Alignment: Justified.
  • Spacing: Use double spacing, though 1.5 spacing may be acceptable in certain cases.
  • Word Count: Typically, aim for a word count ranging from 500 to 2000 words. However, it's advisable to refer to your teacher's instructions to determine the specific word count requirement for your assignment.

To provide you with a clearer understanding of how to create an outline for a persuasive essay, here's a template for a persuasive essay on the topic 'Are Women Weaker Than Men Today':

1. Introduction

  • Hook: 'In the 21st century, women have transcended traditional roles.'
  • Background Information: 'The age-old debate on women's relative strength persists.'
  • Thesis Statement: 'The era of male dominance has given way to a new reality. Today, women can excel in virtually any field or role just as men can.'

2. Main Body

  • Argument #1: Strength in Family Dynamics + Supporting Facts, Stats, and Evidence
  • Argument #2: Strength in the Workplace + Supporting Facts, Stats, and Evidence
  • Argument #3: Strength in Society + Supporting Facts, Stats, and Evidence

3. Conclusion

  • Summary of Key Arguments
  • Restate Thesis: 'For centuries, women were unjustly labeled as the weaker sex. However, examining the accomplishments of contemporary women dispels this notion.'
  • Thought-Provoking Conclusion: 'In recent decades, women worldwide have demonstrated their capability to excel in diverse roles traditionally dominated by men. Their accomplishments are a testament to their strength. Yet, women continue to strive for greater participation in modern society, a testament to their enduring resilience and determination.'

How to Shape a Powerful Persuasive Argument

The notion of how to write a good persuasive essay is tightly related to how you can make compelling arguments. Here are some fundamental tips to assist you in crafting irresistible arguments for your paper:

  • Thorough Research: It's essential to be well-versed in your chosen topic to develop strong and persuasive points. Conduct comprehensive research using reputable sources, gather expert opinions, and uncover relevant facts.
  • Ensure Controversy: Your thesis should encompass two opposing sides – the one you support and the one you intend to counter. Without a debatable topic, creating a persuasive argument is challenging.
  • Comprehend Contrary Views: Another crucial aspect of building robust arguments is the ability to grasp the opposing standpoint and find solid counterarguments to refute it effectively.
  • Utilize Supporting Evidence: Lastly, remember that a persuasive argument may appear incomplete and unconvincing without ample, cogent evidence to back it up. Incorporate relevant and reliable evidence to reinforce your claims.

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How to Shape a Powerful Persuasive Argument

How to Support Your Argument

When writing a persuasive essay that resonates with readers thanks to an enthralling argument, it would be a great idea to use various methods to reinforce it:

  • Statistics: An excellent way to bolster your ideas is by incorporating a variety of statistics. Statistics often carry significant weight within the broader context. However, it's crucial to use only valid statistics from reputable sources. Example: Presently, women constitute 18% of the officer corps and approximately 16% of the enlisted military forces in the United States, reinforcing the notion that women are equally capable as men.
  • Facts: Established facts are potent tools of persuasion that you can rely on in your paper. Example: Research indicates that in terms of longevity, women are more likely to survive illness and cope with trauma.
  • Examples: Incorporating real-life examples (including personal experiences), references to literature, or historical instances can enhance the impact of your persuasive paper and provide substantial support for your arguments. Example: Angela Merkel, the Chancellor of Germany, serves as a compelling real-life illustration of women's strength. Merkel displayed the fortitude to enter the realm of politics and compete against men. Her success has demonstrated that a woman can excel in politics. It's no coincidence that she held the top spot on Forbes' list of the world's most powerful women for nine consecutive years.
  • Quotes: Another effective method to reinforce your ideas is to include direct quotes that reflect the opinions of respected and credible figures. Example: Mahatma Gandhi once stated, 'To call woman the weaker sex is a libel; it is man's injustice to woman. If by strength, brute strength is meant, then indeed, a woman is less brute than a man. If moral power is meant by strength, then the woman is immeasurably man's superior. Has she not greater intuition, is she not more self-sacrificing, has she not greater powers of endurance, has she not greater courage? Without her, man could not be. If nonviolence is the law of our being, the future is with a woman. Who can make a more effective appeal to the heart than woman?

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How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Step-by-Step

When tasked with composing a persuasive paper, a common error among students is diving straight into essay writing, often overlooking essential preparatory steps.

To address this, we offer a comprehensive, step-by-step guide to navigate you through the entire process:

Persuasive Argument Step by Step

Choose a Topic That Ignites Your Passion

Your persuasive abilities shine when you advocate for something you genuinely believe in. One of the most important steps to writing a persuasive essay is to select your topic, opting for one that resonates with your own convictions. While research is still vital, having a strong opinion about the subject will bolster your argument.

Engage in Thorough Research

Learning how to write a persuasive essay, you should convince readers to embrace your viewpoint. You must also understand the opposing perspective. Your audience may be firmly entrenched in their own views, so familiarizing yourself with both sides of the argument and knowing how to effectively counter opposing arguments will address potential doubts.

Understand Your Audience

Prior to persuading your readers, get to know them. Tailor your approach to match your target demographic. For example, if you're crafting a persuasive letter advocating for the removal of standardized testing from school systems, your primary audience is likely parents. Keep this in mind when addressing your specific audience. Does getting into the minds of readers sounds a bit too difficult? Consider custom essay writing services from pro writers who know how to appeal to various types of audiences.

Create a Detailed Outline

Before commencing the writing process, create a persuasive essay outline. This aids in structuring your thoughts, organizing your research, and establishing your essay's framework. Elaborate on all your main points and pair them with the relevant supporting evidence from your cited sources.

Craft a Captivating Introduction

An intriguing article kicks off with an effective persuasive essay introduction, typically the first paragraph. Its primary purpose is to introduce the paper's central premise, furnish necessary background information, appeal to the reader's sensibilities, and capture their attention. You can achieve this through personal anecdotes or information derived from your research. The introductory paragraph should also feature your essay's thesis statement, functioning as a roadmap for the ensuing content. It succinctly articulates the main point of the paper, with the rest of the essay serving to bolster this point.

Develop Your Body Paragraphs

This section serves as the substantive core of your persuasive essay, employing data and evidence to support your thesis while addressing opposing viewpoints. Each body paragraph comprises three key components: a topic sentence (or primary sentence), pertinent supporting sentences, and a closing (or transition) sentence. This structure maintains the paragraph's focus on the central idea, delivering clear and concise information. The body also provides an opportunity to discuss opposing opinions and justify their dismissal, so ensure that the claims you make are substantiated with credible and pertinent information. Did you know that one of the reasons students choose an essay service is because they find body paragraph writing too exhausting?

Conclude Powerfully

A persuasive essay conclusion represents the final segment of your essay, encapsulating the entire work. It should recap your thesis, summarize the key supporting ideas explored in the essay, and convey your final perspective on the central concept. This is also where you present your call-to-action if you are urging readers to take prompt action on a particular issue.

Proofread Diligently

Always subject your writing to thorough proofreading before submission or presentation. Overlooked words, grammatical errors, or sentence structure issues can undermine your credibility in the reader's eyes.

Writing a Persuasive Essay: Essential Tips

Taking into account the abovementioned information, here are some concluding tips to enhance the quality of your persuasive essay:

  • Simplicity Over Complexity: While it's acceptable to incorporate vocabulary variety, don't expect a higher grade solely from using fancy synonyms. Find your writing style and strive for clarity.
  • Smooth Transitions: Ensure your essay flows seamlessly by employing logical transitions between different sections, making it easy and enjoyable to read.
  • Exploring Diverse Techniques: Experiment with a range of persuasive writing methods. While we've covered fundamental elements in this article, numerous other techniques can be discovered in various sources and mediums.
  • Thorough Proofreading: Triple-check your work! Regular practice and diligent proofreading improve the quality of your writing. Review your essay for readability, logical consistency, style, tone, and alignment with the thesis. Seek a second opinion by having a friend read your essay.
  • Ask the Right Questions. After writing and proofreading, take a moment to address the following inquiries:
  • Did I adhere to the teacher's instructions?
  • Have I addressed the primary question presented in the assignment (if applicable)?
  • Is my essay well-structured?
  • Is the text coherent and clear?
  • Is my word choice throughout the paper appropriate?
  • Have I provided sufficient supporting evidence for my ideas?
  • Is my paper free of errors?
  • Can I enhance the overall quality further?
  • Does it present a convincing argument?

So, knowing all the crucial elements of persuasive writing, have you already thought of persuasive essay topics ? Check out our collection to get your creative juices flowing!

Persuasive Essay Examples

Explore the persuasive essay examples provided below to gain a deeper comprehension of crafting this type of document.

Persuasive Essay Example: Are Women Weaker Than Men Today?

This well-structured persuasive essay challenges the presumption that women are weaker than men and presents supporting evidence.

The question of whether women are weaker than men has often elicited raging debates, with conservationists arguing that women are certainly weaker than men. The converse is, however, true, and if the 21st-century woman is to be taken as an example, women are certainly as strong as men, if not stronger, across all comparable platforms. The era of male dominance came to an end with the rise of feminine power, and gone are the days when men were the more dominant of the human species. As the saying goes, "what men can do, women can do better," the women of today can do almost everything men can do and as just as good.

Persuasive Essay Example: Should People Who Download Music and Movies Illegally Be Punished?

This persuasive essay example adeptly employs source material and addresses a contemporary concern. The author questions the concept of online piracy and argues that media sharing has become a societal norm.

The United States government came up with the Copyright Act of 1976 to protect the works of art by different artists. The act outlines the punishable felonies concerning authenticity; for instance, illegally downloading music from the internet is a punishable offense. In addition, it sets specific fines for committing such crimes; for example, it says that one could pay a fine of up to $ 30,000 per piece of work (Burrell & Coleman, n.d.). Therefore, though downloading songs freely from the internet could sound normal, it is a felony. However, some questions exist on whether this act is worth the penalties. For this reason, a critical analysis of the transgression will determine whether or not it merits the charges.

Concluding Words

In this guide, we covered all the fundamentals of how to write a persuasive essay. We outlined the essential steps, from selecting a topic to developing strong arguments, and provided tips for creating impactful introductions and conclusions. By following this guide, you could be able to persuade and effectively communicate your viewpoints to captivate the audience and eventually score an excellent grade.

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What is persuasive essay definition, usage, and literary examples, persuasive essay definition.

A persuasive essay (purr-SWEY-siv ESS-ey) is a composition in which the essayist’s goal is to persuade the reader to agree with their personal views on a debatable topic. A persuasive essay generally follows a five-paragraph model with a thesis, body paragraphs, and conclusion, and it offers evidential support using research and other persuasive techniques.

Persuasive Essay Topic Criteria

To write an effective persuasive essay, the essayist needs to ensure that the topic they choose is polemical, or debatable. If it isn’t, there’s no point in trying to persuade the reader.

For example, a persuasive essayist wouldn’t write about how honeybees make honey; this is a well-known fact, and there’s no opposition to sway. The essayist might, however, write an essay on why the reader shouldn’t put pesticides on their lawn, as it threatens the bee population and environmental health.

A topic should also be concrete enough that the essayist can research and find evidence to support their argument. Using the honeybee example, the essayist could cite statistics showing a decline in the honeybee population since the use of pesticides became prevalent in lawncare. This concrete evidence supports the essayist’s opinion.

Persuasive Essay Structure

The persuasive essay generally follows this five-paragraph model.

Introduction

The introduction includes the thesis, which is the main argument of the persuasive essay. A thesis for the essay on bees and pesticides might be: “Bees are essential to environmental health, and we should protect them by abstaining from the use of harmful lawn pesticides that dwindle the bee population.”

The introductory paragraph should also include some context and background info, like bees’ impact on crop pollination. This paragraph may also include common counterarguments, such as acknowledging how some people don’t believe pesticides harm bees.

Body Paragraphs

The body consists of two or more paragraphs and provides the main arguments. This is also where the essayist’s research and evidential support will appear. For example, the essayist might elaborate on the statistics they alluded to in the introductory paragraph to support their points. Many persuasive essays include a counterargument paragraph to refute conflicting opinions.

The final paragraph readdresses the thesis statement and reexamines the essayist’s main arguments.

Types of Persuasive Essays

Persuasive essays can take several forms. They can encourage the reader to change a habit or support a cause, ask the reader to oppose a certain practice, or compare two things and suggest that one is superior to the other. Here are thesis examples for each type, based on the bee example:

  • Call for Support, Action, or Change : “Stop using pesticides on your lawns to save the environmentally essential bees.”
  • Call for Opposition : “Oppose the big businesses that haven’t conducted environmental studies concerning bees and pesticides.”
  • Superior Subject : “Natural lawn care is far superior to using harmful pesticides.”

The Three Elements of Persuasion

Aristotle first suggested that there were three main elements to persuading an audience: ethos, pathos, and logos. Essayists implement these same tactics to persuade their readers.

Ethos refers to the essayist’s character or authority; this could mean the writer’s name or credibility. For example, a writer might seem more trustworthy if they’ve frequently written on a subject, have a degree related to the subject, or have extensive experience concerning a subject. A writer can also refer to the opinions of other experts, such as a beekeeper who believes pesticides are harming the bee population.

Pathos is an argument that uses the reader’s emotions and morality to persuade them. An argument that uses pathos might point to the number of bees that have died and what that suggests for food production: “If crop production decreases, it will be impoverished families that suffer, with perhaps more poor children having to go hungry.” This argument might make the reader empathetic to the plight of starving children and encourage them to take action against pesticide pollution.

The logos part of the essay uses logic and reason to persuade the reader. This includes the essayist’s research and whatever evidence they’ve collected to support their arguments, such as statistics.

Terms Related to Persuasive Essays

Argumentative Essays

While persuasive essays may use logic and research to support the essayist’s opinions, argumentative essays are more solely based on research and refrain from using emotional arguments. Argumentative essays are also more likely to include in-depth information on counterarguments.

Persuasive Speeches

Persuasive essays and persuasive speeches are similar in intent, but they differ in terms of format, delivery, emphasis, and tone .

In a speech, the speaker can use gestures and inflections to emphasize their points, so the delivery is almost as important as the information a speech provides. A speech requires less structure than an essay, though the repetition of ideas is often necessary to ensure that the audience is absorbing the material. Additionally, a speech relies more heavily on emotion, as the speaker must hold the reader’s attention and interest. In Queen Elizabeth I’s “Tilbury Speech,” for example, she addresses her audience in a personable and highly emotional way: “My loving people, We have been persuaded by some that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit our selves to armed multitudes for fear of treachery; but I assure you I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful and loving people. Let tyrants fear.”

Examples of Persuasive Essay

1. Martin Luther King, Jr., “Letter From Birmingham Jail”

Dr. King directs his essay at the Alabama clergymen who opposed his call for protests. The clergymen suggested that King had no business being in Alabama, that he shouldn’t oppose some of the more respectful segregationists, and that he has poor timing. However, here, King attempts to persuade the men that his actions are just:

I am in Birmingham because injustice is here. Just as the prophets of the eight century B.C. left their villages and carried their ‘thus saith the Lord’ far beyond the boundaries of their hometowns, and just as the Apostle Paul left his village of Tarsus and carried the gospel of Jesus Christ to the far corners of the Greco-Roman world, so am I compelled to carry the gospel of freedom beyond my hometown.

Here, King is invoking the ethos of Biblical figures who the clergymen would’ve respected. By comparing himself to Paul, he’s claiming to be a disciple spreading the “gospel of freedom” rather than an outsider butting into Alabama’s affairs.

2. Garrett Hardin, “The Tragedy of Commons”

Hardin argues that a society that shares resources is apt to overuse those resources as the population increases. He attempts to persuade readers that the human population’s growth should be regulated for the sake of preserving resources:

The National Parks present another instance of the working out of the tragedy of commons. At present, they are open to all, without limit. The parks themselves are limited in extent—there is only one Yosemite Valley—whereas population seems to grow without limit. The values that visitors seek in the parks are steadily eroded. Plainly, we must soon cease to treat the parks as commons, or they will be of no value to anyone.

In this excerpt, Harden uses an example that appeals to the reader’s logic. If the human population continues to rise, causing park visitors to increase, parks will continue to erode until there’s nothing left.

Further Resources on Persuasive Essays

We at SuperSummary offer excellent resources for penning your own essays .

Find a list of famous persuasive speeches at Highspark.co .

Read up on the elements of persuasion at the American Management Association website.

Related Terms

  • Argumentative Essay

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  • How to write an argumentative essay | Examples & tips

How to Write an Argumentative Essay | Examples & Tips

Published on July 24, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

An argumentative essay expresses an extended argument for a particular thesis statement . The author takes a clearly defined stance on their subject and builds up an evidence-based case for it.

Table of contents

When do you write an argumentative essay, approaches to argumentative essays, introducing your argument, the body: developing your argument, concluding your argument, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about argumentative essays.

You might be assigned an argumentative essay as a writing exercise in high school or in a composition class. The prompt will often ask you to argue for one of two positions, and may include terms like “argue” or “argument.” It will frequently take the form of a question.

The prompt may also be more open-ended in terms of the possible arguments you could make.

Argumentative writing at college level

At university, the vast majority of essays or papers you write will involve some form of argumentation. For example, both rhetorical analysis and literary analysis essays involve making arguments about texts.

In this context, you won’t necessarily be told to write an argumentative essay—but making an evidence-based argument is an essential goal of most academic writing, and this should be your default approach unless you’re told otherwise.

Examples of argumentative essay prompts

At a university level, all the prompts below imply an argumentative essay as the appropriate response.

Your research should lead you to develop a specific position on the topic. The essay then argues for that position and aims to convince the reader by presenting your evidence, evaluation and analysis.

  • Don’t just list all the effects you can think of.
  • Do develop a focused argument about the overall effect and why it matters, backed up by evidence from sources.
  • Don’t just provide a selection of data on the measures’ effectiveness.
  • Do build up your own argument about which kinds of measures have been most or least effective, and why.
  • Don’t just analyze a random selection of doppelgänger characters.
  • Do form an argument about specific texts, comparing and contrasting how they express their thematic concerns through doppelgänger characters.

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An argumentative essay should be objective in its approach; your arguments should rely on logic and evidence, not on exaggeration or appeals to emotion.

There are many possible approaches to argumentative essays, but there are two common models that can help you start outlining your arguments: The Toulmin model and the Rogerian model.

Toulmin arguments

The Toulmin model consists of four steps, which may be repeated as many times as necessary for the argument:

  • Make a claim
  • Provide the grounds (evidence) for the claim
  • Explain the warrant (how the grounds support the claim)
  • Discuss possible rebuttals to the claim, identifying the limits of the argument and showing that you have considered alternative perspectives

The Toulmin model is a common approach in academic essays. You don’t have to use these specific terms (grounds, warrants, rebuttals), but establishing a clear connection between your claims and the evidence supporting them is crucial in an argumentative essay.

Say you’re making an argument about the effectiveness of workplace anti-discrimination measures. You might:

  • Claim that unconscious bias training does not have the desired results, and resources would be better spent on other approaches
  • Cite data to support your claim
  • Explain how the data indicates that the method is ineffective
  • Anticipate objections to your claim based on other data, indicating whether these objections are valid, and if not, why not.

Rogerian arguments

The Rogerian model also consists of four steps you might repeat throughout your essay:

  • Discuss what the opposing position gets right and why people might hold this position
  • Highlight the problems with this position
  • Present your own position , showing how it addresses these problems
  • Suggest a possible compromise —what elements of your position would proponents of the opposing position benefit from adopting?

This model builds up a clear picture of both sides of an argument and seeks a compromise. It is particularly useful when people tend to disagree strongly on the issue discussed, allowing you to approach opposing arguments in good faith.

Say you want to argue that the internet has had a positive impact on education. You might:

  • Acknowledge that students rely too much on websites like Wikipedia
  • Argue that teachers view Wikipedia as more unreliable than it really is
  • Suggest that Wikipedia’s system of citations can actually teach students about referencing
  • Suggest critical engagement with Wikipedia as a possible assignment for teachers who are skeptical of its usefulness.

You don’t necessarily have to pick one of these models—you may even use elements of both in different parts of your essay—but it’s worth considering them if you struggle to structure your arguments.

Regardless of which approach you take, your essay should always be structured using an introduction , a body , and a conclusion .

Like other academic essays, an argumentative essay begins with an introduction . The introduction serves to capture the reader’s interest, provide background information, present your thesis statement , and (in longer essays) to summarize the structure of the body.

Hover over different parts of the example below to see how a typical introduction works.

The spread of the internet has had a world-changing effect, not least on the world of education. The use of the internet in academic contexts is on the rise, and its role in learning is hotly debated. For many teachers who did not grow up with this technology, its effects seem alarming and potentially harmful. This concern, while understandable, is misguided. The negatives of internet use are outweighed by its critical benefits for students and educators—as a uniquely comprehensive and accessible information source; a means of exposure to and engagement with different perspectives; and a highly flexible learning environment.

The body of an argumentative essay is where you develop your arguments in detail. Here you’ll present evidence, analysis, and reasoning to convince the reader that your thesis statement is true.

In the standard five-paragraph format for short essays, the body takes up three of your five paragraphs. In longer essays, it will be more paragraphs, and might be divided into sections with headings.

Each paragraph covers its own topic, introduced with a topic sentence . Each of these topics must contribute to your overall argument; don’t include irrelevant information.

This example paragraph takes a Rogerian approach: It first acknowledges the merits of the opposing position and then highlights problems with that position.

Hover over different parts of the example to see how a body paragraph is constructed.

A common frustration for teachers is students’ use of Wikipedia as a source in their writing. Its prevalence among students is not exaggerated; a survey found that the vast majority of the students surveyed used Wikipedia (Head & Eisenberg, 2010). An article in The Guardian stresses a common objection to its use: “a reliance on Wikipedia can discourage students from engaging with genuine academic writing” (Coomer, 2013). Teachers are clearly not mistaken in viewing Wikipedia usage as ubiquitous among their students; but the claim that it discourages engagement with academic sources requires further investigation. This point is treated as self-evident by many teachers, but Wikipedia itself explicitly encourages students to look into other sources. Its articles often provide references to academic publications and include warning notes where citations are missing; the site’s own guidelines for research make clear that it should be used as a starting point, emphasizing that users should always “read the references and check whether they really do support what the article says” (“Wikipedia:Researching with Wikipedia,” 2020). Indeed, for many students, Wikipedia is their first encounter with the concepts of citation and referencing. The use of Wikipedia therefore has a positive side that merits deeper consideration than it often receives.

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An argumentative essay ends with a conclusion that summarizes and reflects on the arguments made in the body.

No new arguments or evidence appear here, but in longer essays you may discuss the strengths and weaknesses of your argument and suggest topics for future research. In all conclusions, you should stress the relevance and importance of your argument.

Hover over the following example to see the typical elements of a conclusion.

The internet has had a major positive impact on the world of education; occasional pitfalls aside, its value is evident in numerous applications. The future of teaching lies in the possibilities the internet opens up for communication, research, and interactivity. As the popularity of distance learning shows, students value the flexibility and accessibility offered by digital education, and educators should fully embrace these advantages. The internet’s dangers, real and imaginary, have been documented exhaustively by skeptics, but the internet is here to stay; it is time to focus seriously on its potential for good.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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An argumentative essay tends to be a longer essay involving independent research, and aims to make an original argument about a topic. Its thesis statement makes a contentious claim that must be supported in an objective, evidence-based way.

An expository essay also aims to be objective, but it doesn’t have to make an original argument. Rather, it aims to explain something (e.g., a process or idea) in a clear, concise way. Expository essays are often shorter assignments and rely less on research.

At college level, you must properly cite your sources in all essays , research papers , and other academic texts (except exams and in-class exercises).

Add a citation whenever you quote , paraphrase , or summarize information or ideas from a source. You should also give full source details in a bibliography or reference list at the end of your text.

The exact format of your citations depends on which citation style you are instructed to use. The most common styles are APA , MLA , and Chicago .

The majority of the essays written at university are some sort of argumentative essay . Unless otherwise specified, you can assume that the goal of any essay you’re asked to write is argumentative: To convince the reader of your position using evidence and reasoning.

In composition classes you might be given assignments that specifically test your ability to write an argumentative essay. Look out for prompts including instructions like “argue,” “assess,” or “discuss” to see if this is the goal.

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How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Step-by-Step Guide + Examples

Have you ever tried to get somebody round to your way of thinking? Then you should know how daunting the task is. Still, if your persuasion is successful, the result is emotionally rewarding.

Our specialists will write a custom essay on any topic for 13.00 10.40/page

A persuasive essay is a type of writing that uses facts and logic to argument and substantiate such or another point of view. The purpose is to assure the reader that the author’s position is viable. In this article by Custom-writing experts, you can find a guide on persuasive writing, compelling examples, and outline structure. Continue reading and learn how to write a persuasive essay!

⚖️ Argumentative vs. Persuasive Essay

  • 🐾 Step-by-Step Writing Guide

🔗 References

An argumentative essay intends to attack the opposing point of view, discussing its drawbacks and inconsistencies. A persuasive essay describes only the writer’s opinion, explaining why it is a believable one. In other words, you are not an opponent; you are an advocate.

Argumentative vs. Persuasive Essays: in what Points Are They Similar and Different?

A persuasive essay primarily resorts to emotions and personal ideas on a deeper level of meaning, while an argumentative one invokes logic reasoning. Despite the superficial similarity of these two genres, argumentative speech presupposes intense research of the subject, while persuasive speech requires a good knowledge of the audience.

🐾 How to Write a Persuasive Essay Step by Step

These nine steps are the closest thing you will find to a shortcut for writing to persuade. With practice, you may get through these steps quickly—or even figure out new techniques in persuasive writing.

📑 Persuasive Essay Outline

Below you’ll find an example of a persuasive essay outline . Remember: papers in this genre are more flexible than argumentative essays are. You don’t need to build a perfectly logical structure here. Your goal is to persuade your reader.

Note that the next section contains a sample written in accordance with this outline.

Persuasive Essay Introduction

  • Hook: start with an intriguing sentence.
  • Background: describe the context of the discussed issue and familiarize the reader with the argument.
  • Definitions: if your essay dwells upon a theoretical subject matter, be sure to explain the complicated terms.
  • Thesis statement: state the purpose of your piece of writing clearly and concisely. This is the most substantial sentence of the entire essay, so take your time formulating it.

Persuasive Essay Body

Use the following template for each paragraph.

  • Topic sentence: linking each new idea to the thesis, it introduces a paragraph. Use only one separate argument for each section, stating it in the topic sentence.
  • Evidence: substantiate the previous sentence with reliable information. If it is your personal opinion, give the reasons why you think so.
  • Analysis: build the argument, explaining how the evidence supports your thesis.

Persuasive Essay Conclusion

  • Summary: briefly list the main points of the essay in a couple of sentences.
  • Significance: connect your essay to a broader idea.
  • Future: how can your argument be developed?

⭐ Persuasive Essay Examples

In this section, there are three great persuasive essay examples. The first one is written in accordance with the outline above, will the components indicated. Two others are downloadable.

Example #1: Being a Millionaire is a Bad Thing

Introduction, paragraph #1, paragraph #2, paragraph #3, example #2: teachers or doctors.

The importance of doctors in the period of the COVID-19 pandemic is difficult to overstate. The well-being of the nation depends on how well doctors can fulfill their duties before society. The US society acknowledges the importance of doctors and healthcare, as it is ready to pay large sums of money to cure the diseases. However, during the lockdown, students and parents all around the world began to understand the importance of teachers.

Before lockdown, everyone took the presence of teachers for granted, as they were always available free of charge. In this country, it has always been the case that while doctors received praises and monetary benefits, teachers remained humble, even though they play the most important role for humanity: passing the knowledge through generations. How fair is that? The present paper claims that even in the period of the pandemic, teachers contribute more to modern society than doctors do.

Example #3: Is Online or Homeschool More Effective?

The learning process can be divided into traditional education in an educational institution and distance learning. The latter form has recently become widely popular due to the development of technology. Besides, the COVID-19 pandemic is driving the increased interest in distance learning. However, there is controversy about whether this form of training is sufficient enough. This essay aims to examine online and homeschooling in a historical and contemporary context and to confirm the thesis that such activity is at least equivalent to a standard type of education.

Persuasive Essay Topics

  • Why do managers hate the performance evaluation?  
  • Why human cloning should be prohibited.  
  • Social media have negative physical and psychological effect on teenagers.  
  • Using cell phones while driving should be completely forbidden.  
  • Why is business ethics important? 
  • Media should change its negative representation of ageing and older people.  
  • What is going on with the world?  
  • Good communication skills are critical for successful business.  
  • Why capitalism is the best economic system.  
  • Sleep is extremely important for human health and wellbeing.  
  • Face-to-face education is more effective than online education.  
  • Why video games can be beneficial for teenagers.  
  • Bullies should be expelled from school as they encroach on the school safety.  
  • Why accountancy is a great occupation and more people should consider it as a future career.  
  • The reasons art and music therapy should be included in basic health insurance.  
  • Impact of climate change on the indoor environment.  
  • Parents should vaccinate their children to prevent the spread of deadly diseases.  
  • Why celebrities should pay more attention to the values they promote.  
  • What is wrong with realism?  
  • Why water recycling should be every government’s priority.  
  • Media spreads fear and panic among people.  
  • Why e-business is very important for modern organizations.  
  • People should own guns for self-protection.  
  • The neccessity of container deposit legislation. 
  • We must save crocodiles to protect ecological balance.  
  • Why we should pay more attention to renewable energy projects.  
  • Anthropology is a critically relevant science.  
  • Why it’s important to create a new global financial order .  
  • Why biodiversity is crucial for the environment?  
  • Why process safety management is crucial for every organization.  
  • Speed limits must not be increased.  
  • What’s wrong with grades at school ?  
  • Why tattoos should be considered as a form of fine art.  
  • Using all-natural bath and body products is the best choice for human health and safety.  
  • What is cancel culture?  
  • Why the Internet has become a problem of modern society.  
  • Illegal immigrants should be provided with basic social services.  
  • Smoking in public places must be banned for people’s safety and comfort.  
  • Why it is essential to control our nutrition .  
  • How to stimulate economic growth?  
  • Why exercise is beneficial for people.  
  • Studying history is decisive for the modern world.  
  • We must decrease fuel consumption to stop global warming.  
  • Why fighting social inequality is necessary.  
  • Why should businesses welcome remote work?  
  • Social media harms communication within families.   
  • College athletes should be paid for their achievements.  
  • Electronic books should replace print books.  
  • People should stop cutting down rainforest .  
  • Why every company should have a web page .  
  • Tips To Write An Effective Persuasive Essay: The College Puzzle, Stanford University
  • 31 Powerful Persuasive Writing Techniques: Writtent
  • Persuasive Essay Outline: Houston Community College System
  • Essays that Worked: Hamilton College
  • Argumentative Essays // Purdue Writing Lab
  • Persuasion – Writing for Success (University of Minnesota)
  • Persuasive Writing (Manitoba Education)
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Persuasive Essay Guide

Caleb S.

A Comprehensive Guide to Writing an Effective Persuasive Essay

14 min read

Published on: Feb 6, 2023

Last updated on: Oct 16, 2023

Persuasive Essay

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Imagine being able to sway opinions, influence decisions, and convince others with the power of words.

That’s what good persuasive writing can help you achieve! Persuasive essays provide you an opportunity to express your opinions, convince your readers, inspire action, and make a lasting impact. 

So how can you write a great persuasive essay? 

If you're eager to learn the art of persuasive writing, you're in the right place. In this guide, we’ll dive into the step-by-step writing process that can help you. You’ll also get example essays and tips that will make your persuasive writing stand out. 

Let’s dive in!

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What is a Persuasive Essay?

A persuasive essay is a form of writing that aims to convince its audience to adopt a particular viewpoint or take a specific course of action. 

The writer takes a clear position on an issue and attempts to convince the readers through different persuasive techniques, such as evidence and anecdotes. The point is to resonate with the readers emotionally AND logically on a specific issue. 

It's like being a lawyer in a courtroom, making a compelling argument to sway the jury (your readers) to your side. The goal of a persuasive essay can vary, from changing the readers’ opinion on a controversial topic to inspiring them to support a cause or take action on an issue.

What’s the Difference Between Persuasive & Argumentative Essays?

Persuasive and argumentative essays are often confused with each other, but they have distinct differences in terms of their purpose and approach. 

Here are the main differences between persuasive vs. argumentative essays:

The 3 Elements of Persuasion

Before we get into the writing steps, we must understand the basic elements of persuasion. These elements, known as "ethos," "pathos," and "logos," are fundamental to crafting a persuasive essay that resonates with your audience and effectively conveys your message.

  • Ethos: Building Credibility and Trust

Ethos, derived from the Greek word for "character," focuses on establishing your credibility as a writer and gaining the trust of your readers. It involves establishing one's authority, expertise, and reliability in the eyes of the audience. In a persuasive essay, ethos is often established through:

  • Demonstrating expertise on the subject matter.
  • Citing credible sources and references.
  • Maintaining a respectful and professional tone.
  • Acknowledging and addressing opposing viewpoints.

These steps can help you gain the trust of your readers. Ethos provides them a reason to trust you and listen to your arguments.

  • Pathos: Stirring Emotions and Empathy

Pathos is the emotional appeal aimed at evoking specific emotions or empathy from the audience. It seeks to connect with readers on a personal and emotional level. In a persuasive essay, pathos can be incorporated by:

  • Using vivid and emotionally charged language.
  • Sharing compelling anecdotes or stories.
  • Appealing to the values and beliefs of the audience.
  • Highlighting the human or emotional impact of the topic.

The emotional aspect is essential to good persuasive writing. Still, it should be used in moderation to be effective. 

  • Logos: Employing Logic and Reasoning

Logos appeals to the reader's sense of logic and reason. It involves presenting a well-structured, logical argument supported by evidence. In a persuasive essay, logos is evident through:

  • Presenting clear and well-structured arguments.
  • Providing factual evidence, statistics, and research findings.
  • Using logical reasoning and deductive or inductive arguments.
  • Addressing and refuting counterarguments effectively.

When used together, these three elements can be effective tools for persuasion. By utilizing all three elements, the speaker increases the chances of influencing their audience. You can read more about ethos, pathos, and logos to understand them better and ensure their correct usage in your writing. 

Here is a video you can watch about the three persuasive techniques:

How to Write a Persuasive Essay

Persuasive essays are very common, especially for students. However, they are challenging to write if you don’t know where to start. Here are the steps that can help make your writing process easier.

Step 1: Select an Interesting Topic & Define Your Position

Choosing a topic is the most crucial part. Your topic should be engaging and debatable, in which you can clearly define your position. Here are some tips for selecting a topic:

  • Identify Your Interests: You should consider something that is interesting to you too, as this will make it easier and enjoyable for you to write about it. 
  • Consider Your Audience: Think about who your target audience is. Your topic should resonate with them and be relevant to their interests, concerns, or beliefs.
  • Define Your Position: Clearly define your stance or position on your potential topics. Ask yourself: What do I want to persuade my audience to believe or do regarding this topic? What are the key points or arguments I will use to support my position? 
  • Avoid Overly Broad or Narrow Topics: Ensure that your topic is neither too broad nor too narrow. An overly broad topic may lack focus, while an overly narrow one may not provide enough material for a persuasive argument.

Step 2: Research & Gather Evidence

Gather credible sources, statistics, facts, and evidence to support your argument. Conducting thorough research uncovers the themes, arguments, and discussions about your topic, helping you find the best arguments you need.

While collecting information, take detailed notes so you can cite sources later. You also have to evaluate the evidence and priotize those points that can better support your position.

Step 3: Make an Outline

Now that you’ve gathered your main points, you need to organize them in a logical structure. Outline the structure of your essay with a clear introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion. Here are the main points you should include in your first outline: 

  • Thesis Statement: State the main thesis of your essay. presents your main argument. It should clearly mention your position on the topic and how you are going to argue for it.
  • Body Paragraphs: The body paragraph outline should contain the topic sentence and supporting points. Mention clear and concise topic sentences that introduce the main point of each paragraph.
  • Supporting Evidence: Also add supporting evidence, examples, statistics, or quotes for each paragraph that bolster your argument. Ensure each piece of evidence is relevant and directly supports your point.
  • Conclusion: If your persuasive essay aims to prompt a specific action or response from the reader, include a call to action in your outline. Clearly state what you want your audience to think or do after reading your essay.

See this outline format below to understand better:

Persuasive Essay Outline Format

Want to learn more about making an outline? Check out our complete guide to crafting a persuasive essay outline . 

Step 4: Write Your First Draft

With a solid outline in place, it's time to start crafting your persuasive essay's first draft. Follow these guidelines to write your initial draft effectively:

  • Follow the Outline: Refer to your outline as your roadmap. Begin by writing the introduction, followed by the body paragraphs, addressing each point in the order outlined. Finish with the conclusion.
  • Write Freely: In the first draft, focus on getting your ideas down on paper without worrying too much about perfection. Don't be overly concerned about grammar, spelling, or word choice at this stage; you can edit and refine later.
  • Maintain a Consistent Tone: Maintain a tone that aligns with your persuasive goals, whether it's authoritative, passionate, or empathetic. Consistency in tone will help your argument come across convincingly.
  • Support with Evidence: As you develop your arguments in the body paragraphs, ensure that each point is supported with strong evidence, examples, statistics, or quotes from credible sources.
  • Address Counterarguments: Incorporate responses to potential counterarguments where relevant, demonstrating a comprehensive understanding of the issue and reinforcing your position.
  • Be Concise and Clear: Write concisely, expressing your ideas clearly and avoiding unnecessary jargon or complexity. The clarity of your arguments is crucial for persuading your audience.

Step 5: Proofread & Revise

Once you've completed the first draft, take a break to gain some distance from your work. When you return, begin the revision process. Focus on refining your arguments, improving clarity, and ensuring that your essay flows logically.

  • Proofread: Carefully proofread your first draft for grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors. Improve the essay format and clarity wherever possible. 
  • Seek Feedback: Share your first draft with peers, teachers, or writing tutors to obtain feedback on the persuasiveness, clarity, and overall effectiveness of your essay. Use this feedback to make necessary improvements.
  • Polish Your Draft: After incorporating feedback and revising accordingly, refine your essay to its final form. Ensure that it aligns with your outline and effectively conveys your persuasive message.
  • Cite Sources: Remember to include proper citations for all sources used within your essay. Follow the citation style specified by your instructor or guidelines.

Persuasive Essay Structure

A well-structured persuasive essay is essential to effectively convey your argument and persuade your audience. The structure typically consists of three main parts: the introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion. 

A persuasive essay should be at least five paragraphs long. With one introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion. However, the number of body paragraphs can extend based on your topic.

Introduction

The essay introduction serves as the gateway to your persuasive essay. Its primary purpose is to grab the reader's attention, provide context for your argument, and present your thesis statement—the core of your persuasive message. Here's how to craft an engaging introduction:

  • Hook: Start with a compelling hook—a catchy phrase, a thought-provoking question, a surprising statistic, or a relevant anecdote that draws the reader in and piques their interest.
  • Background Information: Offer a brief overview of the topic to provide context and ensure that your readers understand the issue at hand. Keep this section concise and relevant.
  • Thesis Statement: Conclude your introduction with a clear and concise thesis statement . This statement should clearly state your position on the topic and preview the main points you'll be discussing in the body of your essay.

Body Paragraphs

The body paragraphs form the core of your persuasive essay, where you present your point of view and build your case. Here's how to structure and write effective body paragraphs:

  • Topic Sentence: Start each body paragraph with a topic sentence that introduces the main point or argument of that paragraph.
  • Supporting Evidence: Follow the topic sentence with relevant evidence, examples, statistics, quotes, or facts that support your argument. Ensure that your evidence is credible and directly relates to your point.
  • Analysis: After presenting your evidence, analyze it thoroughly. Explain how the evidence supports your thesis and persuades the reader. Discuss the implications and significance of the evidence.
  • Transition: Use transition sentences at the end of each body paragraph to link it to the next one. These transitions ensure that your essay flows smoothly, maintaining coherence.

The conclusion is where you bring your persuasive essay to a close, summarizing your main points, restating your thesis, and leaving a lasting impression. Follow these guidelines for an effective conclusion:

  • Summarize Main Points: Begin by summarizing the key points you've made in the body of your essay. Concisely restate the main arguments you presented.
  • Restate Thesis: Reiterate your thesis statement in slightly different words. Emphasize the central message of your essay.
  • Closing Statement: End your conclusion with a thought-provoking or memorable closing statement. This statement should leave a lasting impact on the reader, encouraging them to reflect on your argument.
  • Avoid New Information: Do not introduce new information or arguments in the conclusion. It should provide a sense of closure rather than introducing new ideas.

Persuasive Essay Format

After writing the complete essay according to the structure above, you need to ensure correct formatting. Formatting ensures that your essay is readable and presentable.

There are several standardized formatting styles used in writing, such as APA and MLA . If you are writing a persuasive essay as an assignment, always ask your instructor about their preferred format. 

Meanwhile, you should format your essay according to these common guidelines:

  • Font Style:       Times New Roman.
  • Font Size:        12pt 
  • Line Spacing:   Double-spaced.
  • Alignment:       Left Alignment
  • Indent:              First-Line indent

Persuasive Essay Examples

Studying persuasive essay examples can be immensely helpful in understanding how to craft a compelling and effective persuasive essay.

Check out these sample essays below:

Persuasive Essay on Social Media (PDF)

Persuasive Essay Samples (PDF)

Persuasive Essay on Abortions (PDF)

Persuasive Essay Sample - Death Penalty

Persuasive Essay on the Preservation of Nature

Want more examples? We’ve got you covered! Head to our persuasive essay examples blog to find persuasive papers on various topics.

Persuasive Essay Topics

Selecting an engaging and relevant topic is the first step in crafting a persuasive essay. Here are a few persuasive essay prompts and ideas to spark your inspiration:

  • Advocate for the reduction of single-use plastics to combat plastic pollution.
  • Argue for the inclusion of financial literacy education in high school curricula.
  • Argue for responsible usage and regulations to combat negative influence of social media.
  • Persuade readers of the benefits of universal healthcare.
  • Take a stance on the importance of online privacy and stronger data protection laws.
  • Argue for electoral reform, such as ranked-choice voting, to improve the fairness and effectiveness of elections.
  • Convince your audience of the benefits of supporting local businesses and shopping locally.
  • Make a case for stricter penalties against human trafficking.
  • Argue for increased public funding for the arts to support creativity and cultural enrichment.
  • Argue for or against the use of artificial intelligence and automation in the workplace.

Need more ideas? Check out our compilation of 200+ persuasive essay topics and find the best topic.

Tips for Writing Stand-Out Persuasive Essays

Now that you know the writing steps and have read some examples, you are able to write a good persuasive essay. However, you can make it even better with the following tips and techniques:

  • Clarity and Conciseness: Write in a clear and concise way. Avoid jargon or overly complex language to make your message easily understandable.
  • Use Persuasive Techniques: Employ persuasive language and rhetoric techniques, such as ethos, pathos, and logos, to appeal to your audience's emotions, ethics, and logic. Use powerful verbs, descriptive adjectives, and vivid metaphors to make your writing engaging.
  • Tell a Compelling Story: Use storytelling techniques to illustrate your points. Engaging narratives can make your arguments more relatable and memorable.
  • Provide Real-Life Examples: Support your arguments with concrete, real-life examples and case studies. Personal anecdotes or case stories can be particularly persuasive.
  • Address the Reader Directly: Use the second-person point of view (you) to address the reader directly, making your essay more engaging and relatable.
  • Maintain a Confident Tone: Maintain a confident and assertive tone throughout your essay. Confidence in your message can persuade readers to adopt your viewpoint.
  • Provide Solutions: Suggest practical solutions or actions that can be taken to address the issue you're discussing. Offering a path forward can be persuasive.

To conclude,

From understanding the fundamentals of persuasion to learning the writing steps, you now know how to craft an essay that engages and compels your audience to accept your position. Additionally, with the help of our examples and tips, you can make your arguments even stronger.

With this knowledge and techniques, you're now ready to embark on your persuasive writing endeavors. So start writing persuasive papers without hesitation and inspire others to see the world through your lens.  

Moreover, if you need further writing help, consider using our persuasive essay writing service which is equipped with a team of seasoned writers ready to offer their expertise. Our writing professionals are committed to crafting essays that are insightful, well-researched, and impactful - tailored to your specific needs!

So contact our expert writing service now!

Caleb S. (Literature, Marketing)

Caleb S. has been providing writing services for over five years and has a Masters degree from Oxford University. He is an expert in his craft and takes great pride in helping students achieve their academic goals. Caleb is a dedicated professional who always puts his clients first.

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Persuasive Essay

Definition of persuasive essay.

The term “persuasive” is an adjective derived from verb “persuade,” which means “to convince somebody.” A persuasive essay is full of all the convincing techniques a writer can employ. It presents a situation, and takes a stand – either in its favor, or against it – to prove to readers whether it is beneficial or harmful for them.

Why Persuasion?

The question arises why persuasion if the people are already aware of everything. Its answer is that each person’s ability of seeing and understanding things depend on his vision. He believes only what he sees or is told about. If another side of the coin is shown, the people do not believe so easily. That is why they are presented with arguments supported with evidences , statistics and facts. Persuasion is done for these reasons:

  • A Better World : To ask the people that if they accept your argument , it will be good for them to take action and make the world a better place.
  • A Worse World : It means that if readers do not do what they are asked to do, the world will become a worse place.
  • Call to Action : It means to persuade or tempt readers to do what the writer wants them to do.

Difference Between a Persuasive Essay and an Argumentative Essay

A persuasive essay is intended to persuade readers to do certain things, or not to do certain things. It is the sole aim of the writer to coax or tempt readers, and force them to do certain things or take actions. However, an argumentative essay intends to make readers see both sides of the coin. It is up to them to select any of the two. In other words, an argumentative essay presents both arguments; both for and against a thing, and leaves the readers to decide. On the other hand, a persuasive essay intends to make readers do certain things. Therefore, it presents arguments only about one aspect of the issue.

Examples of Persuasive Essay in Literature

Example #1: our unhealthy obsession and sickness (by frank furedi).

“Governments today do two things that I object to in particular. First they encourage introspection, telling us that unless men examine their testicles, unless we keep a check on our cholesterol level, then we are not being responsible citizens. You are letting down yourself, your wife, your kids, everybody. We are encouraged continually to worry about our health. As a consequence, public health initiatives have become, as far as I can tell, a threat to public health. Secondly, governments promote the value of health seeking. We are meant always to be seeking health for this or that condition. The primary effect of this, I believe, is to make us all feel more ill.”

This is an excerpt from a persuasive essay of Frank Furedi. It encourages people to think about how the government is helping public health. Both the arguments of persuasion start with “First” in the first line and with “Secondly” in the second last line.

Example #2: We Are Training Our Kids to Kill (by Dave Grossman)

“Our society needs to be informed about these crimes, but when the images of the young killers are broadcast on television, they become role models. The average preschooler in America watches 27 hours of television a week. The average child gets more one-on-one communication from TV than from all her parents and teachers combined. The ultimate achievement for our children is to get their picture on TV. The solution is simple, and it comes straight out of the sociology literature: The media have every right and responsibility to tell the story , but they must be persuaded not to glorify the killers by presenting their images on TV.”

This is an excerpt from Grossman’s essay. He is clearly convincing the public about the violent television programs and their impacts on the kids. See how strong his arguments are in favor of his topic.

Example #3: The Real Skinny (by Belinda Luscombe)

“And what do we the people say? Do we rise up and say, ‘I categorically refuse to buy any article of clothing unless the person promoting it weighs more than she did when she wore knee socks?’ Or at least, ‘Where do I send the check for the chicken nuggets?’ Actually, not so much. Mostly, our responses range from ‘I wonder if that would look good on me?’ to ‘I don’t know who that skinny-ass cow is, but I hate her already.’

Just check the strength of the argument of Belinda Luscombe about purchasing things. The beauty of her writing is that she has made her readers think by asking rhetorical questions and answering them.

Function of a Persuasive Essay

The major function of a persuasive essay is to convince readers that, if they take a certain action, the world will be a better place for them. It could be otherwise or it could be a call to an action. The arguments given are either in the favor of the topic or against it. It cannot combine both at once. That is why readers feel it easy to be convinced.

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Persuasive Essay Writing

Persuasive Essay Examples

Cathy A.

Ace Your Next Essay With These Persuasive Essay Examples!

Published on: Jan 5, 2023

Last updated on: Nov 2, 2023

persuasive essay examples

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Are you starting to feel overwhelmed with that persuasive essay assignment?

Relax! We're here to help. 

In this post, we've collected some persuasive essay examples for you to study. By looking at these examples, you'll better understand how to craft your persuasive essay .

Plus, who knows? You might even find some inspiration for your next writing project. 

So let's get started!

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Persuasive Essay Examples for Students

We've compiled a selection of persuasive essay examples to provide you with a starting point. These examples will serve as practical guides to help you understand how to write persuasively and effectively structure your essays.

Check them out below:

How to Start a Persuasive Essay Examples PDF

Persuasive Essay Examples Middle School PDF

Persuasive Essay Examples High School PDF

Persuasive Essay Examples Grade 10 PDF

Persuasive Essay Examples University PDF

Higher English Persuasive Essay Examples PDF

Political Persuasive Essay Examples PDF

Persuasive Essay Examples About Life PDF

Persuasive Essay Examples About Global Warming PDF

Now that you've seen these examples, you're all set to start writing!

Let's now shift our focus to different formats of persuasive essays, offering you even more versatility in your writing journey.

Persuasive Essay Examples for Different Formats

Looking to get an idea of how a persuasive essay should look according to various formats?  We will provide some persuasive essay examples PDF to show you the ideal persuasive essay format.

Persuasive Essay Examples 5 Paragraph PDF

Persuasive Essay Examples 3 Paragraph PDF

Short Persuasive Essay Examples PDF

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6 Tips to Write a Compelling Persuasive Essay

By now, you are familiar with the basic persuasive essay requirements, structure, and format. So, here are six basic tips that can help you write a high-scoring persuasive essay:

1. Know Your Audience

Consider who will be reading your essay and what their preconceived notions or beliefs would be. This will enable you to tailor your persuasive essay accordingly to ensure that it has a maximum persuasive impact. 

2. Research Thoroughly

Strong persuasive essays are rooted in solid research. When researching for your essay topic, get as much information as possible to make a persuasive case.

3. Analyze Persuasive Essay Examples

Examining persuasive essay examples such as those provided in this blog can help you better understand the persuasive writing style and structure. Look for persuasive essays written by others and use them as models to improve your writing.

4. Structure Your Persuasive Essay

When writing persuasive essays, it is important to have a logical structure that allows you to make your case in an organized manner and effectively support your thesis statement . 

Creating a persuasive essay outline before writing can help you structure your essay properly. Through a well-organized outline, proper transitions, and persuasive language, you can achieve a logical arrangement of arguments in your essay.

5. Support Your Argument

Make sure that any claims made in your persuasive essays are backed up through evidence . Be sure to include data, facts, and quotes that aim to convince the readers and support your point of view.

6. Know How To End Your Essay

Just as it's crucial to begin your persuasive essay on a high note, closing your essay effectively is equally important. Close strongly by summarizing the main points and encouraging readers to adopt a specific action.

Persuasive Essay Examples Topics

Selecting the right topic is an important aspect of crafting an effective persuasive essay. Your choice of topic defines the foundation of your argument and greatly influences your essay's overall impact.  

Here are some good examples of topics to get you started:

  • Should national healthcare be subsidized by the government?
  • Should college education be free for all students? 
  • Is it ethical to use animals in medical research? 
  • Should public schools incorporate prayer into daily activities? 
  • Should students be allowed to grade their teachers? 
  • Should drug testing for welfare recipients be mandatory? 
  • Should the voting age be lowered to 16? 
  • Should extreme sports be banned from public entertainment? 
  • Should recreational marijuana use be legalized? 
  • Is online education as effective as traditional learning?

Remember, the key is to be convincing by providing clear evidence and logically linking your points together. 

Check out some additional  persuasive essay topics  to get some inspiration to write your next essay.

So, there you have it. Ten persuasive essay examples and tips to help you write a successful paper. 

We hope these essays inspire you as you work on your writing.

And if you need a little extra help getting started or polishing off your masterpiece, our expert writing service  is here to assist. 

We offer help from expert writers who are sure to get the grades you deserve. Our persuasive essay writing service ensures that you always get the best essays. 

Frequently Asked Questions

What are some examples of persuasive essays.

Examples of persuasive essays include argumentative essays, opinion essays, and cause-and-effect essays that state a clear position and support it with relevant evidence. 

How can I make my persuasive essay more effective?

To make your persuasive essay more effective, you should include clear and concise arguments supported by evidence, provide logical explanations for why your position is valid, and address any opposing viewpoints.

How do I structure a persuasive essay?

A persuasive essay typically follows the standard 5-paragraph structure of an introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

What are some common persuasive essay topics?

Common persuasive essay topics include gun control, global warming, animal rights, climate change, racial inequality, education reform, and health care reform. 

Additionally, current events and controversial topics can be effective persuasive essay topics.

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Persuasive Essay Outline – Examples, Templates & Structure

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Amanda Green was born in a small town in the west of Scotland, where everyone knows everyone. I joined the Toastmasters 15 years ago, and I served in nearly every office in the club since then. I love helping others gain confidence and skills they can apply in every day life.

Writing a good persuasive essay can help convince others of a point that means a lot to you. It can be anything from an environmental crisis to something as simple as the importance of ebooks to the modern reader. But how do you write a persuasive essay? Where do you even start? Right here! I’ll explain everything you need to know and even show you an example of a persuasive essay.

What Is a Persuasive Essay?

what is persuasive essay and example

Persuasive essays are meant to convince someone or a group of people to agree with you on a certain topic or point of view. As the writer, you’ll use definitive evidence, simple reasoning, and even examples to support your argument and persuade them to understand the point of the essay.

Why Write a Persuasive Essay?

Believe it or not, you’ll have to form convincing arguments throughout real life. This could be in the form of college essays or academic essays, speeches for debate club that requires a valid argument, or even presenting an idea for change to your town council.

Argumentative vs. Persuasive Essay

An argumentative essay presents an argument on a specific topic and tries to persuade people to accept that argument as valid. It uses evidence, logic, and sometimes counterarguments to support the main point.

A persuasive essay is similar but presents an argument and focuses more on appealing to the reader’s emotions and values to convince them of your point of view. Think of it as convincing vs. persuading. And, yes, persuasive essays can also use evidence, but they often rely more on personal anecdotes and moral appeals to plead their case.

Let me give you an example. I’m a content writer, but I’m also a published author. If I were going to write an argumentative essay, I’d probably choose a topic like “Do you think authors should self-edit their work?”

But if I were doing a persuasive essay with a similar angle, the topic would look more like “The benefits of self-editing for authors.” Make sense?

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Basically, the main difference between argumentative and persuasive essays is all in the emphasis placed on logic and emotion.

How Many Paragraphs in a Persuasive Essay?

A decent persuasive essay should be around five or six paragraphs with double line spacing, depending on the topic, and can range from 500-2000 words in length. This includes your introduction and conclusion.

Introduction of a Persuasive Essay Example

Our world is facing a crisis, and that crisis is plastic pollution! Every day, a disgusting amount of plastic waste is just dumped into our oceans, killing and harming innocent marine life and ultimately affecting the entire food chain, including us.

Even though there is a clear and present danger that plastic presents, there are still a lot of people and corporations that continue to use single-use plastics with zero regards for their impact on our environment. It’s time for people to really look around and take some responsibility.

We can make a change by learning and using environmentally friendly alternatives in our everyday lives. So, in this essay, I’ll argue that using reusable bags, water bottles, and containers is not only necessary for the health of our precious planet but also a simple and effective way to make a real difference.

A Persuasive Essay Structure

As persuasive essay writers, you can write it however you like, but to follow a traditional persuasive essay structure, use this basic layout to get an effective paper:

  • An Introduction: You need a good hook to grab the reader’s attention, a thesis statement presenting the main argument, and a roadmap of the essay, so they know what to expect.
  • The Body Paragraphs: 2-3 paragraphs should suffice to provide strong evidence, examples, and any reasoning to support the thesis statement. Each paragraph should focus on a single main idea. 
  • The Counterargument: This section acknowledges and refutes the opposing viewpoint, strengthening your argument but still without being as forward as an argumentative essay.
  • A Conclusion or Closing Statement: Here is where you would summarize the main points of the essay and a restatement of the thesis, including a call to action for the reader and/or a final thought.

In the end, a persuasive essay usually consists of 5-6 paragraphs and needs to be clear, concise, and logically structured to really persuade the reader on the point.

Tips for Persuasive Writing

what is persuasive essay and example

  • Choose a strong, clear thesis statement that presents your argument well.
  • Know your audience and tailor your language and arguments to them. You’ll need a different approach if you’re speaking to a group of teenagers versus a team of adults.
  • Use credible and reliable sources to support your argument so no one can second guess your point.
  • Expect that people will have counterarguments and prepare a few talking points to address them.
  • Use strong pieces of evidence and back them up with facts, statistics, examples, and personal anecdotes. Putting a personal touch on it helps ground the essay and lets people know you’re serious about the topic.
  • Use an emotional appeal to engage the reader and make a personal connection to your argument. Basically, tug at their heartstrings and play into their guilt.
  • Use clear and concise wordage. Try and avoid confusing technical jargon that might confuse people, and maintain a consistent tone throughout the essay.
  • Make sure you’re confident and use an assertive tone but avoid being overly aggressive or confrontational. That will just spark a fight.
  • Finish up with a powerful call to action or a final thought that leaves a lasting impact on the reader or listener.
  • Use the same font throughout your essay, even for headings and titles. Go with easy-to-read fonts like Calibri, Times New Roman, or Garamond.
  • Proofread and edit your essay for clarity, grammar, and style. I cannot stress this one enough. If you’re not confident, use programs like Grammarly to help spot typos and inconsistencies.

Persuasive Essay Topic Ideas

If you’re stuck on some ideas of what to form your essay around, here’s a list of some popular topics to inspire you.

  • Importance of recycling and reducing waste in today’s climate.
  • The need for stricter gun control laws all over the world.
  • A paper on abortion rights in today’s age.
  • Benefits of alternative energy sources over fossil fuels and how we can be using them.
  • How social media has negative impacts on mental health in kids.
  • Key benefits of a vegetarian or vegan diet and how it can help the planet.
  • The value of a college education.
  • Rise of plastic pollution on the environment and sea life and how it is affecting us.
  • Why physical exercise and leading an active lifestyle are important.
  • The dangers of texting while driving.
  • How our public schools need better funding.
  • Benefits of a diverse and inclusive workplace both online and in-person.

Any of these could be used as logical arguments. Still, to make a persuasive argument from either of them, just follow the basic persuasive essay outline examples I’ve given you.

Example of a Persuasive Essay

Introduction.

In today’s age of ever-changing technology, the way we consume and experience books have changed dramatically in just a short time. While physical books were once the only option, ebooks have grown increasingly popular in recent years. In my essay, I’ll argue that, while we all still love paperbacks and hardcovers, ebooks offer so many benefits over physical books, making them the number one choice for most readers today.

Body Paragraph 1: Convenience

Ebooks are convenient; there’s just no denying it. They’re easily accessible through devices like smartphones, tablets, and e-readers, and they allow readers to carry hundreds of books with them at all times. This makes them perfect for traveling or heading to work, or even going to the gym. Readers can now have an entire library with them without the added weight of physical books. Plus, ebooks are easily bought online with just the click of a button, further adding to their convenience.

Body Paragraph 2: Customization

Ebooks offer a level of customization that physical books just can’t match. For one, the font size can be adjusted for easier reading, which is great for those who have eyesight problems. The background color can also be changed from light to dark to reduce eye strain. Personally, as someone who suffers from Meniere’s disease, this is a great feature. All of these options make ebooks a great choice for people with visual impairments, neurological disorders, or reading difficulties.

Body Paragraph 3: Affordability

Ebooks are often far cheaper than physical books, especially when purchased in bulk. You can get an entire series for a fraction of the cost of one paperback. This makes them a more accessible option for budget-conscious readers and people who simply don’t have the disposable funds for books. Also, tons of ebooks are available for free, which is a great option for readers that are looking for ways to save money but keep up with their reading habits.

Body Paragraph 4: Environmentally Friendly

626,000 tons of paper is used to produce all the books we see published every year. That’s a scary number when you consider the rate of deforestation and the state of our world in terms of global warming. We simply can’t afford to move ahead at a rate like that. Ebooks help tackle the issue because they require zero trees to produce.

In conclusion, ebooks offer endless benefits over physical books, including convenience, customization, and affordability. While physical books will always hold a special place in our hearts, you have to admit that the benefits of ebooks just can’t be ignored. For modern, busy, on-the-go readers, ebooks are the preferred choice. It’s time to embrace the digital age and make the switch to ebooks.

Now Write Your Persuasive Essay!

I hope this guide has helped you figure out persuasive essay writing and how to put together powerful arguments. Just stick to the facts and ease the reader into your point with gentle arguments that continue to prove your point. Don’t be afraid to get personal if it can help the essay and convince the reader.

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35 Strong Persuasive Writing Examples (Speeches, Essays, Ads, and More)

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The American Crisis historical article, as an instance of persuasive essay examples

The more we read, the better writers we become. Teaching students to write strong persuasive essays should always start with reading some top-notch models. This round-up of persuasive writing examples includes famous speeches, influential ad campaigns, contemporary reviews of famous books, and more. Use them to inspire your students to write their own essays. (Need persuasive essay topics? Check out our list of 60 interesting ideas here! )

  • Persuasive Speeches
  • Advertising Campaigns
  • Persuasive Essays

Persuasive Speech Writing Examples

Many persuasive speeches are political in nature, often addressing subjects like human rights. Here are some of history’s most well-known persuasive writing examples in the form of speeches.

I Have a Dream by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Sample lines: “And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

Woodrow Wilson’s War Message to Congress, 1917

Sample lines: “There are, it may be, many months of fiery trial and sacrifice ahead of us. It is a fearful thing to lead this great peaceful people into war, into the most terrible and disastrous of all wars, civilization itself seeming to be in the balance. But the right is more precious than peace, and we shall fight for the things which we have always carried nearest our hearts—for democracy, for the right of those who submit to authority to have a voice in their own governments, for the rights and liberties of small nations, for a universal dominion of right by such a concert of free peoples as shall bring peace and safety to all nations and make the world itself at last free.”

Chief Seattle’s 1854 Oration

Sample lines: “I here and now make this condition that we will not be denied the privilege without molestation of visiting at any time the tombs of our ancestors, friends, and children. Every part of this soil is sacred in the estimation of my people. Every hillside, every valley, every plain and grove, has been hallowed by some sad or happy event in days long vanished. Even the rocks, which seem to be dumb and dead as they swelter in the sun along the silent shore, thrill with memories of stirring events connected with the lives of my people, and the very dust upon which you now stand responds more lovingly to their footsteps than yours, because it is rich with the blood of our ancestors, and our bare feet are conscious of the sympathetic touch.”

Women’s Rights Are Human Rights, Hillary Rodham Clinton

Sample lines: “What we are learning around the world is that if women are healthy and educated, their families will flourish. If women are free from violence, their families will flourish. If women have a chance to work and earn as full and equal partners in society, their families will flourish. And when families flourish, communities and nations do as well. … If there is one message that echoes forth from this conference, let it be that human rights are women’s rights and women’s rights are human rights once and for all.”

I Am Prepared to Die, Nelson Mandela

Sample lines: “Above all, My Lord, we want equal political rights, because without them our disabilities will be permanent. I know this sounds revolutionary to the whites in this country, because the majority of voters will be Africans. This makes the white man fear democracy. But this fear cannot be allowed to stand in the way of the only solution which will guarantee racial harmony and freedom for all. It is not true that the enfranchisement of all will result in racial domination. Political division, based on color, is entirely artificial and, when it disappears, so will the domination of one color group by another. … This then is what the ANC is fighting. Our struggle is a truly national one. It is a struggle of the African people, inspired by our own suffering and our own experience. It is a struggle for the right to live.”

The Struggle for Human Rights by Eleanor Roosevelt

Sample lines: “It is my belief, and I am sure it is also yours, that the struggle for democracy and freedom is a critical struggle, for their preservation is essential to the great objective of the United Nations to maintain international peace and security. Among free men the end cannot justify the means. We know the patterns of totalitarianism—the single political party, the control of schools, press, radio, the arts, the sciences, and the church to support autocratic authority; these are the age-old patterns against which men have struggled for 3,000 years. These are the signs of reaction, retreat, and retrogression. The United Nations must hold fast to the heritage of freedom won by the struggle of its people; it must help us to pass it on to generations to come.”

Freedom From Fear by Aung San Suu Kyi

Sample lines: “Saints, it has been said, are the sinners who go on trying. So free men are the oppressed who go on trying and who in the process make themselves fit to bear the responsibilities and to uphold the disciplines which will maintain a free society. Among the basic freedoms to which men aspire that their lives might be full and uncramped, freedom from fear stands out as both a means and an end. A people who would build a nation in which strong, democratic institutions are firmly established as a guarantee against state-induced power must first learn to liberate their own minds from apathy and fear.”

Harvey Milk’s “The Hope” Speech

Sample lines: “Some people are satisfied. And some people are not. You see there is a major difference—and it remains a vital difference—between a friend and a gay person, a friend in office and a gay person in office. Gay people have been slandered nationwide. We’ve been tarred and we’ve been brushed with the picture of pornography. In Dade County, we were accused of child molestation. It is not enough anymore just to have friends represent us, no matter how good that friend may be.”

The Strike and the Union, Cesar Chavez

Sample lines: “We are showing our unity in our strike. Our strike is stopping the work in the fields; our strike is stopping ships that would carry grapes; our strike is stopping the trucks that would carry the grapes. Our strike will stop every way the grower makes money until we have a union contract that guarantees us a fair share of the money he makes from our work! We are a union and we are strong and we are striking to force the growers to respect our strength!”

Nobel Lecture by Malala Yousafzai

Sample lines: “The world can no longer accept that basic education is enough. Why do leaders accept that for children in developing countries, only basic literacy is sufficient, when their own children do homework in algebra, mathematics, science, and physics? Leaders must seize this opportunity to guarantee a free, quality, primary and secondary education for every child. Some will say this is impractical, or too expensive, or too hard. Or maybe even impossible. But it is time the world thinks bigger.”   

Persuasive Writing Examples in Advertising Campaigns

Ads are prime persuasive writing examples. You can flip open any magazine or watch TV for an hour or two to see sample after sample of persuasive language. Here are some of the most popular ad campaigns of all time, with links to articles explaining why they were so successful.

Nike: Just Do It

Nike

The iconic swoosh with the simple tagline has persuaded millions to buy their kicks from Nike and Nike alone. Teamed with pro sports star endorsements, this campaign is one for the ages. Blinkist offers an opinion on what made it work.

Dove: Real Beauty

Beauty brand Dove changed the game by choosing “real” women to tell their stories instead of models. They used relatable images and language to make connections, and inspired other brands to try the same concept. Learn why Global Brands considers this one a true success story.

Wendy’s: Where’s the Beef?

Today’s kids are too young to remember the cranky old woman demanding to know where the beef was on her fast-food hamburger. But in the 1980s, it was a catchphrase that sold millions of Wendy’s burgers. Learn from Better Marketing how this ad campaign even found its way into the 1984 presidential debate.

De Beers: A Diamond Is Forever

Diamond engagement ring on black velvet. Text reads "How do you make two months' salary last forever? The Diamond Engagement Ring."

A diamond engagement ring has become a standard these days, but the tradition isn’t as old as you might think. In fact, it was De Beers jewelry company’s 1948 campaign that created the modern engagement ring trend. The Drum has the whole story of this sparkling campaign.

Volkswagen: Think Small

Americans have always loved big cars. So in the 1960s, when Volkswagen wanted to introduce their small cars to a bigger market, they had a problem. The clever “Think Small” campaign gave buyers clever reasons to consider these models, like “If you run out of gas, it’s easy to push.” Learn how advertisers interested American buyers in little cars at Visual Rhetoric.

American Express: Don’t Leave Home Without It

AmEx was once better known for traveler’s checks than credit cards, and the original slogan was “Don’t leave home without them.” A simple word change convinced travelers that American Express was the credit card they needed when they headed out on adventures. Discover more about this persuasive campaign from Medium.

Skittles: Taste the Rainbow

Bag of Skittles candy against a blue background. Text reads

These candy ads are weird and intriguing and probably not for everyone. But they definitely get you thinking, and that often leads to buying. Learn more about why these wacky ads are successful from The Drum.

Maybelline: Maybe She’s Born With It

Smart wordplay made this ad campaign slogan an instant hit. The ads teased, “Maybe she’s born with it. Maybe it’s Maybelline.” (So many literary devices all in one phrase!) Fashionista has more on this beauty campaign.

Coca-Cola: Share a Coke

Seeing their own name on a bottle made teens more likely to want to buy a Coke. What can that teach us about persuasive writing in general? It’s an interesting question to consider. Learn more about the “Share a Coke” campaign from Digital Vidya.

Always: #LikeaGirl

Girl kicking a sign that says "Can't be brave". Text reads "Unstoppable #likeagirl"

Talk about the power of words! This Always campaign turned the derogatory phrase “like a girl” on its head, and the world embraced it. Storytelling is an important part of persuasive writing, and these ads really do it well. Medium has more on this stereotype-bashing campaign.   

Editorial Persuasive Writing Examples

Original newspaper editorial

Source: New York Daily News

Newspaper editors or publishers use editorials to share their personal opinions. Noted politicians, experts, or pundits may also offer their opinions on behalf of the editors or publishers. Here are a couple of older well-known editorials, along with a selection from current newspapers.

Yes, Virginia, There Is a Santa Claus (1897)

Sample lines: “Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus. He exists as certainly as love and generosity and devotion exist, and you know that they abound and give to your life its highest beauty and joy. Alas! How dreary would be the world if there were no Santa Claus. It would be as dreary as if there were no Virginias.”

What’s the Matter With Kansas? (1896)

Sample lines: “Oh, this IS a state to be proud of! We are a people who can hold up our heads! What we need is not more money, but less capital, fewer white shirts and brains, fewer men with business judgment, and more of those fellows who boast that they are ‘just ordinary clodhoppers, but they know more in a minute about finance than John Sherman,’ we need more men … who hate prosperity, and who think, because a man believes in national honor, he is a tool of Wall Street.”

America Can Have Democracy or Political Violence. Not Both. (The New York Times)

Sample lines: “The nation is not powerless to stop a slide toward deadly chaos. If institutions and individuals do more to make it unacceptable in American public life, organized violence in the service of political objectives can still be pushed to the fringes. When a faction of one of the country’s two main political parties embraces extremism, that makes thwarting it both more difficult and more necessary. A well-functioning democracy demands it.”

The Booster Isn’t Perfect, But Still Can Help Against COVID (The Washington Post)

Sample lines: “The booster shots are still free, readily available and work better than the previous boosters even as the virus evolves. Much still needs to be done to build better vaccines that protect longer and against more variants, including those that might emerge in the future. But it is worth grabbing the booster that exists today, the jab being a small price for any measure that can help keep COVID at bay.”

If We Want Wildlife to Thrive in L.A., We Have To Share Our Neighborhoods With Them (Los Angeles Times)

Sample lines: “If there are no corridors for wildlife movement and if excessive excavation of dirt to build bigger, taller houses erodes the slope of a hillside, then we are slowly destroying wildlife habitat. For those people fretting about what this will do to their property values—isn’t open space, trees, and wildlife an amenity in these communities?”   

Persuasive Review Writing Examples

Image of first published New York Times Book Review

Source: The New York Times

Book or movie reviews are more great persuasive writing examples. Look for those written by professionals for the strongest arguments and writing styles. Here are reviews of some popular books and movies by well-known critics to use as samples.

The Great Gatsby (The Chicago Tribune, 1925)

Sample lines: “What ails it, fundamentally, is the plain fact that it is simply a story—that Fitzgerald seems to be far more interested in maintaining its suspense than in getting under the skins of its people. It is not that they are false: It is that they are taken too much for granted. Only Gatsby himself genuinely lives and breathes. The rest are mere marionettes—often astonishingly lifelike, but nevertheless not quite alive.”

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (Washington Post, 1999)

Sample lines: “Obviously, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone should make any modern 11-year-old a very happy reader. The novel moves quickly, packs in everything from a boa constrictor that winks to a melancholy Zen-spouting centaur to an owl postal system, and ends with a scary surprise. Yet it is, essentially, a light-hearted thriller, interrupted by occasional seriousness (the implications of Harry’s miserable childhood, a moral about the power of love).”

Twilight (The Telegraph, 2009)

Sample lines: “No secret, of course, at whom this book is aimed, and no doubt, either, that it has hit its mark. The four Twilight novels are not so much enjoyed, as devoured, by legions of young female fans worldwide. That’s not to say boys can’t enjoy these books; it’s just that the pages of heart-searching dialogue between Edward and Bella may prove too long on chat and too short on action for the average male reader.”

To Kill a Mockingbird (Time, 1960)

Sample lines: “Author Lee, 34, an Alabaman, has written her first novel with all of the tactile brilliance and none of the preciosity generally supposed to be standard swamp-warfare issue for Southern writers. The novel is an account of an awakening to good and evil, and a faint catechistic flavor may have been inevitable. But it is faint indeed; novelist Lee’s prose has an edge that cuts through cant, and she teaches the reader an astonishing number of useful truths about little girls and about Southern life.”

The Diary of Anne Frank (The New York Times, 1952)

Sample lines: “And this quality brings it home to any family in the world today. Just as the Franks lived in momentary fear of the Gestapo’s knock on their hidden door, so every family today lives in fear of the knock of war. Anne’s diary is a great affirmative answer to the life-question of today, for she shows how ordinary people, within this ordeal, consistently hold to the greater human values.”   

Persuasive Essay Writing Examples

First paragraph of Thomas Paine's The American Crisis

From the earliest days of print, authors have used persuasive essays to try to sway others to their own point of view. Check out these top examples.

The American Crisis by Thomas Paine

Sample lines: “These are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value.”

Politics and the English Language by George Orwell

Sample lines: “As I have tried to show, modern writing at its worst does not consist in picking out words for the sake of their meaning and inventing images in order to make the meaning clearer. It consists in gumming together long strips of words which have already been set in order by someone else, and making the results presentable by sheer humbug.”

Letter From a Birmingham Jail by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Sample lines: “We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed. Frankly, I have yet to engage in a direct action campaign that was ‘well timed’ in the view of those who have not suffered unduly from the disease of segregation. For years now I have heard the word ‘Wait!’ It rings in the ear of every Negro with piercing familiarity. This ‘Wait’ has almost always meant ‘Never.’ We must come to see, with one of our distinguished jurists, that ‘justice too long delayed is justice denied.'”

Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau

Sample lines: “Even voting for the right is doing nothing for it. It is only expressing to men feebly your desire that it should prevail. A wise man will not leave the right to the mercy of chance, nor wish it to prevail through the power of the majority. There is but little virtue in the action of masses of men.”

Go Gentle Into That Good Night by Roger Ebert

Sample lines: “‘Kindness’ covers all of my political beliefs. No need to spell them out. I believe that if, at the end of it all, according to our abilities, we have done something to make others a little happier, and something to make ourselves a little happier, that is about the best we can do. To make others less happy is a crime.”

What are your favorite persuasive writing examples to use with students? Come share your ideas in the WeAreTeachers HELPLINE group on Facebook .

Plus, the big list of essay topics for high school (100+ ideas) ..

Find strong persuasive writing examples to use for inspiration, including essays, speeches, advertisements, reviews, and more.

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Do you need to write a persuasive essay but aren’t sure what topic to focus on? Were you thrilled when your teacher said you could write about whatever you wanted but are now overwhelmed by the possibilities? We’re here to help!

Read on for a list of 113 top-notch persuasive essay topics, organized into ten categories. To help get you started, we also discuss what a persuasive essay is, how to choose a great topic, and what tips to keep in mind as you write your persuasive essay.

What Is a Persuasive Essay?

In a persuasive essay, you attempt to convince readers to agree with your point of view on an argument. For example, an essay analyzing changes in Italian art during the Renaissance wouldn’t be a persuasive essay, because there’s no argument, but an essay where you argue that Italian art reached its peak during the Renaissance would be a persuasive essay because you’re trying to get your audience to agree with your viewpoint.

Persuasive and argumentative essays both try to convince readers to agree with the author, but the two essay types have key differences. Argumentative essays show a more balanced view of the issue and discuss both sides. Persuasive essays focus more heavily on the side the author agrees with. They also often include more of the author’s opinion than argumentative essays, which tend to use only facts and data to support their argument.

All persuasive essays have the following:

  • Introduction: Introduces the topic, explains why it’s important, and ends with the thesis.
  • Thesis: A sentence that sums up what the essay be discussing and what your stance on the issue is.
  • Reasons you believe your side of the argument: Why do you support the side you do? Typically each main point will have its own body paragraph.
  • Evidence supporting your argument: Facts or examples to back up your main points. Even though your opinion is allowed in persuasive essays more than most other essays, having concrete examples will make a stronger argument than relying on your opinion alone.
  • Conclusion: Restatement of thesis, summary of main points, and a recap of why the issue is important.

What Makes a Good Persuasive Essay Topic?

Theoretically, you could write a persuasive essay about any subject under the sun, but that doesn’t necessarily mean you should. Certain topics are easier to write a strong persuasive essay on, and below are tips to follow when deciding what you should write about.

It’s a Topic You Care About

Obviously, it’s possible to write an essay about a topic you find completely boring. You’ve probably done it! However, if possible, it’s always better to choose a topic that you care about and are interested in. When this is the case, you’ll find doing the research more enjoyable, writing the essay easier, and your writing will likely be better because you’ll be more passionate about and informed on the topic.

You Have Enough Evidence to Support Your Argument

Just being passionate about a subject isn’t enough to make it a good persuasive essay topic, though. You need to make sure your argument is complex enough to have at least two potential sides to root for, and you need to be able to back up your side with evidence and examples. Even though persuasive essays allow your opinion to feature more than many other essays, you still need concrete evidence to back up your claims, or you’ll end up with a weak essay.

For example, you may passionately believe that mint chocolate chip ice cream is the best ice cream flavor (I agree!), but could you really write an entire essay on this? What would be your reasons for believing mint chocolate chip is the best (besides the fact that it’s delicious)? How would you support your belief? Have enough studies been done on preferred ice cream flavors to support an entire essay? When choosing a persuasive essay idea, you want to find the right balance between something you care about (so you can write well on it) and something the rest of the world cares about (so you can reference evidence to strengthen your position).

It’s a Manageable Topic

Bigger isn’t always better, especially with essay topics. While it may seem like a great idea to choose a huge, complex topic to write about, you’ll likely struggle to sift through all the information and different sides of the issue and winnow them down to one streamlined essay. For example, choosing to write an essay about how WWII impacted American life more than WWI wouldn’t be a great idea because you’d need to analyze all the impacts of both the wars in numerous areas of American life. It’d be a huge undertaking. A better idea would be to choose one impact on American life the wars had (such as changes in female employment) and focus on that. Doing so will make researching and writing your persuasive essay much more feasible.

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List of 113 Good Persuasive Essay Topics

Below are over 100 persuasive essay ideas, organized into ten categories. When you find an idea that piques your interest, you’ll choose one side of it to argue for in your essay. For example, if you choose the topic, “should fracking be legal?” you’d decide whether you believe fracking should be legal or illegal, then you’d write an essay arguing all the reasons why your audience should agree with you.

Arts/Culture

  • Should students be required to learn an instrument in school?
  • Did the end of Game of Thrones fit with the rest of the series?
  • Can music be an effective way to treat mental illness?
  • With e-readers so popular, have libraries become obsolete?
  • Are the Harry Potter books more popular than they deserve to be?
  • Should music with offensive language come with a warning label?
  • What’s the best way for museums to get more people to visit?
  • Should students be able to substitute an art or music class for a PE class in school?
  • Are the Kardashians good or bad role models for young people?
  • Should people in higher income brackets pay more taxes?
  • Should all high school students be required to take a class on financial literacy?
  • Is it possible to achieve the American dream, or is it only a myth?
  • Is it better to spend a summer as an unpaid intern at a prestigious company or as a paid worker at a local store/restaurant?
  • Should the United States impose more or fewer tariffs?
  • Should college graduates have their student loans forgiven?
  • Should restaurants eliminate tipping and raise staff wages instead?
  • Should students learn cursive writing in school?
  • Which is more important: PE class or music class?
  • Is it better to have year-round school with shorter breaks throughout the year?
  • Should class rank be abolished in schools?
  • Should students be taught sex education in school?
  • Should students be able to attend public universities for free?
  • What’s the most effective way to change the behavior of school bullies?
  • Are the SAT and ACT accurate ways to measure intelligence?
  • Should students be able to learn sign language instead of a foreign language?
  • Do the benefits of Greek life at colleges outweigh the negatives?
  • Does doing homework actually help students learn more?
  • Why do students in many other countries score higher than American students on math exams?
  • Should parents/teachers be able to ban certain books from schools?
  • What’s the best way to reduce cheating in school?
  • Should colleges take a student’s race into account when making admissions decisions?
  • Should there be limits to free speech?
  • Should students be required to perform community service to graduate high school?
  • Should convicted felons who have completed their sentence be allowed to vote?
  • Should gun ownership be more tightly regulated?
  • Should recycling be made mandatory?
  • Should employers be required to offer paid leave to new parents?
  • Are there any circumstances where torture should be allowed?
  • Should children under the age of 18 be able to get plastic surgery for cosmetic reasons?
  • Should white supremacy groups be allowed to hold rallies in public places?
  • Does making abortion illegal make women more or less safe?
  • Does foreign aid actually help developing countries?
  • Are there times a person’s freedom of speech should be curtailed?
  • Should people over a certain age not be allowed to adopt children?

Government/Politics

  • Should the minimum voting age be raised/lowered/kept the same?
  • Should Puerto Rico be granted statehood?
  • Should the United States build a border wall with Mexico?
  • Who should be the next person printed on American banknotes?
  • Should the United States’ military budget be reduced?
  • Did China’s one child policy have overall positive or negative impacts on the country?
  • Should DREAMers be granted US citizenship?
  • Is national security more important than individual privacy?
  • What responsibility does the government have to help homeless people?
  • Should the electoral college be abolished?
  • Should the US increase or decrease the number of refugees it allows in each year?
  • Should privately-run prisons be abolished?
  • Who was the most/least effective US president?
  • Will Brexit end up helping or harming the UK?

body-sparkler-us-flag

  • What’s the best way to reduce the spread of Ebola?
  • Is the Keto diet a safe and effective way to lose weight?
  • Should the FDA regulate vitamins and supplements more strictly?
  • Should public schools require all students who attend to be vaccinated?
  • Is eating genetically modified food safe?
  • What’s the best way to make health insurance more affordable?
  • What’s the best way to lower the teen pregnancy rate?
  • Should recreational marijuana be legalized nationwide?
  • Should birth control pills be available without a prescription?
  • Should pregnant women be forbidden from buying cigarettes and alcohol?
  • Why has anxiety increased in adolescents?
  • Are low-carb or low-fat diets more effective for weight loss?
  • What caused the destruction of the USS Maine?
  • Was King Arthur a mythical legend or actual Dark Ages king?
  • Was the US justified in dropping atomic bombs during WWII?
  • What was the primary cause of the Rwandan genocide?
  • What happened to the settlers of the Roanoke colony?
  • Was disagreement over slavery the primary cause of the US Civil War?
  • What has caused the numerous disappearances in the Bermuda triangle?
  • Should nuclear power be banned?
  • Is scientific testing on animals necessary?
  • Do zoos help or harm animals?
  • Should scientists be allowed to clone humans?
  • Should animals in circuses be banned?
  • Should fracking be legal?
  • Should people be allowed to keep exotic animals as pets?
  • What’s the best way to reduce illegal poaching in Africa?
  • What is the best way to reduce the impact of global warming?
  • Should euthanasia be legalized?
  • Is there legitimate evidence of extraterrestrial life?
  • Should people be banned from owning aggressive dog breeds?
  • Should the United States devote more money towards space exploration?
  • Should the government subsidize renewable forms of energy?
  • Is solar energy worth the cost?
  • Should stem cells be used in medicine?
  • Is it right for the US to leave the Paris Climate Agreement?
  • Should athletes who fail a drug test receive a lifetime ban from the sport?
  • Should college athletes receive a salary?
  • Should the NFL do more to prevent concussions in players?
  • Do PE classes help students stay in shape?
  • Should horse racing be banned?
  • Should cheerleading be considered a sport?
  • Should children younger than 18 be allowed to play tackle football?
  • Are the costs of hosting an Olympic Games worth it?
  • Can online schools be as effective as traditional schools?
  • Do violent video games encourage players to be violent in real life?
  • Should facial recognition technology be banned?
  • Does excessive social media use lead to depression/anxiety?
  • Has the rise of translation technology made knowing multiple languages obsolete?
  • Was Steve Jobs a visionary or just a great marketer?
  • Should social media be banned for children younger than a certain age?
  • Which 21st-century invention has had the largest impact on society?
  • Are ride-sharing companies like Uber and Lyft good or bad for society?
  • Should Facebook have done more to protect the privacy of its users?
  • Will technology end up increasing or decreasing inequality worldwide?

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Tips for Writing a Strong Persuasive Essay

After you’ve chosen the perfect topic for your persuasive essay, your work isn’t over. Follow the three tips below to create a top-notch essay.

Do Your Research

Your argument will fall apart if you don’t fully understand the issue you’re discussing or you overlook an important piece of it. Readers won’t be convinced by someone who doesn’t know the subject, and you likely won’t persuade any of them to begin supporting your viewpoint. Before you begin writing a single word of your essay, research your topic thoroughly. Study different sources, learn about the different sides of the argument, ask anyone who’s an expert on the topic what their opinion is, etc. You might be tempted to start writing right away, but by doing your research, you’ll make the writing process much easier when the time comes.

Make Your Thesis Perfect

Your thesis is the most important sentence in your persuasive essay. Just by reading that single sentence, your audience should know exactly what topic you’ll be discussing and where you stand on the issue. You want your thesis to be crystal clear and to accurately set up the rest of your essay. Asking classmates or your teacher to look it over before you begin writing the rest of your essay can be a big help if you’re not entirely confident in your thesis.

Consider the Other Side

You’ll spend most of your essay focusing on your side of the argument since that’s what you want readers to come away believing. However, don’t think that means you can ignore other sides of the issue. In your essay, be sure to discuss the other side’s argument, as well as why you believe this view is weak or untrue. Researching all the different viewpoints and including them in your essay will increase the quality of your writing by making your essay more complete and nuanced.

Summary: Persuasive Essay Ideas

Good persuasive essay topics can be difficult to come up with, but in this guide we’ve created a list of 113 excellent essay topics for you to browse. The best persuasive essay ideas will be those that you are interested in, have enough evidence to support your argument, and aren’t too complicated to be summarized in an essay.

After you’ve chosen your essay topic, keep these three tips in mind when you begin writing:

  • Do your research
  • Make your thesis perfect
  • Consider the other side

What's Next?

Need ideas for a research paper topic as well?   Our guide to research paper topics has over 100 topics in ten categories so you can be sure to find the perfect topic for you. 

Thinking about taking an AP English class? Read our guide on AP English classes to learn whether you should take AP English Language or AP English Literature (or both!)

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Christine graduated from Michigan State University with degrees in Environmental Biology and Geography and received her Master's from Duke University. In high school she scored in the 99th percentile on the SAT and was named a National Merit Finalist. She has taught English and biology in several countries.

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100 Persuasive Essay Topics

  • M.Ed., Education Administration, University of Georgia
  • B.A., History, Armstrong State University

Persuasive essays are a bit like argument essays and persuasive speeches , but they tend to be a little kinder and gentler. Argument essays require you to discuss and to attack an alternate view, while persuasive essays are attempts to convince the reader that you have a believable argument. In other words, you are an advocate, not an adversary.

A Persuasive Essay Has 3 Components

  • Introduction : This is the opening paragraph of your essay. It contains the hook, which is used to grab the reader's attention, and the thesis, or argument, which you'll explain in the next section.
  • Body : This is the heart of your essay, usually three to five paragraphs in length. Each paragraph examines one theme or issue used to support your thesis.
  • Conclusion : This is the final paragraph of your essay. In it, you'll sum up the main points of the body and connect them to your thesis. Persuasive essays often use the conclusion as a last appeal to the audience.

Learning how to write a persuasive essay is an essential skill that people use every day in fields from business to law to media and entertainment. English students can begin writing a persuasive essay at any skill level. You're sure to find a sample topic or two from the list of 100 persuasive essays below, sorted by degree of difficulty.

Watch Now: 12 Ideas for Great Persuasive Essay Topics

  • Kids should get paid for good grades.
  • Students should have less homework.
  • Snow days are great for family time.
  • Penmanship is important.
  • Short hair is better than long hair.
  • We should all grow our own vegetables.
  • We need more holidays.
  • Aliens probably exist.
  • Gym class is more important than music class.
  • Kids should be able to vote.
  • Kids should get paid for extra activities like sports.
  • School should take place in the evenings.
  • Country life is better than city life.
  • City life is better than country life.
  • We can change the world.
  • Skateboard helmets should be mandatory.
  • We should provide food for the poor.
  • Children should be paid for doing chores.
  • We should populate the moon .
  • Dogs make better pets than cats.

Intermediate

  • The government should impose household trash limits.
  • Nuclear weapons are an effective deterrent against foreign attack.
  • Teens should be required to take parenting classes.
  • We should teach etiquette in schools.
  • School uniform laws are unconstitutional.
  • All students should wear uniforms.
  • Too much money is a bad thing.
  • High schools should offer specialized degrees in arts or sciences.
  • Magazine advertisements send unhealthy signals to young women.
  • Robocalling should be outlawed.
  • Age 12 is too young to babysit.
  • Children should be required to read more.
  • All students should be given the opportunity to study abroad.
  • Yearly driving tests should be mandatory past age 65.
  • Cell phones should never be used while driving.
  • All schools should implement bullying awareness programs.
  • Bullies should be kicked out of school.
  • Parents of bullies should have to pay a fine.
  • The school year should be longer.
  • School days should start later.
  • Teens should be able to choose their bedtime.
  • There should be a mandatory entrance exam for high school.
  • Public transit should be privatized.
  • We should allow pets in school.
  • The voting age should be lowered to 16.
  • Beauty contests are bad for body image.
  • Every American should learn to speak Spanish.
  • Every immigrant should learn to speak English.
  • Video games can be educational.
  • College athletes should be paid for their services.
  • We need a military draft .
  • Professional sports should eliminate cheerleaders.
  • Teens should be able to start driving at 14 instead of 16.
  • Year-round school is a bad idea.
  • High school campuses should be guarded by police officers.
  • The legal drinking age should be lowered to 19.
  • Kids under 15 shouldn't have Facebook pages.
  • Standardized testing should be eliminated.
  • Teachers should be paid more.
  • There should be one world currency.
  • Domestic surveillance without a warrant should be legal.
  • Letter grades should be replaced with a pass or fail.
  • Every family should have a natural disaster survival plan.
  • Parents should talk to kids about drugs at a young age.
  • Racial slurs should be illegal.
  • Gun ownership should be tightly regulated.
  • Puerto Rico should be granted statehood.
  • People should go to jail when they abandon their pets.
  • Free speech should have limitations.
  • Members of Congress should be subject to term limits.
  • Recycling should be mandatory for everyone.
  • High-speed internet access should be regulated like a public utility.
  • Yearly driving tests should be mandatory for the first five years after getting a license.
  • Recreational marijuana should be made legal nationwide.
  • Legal marijuana should be taxed and regulated like tobacco or alcohol.
  • Child support dodgers should go to jail.
  • Students should be allowed to pray in school.
  • All Americans have a constitutional right to health care.
  • Internet access should be free for everyone.
  • Social Security should be privatized.
  • Pregnant couples should receive parenting lessons.
  • We shouldn't use products made from animals.
  • Celebrities should have more privacy rights.
  • Professional football is too violent and should be banned.
  • We need better sex education in schools.
  • School testing is not effective.
  • The United States should build a border wall with Mexico and with Canada.
  • Life is better than it was 50 years ago.
  • Eating meat is unethical.
  • A vegan diet is the only diet people should follow.
  • Medical testing on animals should be illegal.
  • The Electoral College is outdated.
  • Medical testing on animals is necessary.
  • Public safety is more important than an individual's right to privacy.
  • Single-sex colleges provide a better education.
  • Books should never be banned.
  • Violent video games can cause people to act violently in real life.
  • Freedom of religion has limitations.
  • Nuclear power should be illegal.
  • Climate change should be the president's primary political concern.
  • Arizona State University Writing Center staff. " Persuasive Essay Structure ." ASU.edu, June 2012.
  • Collins, Jen, and Polak, Adam. " Persuasive Essays ." Hamilton.edu.
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  • 30 Writing Topics: Persuasion
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  • What Is Expository Writing?
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Writing Beginner

What Is Persuasive Writing? (Complete Answer With Examples)

No matter what you do in life, you will probably find yourself needing to master persuasive writing.

What is persuasive writing?

Persuasive writing is a type of writing that is used to convince or persuade someone of something. It is often used in business and marketing contexts but can be used in any type of writing. Persuasive writing uses logical, emotional, and structural techniques to seek agreement and initiate change.

In this article, I will answer the most common questions related to “What is persuasive writing?”

What Is Persuasive Writing? (Detailed Answer)

A more complete explanation of persuasive writing is that it is a type of writing that is used to try to change or influence the opinion of the reader.

It can be used in many different contexts, such as in business, politics, or marketing, but it can also be used in other types of writing, such as essays or articles.

These are the common characteristics of persuasive writing:

  • Evidentiary support (facts, statistics, case studies, etc)
  • Easy reading experience (transitions, word choice, etc)

In order to be persuasive, your writing must be well thought out, purposeful, and bookended with a strong introduction and conclusion.

Persuasive writing can be formal, informal, or even colloquial in style and tone.

As far as the point of view, you can use first-person, second-person, or third-person. No matter what point of view you use, keep the focus on the reader.

What Is the Purpose of Persuasive Writing?

The purpose of persuasive writing is to grab attention, compel readers to think differently, arouse emotions, challenge assumptions, facilitate agreement, change minds, and—ultimately—convince the reader to take a specific action.

For example, you can convince:

  • Website visitors to sign up to your email newsletter
  • Blog post readers to click on an affiliate link
  • Your manager to allow you to work remotely
  • Clients to buy your product or service
  • A politician to fix a broken streetlight
  • An artist to hire you as a ghostwriter for rappers
  • A literary agent to represent your novel or book
  • Your favorite writer to respond to your letter to an author
  • Dissertation reviewers to give you higher marks
  • Readers to positively comment on your Power Rangers Fan Fiction

3 Types of Persuasive Writing

The three major types of persuasive writing are ethos, pathos, and logos. In my opinion, the best persuasive writing includes all three.

Here are definitions and examples of all three types.

Ethos is the writer’s character or credibility.

In order to be persuasive, a writer must establish trust with the reader. One way to do this is by being transparent and honest about who you are and your credentials.

You can also build ethos by using credible sources, such as statistics, case studies, and expert opinions.

An example of ethos in persuasive writing is:

“As a lifelong resident of this community, I know the importance of keeping our streets clean. I urge you to vote in favor of the cleanup proposal.”

Pathos is the emotional appeal to the reader.

The persuasive writer must connect with the reader on an emotional level in order to convince others to agree with them.

You can use word choice, stories, and “emotional” language to trigger a guttural feeling response in readers.

Here is an example of pathos in persuasive writing:

“Please fix this streetlight. It’s been broken for weeks and it’s very unsafe. Our children play in this neighborhood and I’m worried about their safety.”

Logos is the logical appeal to the reader.

The persuasive writer must make a rational argument in order to be persuasive. You can use facts, statistics, and expert opinions to make your argument.

Here is an example of logos in persuasive writing:

“The national evidence shows that working remotely can increase productivity by up to 43%. My productivity is even higher at 47%. Please consider allowing me to work from home.”

13 Forms of Persuasive Writing

There are many forms of persuasive writing.

Here are 13 forms:

  • Editorials —Opinion pieces that argue for or against a position.
  • Letters to the Editor —Written responses to articles or editorials, often voicing an opinion.
  • Print advertisements —Adversiting materials that try to sell a product or service.
  • Sales letters —Written materials used to sell a product or service.
  • Pamphlets —Flyers or brochures that promote a product, service, or cause.
  • Songs —Emotional music-based lyrics to inspire unity and action.
  • Social media postings —Tweets, posts, and pins that try to create agreement.
  • Speeches —Presentations given before an audience in order to persuade them of an idea or course of action.
  • Treatments —Proposals made to individuals or groups in order to influence them.
  • Websites —Pages or sites that attempt to persuade the reader to take a desired action.
  • Poems —Verses that try to convince the reader to believe in a certain idea or course of action.
  • Email marketing —Messages that try to convince the recipient to buy a product or service.
  • Personal essays —Narratives that argue for or against a position.

Related: Best AI Essay Writer (Tested & Solved)

What Is Persuasive Writing? (Examples)

One of the best ways to learn persuasive writing is to read actual examples.

Here are 5 persuasive writing examples to answer that question.

Example 1: Editorial on Car Accidents at an Intersection

It’s time for the city to take action and stop car accidents from happening at an intersection. There have been too many accidents at this intersection, and it’s only a matter of time before someone is killed.

The city needs to install a traffic light or stop sign to help control the flow of traffic.

This will help to prevent accidents from happening, and it will also make the intersection safer for pedestrians.

Example #2: Essay on Changing the School Mascot

The school should consider changing its mascot. There are many reasons why this is a good idea.

One reason is that the current mascot is offensive to some people.

Another reason is that the mascot doesn’t reflect the diversity of the school’s student body.

Changing the mascot would be a symbolic gesture that shows that the school values all of its students.

Example 3: Letter to the Editor about Gun Control

I am writing in support of gun control. I believe that we need stricter gun laws to prevent mass shootings from happening.

The current laws are not working, and we need to take action to make our schools and public places safer.

I urge you to join me in supporting gun control. It’s time for us to take a stand and make our voices heard.

Example 4: Advertisement for a Credit Card

Looking for a credit card that offers low-interest rates and no annual fees? Look no further!

Our credit card has everything you need and more. It offers 0% APR on purchases and balance transfers, and no annual fees.

Apply today and get started on your path to financial freedom!

Example 5: Email to Teacher to Allow Extra Credit for Class Participation

Hi Mrs. Jones,

I was wondering if I could get some extra credit for class participation. I have been trying to participate more in class, and I think it has improved my grades and helped the entire class feel more motivated.

Is there any way that I could get an extra point or two for my participation grade?

Thank you for your time and consideration!

What Is Persuasive Writing? (Famous Examples)

Here are a few famous examples of persuasive writing:

  • Letter from Birmingham Jail by Martin Luther King Jr.
  • Tilbury Speech by Queen Elizabeth I
  • Common Sense by Thomas Paine
  • Ain’t I A Woman by Sojourner Truth
  • Declaration of Rights of the Women of the United States by Susan B. Anthony

What Is Persuasive Writing? (The Parts)

Persuasive writing is made up of several parts. To truly answer the question, “What is persuasive writing?” it’s helpful to understand these various parts.

Let’s explore the following four persuasive writing terms:

  • Counterargument
  • Call to action

What Is a Hook in Persuasive Writing?

A hook in persuasive writing is a technique that writers use to capture the reader’s attention. It’s a way to get the reader interested in what you have to say.

There are many different types of hooks, but some of the most common include:

Here is a good example of a hook in persuasive writing:

“Birth control is not about birth, it’s about control.”—Anonymous

This quotation is a good hook because it is provocative and makes the reader think. It gets them interested in the topic of birth control and makes them want to read more.

What Is a Claim in Persuasive Writing?

A claim in persuasive writing is a statement that you make to support your argument. It is your position on the topic that you are discussing.

Your claim should be clear, concise, and easy to understand. You should also be able to back it up with evidence.

Here is an example of a claim:

“Donating to Clean Water International will save thousands of innocent lives.”

What Is a Counterargument in Persuasive Writing?

A counterargument in persuasive writing is a statement that opposes your position.

It is an argument that the other person could make against you.

You should be prepared to address any counterarguments that the other person might raise. This will help you to strengthen your argument and convince the other person of your position.

Here is an example of a counterargument:

“Donating to Clean Water International is not a sustainable solution.”

What Is a Call to Action in Persuasive Writing?

A call to action is a request that the reader takes some specific action. It is a plea for the reader to help you achieve your goal.

Your call to action should be clear, specific, and actionable. You should also make it easy for the reader to take action.

Here is an example of a call to action:

“Please donate to Clean Water International today to help save thousands of lives tomorrow.”

Persuasive Writing Techniques & Tips

When writing to change hearts and minds, there are techniques and tips you can use to maximize your results.

Apply these proven persuasive writing techniques:

  • Reframing —Presenting the issue in a different light.
  • Framing —Using specific language to create a particular impression.
  • Bandwagoning —Emphasizing that many people support your position.
  • Pathos, Logos, & Ethos —Appealing to the reader’s emotions, logic, and association with authority.
  • Figurative language —using creative language to make your argument more impactful (stories, analogies, similies, etc).
  • Repetition —Using the same words or phrases to convince the reader. Repeating your claim.
  • Language patterns —The artful use of phrases to subtely shift a reader’s thinking.
  • Rhetorical questions —Asking the reader a question that forces them to think about the issue.
  • Speak directly to the reader —Making a direct appeal to the reader.

When using these techniques, it’s important to be aware of your readers and their interests.

Tailor your message to match their needs, hopes, fears, and belief systems.

What Is a Persuassive Writing Map?

A persuasive writing map is a way to structure and organize your argument.

Here is a persuasive writing map that works well for me:

  • Start with a strong and clear claim.
  • State your reasons for supporting that claim.
  • Include supportive evidence.
  • Sprinkle in persuassive techniques.
  • Address any counterarguments that the other person might raise.
  • Finish with a short and simple call to action.

Using a persuasive writing map can help you stay on track and make sure that your argument is clear and easy to follow.

It can also help you to be more persuasive by addressing the other person’s interests and concerns in the most compelling way.

A persuasive writing map is also known as a persuasive writing outline.

How Is Persuasive Writing Different than Other Forms of Writing?

Persuasive writing is easy to confuse with different types of writing.

Many people ask me how persuasive writing is different from:

  • Argumentative writing
  • Expository writing
  • Informational writing

Persuasive Writing vs. Argumentative Writing

Argumentative writing is a type of persuasive writing. It is a more formal type of writing that mainly uses evidence to support your position.

The big difference is that argumentative writing is based more on logic and reason.

Persuasive writing usually relies heavily on emotion-laden opinions.

Expository Writing vs. Persuasive Writing

Expository writing is a type of informative writing.

It is a less formal type of writing that explains a topic or idea.

The main difference between expository writing and persuasive writing is that persuasive writing attempts to convince the reader to take a specific action.

Informational Writing vs. Persuasive Writing

Informational writing is a type of non-fiction writing. It is a formal type of writing that provides information about a topic or idea.

Persuasive writing might inform but its main goal is to change thinking, feeling, and behavior.

Persuasive Writing vs. Narrative Writing

Narrative writing is a type of creative writing.

It tells a story and uses the writer’s own experiences to support the story.

The main difference between persuasive writing and narrative writing is that persuasive writing is non-fiction and uses evidence to support the argument, while narrative writing is fiction and does not have to be true.

However, narrative writing can include elements of persuasive writing.

Persuasive Writing vs. Technical Writing

Technical writing is a type of informative writing. It is a formal type of writing that provides information about a technical topic or idea.

Both types of writing are nonfiction.

One major difference is that technical writing is usually written for people who are already familiar with the general topic, while persuasive writing might be written for people who are not as familiar with the topic.

Technical writing also includes step-by-step guides on how to perform a specific task.

What Is Persuasive Writing for Kids?

Many kids start to learn persuasive writing in first or second grade.

As kids get older, their teachers give them more challenging persuasive writing assignments.

In high school and college, students often write persuasive essays, speeches, and arguments.

Here is a short video that goes over persuasive writing for kids:

What Is a Persuasive Writing Anchor Chart?

A persuasive writing anchor chart is a visual tool that helps younger students learn and remember the key elements of persuasive writing.

It typically includes:

  • The 5 W’s (who, what, when, where, why)
  • The 3 C’s (claim, clear evidence, clever reasoning)
  • How to Appeal to Emotions
  • How to Appeal to Logic
  • How to use Persuassive Devices

A persuasive writing anchor chart might also give students sentence starters to help jog their creativity.

It serves as a kind of “Mad Lib” or “fill in the blank” template for students.

Why Is Persuasive Writing Important?

Persuasive writing is important because it can be used in so many different contexts.

It’s a great way to get your point of view across or to convince someone to do something. Additionally, persuasive writing is an essential skill for business and marketing.

If you know how to write persuasively, you can write better resumes and cover letters.

That can get you a better job— with more pay.

If you sell anything (and, let’s be honest, we ALL sell something), you can attract more clients. You can also convert more clients into customers.

In school, you can get better grades. As an employee, you can foster better teamwork and move people to action.

Persuasive writing can also convince funders to give money to worthwhile causes, such as feeding children or bringing clean water to people in need.

In short, persuasive writing can make the world a better place for all of us to live.

Can You Use Persuasive Writing in Any Type of Writing?

Yes, persuasive writing can be used in any type of writing. However, it is often most effective when it is used in business or marketing contexts, where the goal is to change or influence the opinion of the reader.

You can apply persuasive writing tips and techniques to:

  • School assignments (reports, essays)
  • Nonfiction books
  • Grant proposals
  • Reviews (movies, books, products, etc)
  • Blog posts and articles
  • Love letters
  • Writing a Dungeons and Dragons book
  • Internal newsletter
  • Affiliate marketing
  • And much more!

What Are Some Tips for Writing Persuasively?

Here are some good tips for writing persuasively:

  • Know your audience : In order to be persuasive, you must understand who you are trying to persuade.
  • Start with a strong claim: In order to be persuasive, you must make a strong argument that is not easily deconstructed or debunked.
  • Support your claim with evidence : This is where the rubber meets the road. You must back up your argument with facts, data, and expert testimony (if applicable).
  • Use deep reasoning to explain the evidence: Once you have presented your evidence, you must then explain why it supports your argument.
  • Make an emotional appeal: People are often persuaded more by emotion than logic. You can use powerful words and images to create an emotional response in your reader.
  • Be succinct: Don’t ramble on and on. Get to the point and make your argument understandable by everyone.

Persuasive Writing Topics

There are an almost unlimited number of persuasive writing topics. Below you’ll find a few ideas to spark your own creativity.

Here is a list of possible persuasive writing topics to consider:

  • Education: Should college be free?
  • Dating: Is it bad to give up on dating and relationship?
  • Prosperity: How to achieve financial prosperity
  • Politics: Is it time for a new political party?
  • Lifestyle: Veganism – pros and cons
  • Environment: Should we all become vegetarians?
  • Morality: Abortion – is it right or wrong?
  • Art: Books are better than TV
  • Texting: Do guys like good morning texts?
  • Science: Is cloning moral?
  • Technology: AI will one day take over the world
  • Food: Is our food killing us?
  • Energy: Should we all live off grid?
  • Health: Is organic food better for you?
  • Pets: Should exotic animals be kept as pets?
  • Transport: The rise of the electric car
  • Religion: Is there a God?
  • Parenting: Raising a child in the internet age
  • Gaming: Can a DM cheat at D&D?

Best Persuassive Writing Tools and Resources

I’ve been writing persuasively for over 20 years.

Here are my favorite persuasive writing tools and resources:

If you only try one tool, I highly recommend Jasper AI (formally known as Jarvis and Conversion.ai).

I use Jasper every day to automatically generate thousands of original words for persuasive writing, blog posts, contracts, and more.

Best Persuasive Essay Examples

  • Expository Essay Examples and Samples
  • Cause and Effect Essay Examples and Samples 2023
  • Definition Essay Examples and Samples
  • Reflective Essay Examples and Samples
  • Analytical Essay Examples
  • Evaluation Essay Examples and Samples

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How to Write a Persuasive Essay

May 13, 2022

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May 13, 2022 | Blog

What is a Persuasive Essay?

What is a Persuasive Essay? | Essay Freelance Writers

You may be required to write different academic essays throughout your high school and college terms, such as a persuasive essay.

The type of essay you may be required to write depends on the purpose of writing that essay.

Many students do not know the proper format or structure of an essay.

You might wonder what a persuasive essay is.

As the name suggests, it means to persuade or influence someone.

Thus a persuasive paper is the one in which you bring the reader towards your point of view using your opinions and emotions supported by some facts.

As for all writings, there are certain norms and conventions, but if you want to know how to write a persuasive essay, then it’s straightforward.

You can write a persuasive essay following the five-paragraph essay structure.

Such an essay aims to analyze and give detailed arguments about the given topic. Through argumentation, the students are given the practice of explaining their analysis in a proper format.

This helps in developing their analytical as well as critical thinking skills.

Read also: How to use Ethos, Pathos, and Logos in a Persuasive Essay

Steps to writing a persuasive essay

Learn how to write a persuasive essay by following the five-step process.

You can also find great tips for each phase of this approach on EssayFreelanceWriters!

At EssayFreelanceWriters, we believe learners should follow our 5 step writing strategy when crafting their essays.

Our team has compiled some powerful persuasion techniques and strategies you’ll need during every stage in your essay creation process, which are outlined below:

Prewriting: This is the most exciting phase of any writing process when students brainstorm and research their work before putting anything on paper. While planning this project, you should consider your audience and what you want them to take away from reading it. But if there’s no clear message or purpose in mind, we can help with that too! We have a team of professional writers, so we know how important thesis statements are at every stage of the game (even just starting), which means finishing strong will be easy.

Drafting: Students can develop all of the ideas and put them in order when it comes to their initial composition. They need to plan what they’re going to write about so that there are no surprises when they read over their work. Audience matters, too, so you should always know who will be reading your essay before drafting anything at all!

Revising: Students should always review their work to ensure it has the right tone, style, and appropriate content. Reorganizing paragraph structure or adding new information can help improve a draft’s quality before turning it in for grading.

Editing: During the proofreading stage, writers fix any errors in grammar and mechanics. Writers also edit their work to improve the style or clarity of writing. It’s helpful when you have feedback from other writers, as they might spot any errors that were missed by mistakes or because of style differences.

Publishing: In the last step of writing, it is time to share your work with others. You can do this in various ways, and thanks to computers, you even have online publishing options.

Persuasive Essay Structure

A Persuasive or Argumentative Essay structure is straightforward as it falls within the five-paragraph essay format.

Normally many students are given practice writing persuasive essays in the five-paragraph format.

But many topics cannot be analyzed and explained in the five-paragraph format.

Normally in most high schools, students are tested on their ability to write in the five-paragraph style as 30 minutes to 1-hour.

But this standard style is not enough for students to write an in-depth analysis of the given topics in several college courses.

Students must analyze and write about more extended topics and content at the college level and provide an in-depth analysis.

Therefore, the persuasive or argumentative essay has a flexible format in such a scenario, and your essay mainly depends on the topic and the question you are going to analyze.

Examples of College Persuasive Essay Topics and persuasive essay ideas

Students are often asked to pick a side in the argument and present their views on it or defend a stance against any criticism.

Some of the common question samples you might be given as assignments to write on are:

  • Should the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes be legalized?
  • Should abortions be legalized?
  • Should there be a law to punish people if they illegally download music and movies?
  • Should violent criminals be given the death penalty as a law?
  • Should the advertisement of tobacco on television be allowed?

10 Best Persuasive Essay Topics

  • Embalming is a dangerous practice
  • Schools should have less technology
  • The workweek should be four days
  • Social media sites should be able to ban users without being accused of censorship.
  • The benefits of space exploration outweigh the costs
  • Euthanasia should be illegal
  • Humans are intrinsically good
  • There shouldn’t be a limit to how many terms a president can serve
  • you could fix all problems facing humanity with better technology
  • Exotic pets are a significant danger to their owners

Interesting Persuasive Essay Topics for Students and Kids

  •    Pets should be allowed in schools
  •         Dogs are better than cats
  •         Elementary schools should all finish at 2 pm
  •        Elementary schools should teach languages
  •         Toys are important for kids to learn
  •         Outside play is better than inside play
  •        Elementary school students should be allowed to get jobs
  •         Ice cream is the best food
  •         Kids should have laptops
  •         Kindness is the most important thing
  •         Parents should be less strict
  •         It’s important to go to school
  •         Being a teacher is the hardest job
  •         Everyone should have a pet
  •         Cats are better than dogs

Most students are trained to write about topics specific to their courses of study.

However, Teachers should train students in writing effectively about topics that have some controversy, like the few general knowledge examples given above.

Regardless of the type of topics, the format for all the persuasive essays stays the same.

Outline for persuasive essay

The general outline of a persuasive essay is given below:

Structure of a Persuasive Essay

Introduction.

  • The topic is introduced in the form of a thesis statement.
  • Both sides of the controversy are presented with a brief reason.
  • The stance you are going to take is stated clearly.
  • Three supporting ideas to support your stance are introduced briefly.
  • A topic sentence stating the first idea in clear words
  • Supporting information with relevant and specific examples as well as pieces of evidence from different sources
  • Concluding sentence relating the supporting information to the topic sentence.

Paragraph 2

  • A topic sentence stating the second idea in clear words
  • Supporting information with relevant and specific examples as well as evidence from different sources
  • Concluding sentence relating the supporting information to the thesis statement
  • Three ideas discussed in three body paragraphs are summed up
  • A solution is pointed out, and you give your opinion or suggest something to satisfy the reader and give a sense of ending.

  How to write a persuasive essay introduction

Hook Statement : Building up a hook statement is a better way to start your argumentative essay.

A sentence that makes your reader excited about your essay and hooks him up to read your essay: the hook statement must in some way relate to the thesis statement.

Brief Background : you should provide a brief background of the topic.

Its length depends on the amount of content and the analysis you will provide.

Thesis Statement : The sentence around which the entire essay is based is the thesis statement.

Your thesis statement should tell what the essay is about.

It is better to create your thesis statement after writing your body paragraphs.

It is easier to see what your content is truly about and then decide upon the thesis statement.

Why is it recommended to create your thesis after writing your body paragraphs?

It is much easier than aligning your statements with your thesis statement.

Trying to align your body paragraphs to your thesis harms the quality and strength of your analysis.

Body Paragraphs

Each body paragraph should follow this format.

Topic Sentence : It is a sentence with some strong words of emphasis to introduce your topic. These words should be strong enough to defend and support your topic sentence .

Argument : After creating your thesis statement, you will need to provide evidence for your stance. Your argument in this part of the essay serves to persuade the audience. These statements may be examples, facts, or any data written to defend your argument and thus prove it to be authentic.

 Evidence/ Explanation : You explain your perspective to support your argument using different examples and pieces of evidence from different sources, giving it even more credibility.

The readers may often find some pieces of evidence realistic and may relate them to their real lives, which become rationalistic in this way.

Concluding Sentence : when you have fully explained your defending argument and satisfied the readers, it is time to conclude your essay.

It would help if you used the most possibly effective words to sum up your point. It summarizes the whole argument presented in the paragraph in the best efficient way. One sentence should say it all.

How to write a conclusion for a persuasive essay

How to write a perfect persuasive essay conclusion

The conclusion should conclude the whole discussion. A conclusion should follow the given format.

Restatement of Thesis : when you have proved your thesis through supporting details in the essay, it’s important to reword and thus establish it in your conclusion. The best way of doing so is to rephrase your thesis statement.

Summarize Key Points : Briefly tell in your own words that your supporting arguments have successfully proved the thesis sentence and also prove your explanations to be logically and reasonably apt.

 Concluding Statement : When you have made sure that your reader has understood the importance and value of your essay and that the argument you explained in your essay was effective, it means you have done your job. If you have successfully persuaded your reader and he has been brought to the point of your argument, that means you have written a wonderful essay.

Write a persuasive essay with integrity and empathy

There are three main points to any successful rhetorical argument: logos, pathos, and ethos.

It would help if you used ethos (ethical reasoning), logos (logical reasoning), and pathos (passionate argumentation) in combination for a successful rhetorical discussion.

While all three elements need a balance for the argument to be valid, it is still possible that one or two of these components might not work as well together as you had hoped.

If you can successfully master all of these, then your argument will be so powerfully robust that nobody could disagree with it.

However, this is easier said than done; even the best rhetoricians in history struggle to balance ethical and logical reasons.

Creating a good argument requires three elements:

Ethically, you’ll want to ensure that your arguments are not misleading or manipulative.

Logically, they must be based on facts and progress in a way that makes sense.

Passionately, it is important to emphasize the evidence of one’s points with strategic repetition to compel an audience by using emotional appeals such as empathy for others’ suffering.

If these three parts are well balanced while writing honestly and with compassion, then creating quality arguments should come easily!

Some Tips on Writing a Persuasive Essay

Tips on Writing a Persuasive Essay | Essay Freelance Writers

  • Chicago and MLA formats are used for argumentative or persuasive essays. They provide the titles, margins, physical alignments, and other formatting features of the essay.
  • Do not become verbose; try to use various words but be simple. If you want to use high words, use them cleverly, not to impress the reader but add spice to your writing.
  •  Double-check and make sure your arguments prove your thesis statement. If the arguments do not fully support your thesis statement, then go back and edit the argument or the thesis statement, but it is better and easier to edit the thesis.
  • In an argumentative essay , you need to make the reader admit that your stance was more reliable than the one opposed to it. You need to prove your side by defending it first, and then you can counterattack.
  • Peer help can help make your essay more impressive. Make friends read your essay from a fresh perspective and tell you whether it makes any sense to them or not.

Need Help with Persuasive Essay Writing ?

We know it’s not that easy to persuade your professor, who has more knowledge and experience than you.

Let EssayFreelancewriters.Com relieve you of this mental struggle to benefit from the best online essay writing services .

Here you can get top-quality persuasive essays custom-written for the lowest possible price !

Argumentative essays are the basic pieces of writing that students are most commonly asked to write. So our professional writers can undoubtedly handle your task!

Isabella Robertson

Isabella Robertson

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92 Essay Transition Words to Know

Matt Ellis

Abruptly switching topics in essays can be jarring; however , transition words can smooth the change for the convenience of the reader. Moreover , you can use essay transition words to start a paragraph, sentence, or clause more naturally. Additionally , essay transition words can connect new information to the previous statement so you don’t have to say everything at once.

This guide looks at how to use transition words in essays. We’ll explain what they are and how to use them, plus we even share an essay transition word list with the most common and useful transition words examples.

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What are essay transition words?

In general, transition words and phrases bridge the gap between two topics whose connection isn’t obvious. Transition words and phrases like however , although , likewise , and on the contrary cue the reader that a change is coming so they know to expect it.

The type of transition word or phrase signals which type of change is coming. For example, transition words like therefore show a cause-and-effect relationship, while transition words like in conclusion introduce a summary or wrap-up. Often, conjunctive adverbs work well as transition words.

Essay transition words are no different from other types of transition words. They are often the same words and phrases used in other pieces of writing, just used for all types of essay , such as an informative essay or a narrative essay .

How to use essay transition words

Transition words and phrases are used to make transition sentences , which either contain two opposing topics in the same sentence or join together the opposing sentences or paragraphs that come before and after the transition sentence.

Essay transition words aren’t necessary for every sentence; you need them only when a shift in topic is so pronounced that it interrupts the writing flow . For example, consider this example, which doesn’t use transition words:

The GPS told us to go left. We went right.

Although those two sentences are grammatically correct, the abrupt change in topic is a bit jarring to readers. Some may feel like they need to reread the passage because they’re worried they missed something. That’s where transition words come in handy.

The GPS told us to go left. However , we went right.

The transition word however acts as a signal to the reader to prepare for a change in topic. When the reader sees transition words like this, they know to expect the switch, so it’s not so jarring.

You can use transition words to start a paragraph, sentence, clause, or even a brief phrase or individual word.

Although tired , we had to continue.

Even in situations when the connection between topics is obvious, essay transition words can help keep your writing organized and comprehensible. This is especially true with ordinal numbers and transition words like next , then , and last , all of which keep items from a series or sequence in order.

First , you wet your hair, and then you apply the shampoo. Last , you rinse the shampoo with warm water.

Keep in mind that transition words aren’t always sentence starters . Sometimes essay transition words and phrases like also , too , or above all can come at the end of a sentence, clause, or phrase.

We were happy to get second place, but we wanted first place above all .

However, most essay transition words work best at the beginning of a sentence, where they can more effectively bridge the gap between two seemingly unrelated topics.

92 transition words examples

Essay transition word list for contradictions.

  • alternatively
  • nevertheless
  • nonetheless
  • notwithstanding
  • on the contrary
  • on the other hand

Essay transition word list for additions

  • accordingly
  • additionally
  • comparatively
  • coupled with
  • equally important
  • furthermore
  • in addition
  • in the same way
  • understandably

Essay transition word list for introducing examples

  • for example
  • for instance
  • in particular / particularly
  • specifically
  • to illustrate

Essay transition word list for conditions and cause and effect

  • as a result
  • consequently
  • for fear of
  • for this reason
  • in the event of
  • subsequently
  • under these/those circumstances

Essay transition word list for extra clarification

  • by all means
  • in other words
  • incidentally
  • predictably
  • significantly
  • undoubtedly

Essay transition word list for summarizing

  • briefly / in brief
  • in conclusion
  • in summary/summation
  • to summarize

Essay transition word list for time relations

  • at the same time
  • in the meantime

Essay transition word list for series and sequences

  • first , second , third , etc.

Essay transition words FAQs

In general, transition words and phrases bridge the gap between two topics whose connection isn’t obvious. Transition words and phrases like however , although , likewise , and on the contrary cue the reader that a change is coming so they know to expect it. Essay transition words have the same function in essays.

When should you use essay transition words?

Use essay transition words and phrases to either contain two opposing topics in the same sentence or join together the opposing sentences or paragraphs that come before and after them. Essay transition words aren’t necessary for every sentence; you need them only when a shift in topic is so pronounced that it interrupts the writing flow.

What are some essay transition words examples?

Some of the most common essay transition words examples include however , although , ultimately , in summary , next , last , also , in general , for that reason , as a result , for example , in the meantime , therefore , similarly , and likewise .

what is persuasive essay and example

IMAGES

  1. 50 Free Persuasive Essay Examples (+BEST Topics) ᐅ TemplateLab

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  2. 48 Amazing Persuasive Essay Examples

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  3. 50 Free Persuasive Essay Examples (+BEST Topics) ᐅ TemplateLab

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  4. 50 Free Persuasive Essay Examples (+BEST Topics) ᐅ TemplateLab

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  5. 50 Free Persuasive Essay Examples (+BEST Topics) ᐅ TemplateLab

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  6. FREE 8+ Persuasive Essay Samples in MS Word

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  1. Persuasive Writing Strategies and Tips, with Examples

    Matt Ellis Updated on June 2, 2022 Students Persuasive writing is any written work that tries to convince the reader of the writer's opinion. Aside from standard writing skills, a persuasive essay author can also draw on personal experience, logical arguments, an appeal to emotion, and compelling speech to influence readers.

  2. 30+ Persuasive Essay Examples

    1. Persuasive Essay Examples For Students 2. Persuasive Essay Examples for Different Formats 3. Persuasive Essay Outline Examples 4. Persuasive Essay Format Example 5. How to Write A Persuasive Essay With Examples 6. How to End a Persuasive Essay Examples 7. Catchy Persuasive Essay Topics Persuasive Essay Examples For Students

  3. How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Expert Tips & Hints

    Conduct comprehensive research using reputable sources, gather expert opinions, and uncover relevant facts. Ensure Controversy: Your thesis should encompass two opposing sides - the one you support and the one you intend to counter. Without a debatable topic, creating a persuasive argument is challenging.

  4. How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Tips and Tricks

    The first step in writing a persuasive essay is choosing a topic and picking a side. If the topic is something you believe in, it will make the entire experience of researching, writing, and arguing your perspective more personal. Choosing a topic that appeals to you on an emotional or sentimental level will make its defense easier.

  5. Persuasive Essay in Literature: Definition & Examples

    Here are thesis examples for each type, based on the bee example: Call for Support, Action, or Change: "Stop using pesticides on your lawns to save the environmentally essential bees." Call for Opposition: "Oppose the big businesses that haven't conducted environmental studies concerning bees and pesticides."

  6. How to Write an Argumentative Essay

    Examples of argumentative essay prompts. At a university level, all the prompts below imply an argumentative essay as the appropriate response. Your research should lead you to develop a specific position on the topic. The essay then argues for that position and aims to convince the reader by presenting your evidence, evaluation and analysis.

  7. How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Step-by-Step Guide + Examples

    📑 Outline ⭐ Examples 🔗 References ⚖️ Argumentative vs. Persuasive Essay An argumentative essay intends to attack the opposing point of view, discussing its drawbacks and inconsistencies. A persuasive essay describes only the writer's opinion, explaining why it is a believable one. In other words, you are not an opponent; you are an advocate.

  8. 50 Free Persuasive Essay Examples (+BEST Topics)

    50 Free Persuasive Essay Examples (+BEST Topics) There are plenty of persuasive essay examples available online and you can access them to learn more about what this type of essay is all about. Persuasive essays explain a topic while trying to persuade the readers that your perspective is the most logical, valid, and informed one about the topic.

  9. Persuasive Essay Guide: How to Write a Persuasive Essay

    2 memberships for the Writing Persuasive Essay Guide: How to Write a Persuasive Essay Written by MasterClass Last updated: Aug 19, 2021 • 4 min read The last time you wrote a persuasive essay may have been in high school or college, but the skill of writing a strong persuasive argument is always a useful one to have.

  10. How to Craft a Persuasive Essay

    A persuasive essay is a form of writing that aims to convince its audience to adopt a particular viewpoint or take a specific course of action. The writer takes a clear position on an issue and attempts to convince the readers through different persuasive techniques, such as evidence and anecdotes.

  11. Persuasive Essay

    Size: 53 KB Download Persuasive Essay Introduction classroom.synonym.com Details File Format PDF Size: 26 KB Download What Is a Persuasive Essay? A persuasive essay uses logical reasoning to prove that one argument is more legitimate than the other.

  12. Make It Perfect: The Definitive Guide to a Persuasive Essay

    7. Tips to Write a Compelling Persuasive Essay What is a Persuasive Essay? A persuasive essay presents logical arguments with emotional appeal. Typically, persuasive essays begin with a question that the writer spends the essay arguing in favor of or opposition to. For example: should kids be allowed to play video games on weekdays?

  13. Persuasive Essay

    The term "persuasive" is an adjective derived from verb "persuade," which means "to convince somebody.". A persuasive essay is full of all the convincing techniques a writer can employ. It presents a situation, and takes a stand - either in its favor, or against it - to prove to readers whether it is beneficial or harmful for them.

  14. Get inspired by our Amazing Persuasive Essay Examples

    4. Persuasive Essay Examples Topics Persuasive Essay Examples for Students We've compiled a selection of persuasive essay examples to provide you with a starting point. These examples will serve as practical guides to help you understand how to write persuasively and effectively structure your essays. Check them out below:

  15. What Is a Persuasive Essay?

    Quiz Course 7.3K views Components Okay, Roberto is ready to make his case, but what should he include in his persuasive essay? What are the elements that go into an essay like that? There are...

  16. Persuasive Essay Outline

    As persuasive essay writers, you can write it however you like, but to follow a traditional persuasive essay structure, use this basic layout to get an effective paper: An Introduction: You need a good hook to grab the reader's attention, a thesis statement presenting the main argument, and a roadmap of the essay, so they know what to expect.

  17. 35 Persuasive Writing Examples (Speeches, Essays, and More)

    This round-up of persuasive writing examples includes famous speeches, influential ad campaigns, contemporary reviews of famous books, and more. Use them to inspire your students to write their own essays. (Need persuasive essay topics? Check out our list of 60 interesting ideas here!) Jump to: Persuasive Speeches Advertising Campaigns Editorials

  18. Persuasive Essay Examples (With Counterarguments!)

    An example of a high school-level persuasive essay could look like this: Thesis statement: Euthanasia should be allowed. Argument: Ending a loved one's life in order to ease their pain should be allowed if the patient had consented. Counterargument: Allowing someone to murder another living human being is illegal.

  19. 113 Perfect Persuasive Essay Topics for Any Assignment

    For example, an essay analyzing changes in Italian art during the Renaissance wouldn't be a persuasive essay, because there's no argument, but an essay where you argue that Italian art reached its peak during the Renaissance would be a persuasive essay because you're trying to get your audience to agree with your viewpoint.

  20. 100 Persuasive Essay Topics

    Learning how to write a persuasive essay is an essential skill that people use every day in fields from business to law to media and entertainment. English students can begin writing a persuasive essay at any skill level. You're sure to find a sample topic or two from the list of 100 persuasive essays below, sorted by degree of difficulty.

  21. What Is Persuasive Writing? (Complete Answer With Examples)

    Example #2: Essay on Changing the School Mascot. The school should consider changing its mascot. There are many reasons why this is a good idea. ... In high school and college, students often write persuasive essays, speeches, and arguments. Here is a short video that goes over persuasive writing for kids:

  22. 100+ Persuasive Essay Examples and Samples For Free 2023

    Best Persuasive Essay Examples. Since this is the most common type of essay, it is important to be familiar with its requirements and style. Check out our persuasive essay samples to get acquainted with this popular form of essay.

  23. Writing A Persuasive Essay: Full Guide, Topics, Tips

    10 Best Persuasive Essay Topics. Embalming is a dangerous practice. Schools should have less technology. The workweek should be four days. Social media sites should be able to ban users without being accused of censorship. The benefits of space exploration outweigh the costs. Euthanasia should be illegal.

  24. Why Is Bullying Important: Persuasive Essay

    Bullying is a most important difficulty in today's schools and it can have dire consequences. For instance, it's estimated that nearly one-third of all college students ages 12 to 18 years ancient have said being bullied in some way at school. Students who have been bullied are more likely to have low self-esteem, challenge trusting others ...

  25. Persuasive Essay on Abortion Pro-Life

    Pro-life is the right choice until the day you die. The abortion rate has fallen by one-third over the past two decades! The pro-life issue means you believe that all human life is created equal regardless of size, level of development, education, and degree of dependency. This issue is so important because everyone has the right to life.

  26. Discrimination and How to Stop It: Persuasive Essay

    The first time there was discrimination going was in America during slavery. There was an amendment that was passed to stop slavery. The thing is, discrimination never stopped, it's still a big thing in the world today. Discrimination is not right at all because you are picking and choosing what is right and what is wrong.

  27. 92 Essay Transition Words to Know, With Examples

    Abruptly switching topics in essays can be jarring; however, transition words can smooth the change for the convenience of the reader.Moreover, you can use essay transition words to start a paragraph, sentence, or clause more naturally.Additionally, essay transition words can connect new information to the previous statement so you don't have to say everything at once.