Writing Forward

10 Essential Lessons You’ll Learn in a Creative Writing Workshop

by Melissa Donovan | Jul 11, 2023 | Creative Writing | 9 comments

creative writing workshop

What can you learn in a creative writing workshop?

When I look back over all my years of formal education, from preschool through college, only a few classes stand out as truly educational in a life-changing way.

In sixth grade, we did a section on space, which fascinated me. I retained a lot of what I learned. Later, I took astronomy and learned even more about the universe. A class on women writers exposed me to a whole world of literature I didn’t know existed. And two writing workshops (poetry and creative writing) put me on the path to becoming a professional writer.

The main difference between a regular class and a workshop is that a workshop is interactive. You work together with your fellow students, critiquing each other’s work, asking questions, and exchanging insights. Whatever you can learn from a single instructor is multiplied by all the knowledge and wisdom you gain by sharing ideas with a roomful of your peers.

What You Can Learn from a Creative Writing Workshop

2. Find out what your writing strengths are. The best part about receiving critiques from your peers is that they tell you what you’re doing right, which is reassuring. When you know that your writing skills have a solid foundation, it’s easier to accept that you still have work to do.

3. Accept the weaknesses in your writing. No matter how good your writing is now, there are things you can do to improve it. When ten of your classmates agree that certain elements in your prose need touching up or that you need to hit the grammar books, all you can do is accept it and dig your heels in.

4. Learn to handle critiques of your work. The first few critiques might be a bit rough, but once you see how all the suggestions make your writing better, you’ll start looking forward to them. You’ll learn how to separate yourself from your work, and you’ll be able to not only handle but actually embrace (and look forward to) critiques. This will also prepare you for real-world critics and their reviews.

5. Help others improve their work. When other writers put your suggestions into action or express appreciation for your recommendations and then tell you that your feedback helped them improve their writing, it feels good, especially when the arrangement is reciprocal.

6. Meet people who share your passion. There’s nothing like sitting in a room surrounded by people who are just as excited about writing as you are. It’s not only inspiring, it’s comforting. Plus, it’s a great opportunity to meet like-minded people, some of whom may become lifelong friends, writing partners, or your future writing group.

7. Improve your writing. This, of course, is the main reason most people take a creative writing workshop. The ultimate goal is to become a better writer , and a workshop will definitely do the trick. You’ll also put a lot more effort into everything you write because you know it will be scrutinized, and this builds excellent writing habits .

8. Adopt new writing techniques. Between the instructor and your peers, you’ll discover all kinds of interesting new writing tools and techniques, often simply through the course of discussion as well as through observing everyone’s work.

9. Get access to a mentor. The person running the workshop should be knowledgeable and experienced in the world of writing. Maybe the instructor is a published author, or maybe it’s someone who’s worked as an agent, editor, or publisher. This access to a mentor is priceless. Take advantage of it!

10. Gain experience and get a lot of creative writing practice. This is one of the most valuable benefits of a creative writing workshop. When writers work on their own, they tend to procrastinate, get distracted, and generally don’t finish most of the projects they start. But in a workshop, you’re forced to get it done. This gives you lots of great experience and practice, and it also builds good writing habits.

Thinking About Taking a Creative Writing Workshop?

I definitely recommend taking a creative writing workshop if you can find a good one that suits your schedule, budget, and writing needs. If you’ve already taken a creative writing workshop or class, share your experiences by leaving a comment. Did you learn or gain anything? Would you do it again?

Ready Set Write a Guide to Creative Writing

You have spoken along these lines before, Melissa, and this entry is, as all your posts, fascinating and carries a great deal of sense. However, and I know I am repeating myself, I am quite unable to allow others to trample over my work, however poor it is and however noble their (expressed) motives.

I cannot help but think of the vast number of ‘real’ writers, men and women who would not have entertained the thought that writing could be learned, like arithmetic, in a classroom.

I am a poor writer and have come to accept the fact I shall always be a poor writer; it is my belief that some things – like arithmetic – can be ‘brought to heel’ by sheer hatd work, while others, like music, painting and writing, will remain ever beyond the reach of some.

Further, I have seen very promising young tennis players taken up by organisations such as the LTA and coached, every shred of flair and originality brutally ‘ironed out’ of them, and my fear is that, for many of us, attending a writer’s workshop would be a similarly dulling experience.

I also realise, however, that there are those of a temperament to survive – and evn thrive in such conditions. Sadly, I am not one of them.

Again, my thanks for a fascinating and informative blog and may it go on to even greater success, but I think you should make it clear that not everyone who has pretensions of being a writer will see their dream come true.

Melissa Donovan

I believe anyone can become a writer. It starts with believing in yourself. I would add that successful authors demonstrate a range of writing skills. Even a “poor writer” (which you are not) can eke out a career in writing. I’ve seen it done. The only way to be sure you will never succeed is to never try.

Phyllis W Allen

Writing can be intended for a wide audience but it’s reason for being is that the writer cannot bear not to write. Whether you are a Eudora Welty, basking in prayers se or an Ethel Jackson whose writing fills notebooks only she has seen, your work has much value

CreatingWordlenik

Our local university has leisure learning classes that are workshops. We not only get feedback on our work, but we also learn how to workshop a piece, looking parts of the writing process with a discerning eye. The instructors keep the focus on the work, not the author. It’s so helpful for all the reasons you mentioned, but also to learn how to look constructively at my own work before anyone else ever reads it. Being inspired by fellow writers talking about writing is my favorite part. I’m sorry that opsimath feels that way. Whose to say what’s poor writing or good writing? Of course, some is obvious, and the above comment isn’t bad writing. I found it to be well-crafted and conveyed what the author intended. Not everybody is Stephen King or F.Scott Fitzgerald, and there are some who would argue even they aren’t good writers. I had the fear that I would lose myself in critique, but even in that it’s a good exercise. One of my best lessons is that no matter what others said, it’s still my writing. I can choose to take their advice or not. Workshops are only helpful when the focus is on the work, though. It’s a criitique, not a criticism. I’ve been in bad ones and they can hurt more than help. I got out of them quick.

Yes! Everything you said is spot-on. Your experiences in workshop give all of us reason to feel optimistic about finding good writing workshops and the benefits that we’ll gain from them. Thanks so much for sharing your experience. I hope it inspires others to take the plunge and try workshopping for themselves.

Shamit Khemka

You have talked thusly some time recently, Melissa, and this section is, as every one of your posts, interesting and conveys a lot of sense. On the other hand, and I know I am rehashing myself, I am very not able to permit others to trample over my work, however poor it is and however honorable their (communicated) thought processes.

I really want to think about the incomprehensible number of “genuine” essayists, men and ladies who might not have entertained the prospect that written work could be learned, similar to math, in a classroom.

I am a poor essayist and now acknowledge the actuality I should dependably be a poor author; it is my conviction that a few things – like math – can be ‘conveyed to heel’ by sheer hatd work, while others, similar to music, painting and composing, will remain ever past the compass of some.

Further, I have seen extremely encouraging youthful tennis players taken up by associations, for example, the LTA and instructed, each shred of energy and innovation mercilessly ‘resolved’ of them, and my trepidation is that, for a significant number of us, going to an author’s workshop would be an also dulling knowle

Hi Shamit. Receiving feedback and critiques is not the same as people trampling all over your work. A good critique is designed to make your writing better. If you want to be a better writer, you can certainly work toward that. It’s your choice. There are people who have a natural talent for writing. However, great writing requires a lot of different skills (grammar, storytelling, word-craft, etc.). Even the most talented writers will find some area of the craft where they need to learn skills they don’t possess. The idea that writing can’t be learned is simply not true, as evidenced by thousands upon thousands of people who worked hard to learn the craft and then became successful. The myth that talent is a requirement is an unfortunate one.

Ann Borger

A writer is someone who writes. However, the object of writing is not necessarily to get published or make a living by writing. Read, for example, the notebooks of Thomas Edison. One of the best writers I knew was my grandmother, who maintained weekly correspondence with seven high school girlfriends for over 50 years.

That’s true, Ann. People write for many reasons and not only for professional purposes.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  • 10 Essential Lessons You'll Learn in a Creative Writing Workshop | Creative Writing | Writing Forward « Project Chiron - [...] via 10 Essential Lessons You'll Learn in a Creative Writing Workshop | Creative Writing | Writing Forw.... [...]
  • No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links | No Wasted Ink - […] 10 Essential Lessons You’ll Learn in a Creative Writing Workshop […]

Submit a Comment Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed .

writers creed

Subscribe and get The Writer’s Creed graphic e-booklet, plus a weekly digest with the latest articles on writing, as well as special offers and exclusive content.

creative writing exercises

Recent Posts

  • 12 Character Writing Tips for Fiction Writers
  • What is Free-Verse Poetry?
  • Grammar Rules: Lay or Lie
  • Writing While Inspired
  • Thoughts on Becoming a Writer

Write on, shine on!

Pin It on Pinterest

Creative Primer

What is Creative Writing? A Key Piece of the Writer’s Toolbox

Brooks Manley

Not all writing is the same and there’s a type of writing that has the ability to transport, teach, and inspire others like no other.

Creative writing stands out due to its unique approach and focus on imagination. Here’s how to get started and grow as you explore the broad and beautiful world of creative writing!

What is Creative Writing?

Creative writing is a form of writing that extends beyond the bounds of regular professional, journalistic, academic, or technical forms of literature. It is characterized by its emphasis on narrative craft, character development, and the use of literary tropes or poetic techniques to express ideas in an original and imaginative way.

Creative writing can take on various forms such as:

  • short stories
  • screenplays

It’s a way for writers to express their thoughts, feelings, and ideas in a creative, often symbolic, way . It’s about using the power of words to transport readers into a world created by the writer.

5 Key Characteristics of Creative Writing

Creative writing is marked by several defining characteristics, each working to create a distinct form of expression:

1. Imagination and Creativity: Creative writing is all about harnessing your creativity and imagination to create an engaging and compelling piece of work. It allows writers to explore different scenarios, characters, and worlds that may not exist in reality.

2. Emotional Engagement: Creative writing often evokes strong emotions in the reader. It aims to make the reader feel something — whether it’s happiness, sorrow, excitement, or fear.

3. Originality: Creative writing values originality. It’s about presenting familiar things in new ways or exploring ideas that are less conventional.

4. Use of Literary Devices: Creative writing frequently employs literary devices such as metaphors, similes, personification, and others to enrich the text and convey meanings in a more subtle, layered manner.

5. Focus on Aesthetics: The beauty of language and the way words flow together is important in creative writing. The aim is to create a piece that’s not just interesting to read, but also beautiful to hear when read aloud.

Remember, creative writing is not just about producing a work of art. It’s also a means of self-expression and a way to share your perspective with the world. Whether you’re considering it as a hobby or contemplating a career in it, understanding the nature and characteristics of creative writing can help you hone your skills and create more engaging pieces .

For more insights into creative writing, check out our articles on creative writing jobs and what you can do with a creative writing degree and is a degree in creative writing worth it .

Styles of Creative Writing

To fully understand creative writing , you must be aware of the various styles involved. Creative writing explores a multitude of genres, each with its own unique characteristics and techniques.

Poetry is a form of creative writing that uses expressive language to evoke emotions and ideas. Poets often employ rhythm, rhyme, and other poetic devices to create pieces that are deeply personal and impactful. Poems can vary greatly in length, style, and subject matter, making this a versatile and dynamic form of creative writing.

Short Stories

Short stories are another common style of creative writing. These are brief narratives that typically revolve around a single event or idea. Despite their length, short stories can provide a powerful punch, using precise language and tight narrative structures to convey a complete story in a limited space.

Novels represent a longer form of narrative creative writing. They usually involve complex plots, multiple characters, and various themes. Writing a novel requires a significant investment of time and effort; however, the result can be a rich and immersive reading experience.

Screenplays

Screenplays are written works intended for the screen, be it television, film, or online platforms. They require a specific format, incorporating dialogue and visual descriptions to guide the production process. Screenwriters must also consider the practical aspects of filmmaking, making this an intricate and specialized form of creative writing.

If you’re interested in this style, understanding creative writing jobs and what you can do with a creative writing degree can provide useful insights.

Writing for the theater is another specialized form of creative writing. Plays, like screenplays, combine dialogue and action, but they also require an understanding of the unique dynamics of the theatrical stage. Playwrights must think about the live audience and the physical space of the theater when crafting their works.

Each of these styles offers unique opportunities for creativity and expression. Whether you’re drawn to the concise power of poetry, the detailed storytelling of novels, or the visual language of screenplays and plays, there’s a form of creative writing that will suit your artistic voice. The key is to explore, experiment, and find the style that resonates with you.

For those looking to spark their creativity, our article on creative writing prompts offers a wealth of ideas to get you started.

Importance of Creative Writing

Understanding what is creative writing involves recognizing its value and significance. Engaging in creative writing can provide numerous benefits – let’s take a closer look.

Developing Creativity and Imagination

Creative writing serves as a fertile ground for nurturing creativity and imagination. It encourages you to think outside the box, explore different perspectives, and create unique and original content. This leads to improved problem-solving skills and a broader worldview , both of which can be beneficial in various aspects of life.

Through creative writing, one can build entire worlds, create characters, and weave complex narratives, all of which are products of a creative mind and vivid imagination. This can be especially beneficial for those seeking creative writing jobs and what you can do with a creative writing degree .

Enhancing Communication Skills

Creative writing can also play a crucial role in honing communication skills. It demands clarity, precision, and a strong command of language. This helps to improve your vocabulary, grammar, and syntax, making it easier to express thoughts and ideas effectively .

Moreover, creative writing encourages empathy as you often need to portray a variety of characters from different backgrounds and perspectives. This leads to a better understanding of people and improved interpersonal communication skills.

Exploring Emotions and Ideas

One of the most profound aspects of creative writing is its ability to provide a safe space for exploring emotions and ideas. It serves as an outlet for thoughts and feelings , allowing you to express yourself in ways that might not be possible in everyday conversation.

Writing can be therapeutic, helping you process complex emotions, navigate difficult life events, and gain insight into your own experiences and perceptions. It can also be a means of self-discovery , helping you to understand yourself and the world around you better.

So, whether you’re a seasoned writer or just starting out, the benefits of creative writing are vast and varied. For those interested in developing their creative writing skills, check out our articles on creative writing prompts and how to teach creative writing . If you’re considering a career in this field, you might find our article on is a degree in creative writing worth it helpful.

4 Steps to Start Creative Writing

Creative writing can seem daunting to beginners, but with the right approach, anyone can start their journey into this creative field. Here are some steps to help you start creative writing .

1. Finding Inspiration

The first step in creative writing is finding inspiration . Inspiration can come from anywhere and anything. Observe the world around you, listen to conversations, explore different cultures, and delve into various topics of interest.

Reading widely can also be a significant source of inspiration. Read different types of books, articles, and blogs. Discover what resonates with you and sparks your imagination.

For structured creative prompts, visit our list of creative writing prompts to get your creative juices flowing.

Editor’s Note : When something excites or interests you, stop and take note – it could be the inspiration for your next creative writing piece.

2. Planning Your Piece

Once you have an idea, the next step is to plan your piece . Start by outlining:

  • the main points

Remember, this can serve as a roadmap to guide your writing process. A plan doesn’t have to be rigid. It’s a flexible guideline that can be adjusted as you delve deeper into your writing. The primary purpose is to provide direction and prevent writer’s block.

3. Writing Your First Draft

After planning your piece, you can start writing your first draft . This is where you give life to your ideas and breathe life into your characters.

Don’t worry about making it perfect in the first go. The first draft is about getting your ideas down on paper . You can always refine and polish your work later. And if you don’t have a great place to write that first draft, consider a journal for writing .

4. Editing and Revising Your Work

The final step in the creative writing process is editing and revising your work . This is where you fine-tune your piece, correct grammatical errors, and improve sentence structure and flow.

Editing is also an opportunity to enhance your storytelling . You can add more descriptive details, develop your characters further, and make sure your plot is engaging and coherent.

Remember, writing is a craft that improves with practice . Don’t be discouraged if your first few pieces don’t meet your expectations. Keep writing, keep learning, and most importantly, enjoy the creative process.

For more insights on creative writing, check out our articles on how to teach creative writing or creative writing activities for kids.

Tips to Improve Creative Writing Skills

Understanding what is creative writing is the first step. But how can one improve their creative writing skills? Here are some tips that can help.

Read Widely

Reading is a vital part of becoming a better writer. By immersing oneself in a variety of genres, styles, and authors, one can gain a richer understanding of language and storytelling techniques . Different authors have unique voices and methods of telling stories, which can serve as inspiration for your own work. So, read widely and frequently!

Practice Regularly

Like any skill, creative writing improves with practice. Consistently writing — whether it be daily, weekly, or monthly — helps develop your writing style and voice . Using creative writing prompts can be a fun way to stimulate your imagination and get the words flowing.

Attend Writing Workshops and Courses

Formal education such as workshops and courses can offer structured learning and expert guidance. These can provide invaluable insights into the world of creative writing, from understanding plot development to character creation. If you’re wondering is a degree in creative writing worth it, these classes can also give you a taste of what studying creative writing at a higher level might look like .

Joining Writing Groups and Communities

Being part of a writing community can provide motivation, constructive feedback, and a sense of camaraderie. These groups often hold regular meetings where members share their work and give each other feedback. Plus, it’s a great way to connect with others who share your passion for writing.

Seeking Feedback on Your Work

Feedback is a crucial part of improving as a writer. It offers a fresh perspective on your work, highlighting areas of strength and opportunities for improvement. Whether it’s from a writing group, a mentor, or even friends and family, constructive criticism can help refine your writing .

Start Creative Writing Today!

Remember, becoming a proficient writer takes time and patience. So, don’t be discouraged by initial challenges. Keep writing, keep learning, and most importantly, keep enjoying the process. Who knows, your passion for creative writing might even lead to creative writing jobs and what you can do with a creative writing degree .

Happy writing!

Brooks Manley

Brooks Manley

what is creative writing workshop

Creative Primer  is a resource on all things journaling, creativity, and productivity. We’ll help you produce better ideas, get more done, and live a more effective life.

My name is Brooks. I do a ton of journaling, like to think I’m a creative (jury’s out), and spend a lot of time thinking about productivity. I hope these resources and product recommendations serve you well. Reach out if you ever want to chat or let me know about a journal I need to check out!

Here’s my favorite journal for 2024: 

the five minute journal

Gratitude Journal Prompts Mindfulness Journal Prompts Journal Prompts for Anxiety Reflective Journal Prompts Healing Journal Prompts Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Journal Prompts Mental Health Journal Prompts ASMR Journal Prompts Manifestation Journal Prompts Self-Care Journal Prompts Morning Journal Prompts Evening Journal Prompts Self-Improvement Journal Prompts Creative Writing Journal Prompts Dream Journal Prompts Relationship Journal Prompts "What If" Journal Prompts New Year Journal Prompts Shadow Work Journal Prompts Journal Prompts for Overcoming Fear Journal Prompts for Dealing with Loss Journal Prompts for Discerning and Decision Making Travel Journal Prompts Fun Journal Prompts

Inspiring Ink: Expert Tips on How to Teach Creative Writing

You may also like, how to have more effective meetings.

Brooks Manley

What Time of Day Are People Most Creative?

How to use a planner to stay organized and get more done, leave a reply cancel reply.

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

  • Productivity
  • Favorite Journals

NEW VIDEO COURSE

Learn How to Write a Novel, Join Tom Bromley for a writing master class.

Learn How to Write a Novel

Join Tom Bromley for a writing master class and finish your first draft in 3 months.

596 Best Creative Writing Classes in 2024

Showing 596 courses that match your search.

2024 Youth Summer Camp: Sci-Fi/Fantasy ONLINE

Story Studio Chicago

Over the course of one week, writers will generate their own science fiction and fantasy pieces and workshop them with the help of their peers. They will learn the differences between the genres and read the works of notable authors.

Website: https://www.storystudiochicago.org/classes/youth/2024-you...

Categories: Book, Fiction, Fantasy, and Science Fiction

Start date:

Prerequisites: No prerequisites

8-week Writing Sprints: A Generative Class

Sackett Street Writers

Writing Sprints is an exercise-intensive course designed to “unstick” writers struggling to start or continue new projects, boosting writing productivity. The course relies heavily on writing exercises (for both fiction & nonfiction writers). This class is for writers of all levels looking for inspiration and motivation.

Website: https://sackettworkshop.com/writing/2024/03/05/8-week-wri...

Categories: Book, Fiction, and Nonfiction

September, 2024

Prerequisites: A writing sample is recommended for this class.

The Secret Life of Scenes Workshop with David Biespiel

Attic Institute

Do you feel your writing gets bogged down in announcing, recounting, and summarizing? What you need is some scene-making medicine. Work with Attic Institute founder and two-time Oregon Book Award winner David Biespiel to learn the keys to explain less and dramatize more.

Website: https://atticinstitute.com/node/2830

Categories: Book, Fiction, Nonfiction, Screenplay, and Short Story

what is creative writing workshop

How to Write a Novel

Your story matters. Unlock your potential with daily video lessons from bestselling ghostwriter Tom Bromley, and finish your first draft in just 3 months. Learn more →

2024 I Love to Write Camp

Kansas City Writers

Explore the creative writing process without worrying about your grade! These workshops include experience with free writing of many types of writing and techniques to help your writing come alive.

Website: https://www.kansascitywriters.com/workshops-for-kids.html

Categories: Fiction and Kids

Open all year round

Healing a Heart: Writing Your Way to Hope

Rockvale Writer's Colony

In this four-part class we'll explore the art and magic of writing as a healing process in a collaborative and supportive environment. Together, we will share our stories, read a variety of essays and short fiction in order to identify how others have utilized the written word to heal themselves.

Website: https://rockvalewriterscolony.org/workshops/november-8-10...

Categories: Fiction, Nonfiction, Book, and Essay

November, 2024

Fall Virtual Workshop

Futurescapes

Futurescapes is an intensive, exclusive workshop, offering writers an unparalleled chance to work with top authors and agents in speculative fiction (science fiction, horror, fantasy, paranormal).

Website: https://futurescapes.ink/fall-workshop

Categories: Science Fiction, Fantasy, Book, and Fiction

October, 2024

Prerequisites: You may submit any original written work for your application.

Teen Summer: Say It Like You Mean It

Whether characters are arguing, bantering, betraying secrets, or confessing their guilt, dialogue can be one of the most challenging parts of writing a scene. In this workshop, we’ll learn about the various ways you can use dialogue in your writing, such as to advance the plot or develop characters.

Website: https://grubstreet.org/workshop/teen-summer-say-it-like-y...

Categories: Screenplay, Short Story, Book, Kids, and Nonfiction

August, 2024

The Poetry of Play

Writers.com

In this class, we’ll enjoy a rollicking good time by responding to poetry’s call to do just that. Students will read a wide variety of playful poetry, then experiment with in-class writing prompts designed to awaken freedom and enjoyment.

Website: https://writers.com/course/the-poetry-of-play

Categories: Poetry, Book, and Short Story

January, 2025

The Art of Live Storytelling

Ever dreamt of captivating an audience with your storytelling, condensing your writing into a sharp pitch, or confidently speaking in public? This course is designed for you. Uncover the craft of powerful storytelling using the classic "pity, fear, catharsis" framework and contemporary engagement techniques.

Website: https://grubstreet.org/workshop/the-art-of-live-storytell...

Categories: Nonfiction, Essay, and Fiction

Prerequisites: For writers age 13 - 18 ONLY.

Writing Experimental Essays

The aim of this class is to open up your writing by embracing this experimentation with form and structure. You’ll learn about the lyric essay—braided, collage, and hermit crab and more.

Website: https://grubstreet.org/workshop/writing-experimental-essa...

Categories: Nonfiction and Essay

Teen Summer: DIY Comic Book Making

You love comics, and graphic novels, and you like to doodle, but perhaps you’ve never finished a multi-page comic story? Or, you are a veteran comics creator and want to draw a new one! Now’s your chance to create a mini-comic during one week this summer.

Website: https://grubstreet.org/workshop/teen-summer-diy-comic-boo...

Categories: Book, Short Story, and Nonfiction

Teen Summer: From Story to Screen: Intro to Screenwriting

In this screenwriting and film workshop, we will learn Aristotle’s poetics, character work, scene writing, and dialogue. Further, we will immerse ourselves in clips from movies and short films and discuss how they relate to our learning techniques.

Website: https://grubstreet.org/workshop/teen-summer-from-story-to...

Categories: Kids

What are the 5 best creative writing classes?

Congratulations! Deciding to learn how to creative write is often the hardest step of all. Now it's time for a choice that's almost just as difficult: picking which creative writing class you want to take in a market that's getting more crowded by the day.  

That’s why we built this directory of the best creative writing courses — so that you can more easily filter through all of the selections out there. But in case you don't have time to dive into them all, here are five of the best creative writing classes for you to take a look at. 

1. Reedsy Learning

💲 Cost: Free 👨‍🏫 Type: Email lessons

If you’re struggling to find time for creative writing classes, Reedsy Learning is for you. These bite-sized lessons are emailed to you once a day for ten days and can be read in five minutes or less. But don’t let their compact size fool you — each lesson is packed with practical tips, links to additional resources, and enough exercises to keep your skills sharp. There are also courses on editing, marketing, and publishing for when you’re ready to take your creative writing to the next level.

2. Gotham Writers’ Workshop

💲 Cost: $165 - $409 (plus registration fees) 👨‍🏫 Type: Video lectures, live Zoom classes, assignments, critique

The largest adult-education writing school in the US, Gotham Writers has been helping budding authors hone their skills since the 1990s. Based in New York City, they offer in-person classes as well as a variety of online options for students all over the globe. With self-paced courses, live Zoom lectures, write-ins, and several free events per term, Gotham Writers emulates the university feel wherever possible.

💲 Cost: $0 - $109 👨‍🏫 Type: Lectures (videos, slides, and text)

Founded in 2010, Udemy is a massive online open course (MOOC) platform, created to provide an alternative to in-person, university learning. Their primary audience is made up of professionals and students — some of their courses even offer credit toward technical certifications. Their creative writing courses are broad and geared mainly toward beginners, through there are some intermediate courses that get into specific niches.

💲 Cost: $0 - $998 👨‍🏫 Type: Video lectures, online assignments

Another MOOC, edX was started as a collaboration between Harvard and MIT, but these days boasts classes from a wide variety of respected universities. Like Udemy, some of their courses also offer college credits. edX’s courses are weekly, consisting of short videos, interactive learning exercises, and online discussion groups. Their writing courses cover everything from novels to stand-up comedy to digital content. There are also related courses in journalism, composition, and grammar, among other specializations.

5. Coursera

💲 Cost: Free (Creative Writing Specialization) 👨‍🏫 Type: Video lectures, online assignments

One last MOOC for our list, this time founded by several Computer Science professors from Stanford University. But don’t let its history fool you — Coursera offers humanities classes as much as science and technology. In addition to general courses, Coursera also offers specializations, a series of courses that work together much like what you’d find in a university.

I have a long list of creative writing courses. Now what?

If you've narrowed down a list of writing classes in English you like, then it's time to commit to one of them. But how do you know which is the right fit for your needs and lifestyle?

Before committing to one of them, we recommend considering some of these questions.

  • What skill levels does the writing course cover?
  • What’s the price of the writing course? Does it match your budget?
  • How long does the writing course run for?
  • Who is the instructor of the course? Can you verify their credentials?
  • Is the writing course remote or in-person?

More creative writing resources

Whether you’re a new or established author, there are always evergreen resources out there to how to get a headstart on creative writing! 

Free online materials

  • Creative Writing Prompts (resource)
  • Book Title Generator (resource)
  • Character Name Generator (resource)
  • Plot Generator (resource)
  • How to Write a Novel (blog post)
  • How to Write a Book Proposal (blog post)
  • How to Edit a Book (blog post)

Recommended books

  • For writers in the UK:  Writers' & Artists' Yearbook  
  • For writers in the US:  Writer’s Market 2020

Join a community of over 1 million authors

Reedsy is more than just a blog. Become a member today to discover how we can help you publish a beautiful book.

Reedsy Marketplace UI

Save your shortlist

Enter your email address to save your shortlist so that you don't lose it!

By continuing, you will also receive Reedsy's weekly publishing tips and access to our free webinars.

Reedsy Marketplace UI

We sent over your shortlist. Thank you for using Reedsy's Writing Courses Directory, happy publishing! 🙌

Learning | Free Lesson — Archer | 2024-01

Try our novel writing master class — 100% free

Sign up for a free video lesson and learn how to make readers care about your main character.

Reedsy Marketplace UI

1 million authors trust the professionals on Reedsy. Come meet them.

Enter your email or get started with a social account:

The Write Practice

Writing Workshop: Can a Writing Workshop Help You Become a Better Writer?

by Joe Bunting | 0 comments

Want to Become a Published Author? In 100 Day Book, you’ll finish your book guaranteed. Learn more and sign up here.

How do you write beautiful, award-winning novels, memoirs, and short stories? One tried-and-true way is through a writing workshop, a program with other writers who can give encouragement, feedback, and support as you write, edit, and publish your writing.

Writing Workshop: Can a Writing Workshop Help You Become a Better Writer?

But maybe you don't know how to join a writing workshop, can't afford the steep admission fee a masters-level creative writing program costs, or you don't live near one.

That's where an online writing workshop like The Write Practice Pro can help in.

In this post, I’m going to share what a creative writing workshop is and how you can use it to improve your writing habits, get feedback on your creative writing, and go on to publish award-winning writing. Then we’ll talk about how to find a writing workshop, whether online or locally, and how to get the most out of it.

What Is a Creative Writing Workshop?

Writing workshop is a method of guiding people through the creative writing process with a focus on publishing and/or sharing their writing.

The Six Elements of a Writing Workshop

There are six parts to writing workshops:

  • Lessons on the creative writing process.
  • Structured time to plan your writing piece and brainstorm story ideas
  • Structured writing time
  • Getting feedback from editors/teachers and other students/writers
  • Revision time based on content/grammar/flow
  • Publishing or sharing

The Limitations of Most Creative Writing Workshops

In the past, creative writing workshops haven’t been accessible to everyone. Here’s why:

1. Location Dependent

Generally creative writing workshops are done in school settings, from a Masters in Fine Arts (MFA) creative writing program to a middle school creative writing unit.

For example, one of the most famous workshops is the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, which is in Iowa City, Iowa. Hundreds of award-winning novelists and memoirists have either graduated from or taught at this program, including Pulitzer Prize winners Marilyn Robinson, Michael Cunningham, John Cheever, and more.

The problem is if you’re going to participate, you need to be in a specific location, namely Iowa.

Iowa isn’t the only excellent creative writing program (Poets and Writers has a full list of MFA programs ), and there are low-residency programs, where you can go in-person for just a few weeks per semester. But all creative writing programs require you to be in a specific location for at least several weeks and often several years.

If you can’t move your life to Iowa or some other city with a program, that rules out the possibility of improving your writing through this method.

2. High Cost

The average cost at an MFA creative writing workshop for a single class is over $3,300. The total cost can be as low as $27,000 and up to $108,000. That’s a lot!

If you don’t have an extra $50k lying around (and if you do, call me!), participating in a creative writing workshop is probably not possible.

3. Lack of Focus on Publishing

Writers write for readers. One drawback of some creative writing workshops is they spend so much time focusing on writing for other writers, professors, and a handful of university-funded literary magazines that they forget who their real audience is.

Without a strong focus on publishing, a creative writing workshop can get lost in the weeds of craft that sounds good in theory but doesn’t serve readers.

Can Regular People Participate in Creative Writing Workshops? Yes, in 3 Ways

There is huge value to the creative writing workshop process for all writers and aspiring writers, regardless of whether they’re in a formal school setting or not.

The great news is that now anyone can participate in this process and use it to improve their writing and get published.

There are three main ways that people can get involved with creative writing workshops, apart from local school settings:

  • Local writing critique groups
  • Online writing classes
  • Online writing critique groups

Let’s look at two of those, local writing groups and online writing groups.

Pros and Cons of Local Writing Groups and How to Find Them

Local writing groups are groups of people interested in writing who meet regularly (often weekly) to critique each other’s chapters and short stories and talk about the writing process.

Sometimes these groups are filled with amateur writers working on their first books and pieces, but established writers often belong to writers’ groups too.

Famous examples of local writers’ groups include the Inklings , J.R.R Tolkien and C.S. Lewis’s writing group in Oxford; the Bloomsbury Group , Virginia Woolf and T.S. Eliot’s group in London; and the more informal Lost Generation , Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s group in Paris.

The benefit of local writers’ groups is that they give you a great chance to build relationships with other writers, and these writing friends can help you with more than just improving your chapters, but also how to get published and how to market your writing.

Here are some ways you can find a local writers’ groups:

  • Google for local writing groups in your area
  • Ask other writers you know locally if they are part of a group or know of groups
  • Create your own

The drawback of local writers’ groups is that these groups only provide one aspect of the creative writing workshop experience: feedback.

Getting good feedback might be a valuable part of becoming a published writer, but it’s certainly not the only part. Structured brainstorming, structured writing time (like deadlines), focusing on revision, publishing opportunities, and even lessons on creative writing are also important parts of growing as a writer.

On top of that, you might not connect with your local group (I never have!). You might not be a good fit in terms of career level, with people either far ahead of you or behind you.

Even worse, what if you don’t live in an area with a local writers’ group at all?

If a local writers’ group isn’t a good solution for you, how can you get the full creative writing workshop experience?

That’s where online creative writing workshops like The Write Practice Pro can help.

How an Online Writing Workshop Like The Write Practice Pro Works

There are several online writing workshops that overcome the hurdles we talked about above. One of the best groups is The Write Practice Pro.

The Write Practice Pro is an online creative writing workshop dedicated to helping you become a better writer, write award-winning books and short stories, and ultimately become a bestselling author.

Here’s how it can help you get the full creative writing workshop experience:

1. Lessons on the creative writing process

At The Write Practice, we believe everyone can become a great writer through deliberate practice, and one of the most important aspects of deliberate practice is solid lessons.

Through The Write Practice Pro, you can get daily writing lessons, writing prompts, and exercises to help you become a better writer. For example, click here for the top 100 creative writing lessons .

We also host regular writing courses , like 100 Day Book , where you can connect with a mentor who will walk you through the process of writing a first draft (or second draft) of a novel, memoir, or non-fiction book.

2. Planning your writing and brainstorming ideas

It can take hundreds of hours to write a book, sometimes even thousands. If you’re going to invest that time into the writing process, you want to make sure that you’re working on the right idea.

That’s why getting feedback on your idea, not just your actual writing, is so important.

In The Write Practice Pro, you can go to the Book Ideas group , share your idea, and get feedback from other writers on whether the idea works or not.

what is creative writing workshop

3. Structured writing time

As someone who struggles with structure, one thing I’ve learned is that if I don’t have structured writing time, I will never finish my writing! I’ve written over ten books, but I wouldn’t have finished any of them if I hadn’t leaned into structure.

The best way I know to build structure for writing is to create deadlines that I can actually keep, and in The Write Practice Pro, we have a sacred deadline that the whole community lives by. We call in The Write Practice Pro challenge:

what is creative writing workshop

Write one chapter, story, article, or poem per week by Friday at midnight.

If you’re in one of our writing classes, like 100 Day Book or Write to Publish, you follow this deadline. And if you’re in The Write Practice Pro, you follow it too.

Why? Because as writers, we need deadlines. Even more importantly, we need a community that will encourage us to hit the deadline even if we don’t want to.

4. Getting feedback, from editors and other writers

At The Write Practice, we believe everyone can become a great writer through deliberate practice, and one of the most important aspects of deliberate practice is feedback.

To grow as a writer you need feedback both from your peers (other writers) and from experts (an editor or teacher).

Why does feedback work? Because good writing is rewriting. But studies have shown that when you rewrite without feedback, you generally focus on surface-level edits like fixing grammatical errors and typos. However, if you get feedback, you’ll focus on content-level edits, like rewriting a section to make it more readable or restructuring the piece entirely.

The amazing thing that these studies have shown is that peer feedback is almost as effective as professional feedback. So as important as it is to get professional feedback, even feedback from writers at your same level will help you become a better writer.

Below I’ll share how to get peer and professional feedback on your writing on The Write Practice Pro.

How to Get Feedback on The Write Practice Pro

1. Start by going to The Write Practice Pro groups screen . The Write Practice Pro is organized into several different critiquing groups, including a group for short stories and a group for novels.

2. Follow the group for your piece. If you’ve written a short story or writing practice, click “Follow” next to the Writers Workshop: Short Stories group. If you’ve written a chapter of a novel, click “Follow” next to the Writers Workshop: Novels and Books group.

I’m writing a Pirate Story and so I’m going to be sharing in the Short Stories workshop .

what is creative writing workshop

3. Click to your group and then copy and paste your piece into the editor. Then click submit and wait for your piece to publish!

I copied and pasted my Pirate Story (from Pirate Ipsum ) into the Short Story Workshop below. Once the story is published, my story will be assigned to other writers and I can start to get feedback.

4. Complete your critiquing. Some groups in The Write Practice Pro, like the Short Story Workshop, pair you with other writers to critique. This is a great way to get to know the work of other writers and make new writer friends. Here’s what a match looks like:

what is creative writing workshop

Now, I will follow the links to those three stories, read them, and give feedback to the writer.

Other groups, like the Novel and Books Workshop, allow you to choose whom you will critique.

But all groups ask you to read and give feedback on three other pieces in your group before you can view the critiques on your own story (this requirement expires after fourteen days). That way everyone gets the feedback they need to improve their writing!

There are two ways to give feedback:

  • Critique the story as a whole, following our critiquing guidelines and using the Oreo Method .
  • Give inline feedback by highlighting text and clicking the comment icon. This is great for spotting typos, grammatical errors, or other inline issues.

After I finish my matched critiques, I will be able to view feedback on my own story.

5. Upgrade for Professional Editor Feedback. If you want a professional critique, click the “Upgrade” button (see screenshot below) and send your story to The Write Pro’s team of Story Grid certified editors for a content-based critique.

what is creative writing workshop

I want an editor’s feedback on Pirate Story, so I click the upgrade button. Then I’m taken to a page describing the kind of feedback I’ll receive and the cost, which is 1.5¢ per word.

I can also enter any special area of focus for the critique. After I click submit, a member of The Write Practice Pro’s team will follow up and I will receive my professional critique within one to three weeks.

5. Revisions Based on Content, Grammar, and Readability

After you get feedback, you need to edit your writing and revise it based on content, grammar, and readability.

Often this is the hardest part of the writing process, and I usually have my biggest struggles and moments of self-doubt during the revision process.

However, that’s why it’s so great to have an encouraging community of other writers. When you feel stuck, share your struggles with the community in The Write Practice Pro’s Café group. This is a great way to get tips and encouragement from the community.

what is creative writing workshop

6. Publishing or sharing

This is the end goal. As writers, we don’t just write . We share our writing with the world.

The Write Practice Pro makes it easy to publish. Through their partnership with Short Fiction Break literary magazine , you can publish your writing instantly on the website, sharing your writing with the world.

Here’s how it works:

How to Publish Your Writing on Short Fiction Break Literary Magazine

Note: publishing is currently only available for pieces posted in the Short Stories Workshop.

1. After your piece has been thoroughly edited, navigate to your writing piece on The Write Practice Pro . If you can’t find it, go to your profile and find your story in your feed.

what is creative writing workshop

When I click on my profile, I can easily find my story in my activity feed.

what is creative writing workshop

2. Click the “Publish” button beside the story title. Note that you must complete your three critiques before the “Publish” button will appear.

what is creative writing workshop

After you click Publish, a dialogue box will appear, asking if you agree to Short Fiction Break’s publishing guidelines and terms. When you confirm you’re ready to publish, you will see this message with a link to your story:

what is creative writing workshop

Here’s the story LIVE on Short Fiction Break:

what is creative writing workshop

That was easy! Maybe I should write a real story now!

Will the Writing Workshop Process Help You Become a Better Creative Writer?

So what’s the verdict? Will participating in the Writing Workshop process help your writing?

Yes! Even if you only participate in a local writers’ group and just get feedback, that feedback will help you become a better writer.

Even better, if you enroll in an MFA program or join an online writing workshop like The Write Practice Pro and go through all six steps of the workshopping process, you will become a better writer even faster.

One thing to remember, though: these workshops do not make the writing process easier. In fact, in some ways it will be harder, because you are growing in each step in the writing process.

After all, growth never comes without discomfort.

But if you follow the process and press in to that discomfort, you will become a better writer.

Ready to start the writing workshop process? Join The Write Practice Pro and get started now. Click to join The Write Practice Pro .

What is your favorite part of the writing workshop process? How has being part of a workshop helped you? Let me know in the comments .

Ready to practice the writing workshop process? Here’s a writing prompt to help:

Write about a writing critique group gone wrong. Maybe two of the members are dating and get into a massive fight. Maybe one member can’t take feedback and erupts in anger. Maybe the teacher is secretly gaslighting everyone.

Whatever your writing group gone wrong looks like, write about it for fifteen minutes . When your time is up, participate in the workshopping process by posting your practice in the comments section for feedback. And if you do post, please be sure to give feedback on at least three other pieces.

Happy writing!

what is creative writing workshop

Join 100 Day Book

Enrollment closes May 14 at midnight!

' src=

Joe Bunting

Joe Bunting is an author and the leader of The Write Practice community. He is also the author of the new book Crowdsourcing Paris , a real life adventure story set in France. It was a #1 New Release on Amazon. Follow him on Instagram (@jhbunting).

Want best-seller coaching? Book Joe here.

The 7 Components of a Fail Proof Book Plan

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  • The Write Practice Pro Review: Does this Online Writing Workshop Actually Work? - […] do you write beautiful, award-worthy books and short stories? One of the best ways is to join an online writing…
  • How to Publish a Short Story: The Complete Guide - […] Guaranteed. If you don’t have a writing group to give you feedback, consider checking out The Write Practice Pro.…
  • How to Publish a Short Story: The Complete Guide – Lederto.com Blog - […] typos. Guaranteed. If you don’t have a writing group to give you feedback, consider checking out The Write Practice…
  • Freytag’s Pyramid: Definition, Examples, and How to Use this Dramatic Structure in Your Writing - […] Gustav Freytag originally formulated Freytag’s Pyramid in his 1863 book Freytag’s Technique of the Drama, and over the last…
  • Evelyn Puerto on How to Write Great Dialogue in a Story - […] Getting feedback was extremely helpful, because it told me that at least some people enjoyed my work. That gave…
  • Evelyn Puerto on How to Write Great Dialogue in a Story – Books, Literature & Writing - […] Getting feedback was extremely helpful, because it told me that at least some people enjoyed my work. That gave…
  • How will you use the advice from this post? - […] Getting feedback was extremely helpful, because it told me that at least some people enjoyed my work. That gave…
  • What’s the most interesting marketing tip you’ve discovered from this post? - […] Getting feedback was extremely helpful, because it told me that at least some people enjoyed my work. That gave…
  • Evelyn Puerto on How to Write Great Dialogue in a Story – Journal Monks - […] Getting feedback was extremely helpful, because it told me that at least some people enjoyed my work. That gave…
  • Can The Write Practice Help You Get Published? 19 Books Our Community Published in 2019 - […] of the authors we’re celebrating here are members of The Write Practice Pro, our online writing workshop. If you…
  • Can The Write Practice Help You Get Published? 19 Books Our Community Published in 2019 – Books, Literature & Writing - […] of the authors we’re celebrating here are members of The Write Practice Pro, our online writing workshop. If you…
  • What’s the most helpful content marketing tip you’ve uncovered from this post? - […] of the authors we’re celebrating here are members of The Write Practice Pro, our online writing workshop. If you…
  • What’s the most interesting marketing tip you’ve uncovered from this post? - […] of the authors we’re celebrating here are members of The Write Practice Pro, our online writing workshop. If you…
  • How will you apply the advice from this post? - […] of the authors we’re celebrating here are members of The Write Practice Pro, our online writing workshop. If you…

Submit a Comment Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Submit Comment

Join over 450,000 readers who are saying YES to practice. You’ll also get a free copy of our eBook 14 Prompts :

Popular Resources

Book Writing Tips & Guides Creativity & Inspiration Tips Writing Prompts Grammar & Vocab Resources Best Book Writing Software ProWritingAid Review Writing Teacher Resources Publisher Rocket Review Scrivener Review Gifts for Writers

Books By Our Writers

Box of Shards

You've got it! Just us where to send your guide.

Enter your email to get our free 10-step guide to becoming a writer.

You've got it! Just us where to send your book.

Enter your first name and email to get our free book, 14 Prompts.

Want to Get Published?

Enter your email to get our free interactive checklist to writing and publishing a book.

  • Write For Us

Re:Fiction

How to Lead a Creative Writing Workshop

what is creative writing workshop

A writing workshop has been described as a class that teaches itself. At their best, they can create an experience that exceeds everyone’s expectations – including the leader’s! Here’s how to give your next workshop the best chance of making that happen.   

As writers who have both attended and conducted writing workshops, we’ve seen firsthand how they can work well – and how they can fall apart. Every writing workshop is unique, and there is no magical formula to ensure success. But there are lots of things you can do to set up the session to have the best chance of generating some truly creative magic.

So much about your workshop’s success depends on the participants and how they work with each other as well as the exercises they are given. Even as the workshop leader, you won’t have complete control over these variables. But you can do your best to provide the right environment, ideas and support for the creative spark to ignite.

Choose a Conducive Venue

Getting the setting for the workshop right, if it’s not already determined as part of another event, is essential. You want a space that’s easy for people to find, with practicalities like parking, accommodations and refreshments covered. At the same time, it needs to be a quiet, self-contained space where you and your fellow creative writers won’t be disturbed.

If you are running the workshop to generate revenue, you may need to factor in costs like venue rental and hiring extra help. Training providers and creative companies will often be willing to rent out an unused meeting room at a reasonable rate, and libraries or even church halls can make good locations, too. So it’s a good idea to ask around before springing for an option that will look very swish, but will erode your profits.

Set Expectations

Give participants a good idea of what to expect before they arrive at the workshop. Let them know that they’ll be asked to write something during the session, and that their writing will be discussed in a nonjudgmental way by the group.

It’s important to communicate this up front, because some writers – however experienced – may be uncomfortable with the idea of writing spontaneously and sharing in a group setting. The writers that gain the most from workshops are likely to be those that are ready to take on a challenge and to push beyond their comfort zones in the hopes of developing their craft.

Lock Down the Practicalities

Inform participants about the length and overall structure of the session. A decent length of time per session is about two hours, typically broken down into an hour of writing followed by another hour of reading and feedback. Make sure the time and location are both clearly communicated beforehand, and that you have confirmation of the number of writers who will be attending.

In terms of numbers, five is probably about the ideal group size for this kind of workshop and timeframe. Many more than that, and there is the risk of running out of time before everyone’s had a chance to receive feedback on their work. Less than four participants, and it can start to feel a bit too intense, and lacking in varied opinions.

People sometimes forget to bring writing materials, too, so make sure you have a stock of spare pens and pads handy.

How to Structure Your Workshop

There are a number of different ways to structure a workshop, but whichever approach you use, don’t brief participants on the specific exercises you intend to give them. It’s vital that they arrive without any preconceptions about what they will try to write.

Warm-up and Rapport

Before starting any exercise, it helps to have a way to break the ice and generate a bit of group rapport, especially as some attendees may be strangers to each other and will understandably feel a little nervous about diving in.

A simple way to do this is to get the group to pair off and chat briefly about why they’ve come to the workshop and what sort of writing they do. Then, you bring everyone back together and ask each person to introduce not themselves, but whomever he or she talked to. Inevitably, the subject of each intro will want to chip in and clarify or supplement a few facts, and in this way people warm up and start interacting more freely.

From there, it’s straight into the exercise section!

The Single-exercise Approach: Pros and Cons

We’ve attended writing workshops where, after a brief introduction, everyone launches straight into a single, hour-long exercise. This approach has both benefits and drawbacks.

The main benefit is that it gives participants the time to attempt something ambitious and unconstrained. It’s comforting to know that you can always abandon your piece if it isn’t working, and still be able to produce something halfway decent by the end of the session.

The drawbacks are that, firstly, you’ve barely taken off your coat and uncapped your pen (or fired up your laptop) and you’re immediately expected to be creative – often the mind can freeze in such situations. Secondly, if you’re not inspired by the exercise you’ve been given, you’re basically stuck. So, this can be quite the risky approach, and we’d advise breaking up the writing part of the workshop into a number of different exercises to take some of the pressure off your participants.

The Multi-exercise Approach

A more common approach in writing workshops is for participants to begin with a short and simple warm-up exercise to get the creative juices flowing. This could be, for example, spending a minute writing down all the sounds they can hear. They could then extend this to imagine themselves in a forest or on a busy street and write down what they think they could hear now that they’ve extended the setting.

Another simple exercise to get people in the writing mood would be to ask them to use a couple hundred words to describe a recent meal, their journey to the workshop, or a room in their house or a view from a window. For an extra challenge, tell them they have to do it without using the word “I.”

These limited and circumscribed exercises can be followed by a more open kind of writing challenge, such as:

  • Write a story in which each sentence begins with a different letter of the alphabet
  • Write a letter to your younger self
  • Think of someone you know well and write a scene from his or her perspective

Other classic workshop exercises require some preparatory work on the leader’s part. You might, for example, provide a list of odd and mismatched words and ask the participants to write a story containing all of them. Or, you might hand around images cut out from a magazine as inspiration for a story. There are lots of other weird and wonderful prompts you could draw on here, too.

The Cumulative Approach

Personally, we prefer to structure writing exercises so that the results flow into one another and contribute to, and help shape, a larger story.

For example, you might start off by inviting participants to select one object out of a variety: a hat, a pair of shoes, an umbrella, a pair of glasses, a walking stick, a wristwatch, etc. They would then be asked to write a paragraph describing their chosen object in detail. In the second exercise, the challenge is to describe the person who owns or regularly uses the object, including that person’s personality and life story. The next task is to describe the person’s relationship with the object – how it was acquired, why it’s important to the owner, how it’s used, how it can be personalized, and how it’s changed its owner.

Finally, after briefly discussing what the participants have developed so far, they are asked to begin a story featuring the person and the object. This could be the origin story of how the two first came in contact, a moment of triumph or pride when the object helped the owner achieve something, a significant event when the object first became important, or a moment of crisis or loss. With this approach, the exercises feed naturally into one other, with each adding to the next, giving writers momentum, so that when it comes to the final exercise, they have fewer doubts about the stories they wish to write.

The Feedback Session: Balancing Praise and Critique

When the writing part of the workshop is over, the leader will invite participants to read out some or all of what they have written. No one should feel compelled to read – although it might be worth gently reminding reluctant participants that a big part of the value of any workshop is the feedback one receives from one’s peers.

The leader usually facilitates the discussion that follows a reading by offering his or her views, which should always be positive and constructive to set the right tone. Everything written in the pressure cooker environment of a workshop is deserving of sincere and wholehearted praise, after all. We praise primarily to show that we understand what the writer intended and can appreciate the work from the writer’s perspective, on his or her terms.

When it comes to the critique part of the workshop, you have to be careful how you express things. Avoid speaking in definitive or objective terms (“this is bad writing”) and refer instead to aspects that didn’t work for you as a reader, or what the writer might expand on, with suggestions of things he or she might do differently or try in the future.

It’s important that the leader doesn’t dominate the feedback session, but also encourages the other participants to give their responses to the readings. The leader’s main role, after offering an informed opinion, is to keep the discussion positive and on-topic, to challenge harsh or unfair criticisms, and to sum up at the end. The leader should also keep an eye on the clock to ensure that discussions don’t run on too long and everyone gets a fair share of feedback time. Once everyone has shared his or her thoughts on the readings, or there is no more time left for the workshop, the leader should bring the session to a close with a few final summarizing remarks.

Watch the Benefits Emerge

Often the real benefit of a workshop will only become apparent after the fact. The exercises, along with the feedback, may have sown the seeds of a potential story, or maybe even a novel. The experience might encourage a participant to work on and improve an aspect of his or her technique. The exercises themselves can be reused or adapted as writing prompts in the future.

In short, no one can be sure exactly what will be gained from a creative writing workshop until jumping in and doing one! The simple act of writing spontaneously and then discussing the results will always throw out surprises, and the leader is likely to learn as much, if not more, than the participants.

About the author

Alex Woolf and Dan Brotzel are co-authors of a new comic novel, Kitten on a Fatberg (Unbound). As a reader of this website, you can pre-order Kitten on a Fatberg for a 10% discount – simply quote promo code KITTEN10.

Alex has written over 100 books for children and adults, published by the likes of OUP, Ladybird, and Heinemann and Watts.

Dan Brotzel

Dan Brotzel is the winner of the latest Riptide Journal short story competition, was runner-up in the 2019 Leicester Writes contest, and was highly commended in the Manchester Writing School competition 2018. Other competition shortlists include Flash500, Sunderland University/Waterstones, To Hull and Back, Wimbledon BookFest, Fish, Dorset Writers Award and Retreat West. He has words in places like Pithead Chapel, Ellipsis, Reflex Fiction, Cabinet of Heed, Bending Genres, The Esthetic Apostle, Spelk, Ginger Collect, and Fiction Pool. His first collection of short stories, Hotel du Jack, will be published early 2020. He is also co-author of a comic novel, Kitten on a Fatberg, now available to pre-order at Unbound (discount code Kitten10).

Leave a Comment X

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

We know, we hate these, too. But we do care about your privacy, and we will never sell your information. By continuing to use Re:Fiction, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with our Privacy Policy .

All right No, thanks.

ENROLL DONATE

  • Who We Serve
  • Program Logic Model
  • Culture Statement
  • Board of Directors
  • Advisory Council
  • Join the Team!
  • Get Involved
  • What's Hot?
  • WRITOPIA SPEAKS
  • Creative Writing
  • Essay Writing
  • College Essay
  • Role-Playing Games
  • Debate Team
  • Private Sessions & Workshops
  • Specialty Genres, Events, and More
  • Sleepaway Camps
  • School Year
  • Writopia Publishing Lab
  • Worldwide Plays Festival
  • Scholastic Writing Awards
  • Youth Essay Conference
  • Family Memoir
  • Writopia Lab Salon
  • Teen Intensives
  • Professional Development
  • Upcoming Events
  • Westchester
  • Program Schedules
  • For Students
  • For Parents
  • For Educators

Creative Writing Workshops & Camps

Creative Writing Workshops & Camps

Who We Are

Writopia Lab is a national community of teen and young writers and thinkers.

Why We Do This

Why We Do This

Because we love authentic writing, thoughtful conversations, stunning prose, and silly madness.

Our Mission

What We Do

In addition to running workshops at our labs, we work with community-based organizations, the NY Public Library, Homes for the Homeless, and public and private schools across the country.

Testimonials

"Writopia was Abey's first inclusion experience. He was embraced by the community and encouraged to submit his writing for publications and awards. Abey was very happy at Writopia and it gave us the confidence to transition from a private special education school to a NYC public high school. His highest compliment is 'This is just like Writopia.'" Michelle Noris
"Writopia online has been a miracle during the pandemic. The workshops have always been the bright spot in Hugh's week and even more so during this past year. Thank you for continuing to provide a top notch creative outlet!" Jessica Manser
Thursday is Willem’s favorite day of the week! He and several others from their D & D game just chatted with each other on roll20 the other day— love the way this group has bonded. I’m amazed and grateful to know that making friends virtually during a pandemic is totally a thing. Jennifer Robinson
"My daughter loves her class. This is huge - for years, I've been digging for her passion, her fire, and I think we just rubbed two sticks together and got some." A Proud Dad
"I just glanced at Shaylem's essay and was really happy with what you all have helped facilitate for him. I really appreciate the feedback, all of your hard work, and the organization as a whole." Liz Lawler
"Thank you all. One thing I have learned from Covid is what people and activities are really the most meaningful for my child and Writopia is top of the list. Thank you all for creating such an amazing supportive community!!!" L.P.
"I never thought I would say this, but i am soooooo happy that your classes are on Zoom so Robbie can continue to take your classes when we move!!! Thank you so much...I cannot express enough how wonderful Writopia has been for my son..." Shari
"...thanks so much for granting Amira with her first sleepaway camp experience last summer at WriCampia. Amira had an amazing time and wants to attend again this summer... She still talks about her experience at WriCampia to date and keeps in touch with the friends she met. I myself really enjoyed viewing all of the photos, her short story video and fun memories captured! Thanks so much again!" Tanisha, Writopia Parent (Winter 2019)
I absolutely recommend this class. Discussions and readings changed my thinking about how to teach writing... The classes were fun especially the writing games and exercises. I felt like a kid again. NYC DOE educator's evaluation of Writopia Lab's Training Institute
Writopia was really beneficial for students who already see themselves as writers, as it gives them the creative outlet. But it is also great for reluctant writers; they flourish in this type of environment. Teacher, PS 276 in New York City

Politics and Pens

Politics and Pens

Write legislation, arguments, and speeches for a fictional scenario, participate in a mock session of congress, and meet real elected officials!

Monday July 15th to Friday July 19th, 2024

Connecting Across Cultures Book

Connecting Across Cultures Book

A Collection of Writing by Ten Jewish and Muslim American Teens.

The culminating anthology of pieces written in our Connecting Across Cultures program.

Workshops for Kids 4-6

Workshops for Kids 4-6

Language Play is an innovative program designed to inspire and enhance your 4- to 6-year-old's imagination and language usage in a fun, interactive environment.

Workshops offered this summer at our Upper West Side lab.

"Loved Your Essay" Second Edition

"Loved Your Essay" Second Edition

We've added nine new essays to our collection of the most fiercely individualistic college essays, available on Amazon!

Playwriting & Performance Summer Camp

Playwriting & Performance Summer Camp

In the morning, playwrights develop new plays or musicals. In the afternoons, they dive into the world of performance; culminating in a live showcase of their one-act plays.

Upper West Side

Monday, July 29th to Friday, August 2nd, 2024

Sports Writing

Sports Writing

New Summer Program: Sports Writing! Explore every form of sports writing from reviews, to features, to op-eds and personal essays.

Teen Open Mics in NYC

Teen Open Mics in NYC

Teen writers are welcome to share their poetry, songs, or short prose on stage within a supportive environment of Writopia educators and peers.

Saturday, June 29th, 2024

Writopia Debate Teams

Writopia Debate Teams

Debaters work with a set team and explore a variety of topics and stances through the use of sparring and gameplay. Novice and Experienced workshops available. Plus, our new "Rhetoric Rookie" workshops are open to 7-9 year olds!

Enrollment for Summer is Open!

Enrollment for Summer is Open!

Register now for a week-long, half-day workshop or full-day camp this Summer!

Middle School Advanced Writing Exploration (AWE)

Middle School Advanced Writing Exploration (AWE)

This application-only program invites 7th and 8th-grade writers to be part of a community of dedicated, focused writers looking to explore, expand, and deepen their literary passions. 

What is a Creative Writing Workshop?

A workshop is not an academic lecture; instead, it's a group session, led by an instructor, that focuses on student writing.

Hands-On Learning

Here, in a hands-on learning approach, students critique each others' work, discussing areas of strength and making constructive suggestions about aspects of writing that could be improved upon, all in a supportive environment. Students learn to articulate their response to writing in a way that is useful for both the person whose work is being critiqued and the person who makes the comments.

Valuable Skills

The workshop method of teaching allows students to develop the critical thinking skills needed for revising their own work, as well as the interpersonal skills necessary to participate in upper level and graduate level workshops in university. Creative Writing workshops focus on the development of style and the treatment of content, not on writing skills. An appropriate level of writing skill is required.

Become a better writer and meet beta readers in our online writing group

Scribophile is one of the largest and most award-winning online writing communities.

Scribophile in Writer’s Digest 101 Best Websites for Writers 2014

Make your writing shine with feedback from other writers

You’ve spent a lot of time writing your story. But how can you make it perfect before you start thinking about publishing?

Scribophile is a writing group focused on getting you feedback on your manuscript. — in fact, we’re one of the largest online writing groups out there. Our points-based peer critique system guarantees you’ll get feedback from writers from all walks of life. You can then use that feedback to polish your writing before you take the next step in your publishing journey.

How Scribophile works

1 earn points by giving feedback.

Earn karma points by critiquing writing. Giving feedback to group members is fast, easy, fun, and helps improve your own writing, too!

2 Get feedback on your own writing

Spend karma points to post your own writing for critique from our writing community — anything from flash fiction to novels. Our writer’s group will give you detailed feedback on how to improve it, regardless of your specific genre, and all in a supportive environment.

3 Make friends and meet beta readers

As you participate in our writing group, you’ll meet and form relationships with many different kinds writers. They’ll become your inspiration, your encouragement, and even your beta readers, ready to help with your current manuscript, and your next ones too!

Scribophile was the first place I stopped when I went from being an I-wanna-be-a-writer to I-am-an-author. Now I have four international bestselling novels with major publishers, and when authors come to me I always send them to Scribophile. Genevieve Graham Tides of Honour and others published with Simon & Schuster

Join writing workshops and level up your writing

Our writing workshops are taught by bestselling authors, expert teachers, and industry insiders. We have workshops for writers of any skill level, where we cover everything from beginning topics to advanced techniques.

Our writing workshops are designed to be both comprehensive and transformational — they’re your fast track to leveling up your writing.

Some of our upcoming writing workshops

what is creative writing workshop

How to Build an Author Brand with Lacy Phillips

May 18, 2024 • 2 hour webinar

Join author and expert brand strategist Lacy Phillips as she teaches you the fundamentals of building an author brand that will pump your book sales.

what is creative writing workshop

Enhancing Your Writing By Engaging All the Senses with David D. Levine

May 25, 2024 • 2 hour webinar

Hugo- and Nebula-award-winning author David D. Levine shows you the methods and techniques master writers use to draw readers in by engaging all of their senses.

Our writing group welcomes writers of any skill level

Our writing group welcomes writers of all skill levels — from beginners to published authors, and every writer in between.

Each critique you receive on your manuscript is a fresh perspective for you to incorporate. Our bustling writing forums feature writers discussing the craft twenty-four hours a day — share inspiration, ignite your creativity, get support, and connect with others no matter your genre. Plus, our extensive Writing Academy is full of insightful articles on the art — and business — of writing.

Scribophile played a major part in helping me polish my novel for submission. I learnt a huge amount from critiquing other people’s work, as well as from reading critiques of mine. I now have a wonderful agent and have signed a three-book deal in the UK, a two-book deal in Germany, and a TV option. The book was also shortlisted for The Debut Dagger! Roz Watkins The Devil’s Dice and others published with HarperCollins
Giving and receiving critiques on Scribophile made a big difference to the quality of my writing. I learned how to write a query letter here and that led to an agent and a book deal. Ruth Lauren Prisoner of Ice and Snow and others published with Bloomsbury

No more writing alone — meet your new community

Sometimes, the hardest part of the writing process is how lonely it can get.

That’s why the most important part of Scribophile is our community of hundreds of thousands of writers from all over the world. No matter what genre you work in, or how far along you are in your manuscript, the friends you make at Scribophile will give encouragement, accountability, and will finally take the loneliness out of our solitary craft.

My years on Scribophile have given me a master’s level education in writing. The critiques are great, but I’ve learned as much from reading and analyzing other writers on Scribophile. I don’t think I could have polished my novel to a publishable level without this site. I’m an addict. Laura Creedle The Love Letters of Abelard and Lily published with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Ready to take the next step in your writing journey?

It’s easy and free.

Get the latest publishers and contests eager to read your writing

Our newsletter delivers a list of the latest publishers, writing markets, and writing contests directly to your inbox once per week, totally free. Unsubscribe at any time.

Support the creation and experience of contemporary art. Become a CAC Member today!

For Visitors

  • Hours & Admission
  • Getting Here
  • Eat & Drink
  • Event Rentals
  • Around Town
  • Accessibility
  • Mission + Vision + Values
  • Our Building
  • Board of Trustees
  • Careers + Internships
  • Where We Stand

Exhibitions

Performances

  • School Programs

Public Programs

  • Special Events
  • Family Programs
  • Teen Programs
  • 20th Building Anniversary

Creativity Center & UnMuseum

Blog & News

Video & Audio

  • Education + Programming
  • Artist Conversations
  • This Time Tomorrow
  • 6 Questions
  • CONTEXT, in-depth interviews

Ways to Give

  • Become a Member
  • Become a Contemporary
  • Become a Patron
  • Become a Corporate Member
  • Become a Sponsor

Annual Gala

  • Current Exhibitions
  • Make a Donation

Contemporary Arts Center Lois & Richard Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Art 44 E. 6th Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 513 345 8400

The Creative Writing Project

The Creative Writing Project is a series of workshops designed to provide adult writers of all levels with opportunities to explore the art of creative writing. Each month-long series puts participants amongst a community of writers and educators, offering instruction and guidance from a diverse group of local and published writers. Throughout the series, writers will produce a piece of their choosing, exploring methods such as poetry, nonfiction, and prose.

Series Costs (5 sessions): This program is sold together as a 5 session series. Registration for the series is required through Passage . $125 for Non-Members, $80 for CAC Members or students.

Ticket Registration

2024 Series Dates at the CAC:

February 3 - Alison Taylor

February 10 - Annette Januzzi Wick

February 17 - Stacy Sims

February 24 - Desirae Hosley

March 2 - Jamie Lee Elizabeth Morris

Inspired by the CAC exhibition, And above the beautiful commune , each 2024 workshop centers around body inspired themes.

Contact the CAC's Education Team if you have any questions.

Included in the Series:

  • 5 sessions (1 per week) that explore the creative writing process with a diverse group of local writers.
  • The opportunity to submit work to a literary magazine.
  • An embossed notebook with guided writing prompts.
  • Coffee and refreshments
  • Class size is limited, ensuring participants are given time for individual attention.

Past Events

the-creative-writing-project

02 March 2024

24 February 2024

17 February 2024

10 February 2024

03 February 2024

18 March 2023

11 March 2023

04 March 2023

25 February 2023

18 February 2023

05 March 2022

26 February 2022

the-creative-writing-project

19 February 2022

the-creative-writing-project

12 February 2022

05 February 2022

Important Notice

Share this Page

This page uses technologies your browser does not support.

Many of our new website's features will not function and basic layout will appear broken.

Visit browsehappy.com to learn how to upgrade your browser.

University of New Orleans Logo

  • university of new orleans
  • creative writing workshop

Creative Writing Workshop (M.F.A.)

Request information.

REQUEST HERE

Be sure to select 'Creative Writing MFA' and note your genre of interest in the text box.

Where you write matters! Come to New Orleans and master your craft. Write in one of the most vibrant, diverse cultures in North America, home to writers, outsiders, and artists of every stripe.

Our graduates publish! For over 25 years, the Creative Writing Workshops have trained writers to thrive in poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, and drama.

UNO alumnus Jericho Brown has been awarded a 2020 Pulitzer Prize.

The Creative Writing Workshop Offers

  • Interdisciplinary study. Writers can explore multiple genres, academic work, and theatre/film to match their needs
  • High faculty support with lots of one-on-one attention
  • Value. We have one of the lowest tuition MFAs in the country
  • Accomplished alums (over 100 published books and many produced plays)
  • Lauded as a “Program to Watch” by Publishers Weekly and named a “Top 25 Underrated Program” by The Huffington Post
  • Lauded faculty with strong nation reputations for both popular and critical success
  • Evening classes to accommodate study/work/life balance
  • Study abroad opportunities in Austria, Japan, and Mexico

Active in the New Orleans literary community:

  • Monthly reading series at The Gold Room
  • Visiting writers’ series (recent guests include Lisa D’Amour, Katy Simpson Smith, Keith Lee Morris, C. Morgan Babst, Laura Mullen)
  • Literary journal experience through Bayou Magazine
  • Involvement with the Tennessee Williams & New Orleans Literary Festival
  • Internship opportunities with local theatres and publishers
  • Teaching opportunities with the Department of Language and Literature at UNO 
  • Publishing experience through UNO Press’s Publishing Institute

Student Learning Outcomes

Student Learning Outcomes specify what students will know, be able to do, or be able to demonstrate when they have completed a program of study.

View Outcome

Academic Highlights

  • Average workshop size:  7-10 students (capped at 12)
  • Average literature seminar size:  8-12 (capped at 14)
  • Average incoming cohort:  5 Poetry, 5 Non-Fiction, 8 Fiction, 4 Playwriting
  • Average time to complete degree:  3 years (6 semesters)
  • UNO Graduate School
  • Creative Writing Books
  • Bayou Magazine
  • Summer Residencies Abroad
  • About New Orleans
  • Grades 6-12
  • School Leaders

Win 10 Summer Reading Books from ThriftBooks 📚!

What Is Writing Workshop?

An essential part of the responsive classroom.

What Is Writing Workshop?

If you’re new to teaching writing, you may have heard discussion about writing workshop but not be entirely sure about what it is or how to use it in your classroom. WeAreTeachers is here with the answer.

What is writing workshop?

Writing workshop is a student-centered framework for teaching writing that is based on the idea that students learn to write best when they write frequently, for extended periods of time, on topics of their own choosing. 

To develop skills as a writer, students need three things: ownership of their own writing, guidance from an experienced writer, and support from a community of fellow learners. The writing workshop framework meets these needs and streamlines instruction in order to meet the most important objective: giving kids time to write. The workshop setting supports children in taking their writing seriously and viewing themselves as writers. 

The four main components of writing workshop are the mini-lesson, status of the class, writing/conferring time, and sharing. There is not a prescribed time limit for each component, rather they are meant to be flexible and determined by students’ needs on any given day. 

1. Mini-lesson (5 – 15 minutes)

This is the teacher-directed portion of writing workshop. Mini-lessons should be assessment-based, explicit instruction. They should be brief and focused on a single, narrowly defined topic that all writers can implement regardless of skill level. According to writing guru Lucy Calkins , mini-lessons are a time to “gather the whole class in the meeting area to raise a concern, explore an issue, model a technique, or reinforce a strategy.” 

Sources for mini-lessons can come from many places. Many teachers follow the scope and sequence of a prepared curriculum or use the state or national standards as a guide. Ideally, topics for mini-lessons come from your observations as you conference with your students and become aware of their needs. 

The four parts of a mini-lesson:

  • Connection (activating students’ prior knowledge)
  • Teaching (presentation of the actual skill or topic)
  • Active engagement (giving students time for supported practice of the skill)
  • Link (helping students figure out how the topic pertains to their individual writing piece).

For a helpful description of the mini-lesson process, read Writing Workshop Fundamentals by Two Writing Teachers.

2. Status update (3 – 5 minutes)

Meant to be a quick check-in, status update is a way to find out where your students are in the writing process— pre-writing, drafting, revising, editing, evaluating, or publishing.

Status of the class doesn’t have to happen every day and it needn’t take up much class time. It can be a quick verbal check-in or “whip” around the classroom. Or you may want to use a clip chart, notebook, or a magnet chart.

what is writer's workshop

SOURCE: Polka Dots and Pencils

Another great idea is to use a pocket chart. Students show which step they are on by putting the appropriately colored card in their pocket.  

what is writer's workshop

SOURCE: Teaching My Friends

Status update lets you as the teacher evaluate how your students are progressing. It also creates accountability for the students and motivates your community of learners.

3. Writing (20 – 45 minutes)  

The majority of writing workshop is devoted to simply giving students time to write. During this time, teachers can either be modeling the process by working on their own writing or conferencing with individual students. In all reality, the majority of your time will be observing and helping students. A good goal during a typical week of writing workshop is to aim to work individually with every student in the class at least once.  

Remember, the main priority of conferencing is to listen, not to talk. But to prompt your students to share their progress with you, here are a few questions to ask from Teaching That Makes Sense . 

What is Writer's Workshop?

Once your students get the hang of what a helpful conference looks and feels like, they can use peer conferencing to help one another. 

4. Sharing (5–15 minutes)

It can be tempting, when time is running short, to skip this last element of writing workshop, but don’t!  It can be the most instructionally valuable part of the class, other than the writing time itself. When students grow comfortable seeing themselves as part of a writing community, they are willing to take more risks and dive deeper into the process. In addition, kids often get their best ideas and are most influenced by one another. 

Some tips to keep sharing time manageable: 

  • For whole-class sharing, keep a running list of who has shared and when, and h ave students share only a portion of their writing—maybe what they consider their best work, or a part they need help with.
  • Let students share in pairs—one reads aloud and one listens. 
  • Have students swap work and read silently to themselves. 

At first the concept of writing workshop may seem overwhelming. But once you establish your routine, you’ll be surprised how easy it is to implement. Because writing workshop gives students so much time to write, their writing skills will improve dramatically. And hopefully, being part of such a dynamic writing community will instill in your students a lifelong love for writing.

Got any hot tips for using writing workshop in your classroom? We’d love to hear about them in our WeAreTeachers HELPLINE group on Facebook.

Plus, check out 5 Peer Conferencing Strategies that Actually Work .

what is creative writing workshop

You Might Also Like

Everfi decoding strategies poster and student flip book

Use Our Free Decoding Strategies Poster + Flip-Book To Nurture Independent Readers

Give students options to try when they are stuck on a word. Continue Reading

Copyright © 2024. All rights reserved. 5335 Gate Parkway, Jacksonville, FL 32256

Jump to navigation

  • Inside Writing
  • Teacher's Guides
  • Student Models
  • Writing Topics
  • Minilessons
  • Shopping Cart
  • Inside Grammar
  • Grammar Adventures
  • CCSS Correlations
  • Infographics

Get a free Grammar Adventure! Choose a single Adventure and add coupon code ADVENTURE during checkout. (All-Adventure licenses aren’t included.)

Sign up or login to use the bookmarking feature.

7 Steps to a Great Writing Workshop

Writing Workshops in Your Classroom

Would you like to make your classroom a stimulating community of writers and learners? Set up a writing workshop! This instructional approach truly engages students by letting them write, read, interact, mentor, and take risks—all at their own pace. Follow these simple steps to create a writing workshop in your classroom.

Step 1: Set up a writing workshop framework.

A typical writing workshop session has four parts.

Step 2: Be a writer!

Teach by example, showing not only how you write, but also how to collaborate, respond to other writers, and make improvements based on responses.

Step 3: Create a writing community.

Help your students work side by side, learning from each other in much the same way that artists do in studios or cooks do in the kitchen. Provide spaces for individual work and spaces for small-group work.

Step 4: Provide many models and topic choices.

Student Model

Models help students see how other writers have shaped their ideas in essays and stories. They also serve as springboards for minilessons and class discussions about specific writing strategies. ( See student models .)

Your students need to write about topics that interest them. When students have strong feelings about their topics, they stay with their writing longer and do their best work. ( See writing topics .)

Step 5: Let students work at their own pace.

On any given day, some students may be researching a topic; others may be drafting or revising; and still others may have finished one piece of work and started on another. As workshop manager, your job is to make sure that everyone is gainfully working on a project.

Step 6: Invite peer responses.

Your students need the feedback of their peers to develop strong writing and feel part of the writing community. Help them carry out peer response groups. ( See the peer response minilesson .)

Step 7: Offer your support.

Hold brief (2- to 3-minute) conferences with students as needed during independent writing time. During these conferences, don’t act as a fixer but rather as someone who listens and suggests and offers next steps.

Final Thoughts:

Effective classroom management is the key to implementing a successful writing workshop. You need to establish specific goals (such as the number of pieces to be completed per quarter), keep students on task (via the work check), and look for teachable moments to introduce specific minilessons.

Writing Workshop Resources

Writing Workshop: The Essential Guide by Ralph Fletcher and JoAnn Portalupi

About the Authors: Writing Workshop with Our Youngest Writers by Katie Wood Ray

In the Middle: New Understandings About Writing, Reading, and Learning by Nancie Atwell

The 9 Rights of Every Writer by Vicki Spandel

The No-Nonsense Guide to Teaching Writing by Judy Davis and Sharon Hill

www.writingproject.org (National Writing Project)

Teacher Support:

Click to find out more about this resource.

Standards Correlations:

The State Standards provide a way to evaluate your students' performance.

  • LAFS.K12.W.1.1
  • LAFS.K12.W.1.2
  • LAFS.K12.W.1.3
  • LAFS.K12.W.2.4
  • LAFS.K12.W.2.5
  • LAFS.K12.W.2.6
  • LAFS.K12.W.3.7
  • LAFS.K12.W.3.8
  • LAFS.K12.W.3.9
  • LAFS.K12.W.4.10

Related Resources

All resources.

  • Forming a Focus
  • How to Engage Your Students with Shared Inquiry
  • Writing a "Showing" Paragraph
  • Writing a Four-Star Food Review
  • Drawing a Life Map
  • All 3-5 Units (5 Seats)
  • All 6-8 Units
  • All 6-8 Units (5 Seats)
  • All 3-5 Units
  • Writing Essays
  • Writers Express
  • Write on Track
  • Writers Express Teacher's Guide
  • Write on Course 20-20
  • Write for Business

You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience.

The Home of Creative Writing

Festival of writing.

Arvon is a charity that runs creative writing courses, events and retreats both in-person and online. Our courses are tutored by leading authors and include a powerful mix of workshops and individual tutorials, with time and space to write, free from distractions of everyday life. Grants and concessions are available to help with course fees.

ARVON COURSES & RETREATS

Starting to Write , Theatre

Online Writing Day: Write a Short Play in a Day

From idea to script

what is creative writing workshop

Masterclass: The Poetry of Care

How to write a poem when you've got 100 more important things to do (and how it can help)

what is creative writing workshop

Fiction , Poetry , Short Story , Other

Online Writing Week: Starting to Write

Honing your working class voice

what is creative writing workshop

Fiction , Starting to Write

How I Write: Isabel Waidner

Q&A and Reading

Masterclass: Poetic Metaphor

Nailing the mechanics of metaphor

what is creative writing workshop

Hebden Bridge Town Hall

Arvon Writing Festival: Lemn Sissay

Let the light pour in

what is creative writing workshop

Fiction , Poetry , Screenwriting , Other

Arvon Writing Festival: Henry Normal

Everything and more

what is creative writing workshop

Fiction , Poetry , Non-Fiction

Festival of Writing Day

what is creative writing workshop

“Every time I’ve taught at Arvon - going back over fifteen years now - I’ve seen how much difference just a handful of days can make in the life of writers. There’s a perfect mix of tutorials, writing time, socializing, and discussion - all those elements come together to create an atmosphere in which writing projects move in that longed-for but often unattainable direction: forward.”

— Kamila Shamsie

what is creative writing workshop

ARVON AT HOME

Our online programme of courses, events and writing support

Virtual versions of our famous Writing Weeks, plus Masterclasses, free How I Write events, Online Writing Weekends, Writing Days and more . . . all accessible from the comfort of your sofa.

what is creative writing workshop

SUPPORT ARVON NORTH

Arvon North is an ambitious capital project to adapt Lumb Bank into a beacon of creativity for the North

Help us transform Lumb Bank into an engine-house for creative writing development in the North of England, connecting the rich literary collateral of the region with a community of writers locally, regionally, nationally and globally.

what is creative writing workshop

CLOCKHOUSE WRITERS' RETREAT

Give your writing the time and space it deserves with Arvon’s dedicated Writers Retreat at The Clockhouse

The Clockhouse is specifically designed for writers on retreat. It has four apartments for writers, each with bedroom, study-lounge and bathroom. All food is provided for you, so you can spend your time as you please.

what is creative writing workshop

DONATE TO ARVON

Do you believe that everyone should have the opportunity to unlock their creative potential?

Arvon is a charity that believes everyone deserves the freedom to imagine, write and explore ideas regardless of their age or financial background.

what is creative writing workshop

OUR SCHOOLS & GROUPS WORK

We offer residential weeks for schools, young people and adult groups.

Our weeks for schools and groups follow the same pattern as our adult course programme – led by two professional writers, with tutorials, group workshops, and time and space to write.

ARVON BLOGS

what is creative writing workshop

My Arvon Week: Jessica Eve Watkins

15 Apr 2024 / My Arvon Week

A preview of Jessica Eve Watkin’s experience on a week-long writing retreat at Arvon’s writing house, The Hurst. “ ‘The…

what is creative writing workshop

SI Leeds Literary Prize 2024

07 Mar 2024 / General

A writing prize that helps discover exciting new talent from underrepresented groups will be accepting entries again next month. The SI…

what is creative writing workshop

Arvon and Creative Minds Calderdale to Develop Writing for Change Project

28 Feb 2024 / News

Arvon and Creative Minds Charity, hosted by South West Yorkshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, are embarking on an exciting project aimed…

what is creative writing workshop

My Arvon Journey: Gráinne O’Hare

27 Feb 2024 / My Arvon Journey

When I logged on to my first online Arvon workshop, it was autumn 2022 and already chilly at my writing desk;…

JOIN OUR MAILING LIST

Want to know what's coming up in the next week? Arvon’s newsletter is the best way to avoid missing out on anything - from new and upcoming courses, to Arvon giveaways and writing and self-development opportunities.

FIND A COURSE OR RETREAT

  • Inua Ellams' Spring Season
  • Residential Writing Week
  • Online Writing Week
  • Masterclass
  • Masterclass Recording
  • How I Write
  • Online Five Week Course
  • Residential Tutored Retreat
  • Online Writing Day
  • Residential Retreat
  • Children and Young People's Events
  • Non-Fiction
  • Starting to Write
  • Children & YA
  • Screenwriting
  • Short Story
  • Totleigh Barton

Privacy Overview

Creative Writing Prompts

Join the Club: Creative Writing Club Explained

Photo of author

My name is Debbie, and I am passionate about developing a love for the written word and planting a seed that will grow into a powerful voice that can inspire many.

Join the Club: Creative Writing Club Explained

What is Creative Writing Club?

Benefits of joining a creative writing club, activities and workshops offered by creative writing clubs, how to find and join a creative writing club, tips for maximizing your experience in a creative writing club, advantages of joining creative writing clubs:, opportunities for publication:, networking and building connections within a creative writing club, frequently asked questions, future outlook.

Our Creative Writing Club is a community of passionate writers who come together to share their love for storytelling and hone their craft. Whether you’re new to writing or a seasoned wordsmith, our club offers a supportive and inspiring environment where you can explore your creativity, develop your writing skills, and connect with fellow writers.

In our club, you’ll have the opportunity to:

  • Participate in writing exercises and workshops: Join us as we engage in various writing activities designed to stimulate your imagination and develop your writing techniques.
  • Receive feedback on your work: Share your writing with other club members and receive constructive feedback to help you improve your storytelling abilities.
  • Explore different genres and styles: Be exposed to a wide range of writing styles and genres through our discussions and workshops, allowing you to expand your writing horizons.
  • Connect with like-minded individuals: Forge meaningful connections with fellow writers who share your passion for the written word. Exchange ideas, collaborate on projects, and support each other on your writing journeys.

Join our Creative Writing Club and unleash your creativity while growing as a writer. Whether you’re seeking inspiration, feedback, or simply the camaraderie of other writers, we welcome you to become a part of our vibrant community.

Benefits of Joining a Creative Writing Club

Introduction to the World of Imagination:

Joining a creative writing club opens up a world of imagination and possibility. It offers a platform for aspiring writers to explore their creativity and develop their writing skills among a supportive community of like-minded individuals. Through engaging workshops, group discussions, and constructive feedback sessions, members can broaden their horizons by stepping into the shoes of various characters, exploring different genres, and experimenting with diverse writing styles. The club serves as a safe space for writers to express themselves freely, fostering a sense of self-discovery and personal growth.

  • Creative Inspiration: The creative writing club provides an environment that inspires and motivates its members to pursue their writing ambitions. By regularly interacting with fellow writers and sharing ideas, participants can tap into a wealth of creativity and inspiration. The club’s members often engage in stimulating writing exercises and prompts, sparking new ideas and breaking through writer’s block. This constant flow of creative energy nurtures a fertile ground for imagination to flourish.
  • Constructive Feedback: One of the greatest advantages of joining a creative writing club is the opportunity for constructive feedback. By participating in workshops and critique sessions, members can receive valuable insights and suggestions to improve their writing. This feedback is invaluable in identifying strengths and weaknesses, polishing writing skills, and refining one’s literary voice. With the constructive guidance of fellow writers, club members can gain a deeper understanding of the art of storytelling and hone their abilities to captivate readers.

Activities and Workshops Offered by Creative Writing Clubs

Joining a creative writing club offers an exciting array of activities and workshops that nourish your writing skills and ignite your imagination. Here are some of the captivating opportunities that await you:

  • Writing Prompts: Get those creative juices flowing with a myriad of thought-provoking prompts designed to push your boundaries and inspire unique story ideas. From surreal scenarios to character-driven dilemmas, these prompts will challenge you to explore new genres and writing styles.
  • Feedback Sessions: Engage in constructive discussions with fellow writers who are enthusiastic about fine-tuning their craft. Share your work-in-progress and receive valuable feedback, allowing you to identify strengths, improve weak points, and develop your unique voice in a supportive environment.
  • Guest Speaker Events: Attend exclusive talks by established authors, editors, and literary agents. Gain insight into their writing processes, listen to captivating anecdotes from their career journeys, and learn valuable tips and tricks to enhance your own craft. These events offer a unique opportunity to interact with industry professionals and expand your network within the literary world.

But that’s not all! Creative writing clubs provide a platform for various enriching workshops that cover a range of topics, such as:

  • Character Development: Learn techniques to create compelling and well-rounded characters that resonate with your readers.
  • Plot Structure: Explore different plot structures and discover how to add suspense, build tension, and craft captivating story arcs.
  • Worldbuilding: Dive into the intricacies of building fictional worlds, from designing unique settings to establishing believable rules and cultures.
  • Editing and Revision: Acquire essential skills for revising and polishing your work, ensuring your writing shines before it reaches an audience.

By immersing yourself in these activities and workshops, creative writing clubs provide an inspiring community of like-minded individuals who share your passion for storytelling. Joining a club today will not only improve your writing skills but also offer a supportive space to nurture your creativity and connect with fellow writers on your journey toward literary success.

How to Find and Join a Creative Writing Club

Joining a creative writing club can be a fantastic way to connect with like-minded individuals, improve your writing skills, and get valuable feedback on your work. If you’re wondering how to find and join the perfect club for you, here are a few tips:

1. Research Online: Start by doing a quick search on the internet to find creative writing clubs in your area. Look for clubs that align with your interests and goals. Check out their websites or social media pages to get an idea of their activities and the type of writing they focus on.

2. Local Libraries and Bookstores: Visit your local library or bookstore and ask if they have any creative writing clubs or if they can recommend any in the area. These establishments often have community bulletin boards where clubs advertise their meetings or workshops, so keep an eye out for any notices.

3. Online Writing Communities: Don’t limit yourself to physical clubs! There is a wealth of online writing communities where you can connect with writers from all around the world. Platforms like Meetup, Goodreads, and Reddit have dedicated spaces for writers to share their work, give feedback, and even arrange virtual meetups or workshops.

4. Attend Open Mic Nights: Open mic nights are not only a great way to showcase your own writing talent, but they can also be an opportunity to meet other writers and learn about local creative writing clubs. Strike up conversations with fellow writers during these events, and you might find yourself on the path to discovering the perfect club to join.

Ready to dive into the world of creative writing? Joining a creative writing club is one of the best ways to sharpen your skills and connect with fellow writers who share your passion. To ensure you make the most out of your experience, here are some invaluable tips to keep in mind:

  • Embrace diversity: One of the most exciting aspects of a creative writing club is the diversity of writing styles, genres, and perspectives. Embrace this diversity! Engage in discussions and workshops with an open mind, appreciating the unique approaches of your fellow writers. This exposure will not only broaden your own writing horizons but also foster a supportive and inclusive community within the club.
  • Consistency is key: To truly maximize your experience in a creative writing club, consistency is crucial. Attend meetings regularly and actively participate in writing exercises, critiques, and group discussions. Consistency not only helps you stay accountable in your writing journey but also allows you to build strong connections with other club members. Remember, the more you invest in the club, the more you’ll benefit from the invaluable insights, feedback, and inspiration that your fellow writers can offer.

Exploring Opportunities for Publication through Creative Writing Clubs

Joining a creative writing club can be a fantastic way to unlock opportunities for publication and share your written work with a wider audience. In these clubs, you’ll find a supportive community of fellow writers who understand the struggles and joys of the creative process. Together, you can cultivate your skills, gain valuable feedback, and discover a variety of avenues for showcasing your talent.

One invaluable benefit of creative writing clubs is the opportunity to participate in writing competitions and literary magazines. Many clubs organize regular contests, providing you with a chance to submit your work and potentially win recognition for your creativity. Additionally, these clubs often collaborate with schools, local organizations, and literary publications, increasing your exposure and facilitating potential publication. By participating in these activities, you not only enhance your writing abilities but also establish connections within the writing community.

  • Gain inspiration and motivation from like-minded writers
  • Receive constructive feedback to improve your writing skills
  • Expand your network by connecting with professionals in the literary field
  • Participate in writing workshops and learn new techniques
  • Access valuable resources and recommendations for editors and agents
  • Submit your writing to contests organized by the club
  • Showcase your work in club-sponsored literary magazines
  • Collaborate with local organizations and schools for publishing opportunities
  • Connect with established literary publications through club affiliations
  • Explore self-publishing options with the support and guidance of fellow club members

Networking and Building Connections within a Creative Writing Club

Being a part of a creative writing club not only allows you to explore your writing skills, but it also provides an exciting opportunity to network and build connections with like-minded individuals. Building connections within the club can open up doors to new perspectives, collaborations, and even potential publishing opportunities. Here are some ways you can network and build connections within the creative writing club:

  • Participate in club events and activities: Attending club events like writing workshops, open mic nights, or book discussions is a fantastic way to interact with fellow writers and exchange ideas. Engage in conversations, actively participate, and be open to receiving feedback on your work. These events provide the perfect platform to connect with writers who share your passion.
  • Form writing critique groups: Establishing a writing critique group within the club can be highly beneficial. This allows you to regularly share your work with a smaller, dedicated group of writers who can provide valuable feedback and help you improve your writing skills. By actively engaging in critique sessions, you not only strengthen your bonds with other writers but also enhance your own writing abilities.
  • Utilize online platforms: Many creative writing clubs have online platforms or social media groups where members can connect and interact outside of physical meetings. Take advantage of these platforms to share your work, provide feedback to others, initiate discussions, and seek advice. The online space provides a conducive environment for networking and building connections with writers beyond the boundaries of the physical club.

In conclusion, can significantly enrich your writing journey. By actively participating in club events, forming writing critique groups, and utilizing online platforms, you can foster meaningful relationships with fellow writers, gain valuable insights, and open doors to exciting writing opportunities.

Q: What is a creative writing club? A: A creative writing club is a group of individuals who share a passion for writing and come together to foster creativity, hone their writing skills, and receive feedback on their work.

Q: Why should I join a creative writing club? A: Joining a creative writing club can be a wonderful opportunity to connect with fellow writers, gain inspiration, and receive constructive criticism on your writing. It provides a supportive community that can help you grow and improve as a writer.

Q: How does a creative writing club work? A: The structure of creative writing clubs can vary, but most typically include regular meetings where members share their writing and receive feedback. Some clubs may also host workshops, writing exercises, guest speakers, or even organize writing competitions or publishing opportunities.

Q: Do I need to have previous writing experience to join a creative writing club? A: Absolutely not! Creative writing clubs welcome writers of all levels, from beginners to experienced authors. The focus is on nurturing creativity and providing a space where writers can develop their skills, regardless of their experience level.

Q: Can joining a creative writing club improve my writing skills? A: Yes, joining a creative writing club can significantly enhance your writing skills. Through regular feedback and critique sessions, you’ll receive valuable input from fellow writers, helping you to identify your strengths and areas for improvement. The exposure to different writing styles and techniques shared by club members can also inspire and enhance your own writing.

Q: How can I find a creative writing club to join? A: There are several ways to find a creative writing club. You can check with your local community centers, libraries, or universities, as they often host such clubs. Alternatively, online platforms and forums dedicated to writing can provide information about virtual writing clubs where you can participate from anywhere.

Q: What are the benefits of joining a creative writing club? A: Joining a creative writing club offers numerous benefits. Apart from receiving valuable feedback on your work, you’ll find a supportive community of like-minded individuals who share your passion for writing. This sense of camaraderie can boost your motivation and provide a platform for networking and collaboration with fellow writers.

Q: Is it necessary to share my writing with others in a creative writing club? A: Sharing your writing with others is typically encouraged in a creative writing club but is not mandatory. Many clubs provide a safe and nurturing environment where you can share your work and receive valuable feedback. However, if you prefer to simply absorb the discussions and critique of others without sharing your own writing, that is usually respected as well.

Q: Can I join multiple creative writing clubs? A: Yes, you can join multiple creative writing clubs if you wish. This can provide you with a wider range of perspectives and feedback to help improve your writing. However, do keep in mind that joining too many clubs might divide your time and attention, so find the balance that works best for you.

Q: What is the most important thing to remember when joining a creative writing club? A: The most important thing to remember when joining a creative writing club is to approach it with an open mind and a willingness to learn and grow. Be respectful towards your fellow club members, embrace constructive criticism, and actively participate in discussions and activities. This will help you make the most of your experience and nurture your growth as a writer.

In conclusion, joining a creative writing club offers a supportive community, valuable feedback, and endless opportunities for growth as a writer. Explore your creativity and meet like-minded individuals today!

Data Insights: What Is a Well-Known Write-Blocking Data Preview and Imaging Tool

Sands of Creativity: Mastering the Art of Describing Sand in Creative Writing

Leave a Comment Cancel reply

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Reach out to us for sponsorship opportunities.

Welcome to Creative Writing Prompts

At Creative Writing Prompts, we believe in the power of words to shape worlds. Our platform is a sanctuary for aspiring writers, seasoned wordsmiths, and everyone. Here, storytelling finds its home, and your creative journey begins its captivating voyage.

© 2024 Creativewriting-prompts.com

  • Future Students
  • Parents/Families
  • Alumni/Friends
  • Current Students
  • Faculty/Staff
  • MyOHIO Student Center
  • Visit Athens Campus
  • Regional Campuses
  • OHIO Online
  • Faculty/Staff Directory
  • Excellence in Health Care
  • Chillicothe
  • Calendar of University Events
  • Building Directory
  • Emergency Information
  • Office of the President
  • Executive VP and Provost
  • Board of Trustees
  • Undergraduate
  • Study Abroad/Away
  • Academic Calendar
  • Course Catalog and Registration
  • Academic Advising
  • Career Network
  • Experiential Learning
  • Research Division
  • Research Centers and Institutes
  • Research and Sponsored Programs
  • Research News
  • Entrepreneurship & Innovation
  • LEO Electronic Awards Administration
  • Undergraduate Athens
  • Online Programs
  • Transfer Students
  • Schedule a Visit
  • Virtual Tour
  • Campus/Parking Map
  • Tuition Guarantee
  • Scholarships and Financial Aid
  • Admitted Students
  • Transfer Your Credits
  • Confirm Your Intent
  • Student Organizations
  • Diversity on Campus
  • Campus Recreation
  • Employment Opportunities
  • Athens Community
  • Culinary Services
  • Housing and Residence Life
  • Off-Campus Living
  • Transportation
  • Campus Safety Resources
  • Campus Care
  • Counseling and Psychological Services
  • Emergency Alerts

Helpful Links

Navigate OHIO

Connect With Us

Creative Writing Workshops

A notebook with writing lays on top of a blank notebook by a pen.

Creative writing workshops offer students the chance to explore their creativity and experience the writing process among fellow writers. Students have the choice to focus on different genres: poetry, fiction or literary nonfiction.

These courses are offered through the English Department in the College of Arts and Sciences in the fall and spring semesters.  

The courses are offered in the fall and spring semesters.

Academic Credit

Each course is worth 3 credits.

More Information

Experience tags, industry focus:, experience type:, eligible class years:, college affiliation:, related experiences.

Students pose for a photo in Prague.

Study Abroad: Rhetorics of Remembering

Ecuador experience

Tropical Disease Research Program and International Research Training Course

Art students at Ohio University smile in a group pose

Art Ambassadors at the School of Art + Design

Looking for a different kind of experience.

Go to the full experience directory

Calculate for all schools

Your chance of acceptance, your chancing factors, extracurriculars, great colleges for aspiring authors.

Hey everyone! I'm passionate about creative writing and want to pursue a career as an author. What colleges would you recommend for someone looking to major in English or creative writing?

I'm glad to hear that you're passionate about creative writing and interested in pursuing it in college! Here are some excellent colleges and universities that offer strong programs in English and creative writing:

1. Columbia University: Known for its School of the Arts, Columbia offers a Creative Writing major with a strong emphasis on the craft and offers courses that focus on various genres such as fiction, non-fiction, and poetry.

2. New York University: NYU houses the renowned Creative Writing Program within the College of Arts and Science. This program provides a wide range of courses, including workshops in fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction.

3. Brown University: Brown's Literary Arts program emphasizes creative writing workshops and allows for a great deal of flexibility in terms of course selection. They also offer a unique opportunity to work on the famous Brown Literary Review.

4. University of Iowa: Known for its prestigious Iowa Writers' Workshop, the University of Iowa is an excellent choice for aspiring writers. They offer both undergraduate and graduate programs in creative writing.

5. Kenyon College: With a strong focus on literature and creative writing, Kenyon College is known for its well-regarded English department and literary magazine, The Kenyon Review.

6. Emerson College: Emerson offers a Creative Writing major and is home to the acclaimed literary magazine Ploughshares. They emphasize workshop-style classes and offer unique opportunities for publishing internships.

7. Middlebury College: Middlebury provides a solid foundation in English and creative writing through their liberal arts curriculum. They also host the prestigious Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, which offers additional networking and learning opportunities.

8. Hamilton College: Hamilton's Creative Writing major includes a mix of literature courses and workshops, as well as the chance to work on their literary magazine, The Hamilton Stone Review.

9. Oberlin College: Oberlin's Creative Writing major focuses on various writing workshops and also offers the opportunity to work on the college's literary magazine, The Oberlin Review.

10. University of Virginia: UVA's English department offers a strong creative writing program with workshops, readings, and the chance to work on their literary magazine, The Virginia Quarterly Review.

These colleges are just a few examples of schools with great English and creative writing programs. Keep in mind that you should also consider factors such as campus size, location, and overall fit when choosing a college. Good luck with your college search!

About CollegeVine’s Expert FAQ

CollegeVine’s Q&A seeks to offer informed perspectives on commonly asked admissions questions. Every answer is refined and validated by our team of admissions experts to ensure it resonates with trusted knowledge in the field.

  • College of Arts & Sciences
  • Graduate Division
  • College of Liberal and Professional Studies

Home

Kelly Writers House Summer Workshop Alum Deborah Olatunji featured in Penn Today

Deborah Olatunji poses next to the Kelly Writers House sign

Check out this fantastic  Penn Today feature on fourth-year student Deborah Olatunji, whose journey at Penn began with the Kelly Writers House Summer Workshop . Though initially intending to major in nursing, Deb discovered that her true passion lay in exploring identity, vulnerability, and mental health advocacy.  

Four years later, Deb has changed her major, started a podcast , studied abroad in South Africa, and launched the Black Storytellers Collective, a transnational project that connects Black writers across the diaspora. Through it all, the Kelly Writers House has remained a source of community and Deb's "third place" at Penn.

Read more about Deb's extraordinary path at the link below.

IMAGES

  1. Creative writing workshops allow students to hone their craft

    what is creative writing workshop

  2. Launch of New Creative Writing Workshops in The Hague

    what is creative writing workshop

  3. James Gering

    what is creative writing workshop

  4. 10 Essential Lessons You'll Learn in a Creative Writing Workshop

    what is creative writing workshop

  5. Learn Creative Writing Workshop

    what is creative writing workshop

  6. Creative Writing Workshop (School Holidays)

    what is creative writing workshop

COMMENTS

  1. How to Workshop Creative Writing

    How to Workshop Creative Writing: Receiving Writing Feedback. Ask questions. The best writing workshops give you the space to work through what you don't know how to do. Come prepared with questions about your work, and don't be afraid to follow up with the suggestions people give you. Consider your ideal reader.

  2. 10 Essential Lessons You'll Learn in a Creative Writing Workshop

    1. Discover yourself and your path. One day, while sitting in creative writing workshop, I was overcome by the strangest sensation. The best way I can describe it is that I felt like I was exactly where I was supposed to be. It was the moment I knew without a doubt that I would be a writer. 2.

  3. Learn Essential Creative Writing Skills

    In summary, here are 10 of our most popular creative writing courses. Creative Writing: Wesleyan University. Write Your First Novel: Michigan State University. The Strategy of Content Marketing: University of California, Davis. Writing for Young Readers: Opening the Treasure Chest: Commonwealth Education Trust.

  4. What is Creative Writing? A Key Piece of the Writer's Toolbox

    5 Key Characteristics of Creative Writing. Creative writing is marked by several defining characteristics, each working to create a distinct form of expression: 1. Imagination and Creativity:Creative writing is all about harnessing your creativity and imagination to create an engaging and compelling piece of work.

  5. The Ultimate List of 596 Writing Classes in 2024

    2. Gotham Writers' Workshop. 💲 Cost: $165 - $409 (plus registration fees) 👨‍🏫 Type: Video lectures, live Zoom classes, assignments, critique. The largest adult-education writing school in the US, Gotham Writers has been helping budding authors hone their skills since the 1990s.

  6. The Best Online Writing Workshops

    The best creative writing workshops are the beginning of your writing life, not the end. Throughout the workshop, you'll find new opportunities for continuous growth. You might find a list of literary journals to submit to, new readings to stimulate your writing, further creative writing workshops to attend, or simply the emails and social ...

  7. Writing Workshop: Can a Workshop Help You Become a Better Writer?

    Generally creative writing workshops are done in school settings, from a Masters in Fine Arts (MFA) creative writing program to a middle school creative writing unit. For example, one of the most famous workshops is the Iowa Writers' Workshop, which is in Iowa City, Iowa.

  8. How to Lead a Creative Writing Workshop

    Another simple exercise to get people in the writing mood would be to ask them to use a couple hundred words to describe a recent meal, their journey to the workshop, or a room in their house or a view from a window. For an extra challenge, tell them they have to do it without using the word "I.".

  9. Writopia Lab

    Middle School Advanced Writing Exploration (AWE) This application-only program invites 7th and 8th-grade writers to be part of a community of dedicated, focused writers looking to explore, expand, and deepen their literary passions. Creative Writing Workshops for Kids Ages 2 to 18.

  10. What is a Creative Writing Workshop?

    The workshop method of teaching allows students to develop the critical thinking skills needed for revising their own work, as well as the interpersonal skills necessary to participate in upper level and graduate level workshops in university. Creative Writing workshops focus on the development of style and the treatment of content, not on ...

  11. Scribophile: The writing group and online writing workshop for serious

    Scribophile is a writing group focused on getting you feedback on your manuscript. — in fact, we're one of the largest online writing groups out there. Our points-based peer critique system guarantees you'll get feedback from writers from all walks of life. You can then use that feedback to polish your writing before you take the next ...

  12. Creative Writing Classes

    Gotham Writers Workshop is a creative home where writers develop their craft and come together in the spirit of discovery and fellowship. We've been teaching creative writing and business writing since 1993. Fiction. Nonfiction. Scriptwriting. Comedy, Poetry. & Song. Professional. Development.

  13. The Creative Writing Project

    The Creative Writing Project is a series of workshops designed to provide adult writers of all levels with opportunities to explore the art of creative writing. Each month-long series puts participants amongst a community of writers and educators, offering instruction and guidance from a diverse group of local and published writers.

  14. Creative writing

    Creative writing is any writing that goes outside the bounds of normal professional, journalistic, academic, or technical forms of literature, typically identified by an emphasis on narrative craft, character development, and the use of literary tropes or with various traditions of poetry and poetics.Due to the looseness of the definition, it is possible for writing such as feature stories to ...

  15. Creative Writing Workshop

    Come to New Orleans and master your craft. Write in one of the most vibrant, diverse cultures in North America, home to writers, outsiders, and artists of every stripe. Our graduates publish! For over 25 years, the Creative Writing Workshops have trained writers to thrive in poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, and drama.

  16. What Is Writing Workshop and How Do I Use It in the Classroom?

    Writing (20 - 45 minutes) The majority of writing workshop is devoted to simply giving students time to write. During this time, teachers can either be modeling the process by working on their own writing or conferencing with individual students. In all reality, the majority of your time will be observing and helping students.

  17. 7 Steps to a Great Writing Workshop

    Set up a writing workshop! This instructional approach truly engages students by letting them write, read, interact, mentor, and take risks—all at their own pace. Follow these simple steps to create a writing workshop in your classroom. Step 1: Set up a writing workshop framework. A typical writing workshop session has four parts.

  18. Arvon

    2. Arvon is a charity that runs creative writing courses, events and retreats both in-person and online. Our courses are tutored by leading authors and include a powerful mix of workshops and individual tutorials, with time and space to write, free from distractions of everyday life. Grants and concessions are available to help with course fees.

  19. Creative Writing (Iowa Writers' Workshop) < University of Iowa

    The Creative Writing Program (Iowa Writers' Workshop) is a world-renowned graduate program for fiction writers and poets. Founded in 1936, it was the first creative writing program in the United States to offer a degree, and it became a model for many contemporary writing programs. In addition to its Master of Fine Arts program, it also offers ...

  20. Join the Club: Creative Writing Club Explained

    Our Creative Writing Club is a community of passionate writers who come together to share their love for storytelling and hone their craft. Whether you're new to writing or a seasoned wordsmith, our club offers a supportive and inspiring environment where you can explore your creativity, develop your writing skills, and connect with fellow writers.

  21. Homepage

    Advanced Summer Workshops. Deadline: 5/20. Summer is the perfect time to take your story, essay, poem, and more to the next level. Our advanced workshops are by application only and limited to 9 students to foster a closer and more rigorous learning experience, so your writing can get the attention, feedback, and support it needs.

  22. Creative Writing

    Maura Adela Cruz (she/her) is an undergraduate student at the University of California, Berkeley pursuing a degree in English with a minor in Creative Writing. She was raised in California's Central Valley to an Indigenous farmworker community and is of Zapotec and Mixtec descent. Maura's poetry focuses on Zapotec language revitalization while also examining the circumstances imposed by ...

  23. 27 Writing Workshops You'll Love

    Writer's Digest University "Creative Writing 101" Workshop. The "Creative Writing 101" workshop by Writer's Digest University is great for writers who know what they want to do, but don't know where to start. In this writing workshop, you'll learn the essentials and get excellent help in achieving your goals! Novel Writing Workshops

  24. 25+ Incredible Writers Retreats to Attend in 2024

    Willow Writers' Retreat is facilitated by Susan Isaak Lolis, a published and award-winning writer. Attendees have access to workshops, including one with creative writing instructor Margaret Harrington, plus a reading on the last evening to celebrate your work. Cost: TBD; 2022 rate was $350.

  25. Creative Writing Workshops

    Creative writing workshops offer students the chance to explore their creativity and experience the writing process among fellow writers. Students have the choice to focus on different genres: poetry, fiction or literary nonfiction.These courses are offered through the English Department in the College of Arts and Sciences in the fall and spring semesters.

  26. What's a Generative Workshop Anyway?

    A generative workshop is designed to pull the plugs on the adult conscious mind for just a little while. Long enough and in a safe enough environment to thaw down to your wild child mind that was there once and is still. To ignite, embolden, excite. Later, back home at your desk, you, the mature adult writer, can ultimately shepherd these wild ...

  27. The Best Free Online Writing Courses for Creative Writers, Fiction, and

    The Non-Sexy Business of Writing Nonfiction walks you through the good, the bad, and the ugly of writing, publishing, and marketing nonfiction books. In this 10-day course, you'll get an email each day walking you through some critical aspect of writing and publishing nonfiction, covering topics like:

  28. Great Colleges for Aspiring Authors?

    Brown University: Brown's Literary Arts program emphasizes creative writing workshops and allows for a great deal of flexibility in terms of course selection. They also offer a unique opportunity to work on the famous Brown Literary Review. 4. University of Iowa: Known for its prestigious Iowa Writers' Workshop, the University of Iowa is an ...

  29. Creative Writing Workshop offered May 22

    SMITHFIELD - East Smithfield Public Library, 50 Esmond St., will host a Creative Writing Workshop on Wednesday, May 22, at 5 p.m. Young adults are invited to learn ways to begin a story, try ...

  30. Kelly Writers House Summer Workshop Alum Deborah Olatunji featured in

    Check out this fantastic Penn Today feature on fourth-year student Deborah Olatunji, whose journey at Penn began with the Kelly Writers House Summer Workshop. Though initially intending to major in nursing, Deb discovered that her true passion lay in exploring identity, vulnerability, and mental health advocacy.