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5 Expository Essay Examples (Full Text with Citations)

  • Video Overview
  • Quick Example
  • Formatting Guide

An expository essay attempts to explain a topic in-depth, demonstrating expert knowledge and understanding.

This form of essay is structured around the clear, factual presentation of information, devoid of the writer’s personal opinions or arguments.

The primary goal is to inform or explain rather than persuade.

Unlike an argumentative essay, which is built around defending a particular point of view with evidence and persuasion, an expository essay maintains a neutral stance, focusing on delivering straightforward facts and explanations.

An example of expository writing could be an article explaining the process of photosynthesis.

The article would systematically describe each stage of how plants convert sunlight into energy, detailing the role of sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide.

It would explain the sequence of reactions – first, second, third, fourth, fifth – that occur and the importance of each step in supporting the life of the plant.

An expository essay generally follows this essay format:

expository essay format and structure template

  • A) To persuade the reader to adopt a particular viewpoint
  • B) To inform or explain a topic clearly
  • C) To present the writer’s personal opinions and arguments
  • D) To entertain the reader with creative writing
  • A) An expository essay uses creative storytelling techniques
  • B) An expository essay remains neutral and avoids personal opinions
  • C) An expository essay focuses on persuading the reader with evidence
  • D) An expository essay prioritizes the writer’s personal experiences

Expository Essay Examples

#1 impacts of technology on education.

955 words | 4 Pages | 15 References

impact of technology on education essay

Thesis Statement: “The integration of technology in education represents a complex and critical area of study crucial for understanding and shaping the future of educational practices.”

#2 Impacts of Globalization on Education

1450 words | 5 Pages | 9 References

impacts of globalization on education essay

Thesis Statement: “This essay examines the profound and multifaceted effects of globalization on education, exploring how technological advancements and policy reforms have transformed access to, delivery of, and perceptions of education.”

#3 The Role of Emotional Intelligence in Interpersonal Relationships

1211 Words | 5 Pages | 22 References

emotional intelligence essay

Thesis Statement: “The central thesis is that EI, defined as the ability to perceive, understand, and manage emotions, is a crucial determinant of success and well-being.”

#4 The Future of Renewable Energy Sources and Their Impact

870 words | 4 Pages | 20 References

renewable energy essay

Thesis Statement: “The essay posits that although renewable energy sources hold immense promise for a sustainable future, their full integration into the global energy grid presents significant challenges that must be addressed through technological innovation, economic investment, and policy initiatives.”

#5 The Psychology Behind Consumer Behavior

1053 words | 4 Pages | 17 References

consumer behavior essay

Thesis Statement: “The thesis of this essay is that consumer behavior is not merely a product of rational decision-making; it is deeply rooted in psychological processes, both conscious and subconscious, that drive consumers’ choices and actions.”

How to Write an Expository Essay

expository essay definition and features, explained below

Unlike argumentative or persuasive essays, expository essays do not aim to convince the reader of a particular point of view.

Instead, they focus on providing a balanced and thorough explanation of a subject.

Key characteristics of an expository essay include:

  • Clarity and Conciseness
  • Structured Organization (Introduction, Body, Conclusion)
  • Objective Tone
  • Evidence-Based (Cite academic sources in every body paragraph)
  • Objective thesis statement (see below)
  • Informative purpose (Not argumentative)

You can follow my expository essay templates with AI prompts to help guide you through the expository essay writing process:

Expository Essay Paragraph Guide

How to write a Thesis Statement for an Expository Essay

An expository thesis statement doesn’t make an argument or try to persuade. It uses ‘is’ rather than ‘ought’ statements.

Take these comparisons  below. Note how the expository thesis statements don’t prosecute an argument or attempt to persuade, while the argumentative thesis statements clearly take a side on an issue:

💡 AI Prompt for Generating Sample Expository Thesis Statements An expository essay’s thesis statement should be objective rather than argumentative. Write me five broad expository thesis statement ideas on the topic “[TOPIC]”.

Go Deeper: 101 Thesis Statement Examples

Differences Between Expository and Argumentative Essays

Expository and argumentative essays are both common writing styles in academic and professional contexts, but they serve different purposes and follow different structures.

Here are the key differences between them:

  • Expository Essay : The primary purpose is to explain, describe, or inform about a topic. It focuses on clarifying a subject or process, providing understanding and insight.
  • Argumentative Essay : The goal is to persuade the reader to accept a particular point of view or to take a specific action. It’s about presenting a stance and supporting it with evidence and logic.
  • Expository Essay : It maintains a neutral and objective tone. The writer presents information factually and impartially, without expressing personal opinions or biases.
  • Argumentative Essay : It often adopts a more assertive, persuasive, and subjective tone. The writer takes a clear position and argues in favor of it, using persuasive language.
  • Expository Essay : The reader is expected to gain knowledge, understand a process, or become informed about a topic. There’s no expectation for the reader to agree or disagree.
  • Argumentative Essay : The reader is encouraged to consider the writer’s viewpoint, evaluate arguments, and possibly be persuaded to adopt a new perspective or take action.

Go Deeper: Expository vs Argumentative Essays

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Expository writing: how to write an incredible expository essay.

Expository essays are frequently assigned in  English classes  and are evaluated in various standardized exams.

But what exactly  is  an expository essay, and how do you write a good one?

In this article, we’ll tell you everything you need to know to pen a high-scoring expository paper.

What Is an Expository Essay?

The word  expository  means “intended to explain or describe something.”

An expository essay requires you to investigate an idea, gather supporting evidence, and present your point of view on a topic.

  • You may be wondering how this differs from a persuasive essay.
  • While both essay types require you to provide evidence to support a claim, persuasive essays are more argumentative.

A persuasive essay includes a counterargument, which addresses and rebuts an opposing viewpoint.

Expository essays, on the other hand, focus on clearly explaining and supporting  your  point of view.

Parts of an Expository Essay

A strong expository essay should consist of:

  • An introductory paragraph with a clear thesis
  • Evidence that supports the thesis (typically in three body paragraphs)
  • A conclusion

Below, we’ll look at how to construct the expository essay piece by piece.

For clarity, we’ll focus on a somewhat formulaic process for expository writing.

Once you’ve mastered these basics, you can take risks and sprinkle more creativity throughout your essays.

Introduction

The introduction frames the topic of your essay.

It also provides readers with any necessary background information or context.

A simple format for your introduction is:

  • Grabber/Hook  – A compelling sentence or two that draws readers into your essay.
  • Background Information (as needed)  – Any basic information the reader needs to know about the topic to understand your essay.
  • Thesis Statement  – This is the most important sentence of your entire essay. See below for more information.

Thesis Statement

The thesis statement is the roadmap for your entire essay, so it must be clear and concise. It should state your point of view on the topic.

  • The thesis may also  briefly  mention the supporting evidence you’ll expand on in the body of the essay.

For instance, a thesis statement might say:

Students should read more literature because it improves vocabulary, reading comprehension, and empathy.

The writer’s viewpoint is immediately clear: Students should read more literature.

The writer also indicates that her supporting evidence will mention several benefits of reading literature: improved vocabulary, better reading comprehension, and increased empathy.

  • Most likely, each of these points will form one of the writer’s body paragraphs.

If your teacher (or a standardized test) assigns you a topic, here’s another way to think of a thesis statement: The thesis is your answer to the question being asked.

  • Let’s say you receive a prompt that says, “Your community is thinking of starting a program encouraging people to limit car usage. Explain how limiting car usage would benefit your community.”

This prompt is essentially asking, “How would limiting car usage benefit your  community ?”

  • Thus, your thesis could answer the question by saying something like, “Limiting car usage would benefit the community because it would decrease traffic, improve public health, and reduce air pollution.”

This approach ensures that you’re on topic and directly addressing the prompt.

Supporting Evidence

Once you’ve clearly stated your point of view, it’s time to support it. To do this, you’ll need  evidence . Sometimes, this will mean doing your own research.

On other occasions, especially exams, you’ll be provided with relevant resources.

These may include newspaper articles, primary sources, photos, or even audio recordings.

  • Your job is to sort through these resources and find evidence that supports your thesis. It’s important to note that if you can’t find evidence supporting your thesis, you’ll need to change it.

Strong evidence may include research findings, quotes from experts, and statistics. Make sure that your evidence is from credible sources and clearly supports your thesis statement.

Organizing Evidence

After finding your supporting evidence, you’ll organize it into body paragraphs, typically three of them.

Each body paragraph should focus on one general idea.

In addition, each of these general ideas should be logically connected to your thesis statement.

  • Your body paragraphs should start with a topic sentence that introduces the idea that the body paragraph will elaborate upon.

Remember our sample thesis about students reading more literature?

  • The topic sentence of the first body paragraph could read, “To start with, reading literature is essential because it expands students’ vocabulary.”

After the topic sentence, the paragraph should introduce 2-3 pieces of evidence supporting this idea.

If a piece of evidence doesn’t clearly relate to the body paragraph’s topic sentence, it needs to be moved or deleted.

Analyzing Evidence

When you introduce a piece of evidence, follow it up with a sentence analyzing the evidence in your own words.

  • Explain the connection between the evidence and your thesis statement.
  • How does it support your point of view?
  • How do you interpret this evidence?

Remember that essays don’t only reflect your writing skills; they also reflect your critical thinking skills.

Instead of merely quoting evidence, you must also explain your thought process.

As a result, an effective body paragraph can follow this formula:

  • Topic sentence
  • Evidence #1
  • Analysis of Evidence #1
  • Evidence #2
  • Analysis of Evidence #2
  • Evidence #3 (Optional)
  • Analysis of Evidence #3 (Optional)
  • Concluding/transitional sentence

The final sentence of the body paragraph should remind readers of the paragraph’s main point and connect it to the next paragraph.

Transitions are important because they help readers follow your train of thought without confusion.

They smoothly guide readers through your paper.

Transition words and phrases include:

  • For example
  • For instance
  • To illustrate
  • Specifically
  • On the other hand
  • Consequently
  • As a result
  • Additionally
  • Furthermore

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Like stories,  essays  have a beginning, middle, and end.

  • The introduction is your beginning, the body paragraphs form the middle, and the conclusion brings the paper to an end.

The conclusion synthesizes the information included in your essay.

As the name suggests, it also draws a conclusion from the information presented.

  • Instead of simply restating the thesis, you should revisit the thesis in light of the supporting evidence you’ve provided. Do not introduce any new information in the conclusion.

Remember that the conclusion is your last chance to make an impression on the reader. It should be logical and convincing.

Try to end with a strong and/or memorable final sentence.

In total, an expository essay includes these pieces:

– Introduction

  • Hook/grabber
  • Background information

– Body paragraphs (usually three)

– conclusion.

  • Synthesis of evidence
  • Explanation of what this evidence shows (connected to thesis)
  • Strong final sentence

If you include each of these pieces, you’ll have a clear, logical, and effective expository essay.

Once you become comfortable following this formula, you may wish to vary it or infuse it with your own style.

Just make sure that all the essential pieces are present in your essay.

The Expository Essay Writing Process

Before you can effectively assemble an expository essay, you’ll need to gather information and plan your approach.

Typically, the writing process includes:

  • Carefully reading the prompt (if applicable)
  • Brainstorming
  • Gathering evidence
  • Revising/editing

Let’s take a closer look at each step in the process.

1. Reading the Prompt

If you’re provided with a prompt, understanding it is an essential first step.

Misinterpreting the prompt will result in a low score, even if your essay is well-written.

  • Read the prompt at least 2-3 times, underline key words and phrases. If the prompt is complicated, you may want to rewrite it in your own words.

Does the prompt have multiple parts? If so, make sure you understand each part and that your essay clearly addresses all of them.

2. Brainstorming

Once you’ve read the prompt, begin brainstorming how you will approach it.

  • If you’ve been provided with relevant resources, this may also include a first read-through or skimming of these texts.

What position will you take? How are you planning to support your viewpoint? Jot down any idea that pops into your head.

  • It doesn’t matter if the idea is good—right now, you’re just trying to find inspiration. You’ll change, add, or remove information later.

If you haven’t been provided with a prompt, you’ll need to brainstorm a topic that interests you.

It should also be a topic on which you’re at least somewhat knowledgeable.

3. Gathering Evidence

At this point, you’ll find evidence that supports your point of view.

  • It helps to write at least a rough draft of your thesis statement before beginning this step.
  • This way, you’ll have a clear idea of what sort of evidence you need to find.

After writing your thesis statement, find credible evidence that supports it.

  • This may require you to go to the library or browse scholarly databases on the Internet.

Alternatively, you may have been provided with resources.

In that case, read through the resources carefully, underlining or circling evidence that reinforces your thesis.

4. Planning

Planning ensures that your essay is organized, focused, and cohesive.

It also allows you to catch potential mistakes  before  they happen.

  • For instance, you might realize that some of your evidence doesn’t fit, or that one of your body paragraphs is lacking support.

You can then address these areas of weakness before writing your essay.

  • At the top of your planning sheet (or a document on your computer) write your thesis statement.
  • Continually reference the thesis to ensure that you’re focused and on topic.
  • Next, determine the focus of each body paragraph and the 2-3 pieces of evidence that will support it.

Sometimes, students think that planning is too time-consuming.

However, a plan will save you time in the long run.

With all your quotes and evidence organized in one place, writing your essay is much faster and easier.

Once you have a completed plan, begin writing your essay.

  • Remember to analyze each piece of evidence and clearly connect your points with transitions.

Use a formal, academic tone and avoid slang or overly casual language.

Vary your sentence structure, including both short and long sentences. Pay attention to spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

6. Revising

Students often skip the revising and editing step of the writing process.

This is a mistake. Slowly read through your essay  at least  once before submitting it.

  • Look for misspelled words, incorrect verb tenses, and punctuation or grammar mistakes. Does your writing flow well? Does everything make sense?
  • Are all of your points clear? Have you used the same word or phrase repetitively? (If you have, try to substitute a synonym.) Did you use transitions connecting your ideas?

Ensure that you submit the best, most polished version of your essay possible. Mistakes and unclear sentences make a poor impression.

Advice From the Experts:

From Dr. Carrie Brown, professor of English and creative writing at Sweet Briar College and novelist :

When I’m working with students on expository writing — on writing in any rhetorical mode, really — I remind them that almost inevitably they have to stumble their way through some lousy sentences before they discover what they actually want to say. (This takes us back to that famous question: How do I know what I mean until I see what I say?) Some messy writing usually precedes orderly, elegant writing, and every writer needs patience during that messy process, because that process is important: out of that process emerges clear thinking, which is the true key to clear writing. Once  writers have waded around in the muck for a while, then they can step back and examine those sentences or numbered phrases or bulleted points — whatever method felt most natural to the writer by which to set down emerging thoughts — to discover which are relevant, which are simply repetitions of earlier thoughts, which are superfluous or meaningless, and in what order they ought to proceed. A trick that seems to work for students with a strong tendency toward auditory learning can actually record themselves speaking aloud, trying to address the topic, and then play back that recording, meanwhile transposing ideas — and usually improving and clarifying them — as they go.

From Adam Cole, author and writing expert:

Know your audience – Whatever you are writing, you will get the best results if you are thinking about who is reading it, why they are reading it, and what you should do to make sure the interaction between you and the reader is optimal. While the audience for an expository piece may be obvious, writing directly to that audience is not so obvious. It affords you an opportunity to think clearly and write clearly without having to worry about your identity, ego or success. If you are in school, the audience for expository writing is your professor, and you should be fulfilling the boxes in their rubric to the letter. If they haven’t given you a rubric, ask for one. If they won’t, find one or create one based on conversations with them, their former students, or another professor.

From Tangela Walker-Craft –  Simply Necessary, Inc. , Family and Parenting Blogger:

Write in complete sentences. Write in paragraph form. Each paragraph should contain 3 to 5 sentences for short essay questions, and 5 to 10 sentences for long essay questions. Vary sentence length and structure; try not to begin sentences with the same word or words. Use facts and information taken from reading passages to answer questions; refer back to the reading passage to stay focused. Underline important information in reading passages to make it easier to go back to them when answering questions. Proofread. Proofreading sentences backwards makes finding spelling mistakes and punctuation errors easier because it forces test-takers to focus on individual words instead of automatically “seeing” what he or she intended to write.

From Peter Donahue,  a writing expert  and teacher:

1. Write for clarity, not formality. As a teacher, I see a lot of expository writing where the writer is more concerned with following the conventions of academic jargon than she is with expressing ideas. A good example is the use of “utilize” instead of “use,” because it “sounds more formal,” or the avoidance of the pronoun “I” because it “sounds too informal.” So, rather than trying to appear formal, expository writing should aim to be clear. George Orwell’s 1946 essay, “Politics and the English Language,” says more on this topic, and is a worthwhile read. 2. Think synthetically, write analytically. Synthetic thinking starts with small details, or an open-ended question. As thoughts continue to develop, the main idea is clarified (or discovered) at the end the process. Contrariwise, Analytical thinking starts with a “given:” a major premise or generalization. It then proceeds to break down the main idea into its components and deal with each separately. Expository writing is usually presented most effectively in an analytic format — the main idea first, the support afterwards. On the other hand, literary writing, like a poem or discursive essay, is often presented synthetically. The key is knowing the difference between thought process and written format. We can think something synthetically, and then write it analytically. And in fact, this process can be the key to effective expository writing for many people. Don’t assume that because a thesis appears in the first paragraph, you have to think of it first. You could try drafting it synthetically, to clarify your thinking. Then rewrite it analytically to present it more effectively for your reader.

From Jessica Moody,  curriculum expert :

Expository writing is first about structure, second about clarity, and third about content.  Depending on the type of expository writing there is a specific structure expected.  Even in college essays each sentence on the essay has a purpose and can be labeled as a thesis statement, topic sentence, evidence, or explanation of evidence. If the structure is not there, most of the time there is not much clarity and the content is lacking because it is confusing.  This is the same for any type of expository writing. My suggestion for people becoming better at expository writing is to study the structure of the piece, the paragraph structures and the sentence structures.  If you understand how to break down the structure then you can learn to replicate any style or form you want.

Final Touches: Expository Essay Writing

Writing an excellent expository essay isn’t as complicated as it seems. Simply follow the steps and include the essential pieces outlined here.

Your essay is sure to showcase both your thinking and  writing skills —and earn you a high score!

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How to Write an Expository Essay

Published by Grace Graffin at August 17th, 2021 , Revised On July 26, 2023

Expository means “to describe or explain something” . It is related to the words ‘exposition’, ‘expound’, and ‘expose’ – to explain or reveal the meaning, to lay open, speak one’s mind.

Whenever there is a need to gather research and describe an idea, a  topic , or a process clearly and logically, it is done in the form of an expository  essay .

An expository essay requires the writer to take a balanced approach to the subject matter rather than justifying a particular point of view.

Expository essays are assigned to students to evaluate their subject knowledge and composition skills. When compared with  argumentative essays , they involve a lot less research.

Definition of Expository Essay

“The expository essay is the  type of essay  that involves an investigation of an idea or topic, appraises relevant supporting evidence material, and presents an argument in a clear and concise manner. ”

When to Write an Expository Essay

Your school or university could assign an expository essay to you as coursework or as part of an online exam.

However, the guidelines may or may not clearly state that your assignment is an expository essay. If that is the case, then look for keywords like ‘explain’, ‘describe’, ‘define’, etc., to be sure that what has been asked for is an expository essay.

You might even be asked to explain and emphasise a particular concept or term. Writing a simple definition will not be enough because you will be expected to explore the ideas in detail.

Writing an Expository Essay

An expository essay should not be based on your  personal  experiences and opinions. It rather takes an objective approach. You will be expected to explain the topic in a balanced way without any personal bias.

Make sure to avoid the first and second person (“I” and “You”) when writing an expository essay.

How to Structure an Expository Essay

The  structure  and format of your expository essay assignment will depend on your school’s guidelines and the topic you are investigating. However, it is always a good idea to develop an outline for your  essay  before starting to work.

The Five-Paragraph Essay Writing Approach

An expository essay will require you to take the five-paragraph essay approach: an  introductory paragraph , a main body paragraph , and a concluding paragraph . This is often referred to as the hamburger style of the essay because, like a hamburger, it contains five main parts: the introduction and conclusion being the bun that encapsulates everything.

Rationale and Thesis Statement

Start your essay  with a rationale and thesis, also known as the  thesis statement , so your readers know what you set out to achieve in your expository essay assignment. Ensure the thesis statement is narrow enough to follow the guidelines in the assignment brief. If the thesis statement is weak and too broad, you will struggle to produce a flawless expository essay.

The Framework

Construct a framework, so you know what elements will constitute the basis of your essay.

Expository Essay Introduction

Like other  essay types , an expository essay begins with an  introduction , including a hook, background to the topic, and a thesis statement. Once you have grabbed the readers’ interest, it will be easier to get them to read the remaining essay.

Frequently Asked Questions

Will i need the skill of expository writing after i finish my studies.

It depends on what you are studying for. While you might or might not write any more expository essays after your formal education has ended, the skill will be very useful in certain careers, such as business reports, journalism, and in scientific and technical writing.

How does an expository essay differ from an argumentative essay?

An argumentative essay is usually longer and requires more research. It starts with a claim about something that will need supporting evidence. And both sides of the argument need to be discussed. In an expository essay, there is no requirement to make an original argument and defend/support it.

What is the purpose of expository essays?

This style of essay is necessary when you have to showcase your knowledge on a given subject, or your ability to gather research on one and present your findings.

How long is an expository essay?

There is no fixed length but an expository essay could be part of an exam, in which case it might only be 1,000 words or less. They are usually shorter than argumentative essays . It can depend on the subject under discussion. You will likely be given instructions on the required word count.

Are there different types of expository essay?

There are six different types of expository essay, each with a different purpose.

The six types are:

Process essay – describing a task, a method, how to complete something Cause and effect essay – why something happened and its effects Problem-solution essay – provide analysis of problems and their solutions Compare and contrast essay – describe the similarities and differences between two subjects Definition essay – define the topic in detail and explain the how, what, and why Classification essay – separate the topic’s categories and define them in detail

When you are assigned your essay, you should be able to distinguish which of these approaches you are required to take.

You May Also Like

The length of an academic essay depends on your level and the nature of subject. If you are unsure how long is an essay then this article will guide you.

An essay outline – an underrated part of essay writing – brings forth the structure for the writers as they initiate the essay drafting process.

Identifying the causes and reasons why so many students struggle with essay writing can help students avoid these mistakes and write a perfect essay.

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Expository Essay: 3 Building Blocks to Propose an Idea and Defend It

by Dixie-Ann Belle | 0 comments

If you saw the words “expository essay” on a writing assignment, would your mind draw a blank? Would you immediately feel as if you had stumbled into unexplored territory?

Well there's good news.

expository essay

This post is written by guest writer Dixie-Ann Belle. You can learn more about Dixie-Anne at the end of this article. Welcome Dixie-Ann! 

You might not realize it, but chances are this is not your first encounter with this type of essay. Once you have been writing essays in academic environments, you have probably already worked on expository writing.

In this article, I hope to help you recognize this essay type and understand the expository essay outline. Comprehending the building blocks is instrumental in knowing how to construct an exceptional expository essay.

Lay a Strong Foundation

Over the years, I have taught and tutored college students one on one as they write academic essays, in face to face classrooms and online, and I have noticed a pattern. They often approach essays in one of two ways.

Some consider them with apprehension and are fearful of making mistakes. Others feel confident that they have written many essays before and think they have already mastered expository writing.

Interestingly, it's the latter who often end up the most shaken when they realize that they are not as familiar as they think with this type of writing.

What I hope to instill in my students is that they should not feel intimidated whatever their situation or essay assignment.

I encourage them to make sure they understand the foundations of the expository essay structure. I try to get them to grasp the basic blocks that need to be there, and once they do, they have a good chance of crafting a substantial piece of writing.

What is an Expository Essay?

Students are typically assigned one of at least four types of essays: the persuasive/argumentative essay, the descriptive essay, the technical essay, or the expository essay.

Writing an expository essay is one of the most important and valuable skills for you to master.

According to the Purdue Online Writing Lab:

The expository essay is a genre of essay that requires the student to investigate an idea, evaluate evidence, expound on the idea, and set forth an argument concerning that idea in a clear and concise manner.

Keep in mind that your expository writing centers on giving your reader information about a given topic or process. Your goal is to inform, describe, or define the subject for your readers.

As you work to achieve this, your essay writing must be formal, objective, and concise. No matter what your discipline, it's almost guaranteed that you will be required to write this common type essay one day.

Some expository essay examples could include:

  • Define the term ‘democracy'
  • Compare and contrast the benefits of cable television vs streaming
  • Outline the process that generates an earthquake
  • Classify the different types of tourism
  • Outline the aspects of a good fitness program

The possibilities are endless with expository writing, and it can cover a wide variety of topics and specialties.

3 Building Blocks of a Great Expository Essay

To make sure you're on the right track with this type of paper, it helps to understand the three building blocks of the expository essay format and how to apply them to the final expository essay structure .

1. Write an introduction

Most students know that an introductory paragraph should grab the interest of the reader. However, they might not realize that it should also provide context for the essay topic.

Ask yourself : What are you talking about in this essay? Why is this topic important? Some background details could help to establish the subject for your reader.

For example:

If you were writing an essay on the impact smartphones have on society, you might want to start with some information on the evolution of smartphones, the number of smartphones in society, the way people use the phones and more.

The introduction should start off with general information.

You then work your way down to the more specific and principal part of your introduction and the crown of your whole essay, the thesis statement.

What is the thesis statement?

Your thesis statement states in concise language what this essay is going to be about. It is one clear sentence which expresses the subject and the focus of this piece of writing. If there is a prompt, the thesis statement should directly answer that prompt.

Our smart phones topic might create a thesis statement like:  Smart phones have many positive impacts for adults in the business world.

Right away the reader has some idea of what's ahead.

2. Write your body paragraphs

With your thesis statement clear in your mind and your introduction setting the scene, it is time to write your body paragraphs.

Each body paragraph contains supporting information including factual evidence for your essay topic. Each paragraph should each focus on one idea.

Depending on your word count and the teacher requirements, you can write any number of body paragraphs, but there are usually at least three for a basic five paragraph essay.

Each body paragraph should start with a topic sentence. A topic sentence is one single statement that explains the point of the paragraph. It directly refers to your thesis statement and tells you what the body paragraph is going to be about.

Remember our smart phone thesis statement? You need something that will relate to that thesis sentence and will alert the reader to what is to come.

Here's one possibility: 

Smart phones can help increase productivity  for professional adults.

This topic sentence not only reminds us that you are talking about positive impacts for adults with smart phones, it now shows us what the following paragraph will cover.

The best body paragraphs will go on to include different types of details, all of which would support your topic sentence. A good abbreviation to encapsulate the different details is spelt TEEES.

The TEEES Body Paragraph Structure

Let's break down this abbreviation and explore the types of details you'll need in your body paragraphs

T: Topic sentence

You'll begin with your topic sentence establishing the purpose of this paragraph. We'll use our example from above:

Smartphones can help increase productivity for professional adults.

E: Explanation

This is where you expand on your topic and include additional supportive information.

If you were talking about smartphones and productivity, maybe you could mention what elements of the smartphone make it optimal for productivity.

E: Evidence

This is the information from reputable sources you researched for your topic. Here's where you can talk about all the information you have discovered from experts who have carefully studied this subject.

For our smartphone essay, perhaps you could mention a quote from a technology reporter who has been following the rise of smartphones for years.

E: Examples

This would be concrete subject matter to support your point.

Maybe here you can list some of the smartphone apps which have proven to increase productivity in the workplace.

S: Significant/Summarizing sentence

This is the last sentence in the body paragraph which summarizes your point and ends this part of your essay. There should be no doubt in the reader's mind that you have finished talking about your topic, and you are moving on to another in the next paragraph. Here's how we could conclude this paragraph on smartphones and productivity:

Smartphones have transformed the productivity of the modern workforce.

3. Write the conclusion

Once you have written your body paragraphs, you're in the home stretch. You have presented all of your points and supported them with the appropriate subject matter. Now you need to conclude.

A lot of students are confused by conclusions. Many of them have heard different rules about what is supposed to be included.

One of the main requirements to keep in mind when ending an expository essay is that you do not add new information.

This is not the time to throw in something you forgot in a previous body paragraph. Your conclusion is supposed to give a succinct recap of the points that came before.

Sometimes college students are instructed to re-state the thesis, and this puzzles them. It doesn't mean re-writing the thesis statement word for word. You should express your thesis statement in a new way.

For example, here's how you could approach the conclusion for our smartphone essay.

You've come up with three points to support your thesis statement, and you've explored these three points in your body paragraphs. After brainstorming, you might decide the benefits of smartphones in the workplace are improved productivity, better communication, and increased mobility.

Your conclusion is the time to remind your reader of these points with concise language. Your reader should be able to read the conclusion alone and still come away with the basic ideas of your essay.

Plan Your Essay Based on an Expository Essay Outline

While writing fiction, it is sometimes okay to “pants” it and just leap into writing your story.

When writing essays in academia, this is rarely a good idea. Planning your essay helps organize your ideas, helps you refine many of your points early on and saves time in the long run.

There are lots of great brainstorming techniques you can use to get your ideas together, but after that, it's time to create a topic to sentence outline.

There are three steps to creating your topic to sentence essay outline.

  • Develop a powerful thesis statement. Remember, this is the overarching idea of your entire essay, so you have completed a significant step once you have one done.
  • Come up with the ideas you would like to support your thesis statement.
  • Based on your points, craft your topic sentences.

Here is an example of a topic to sentence outline:

Having these important foundation details completed is a great way to develop your essay as you build on each part. It is also an effective method to make sure you are on the right track.

Depending on your instructor (or tutor, if you have one), you can show your outline to them to get feedback before you launch into your entire essay.

Even if you don't have anyone to provide a critique, the outline can make it easier to revise how you will approach the rest of your paragraph essay.

You now have some firm foundations to help you as you construct your expository essay.

How do you organize an expository essay?  Let us know in the comments .

Take fifteen minutes to practice writing your own expository essay.

First, choose an expository writing assignment topic. If you can't think of one, use one of the expository essay examples below .  

  • What are the nutritional elements of a healthy breakfast?
  • What are some of the most influential types of music?
  • Compare and contrast the benefits of electric and gas cars. 
  • What are the major steps to planning a stress-free vacation?
  • How do smartphones affect mental health?
  • Define true love.

Craft a thesis statement about your topic. Then, write three topic sentences for your body paragraphs.

With the time you have left, start writing your essay. You might be surprised how much you can write in fifteen minutes when you have a clear outline for your essay!

When your time is up, share your outline and your essay in the Pro Practice Workshop here . After you post, please be sure to give feedback to your fellow writers.

Happy writing!

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How to Write an Expository Essay

4-minute read

  • 29th March 2020

An expository essay explains something. This means investigating an idea, looking at evidence, coming to a conclusion, and explaining your thinking. But how do you write a strong expository essay? Our top tips include:

  • Read the essay prompt carefully and using it to guide your research.
  • Come up with a thesis statement (i.e., a position that you’ll explain).
  • Plan the structure of your essay before you start writing.
  • Once you have a first draft, revise and proofread to make sure it is perfect.

For more advice on how this works, check out the guide below.

1. Read Your Essay Prompt

Most expository essay prompts will ask you to do one of the following:

  • Define and explain a concept or theory.
  • Compare and contrast two ideas.
  • Examine a problem and propose a solution.
  • Describe a cause and effect relationship.
  • Explain a step-by-step process.
  • Analyze a broad subject and classify examples into groups.

When you’ve been set an expository assignment, then, check the prompt or question carefully. You can use the phrasing to guide your research. You may also need to select a topic to write about. If so, try to think of something:

  • You already know at least something about.
  • You find interesting enough to research.
  • That fits with the instructions in the essay prompt (e.g., if you’ve been asked to contrast two things, you’ll need a topic that allows for a comparison).
  • That is narrow enough to discuss in one essay.

Start by brainstorming topics, then narrow it down to one or two ideas.

2. Come Up with a Thesis Statement

Once you have a topic, you’ll need to do some research and develop a thesis statement. This is the proposition or position that you’ll explain in your essay.

Your thesis statement should be something you can back up with evidence and facts, as well as something that answers the question in your essay prompt. Keep in mind, too, that an expository essay should present a balanced account of the facts available, not personal opinions. For instance, we’ve come up with thesis statements for a few example essay prompts:

When you’ve selected a thesis, make sure you’ve got evidence to back it up! This may mean doing a little more research before you start writing.

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3. Structuring an Expository Essay

The exact length and content of your essay will depend on the topic and prompt. However, most expository essays follow a similar basic structure:

  • Introduction – A paragraph where you introduce the essay topic and your thesis statement (i.e., the issue or idea you will explain in the essay).
  • Main Body – A series of short paragraphs in which you explain your thesis statement, providing evidence and arguments to support each point.
  • Conclusion – A final paragraph where you restate your thesis and how your evidence supports this. Try not to introduce any new information here (if it’s important, it should go in the main body).
  • References – If required, include a bibliography of sources you’ve used.

Before you start writing, then, create an essay outline with the structure above in mind and plan what each paragraph will say.

4. Editing and Proofreading

When you have a first draft, take a break and re-read it. Now comes the redrafting ! This is where you go back over your essay and look for areas to improve. Do you provide enough evidence? Is your argument clear? Even a few tweaks may increase your mark, so make sure to redraft at least once!

Finally, make sure to have your essay proofread before you submit it for marking. This will ensure your writing is error free and easy to read, giving you an even better chance of getting the grades you deserve.

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Home / Guides / Writing Guides / Paper Types / How to Write an Expository Essay

How to Write an Expository Essay

Every student has to write an expository essay at least once in their educational career. These are actually fairly simple essays to write, but they do require some serious research skills. Like most academic essays, the expository essay requires formal writing with an introduction, body, and conclusion.

Guide Overview

  • Focus on the thesis
  • Listen to the assignment
  • Explain, don’t argue
  • Revise and edit, revise and edit
  • Choosing the right topic

Tips for Writing a Kick-Butt Essay

Want to really impress your professor? Here are a few ways you can turn an ordinary essay into something that will blow their socks off.

Focus on the Thesis

Your thesis is the central point of the entire essay, so if it’s amazing, you’re off to a great start. Begin with this and make sure you decide on something that is impressive to kick off the essay.

Listen to the Assignment

Your professor may give you hints on what they’re looking for. If you just write down the basics of the assignment, you could miss out on some key points. For example, your professor may hint at a preferred topic or give tips that could result in a higher score. Write it all down and then analyze what is wanted before you write.

Long before you actually put pen to paper or fingers to keyboard to write the essay, you need to complete the pre-writing phase. This is where you do research and outline your essay. You’ll be amazed at how much better your writing is when you have these basic elements in place first. If you need help with these basic elements consider using an Expository Essay Template.

Explain, Don’t Argue

If you’re not careful, an expository essay can turn into a persuasive or argumentative essay. Focus on explaining the topic, rather than convincing people of something about it.

Revise and Edit, Revise and Edit

Going over the essay once to edit and polish isn’t really enough. If you’re tight on time, such as when writing an essay for an exam, just once will do. However, if you have time, it’s a good idea to edit immediately, then let the essay sit overnight or even longer. When you come back, you won’t be as close to the writing and can look at it more objectively.

Choosing the Right Topic

Topics for an expository essay vary widely, but ideally, you should select something you’re interested in writing about. Topics can answer a question such as “How can we prevent bullying in school?” or they can describe something like a historical building in your area. Other interesting topics to inspire you include:

  • How does technology affect our relationships?
  • How to treat a burn
  • What are the must-haves for a freshman in college?
  • How to handle anxiety attacks naturally
  • How to train your dog to stop barking on command
  • Research the history of a monument in your area
  • Why roller skating is a great exercise

As you can see, there’s no limit to the types of topics you can choose for your essay and it really comes down to what the professor assigns you and what you enjoy writing about. How narrow your topic is will also depend on how much you plan to write. An entire history of the Civil War won’t fit into two page, for example, so you’ll need to narrow it down to a specific battle or element of the Civil War.

Writing an expository essay can actually be a fun experience if you approach it the right way. When you enjoy the topic and are interested in it, your essay will show that and will stand out from those written out of boredom.

Finally, if you’re ever facing writer’s block for your college paper, consider WriteWell Essay Templates to help you get started.

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Expository Essay Guide

Expository Essay Writing

Last updated on: Feb 9, 2023

Expository Essay - A Complete Guideline to Help You Write

By: Donna C.

Reviewed By: Chris H.

Published on: Mar 31, 2020

Expository Essay

Have you been given the assignment to write an expository essay?

Do you struggle with writing this type of essay?

You have come to the right place!

Read this guide, which offers you a step-by-step set of guidelines to help you write an outstanding expository essay.

Expository Essay

On this Page

Expository Essay Definition

'What is an expository essay?'

An expository essay is one of the most challenging writing assignments that need dedication and understanding.

The term expository comes from the word “expose.” It means explaining and clarifying something in great detail. In this type of essay, a specific topic is researched and then explained. All claims in this kind of an essay must be backed with solid proof.

In this type of essay, a specific topic is researched and then explained. All claims in this kind of essay must be backed with solid proof.

‘What is the purpose of an expository essay?’

The main purpose of an expository essay is to:

  • Expose a particular topic.
  • Investigate a topic to increase your understanding as well as the readers.
  • Present an objective description of the topic.

Moreover, an expository essay is an informational, conceptual essay that has a single point of view to support it. This type of essay usually involves illustration and explanation to make the main idea clear while also providing useful facts for readers with little knowledge on the topic.

Expository Essay Vs. Argumentative Essay

Expository Essay Vs. Argumentative Essay

Types of Expository Essay

Expository essays are further categorized into five different types. Here are the five types of expository essay that are commonly used:

Types of Expository Essay

Let us discuss these types in detail.

1. Compare and Contrast Essay

A compare or contrast essay involves looking at two objects or ideas and analyzing them based on their similarities or differences. Keep in mind that the two objects or subjects under comparison must belong to the same category.

For instance, you can compare and contrast Batman and Superman but not Batman vs. Aristotle.

2. Descriptive Essay

In a descriptive essay, you must provide a detailed explanation of an object, event, or person. This type of essay provides the writer with room for creative freedom. You have a variety of topics to choose from and work from in descriptive essays. The writers are supposed to use sensory information to help the reader visualize the text using their five senses.

3. Cause and Effect Essay

Cause and effect essays require an analysis of an object or process. It requires digging a little deeper and figuring out why an event occurred and its effects.

The analysis is the most crucial aspect of writing a cause-and-effect essay and requires critical thinking skills and strong writing skills.

This type of essay examines the impact of other people or events on something in the world.

4. Problem and Solution Essay

In this type of expository essay, problems are identified, stated, and possible solutions are discussed. You must shed light on a problem and propose a valid solution for it.

5. Process Essay

A process essay is a step-by-step guide to completing some type of task. It tells readers how to do things and often provides instructions on how to accomplish a certain task in detail with clarity and precision.

How to Start an Expository essay?

Before you start, you may need to follow some steps that help you in writing a successful essay. Here are some steps to follow.

1. Choose a Topic

To start an expository essay, choose a brilliant topic to write on first.

For choosing the perfect topic, brainstorm different ideas that interest you and create an extensive list. Then, select the topic that interests and inspires you and start your research. Note that it is equally important to keep your reader’s preference in mind as well.

2. Create a Thesis Statement

The most important component of an expository essay is to focus on the thesis statement. A thesis statement indicates the main point of the essay and what will be discussed further in it. Write the good thesis statement in one or two lines towards the end of the introduction, followed by the body.

3. Create the Outline

Create an expository essay outline by mentioning every main point that is going to be discussed in each paragraph. Keep your outline organized and structured.

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How to Create an Expository Essay Outline?

Your outline should act as a blueprint to guide you through the process of building your essay. Without it, there's more risk that we stray off-topic or get confused due to all these new ideas coming in with no clear place for them.

Here is a sample expository essay outline.

  • Introduction
  • Hook Statement
  • Background Details
  • Thesis Statement

Main Body Section

  • 1st Paragraph - Topic sentence, details, conclusion.
  • 2nd Paragraph - Topic sentence, details, conclusion.
  • 3rd Paragraph - Topic sentence, details, conclusion.
  • Summary of the thesis statement.
  • Discussion of important points.
  • Call to action.

A detailed guide about expository essay outline will help you learn more about it and write your essay easily and in less time.

How to Write an Expository Essay?

Here are some steps that you should follow and create a well-written expository essay.

1. Write the Introduction

When writing the introductory paragraph, remember that there are the following purposes:

  • Grab the reader’s attention.
  • Define the essay topic
  • State the main idea/purpose of the essay.

A hook statement is used to attract the reader’s attention and engage them. It is written using different ways such as quotations, anecdotes, statistics, rhetorical questions, personal stories, etc.

After the hook statement, present necessary information about the topic to clear any ambiguities. And lastly, end this section by stating your thesis.

2. Write the Body Paragraphs

The body is where you will discuss and define your topic. Present information about the topic logically, prioritize different points based on importance. Also, provide supporting facts and evidence and explain their significance.

3. Write the Conclusion

The last section of your essay is the concluding paragraph. Brush up on all the main points without repeating them. Highlight the significance of your topic and provide a solution if you addressed an issue.

Establish a strong connection between these parts to make a solid structure. Ensure you fulfill all the requirements necessary for the writing process of the expository essay and follow your instructor’s guidelines.

4. Revise your Essay

Once you have completed writing your essay, revise it thoroughly. Also, keep the following points in your mind while you are checking your essay.

  • Is your essay written with an unbiased analysis?
  • Are the facts and examples relevant to the topic of the essay?
  • Is the information written and communicated to the readers?
  • Are there any unnecessary details included in the essay?
  • Is the entire content of the essay focused on the topic?
  • Are there strong transition words being used in the body paragraphs?
  • Is there a smooth flow between the body paragraphs?
  • Is the conclusion correlating with the supporting details mentioned in the essay?

If your essay is written according to these parameters, then you can easily move to the next step, proofreading.

5. Proofreading and Editing

Now you are almost done with your essay. Don’t forget to proofread your essay before you submit it.

No matter how strong and detailed content you have added in your essay. If there are grammatical mistakes in it, the whole rhythm of your essay will be ruined.

Expository Essay Topics

Below is a list of unique expository writing prompts that can help you to grab top grades from your professor.

  • Discuss the strong point of view of your character.
  • What are your suggestions on time management?
  • Explain why aliens are real.
  • What are the drawbacks of having a curfew?
  • Explain the concept of love.
  • Explain the time that you have been really happy.
  • How is being fat different from being overweight?
  • Do teachers truly care for students?
  • Is there a connection between boredom and hunger?
  • Can reading in the dark lead to blindness?

Other than these, you can check numerous other expository essay topics to get an idea about the kind of topics that work best for such essays.

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Expository Essay Examples

If you still feel that more guidance is needed, check out these examples of expository essays to get a clearer picture.

EXPOSITORY ESSAY EXAMPLES (PDF)

EXPOSITORY ESSAY GUIDE (PDF)

EXPOSITORY ESSAY ON COVID 19

EXPOSITORY ESSAY ON CONSUMER CULTURE

EXPOSITORY ESSAY FORMAT

EXPOSITORY ESSAY OUTLINE

Tips for Writing the Expository Essay

To write an excellent essay, you need to keep in mind the following tips:

  • Understand your topic, learn about it as much as you can
  • Go through similar expository essay samples.
  • Look for supporting evidence.
  • Develop an outline.
  • Come up with a writing style.
  • Create the rough draft.
  • Edit and update.
  • Start each body paragraph of the essay with a topic sentence.
  • Write the final version.

Some writers may continue to struggle in their writing endeavors even after reading and following our paper writing guidelines.

Worry not! Simply consult 5StarEssays.com .

A little help from our team of experienced academic writers can help you achieve top grades. In addition, our team of professional writing experts has years of experience in producing a variety of quality essays. Therefore, all you have to say is do my essay for me,  and our writers are ready for your help.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the basic parts of an expository essay.

An expository essay contains three main parts:

  • Body paragraphs

How do you end an expository essay?

When you end the expository essay, you should summarize the main points. Then, restate the thesis statement and provide a call to action.

What are 4 types of expository writing?

Here are the four types of expository writing are:

  • Descriptive essay
  • Comparison essay
  • Cause and effect essay
  • Problem-solution essay

What are the features of an expository essay?

Here are the key features of an expository essay.

  • Informative
  • Organization

What is it important to engage in expository writing?

The main aim and purpose of expository writing are to provide the readers with clear explanations about the essay topic. It includes the steps of the process and reasoning also. Therefore, it is important that the expository writing is clear and engaging for the readers.

What should you not do in an expository essay?

You must remain objective and unbiased throughout the essay, you should not address the readers directly and you must not allude to yourself also. In simple terms, avoid using first and second-person narration.

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How to Write an Expository Essay

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Table of contents

  • 1 What Is An Expository Essay?
  • 2 What Is the Purpose of Expository Writing?
  • 3.1 Expository Essay Topics about Culture
  • 3.2 Expository Essay Topics about Music
  • 3.3 Expository Essay Topics about Education
  • 3.4 Expository Essay Topics about History
  • 3.5 Expository Essay Topics about Literature
  • 3.6 Expository Essay Topics About Social Issues
  • 3.7 Expository Essay Topics about Psychology and Philosophy
  • 3.8 Controversial Expository Essay Topics
  • 3.9 Expository Essay Topics about Science and Technology
  • 3.10 Expository Essay Topics about Health
  • 3.11 Expository Essay Topics about Ethical Issues
  • 3.12 Expository Essay Topics About Social Problems
  • 3.13 Expository Essay Topics for Middle School
  • 3.14 Expository Essay Topics for High School
  • 3.15 Expository Essay Topics for College
  • 4.1 How to Organize Expository Essays
  • 5.1 Step 1: Select a Topic
  • 5.2 Step 2: Write a Thesis Statement
  • 5.3 Step 3: Select Your Method of Development
  • 5.4 Step 4: Organize Your Ideas
  • 6 Structure of an Expository Essay Outline
  • 7 An Expository Essay Format and Style
  • 8 What is a Good Expository Essay Outline Example?
  • 9 Conclusion

When it comes to writing an expository essay, it can be a challenging task that requires researching, analyzing evidence, and organizing information in a structured manner. To help make the process easier, Papersowl provides expert guidance on the structure and requirements of a successful expository essay.

What Is An Expository Essay?

There are many essay writing types, including descriptive, persuasive, contrast, effect, and personal opinion essays. As explained earlier, a good expository essay is an explanation, investigation, or exposition for clarification. It is different from a descriptive essay or a definition essay. The main difference between this type of write-up and an argumentative essay is that the tone used in an expository essay is neutral. However, in an argumentative essay , the style must highlight the position taken before the argument is presented.

Ideally, an expository essay aims to make the reader aware of all the key points in the article. It is different from descriptive writing.

What Is the Purpose of Expository Writing?

According to the definition of an expository essay, this type of writing aims to inform and clarify a particular topic. Its primary goal is to present facts, information, or opinions. This should be done in a clear, concise, and straightforward manner. The academic tone does not have the purpose of persuading.

It is commonly used in academic settings, such as in research papers, essays, and reports. It is also used in everyday life in instructional manuals, news articles, and online blogs.

One of the key features of expository writing is its focus on clarity and critical thinking. The writer must present the information in a way that is easy to understand. They should also provide clear and detailed explanations of complex concepts to ensure the reader grasps the topic.

Another crucial aspect of expository writing is the use of factual information to support the writer’s position. By citing credible sources, the writer can provide evidence that supports their argument. Presenting facts is particularly important when discussing scientific theories or historical events.

Overall, the goal of the entire essay is to help the reader gain a better understanding of a specific topic or concept. It effectively bridges the gap between experts and the general public. It provides a means for complex ideas and information to be communicated clearly and concisely. It also allows the reader to understand the position that the writer takes.

By presenting information in a straightforward and accessible manner, expository writing enables readers to develop informed opinions. They can then make well-informed decisions.

Choosing a Type of Expository Essay

The format of expository essays mostly features words such as “define” or “explain”. For example, “Write an essay on how to curb global warming.” In this case, you must “explain” the ‘measures that can be implemented to help minimize climate change and its effects.’

If you noticed, no instruction requires you to form an opinion or argument on whether or not there is global warming. However, explaining a certain topic is challenging.

It is paramount to know the various types of expository essays.

  • Cause and Effect Essays

Outlines reasons that cause something and then discusses its results and effects.

  • Problem and Solution Essays

They highlight all the problems associated with a particular situation and suggest solutions to those problems.

  • Classification Essay

This sorts things out things into different categories based on the pre-defined criteria of each type.

  • Comparison or Contrast Essays

It focuses on similarities and differences between objects, events, or notions.

  • Definition Essays

They explain a complicated concept.

  • Process Essay

A process essay, a “how-to-essay, ” explains the procedures involved in doing something.

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Expository Essay Topics about Culture

Culture has always been a prevalent aspect of people’s lives, which makes it a great expository essay topic for students. You can select one direction and narrate about local cuisine, the country’s folk music, a certain poet’s writing, and anything that would be suitable for a subject. Without knowing the distinctive features of such an essay idea, it might be complex to come up with a decent title. The options that you see below are some of the most intriguing and exciting within the cultural field. Consider that even using our sample expository essay topics, you need time to complete the assignment, so start early.

  • Development of Jewish culture
  • Why is Oriental culture that different?
  • How does gambling affect culture in the United States?
  • How does culture affect personality?
  • Gender inequality in the culture
  • Benefits and perks of multicultural education
  • Industry of the culture
  • Education in Chinese and American culture
  • Handling media manipulation properly
  • The way political and cultural issues affect you

Expository Essay Topics about Music

To add a bit of entertainment to your studies, you can write an essay about music. The imagination is wide open: talk about the influence of your favorite boys-band on American teenage culture or write a paper about the positive influence of symphony on the human brain. Specifications are completely up to you. Moreover, by picking something of your interest, you will ease your mind and decrease the workload.

  • Connections Between Different Genres
  • Can Music Be Considered a Propaganda?
  • Advancement Of Sound Production
  • Correlation of Tunes of Your Motherland and Foreign Countries
  • Evolution Of Tunes
  • Tunes And Other Types Of Media Comparison
  • Explanation of High Cultural and Low Cultural Tunes Explained
  • How Tunes Shape The Society Today
  • Current Key Points of Itunes Production
  • The Connection Between Poetry And Tunes

Expository Essay Topics about Education

The field of education is pretty broad. You can turn to different branches of knowledge, their sources, and teaching methods. Choosing this option is a nice idea if you don’t want to put that much effort into doing deep research. Remember that your goal is just to explain and describe one of the processes that are anyhow connected to the educational activity. Below, you’ll see several offers from us. One of them may even become the basis of your expository.

  • Why Higher Education Has Huge Positive Effect On Career
  • Traditional Versus Online Learning
  • The Essential Meaning of Homework
  • Teaching: a Complete Struggle or a Noble Profession
  • Why People With A Higher Degree Get The Job First
  • How to Come Up With a Decent Title for Your Essay?
  • The Future Changes of Literature and Its Impact on Society
  • How Can You Complete a Perfect Paper?
  • How Learning Foreign Languages Benefit Your Life
  • Difference between literate and illiterate individuals

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Expository Essay Topics about History

Similar to previous suggestions, history has a variety of essay options. You can start from the very beginning of time or select a subject out of current events. Any point on the world’s timeline would be both — interesting for the author to describe and for the audience to read. Make sure to create a solid statement and provide 100% accurate shreds of evidence. In case, use some of our variations as prompts.

  • The Changes in the Economy after Titanic Sinking
  • Spanish-American War: Cultural Effects
  • What caused the Battle of Germantown?
  • Child Labor within the Puritan Era
  • The Impact of the US on WWI
  • The Impact of the US on WWII
  • Aztectimes Religion
  • The Great Depression And Unemployment Of Women
  • How the Industrial Revolution Impacted the Planet
  • The Outcomes and Consequences of the WWII

Expository Essay Topics about Literature

School always means lots of reading as much as writing. At some point, you will receive an assignment with the descriptive task. You may talk about the main idea of a certain drama or compare the literary features of several works. Although learners frequently get such homework, narration about literature would be harder than other good expository essay topics. For starters, you have to read the whole book to be able to create a title for your expository essay and analyze the writing. Mainly, remember to stay focused and provide enough details.

  • Romeo and Juliet: explaining the use of language in Shakespeare’s masterpiece
  • Examples of Dramatic Irony in Shakespeare’s Plays
  • Two Examples of Figurative Language and the way it’s implemented in Literature
  • The Causes and Clarification of Hamlet and Claudius Dispute
  • The Lesson I’ve Learned from My Favorite Shakespeare Play
  • The Development of Women Role in Literature
  • Opinion Personal Opinion on Character development in Ophelia
  • Personal Impression of Romeo and Juliet
  • The Importance and Effect of Huge Poems on individuals
  • The Author that Changed Your Lifestyle The Most?

Expository Essay Topics About Social Issues

If you’re interested in the way society works and how it correlates to individuals, picking social issues as your expository topic would be suitable action. It gives lots of opportunities to describe and explain certain complications, current problems, and specific processes and elements. You can also account for anthropological and psychological issues when they relate to the social aspect. Be aware that you will need plenty of data and the skill to manage it wisely. First, start with an outline, add a description to each paragraph you’re going to write, and then form a solid essay step-by-step. If needed, apply to the topics proposed by us.

  • What Problems Do Young Individuals Regularly Face?
  • Can You Use Poetry To Deal With Life Problems?
  • Why Should Individuals Change Their Appearance?
  • Social Issues: Definition and Clarification
  • How Essential is the Social Structure of Childhood?
  • The Way Local Community Prevents Crimes
  • The View on Abortion: Is It Really Supposed to Be Regulated by Law
  • Cyberbullying: The Current Condition and The Way It Affects Individuals
  • Beauty Standards Appropriateness
  • Does The Government Sets Proper Mandates?
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Expository Essay Topics about Psychology and Philosophy

Lots of decent expository essay topics take their place in this section. Psychology is a great part of people’s lives, careers, etc. It may be simple and clear on the one hand, but at the same time, complex and versatile on another. Needless to mention, it is one of the hardest ideas to research and requires attentiveness. Yet, it’s easier to come up with a title for an essay as they are based on the individual’s life processes.

  • Modifying Lifestyle in 2 weeks: possible or just a myth?
  • How to Define the Friend is Lying
  • Receptivity of the concept of time by different people
  • How Our Specific Features Shape Our Character
  • Specifications and Distinctive Features of a Particular Region
  • The Main Life-Lesson Elderly People Would Advice
  • How to Reduce Stress Among Students
  • Mental Disease Description
  • Why Do Teenagers Tend To Be Depressed
  • What Qualities You Need to Become Popular at School

Controversial Expository Essay Topics

The audience is always keen on something that makes them question the whole process; therefore, a controversial expository essay would be just the option to catch readers’ attention. Although it seems entertaining and interesting to dig in, you have to be highly professional and do accurate research. Controversial stories also require staying focused and they have to be written in detail. If you feel like you can handle it, then go for it.

  • Dispute: how many negotiations are required?
  • Communism as a Compound of Dictatorship
  • The danger of military activity in Asia
  • Art as a Way to Treat Mental Disorders
  • The Effect and Outcome of Prohibitions after 20’s
  • Main Points of John Kennedy’s Political Activity
  • How important is IQ?
  • What Causes Racism?
  • Crusaders: good guys or villains?
  • How can you become a good therapist?

Expository Essay Topics about Science and Technology

Technology is a crucial part of our world nowadays. Developing subjects out of this field will be exciting and interesting. Choose anything that is relevant and touches on scientific and tech aspects, and try to be specific within the narration. Even the feature perspective of technology may be suitable for your essay title or overall theme. Below are several options that we’ve created to help you to start.

  • Current Influence of Tech
  • Suitable Projects for Online Format
  • The Way Lifestyle Changes 25 Years from Now
  • Are People Truly Connected Online?
  • AI: Benefits and Drawbacks
  • Selling a specific item
  • The Invention Of A Specific Object In Your Home
  • Description of Another Planet
  • Memory and How it Works
  • The Causes of Global Warming

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Expository Essay Topics about Health

Those students who dream of becoming doctor or nurse would benefit from selecting health as the field of their research. For starters, you will learn lots of essentials for your future occupation and provide readers with something they didn’t know before. You can connect your essay to medication, various diseases, different kinds of procedures, etc. We’ve tried our best to gather the most remarkable titles to ease your mind and quickly start the writing process.

  • How Do Doctors Get Their Licenses?
  • Most Common Myths
  • How Does Anesthesia Work?
  • How does an X-ray machine work?
  • Explain Hip Replacement Surgery
  • Why Chemically Induced Coma Is Important
  • Ebola crisis Explanation
  • The Most Complicated Surgeries
  • Skin Graft: Definition and Importance
  • How To Protect Yourself From Viruses

Expository Essay Topics about Ethical Issues

Living in current society, people often ask themselves why the ethical part of our culture is on such a low level. You can become one of a few learners who would share their essays on a topic like that. Tell the audience about the ethical changes in the US, show them the ways to improve the situation, or mention anything relevant to your preference.

  • Caught bullying: report or not?
  • Should assisted suicide be legalized?
  • Is Plastic Surgery a Good Idea for Kids?
  • What if your friend cheats on the test?
  • Should Church And Politics Be Completely Separated?
  • Should you report if your friend abuses animals?
  • Should coaches earn more than professors?
  • Should All Companies Increase Data Collection?
  • Should the death penalty be mandatory?
  • Would you tell if your friend drinks at the prom?

Expository Essay Topics About Social Problems

In comparison to social issues, social problems have a slightly different direction in the field. Here you should write your expository essay about the issues that are happening around you. For instance, global pandemic or discrimination based on the color of the skin or sexual orientation, etc. If there is anything that concerns you in terms of social activity, make it the basis of your paper and research the topic from the inside out. Apply our suggestions when you need some inspiration.

  • Impact of COVID 19
  • Supply chain during the COVID 19 pandemic
  • Discrimination by skin color
  • Green Energy Convention
  • Modern Society: Healthcare Bias
  • US soldiers in Afghanistan
  • Remote Education Challenge
  • Global Vaccination And Pandemic
  • The environmental situation in Arctic Pole
  • Political Polarization Increase

Expository Essay Topics for Middle School

A middle school is the first place where you get acquainted with such things as expository essays. Usually, teachers ask you to describe a simple subject to shape your writing skills and teach you the essay’s specifications. You are free to pick anything you want, as the aim of the assignment here is to let children complete the paper all by themselves. Doesn’t matter how good the quality will be, but matters how much effort you put into creating it.

  • The Way You Spend the First Day of School
  • The Picture of Your First Teacher
  • Your Weekend with a Favorite Pet
  • Your Favorite Hobby and Why
  • The Best Place in the World

Expository Essay Topics for High School

When choosing expository essay topics for high school, you need to try something mature and more complex. The title may remain ordinary, but the focus has to be on a broad range of aspects. However the initial goal is to practice and get prepared for college expository assignments in the future.

  • Can a dog smell fear?
  • How do you manage stress?
  • Aliens: real or a myth?
  • How significant is the universe?
  • Can people truly change for the better?

Expository Essay Topics for College

Now you’re at the final level, where you have to show all you’ve learned throughout the years. For excellent results, it’s advisable to use online writing tools for college students or ask your professor to give you more guidelines. Still, in creating expository essays for college, you have to put in much more effort.

  • Can We Still Save The Earth?
  • Internet Utility Dispute
  • The Book That Appeals To You The Most
  • The Ways Out Of Personal Financial Crisis
  • Can Little Things Still Bring Happiness?

The Expository Essay Structure

Expository essay assignments are common in academic writing and can also be used in everyday life, such as in instructional manuals or news articles. The structure of an expository essay typically includes an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. Typically, it needs to be a five-paragraph essay.

An expository essay’s introduction paragraph sets the tone for the report and grabs the reader’s attention. It should include a thesis that provides the paper’s main focus and previews the main points to be discussed in at least three body paragraphs.

Each body paragraph of an expository essay should present and develop the essay’s main points. Each section should begin with a topic sentence that relates to the thesis statement and provides a clear focus for the paragraph. Supporting evidence, background information, and examples should be included in each section.

An expository essay’s conclusion summarises the main points made in the body paragraphs and restates the thesis statement. It should not introduce any new information or arguments. Instead, it should provide a sense of closure to the essay and leave the reader with a clear understanding of the topic.

How to Organize Expository Essays

In addition to the traditional structure, several different approaches to organizing an expository essay exist. One common method is the “compare and contrast” approach, where two or more subjects are compared and contrasted by explaining similarities and differences. Another approach is the “cause and effect” method, where the writer describes how one event or action leads to another.

Regardless of the approach used, the structure of an expository essay should be logical and easy to follow. The writer should strive to present information clearly and concisely, using evidence and examples to support their arguments. By doing so, they can effectively explain and clarify a topic for their audience.

Steps to Write Expository Essays

In most cases, your tutor will assign you a topic to write on; however, choosing the right topic is crucial when you have to develop your topic. You should always cover an issue you are conversant with since it will be easier to explain the case to your readers and will need minimal research.

The two crucial aspects of your write-up that form the hook for an expository essay are the topic and statement of thesis. These two things strike your reader’s attention and determine if they will be triggered to read your entire paper. Thus, it is always advisable to choose an appealing topic and a good thesis statement for an expository essay.

Another critical aspect is maintaining clear and logical transitions between the introduction, body, and conclusion of the expository essays.

Lastly, ensure that everybody’s paragraphs feature evidential support. This means that each expository essay body paragraph should be limited to the exposition of one general idea. This gives your reader clarity and direction.

Step 1: Select a Topic

Brainstorm a list of topics you’re interested in. Then narrow down the list of the  good expository essay topics you feel would be easiest to write and that which is manageable within the required word count.

Step 2: Write a Thesis Statement

If you are used to writing argumentative papers, you will likely take a strong position on the topic or a particular idea. However, this should be the case with an expository essay. Here, your thesis statement should only give an insight into what you are writing about and why it is important.

Step 3: Select Your Method of Development

This is the most important part of essay writing. Determine the type of expository essay you will be writing. Is it compare and contrast, process analysis, cause and effect, or other types?

Step 4: Organize Your Ideas

Before you begin writing the body section, you must clearly understand how to plan an expository essay. In this case, you should list the major divisions to be discussed in the main paragraphs and the direct support for each body paragraph.

Structure of an Expository Essay Outline

Although writing any great essay is primarily creative, it should have a clear structure and plan. The structure is one of the most important elements because it involves highlighting the main meaningful elements of the text and establishing logical connections between them. An expository essay outline includes an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. Your outline should show which three main arguments you want to discuss in each paragraph.

Usually, the introductory part of any essay is similar to each other. If, even on this part, the idea of writing an outline for an expository essay scares you, or if you have particular questions, don’t hesitate to contact expository writing services online . We will gladly take this odious problem upon ourselves.

The very structure of the text plays a very important role in expressing the structure. First of all, its main function is to interest and encourage the reader to read the covered topic. Second, it will give the reader an idea of your  expository essay topic .

Your first sentence statement should be like a hook that captures the reader’s thoughts from the first second. A great tip for this is to start with a general statement about your topic. It can be anything, such as a certain quote, a question, an anecdote, a fascinating fact, or a dilemma that needs to be solved.

If, at this point, you have thoughts like who would write essays for me , then don’t worry. We already have a solution. That way, after learning something new in the first sentence, people will be interested to see what you talk about next. The following sentences briefly present the main points and emphasize their connection with the thesis. It is important to add that the thesis of an essay, as a rule, is also based on facts and not on one’s thoughts.

The main part of the essay is where the most difficulties and problems arise with understanding where to start and how to write an essay. The main part consists of one or several paragraphs. First, start with a general sentence that expresses the paragraph’s main idea. Most body paragraphs have three sections covering concepts, explanations, and any arguments that may arise. To make things easier, write out specific textual evidence from other sources that you use to support your thesis. A variety of apt quotes and paraphrases are suitable for this. It is also essential to use reliable facts. An extraordinary hint on how to write an expository essay outline is also useful here. Avoid using the first or second person. When moving from one paragraph to another, it is important to remember to use transitional words. Each paragraph should be connected by one or two sentences that demonstratively lead from one idea to the next. This is necessary to ensure the linguistic flow is maintained.

After writing the two parts listed above, you are ready to complete the text. This part of the work is also quite responsible. How is it built? Conclusion – specific and brief information about what was listed in the introduction and body. In simple words – a simplified version of the entire text. Despite its brevity, it should be a strong enough reinforcement not to spoil the general impression and all previous efforts. Here it can be useful to restate the main idea of your subject, but in different words to emphasize its importance. In addition, this technique nicely directs the reader’s attention to important things. Remind him why this topic should interest him. Do not introduce new information in this part, as this will lead to a new discussion.

An Expository Essay Format and Style

The main feature of this genre that distinguishes it from others is the provision of all relative information without the author taking any specific point of view.

Recognizing the format and style required for writing an expository essay is essential. Also, it is necessary to present details and various examples clearly and concisely. Use facts to reinforce the content of the text. If you do not understand what style to choose for writing and doubt your decision, remember whether the professor gave you a certain task. Usually, they guide you. If not, then use the well-known APA and MLA standards. If you still do not know how to choose a citation style , then realize that the topic often determines the style of writing. So, for example, if your work concerns the discussion of humanities, it can be foreign languages or history, it is better to use MLA. If the chosen topic concerns expressing ideas in psychology or social sciences, APA is the most appropriate format.

What is a Good Expository Essay Outline Example?

Below is an expository essay template that you can follow.

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It is important to know that the body paragraphs of an expository essay may consist of two or more parts. The outline for expository essay includes the following:

I. Introduction Hook sentence to grab the reader’s attention Background statements Clear, focused thesis statement Body paragraphs II. Main concept 1  Fact 1 and testimony to support the main idea Fact 2 and testimony to support the main idea Analysis III. Main concept 2  Fact 1 and testimony to support the main idea Fact 2 and testimony to support the main idea Analysis IV. Main concept 3 Fact 1 and testimony to support the main idea Fact 2 and testimony to support the main idea Analysis V. A conclusion Summarize the question of the thesis Discuss the large significance Reveal unanswered question

To sum up, there are four main kinds of essays, each with its role and task. As for the expository essay, it is needed to transmit information that is based on real facts. To write it correctly, you need to play on contrasts, your strong facts should speak for themselves, and it is equally important to provide commentary analysis. Be sure to take enough time to write an outline of an expository essay. That’s how your paper will gain new colors. If you don’t have time to write this essay, you can always pay for college papers . This is a great way to get a top quality paper without spending too much time and effort.

In conclusion, expository writing is a challenging task. This form of academic writing differs from descriptive essays, classification essays, and even persuasive essays. However, by following the guidelines in this article, such as the proper essay structure, the different types of expository essays, and the steps to write an expository essay, you can effectively clarify a topic for your audience.

Expository writing is a powerful tool that bridges the gap between experts and the general public, providing a means for complex ideas and information to be communicated clearly and concisely. By presenting detailed explanations in a straightforward and accessible manner, expository writing enables readers to develop informed opinions and make well-informed decisions.

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How to Write Excellent Expository Essays

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WHAT IS AN EXPOSITORY ESSAY?

An Expository essay ‘exposes’ information to the reader to describe or explain a particular topic logically and concisely.

The purpose of expository writing is to educate or inform the reader first and foremost.

Though the term is sometimes used to include persuasive writing , which exposes us to new ways of thinking, a true expository text does not allow the writer’s personal opinion to intrude into the text and should not be confused.

Expository Writing follows a structured format with an introduction, body paragraphs presenting information and examples, and a conclusion summarising key points and reinforcing the thesis. Common expository essays include process, comparison/contrast, cause and effect, and informative essays.

EXPOSITORY ESSAY STRUCTURE

TEXT ORGANIZATION Organize your thoughts before writing.

CLARITY Use clear and concise wording. There is no room for banter.

THESIS STATEMENT State position in direct terms.

TOPIC SENTENCE Open each paragraph with a topic sentence.

SUPPORTING DETAIL Support the topic sentence with further explanation and evidence.

LINK End each body paragraph by linking to the next.

EXPOSITORY ESSAY TYPES

PROCESS Tell your audience how to achieve something, such as how to bake a cake.

CAUSE & EFFECT Explore relationships between subjects, such as climate change and its impact.

PROBLEM & SOLUTION Explain how to solve a problem, such as improving physical fitness.

COMPARE & CONTRAST Compare and contrast two or more items, such as life in China life vs life in the United States or Australia.

DEFINITION Provides a detailed definition of a word or phrase, such as self-confidence.

CLASSIFICATION Organizes things into categories or groups, such as types of music.

STRUCTURE & FEATURES OF EXPOSITORY WRITING

While there are many types of expository essays, the basic underlying structure is the same. The Hamburger or 5-Paragraph Essay structure is an excellent scaffold for students to build their articles. Let’s explore the expository essay outline.

INTRODUCTION:

This is the top bun of the burger, and here the student introduces the exposition topic. This usually consists of a general statement on the subject, providing an essay overview. It may also preview each significant section, indicating what aspects of the subject will be covered in the text. These sections will likely relate to the headings and subheadings identified at the planning stage.

If the introduction is the top bun of the burger, then each body paragraph is a beef patty. Self-contained in some regards, each patty forms an integral part of the whole.

EXPOSITORY PARAGRAPHS

Each body paragraph deals with one idea or piece of information. More complex topics may be grouped under a common heading, and the number of paragraphs will depend on the complexity of the topic. For example, an expository text on wolves may include a series of paragraphs under headings such as habitat, breeding habits, what they eat, etc.

Each paragraph should open with a topic sentence indicating to the reader what the paragraph is about. The following sentences should further illuminate this main idea through discussion and/or explanation. Encourage students to use evidence and examples here, whether statistical or anecdotal. Remind students to keep things factual – this is not an editorial piece for a newspaper!

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Expository writing is usually not the place for flowery flourishes of figurative imagery! Students should be encouraged to select a straightforward language that is easy for the reader to understand. After all, the aim here is to inform and explain, and this is best achieved with explicit language.

As we’ve seen, several variations of the expository essay exist, but the following are the most common features students must include.

The title should be functional. It should instantly inform the reader what they will learn about in the text. This is not the place for opaque poetry!

A table of contents in long essays will help the reader locate helpful information quickly. Usually, the page numbers found here will be linked to headings and subheadings to be found in the text.

HEADINGS / SUBHEADINGS:

These assist the reader in finding information by summarizing the content in their wording.

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Usually listed alphabetically, the glossary defines unusual or topic-specific vocabulary and is sometimes accompanied by pictures, illustrations etc.

The index lets the reader identify where to find specific information in longer texts. An index is much more detailed than a table of contents.

VISUAL FORMS OF INFORMATION

Expository essays sometimes support the text with visuals, such as:

  • Pictures / Illustrations / Photographs:

These can be used to present a central idea or concept within the text and are often accompanied by a caption explaining what the image shows. Photographs can offer a broad overview or a close-up of essential details.

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Diagrams are a great way to convey complex information quickly. They should be labelled clearly to ensure the reader knows what they are looking at.

  • Charts and Graphs:

These are extremely useful for showing data and statistics in an easy-to-read manner. They should be labelled clearly and correspond to the information in the nearby text.

Maps may be used to explain where something is or was located. 

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Types of expository essay

There are many different types of expository texts (e.g. encyclopaedias, travel guides, information reports , etc.), but there are also various expository essays, with the most common being.

  • Process Essays
  • Cause and Effect Essays
  • Problem and Solution Essays
  • Compare and Contrast Essays
  • Definition Essays
  • Classification Essays

We will examine each of these in greater detail in the remainder of this article, as they have slight nuances and differences that make them unique. The graphic below explains the general structure for all text types from the expository writing family.

THE PROCESS ESSAY

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This how-to essay often takes the form of a set of instructions. Also known as a procedural text , the process essay has very specific features that guide the reader on how to do or make something.

To learn more about this type of writing, check out our information-packed article here .

Features of a process essay

Some of the main features of the process essay include:

  • ‘How to’ title
  • Numbered or bullet points
  • Time connectives
  • Imperatives (bossy words)
  • List of resources

Example Expository Process Essay:

The cause and effect essay.

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The purpose of a cause-and-effect essay is to explore the causal relationships between things. Essays like this often bring the focus back to a single cause. These essays frequently have a historical focus.

The text should focus on facts rather than assumptions as an expository essay. However, cause-and-effect essays sometimes explore hypothetical situations too.

There are two main ways to structure a cause-and-effect essay.

The Block Structure presents all the causes first. The writer then focuses on the effects of these causes in the second half of the essay.

The Chain Structure presents each cause and then immediately follows with the effects it created.

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Example Expository Cause and Effect Essay:

The problem and solution essay.

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In this type of essay, the writer first identifies a problem and then explores the topic from various angles to ultimately propose a solution. It is similar to the cause-and-effect essay.

While the problem and solution essay can use the block and chain structures as outlined above – substitute cause with problem and effect with a solution – it will also usually work through the following elements:

  • Identifies a problem
  • Contains a clear thesis statement
  • Each paragraph has a topic sentence
  • Supports with facts, examples, evidence
  • The conclusion summarizes the main points

Suggested Title: What Can Be Done to Prevent Bullying in Schools?

Example Expository Problem and Solution Essay:

The compare and contrast essay.

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In this type of essay, students evaluate the similarities and differences between two or more things, ideas, people, etc. Usually, the subjects will belong to the same category.

The compare-and-contrast expository essay can be organized in several different ways. Three of these are outlined below.

In the three structures outlined, it is assumed that two subjects are being compared and contrasted. Of course, the precise number of paragraphs required in the text will depend on the number of points the student wishes to make and the number of subjects being compared and contrasted.

Suggested Title: In-Class or Remote Learning: Which Is Best?

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DEFINITION ESSAYS

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This type of essay provides a detailed description and definition of a word or phrase. It can be a concrete term, such as car or glass, or a more abstract concept, such as love or fear .

A definition essay comprehensively explains a term’s purpose and meaning. It will frequently contain some or all of the following elements:

  • A definition of the term
  • An analysis of its meaning
  • The etymology of the term
  • A comparison to related terms
  • Examples to illustrate the meaning
  • A summary of the main points

Example Expository Definition Essay:

CLASSIFICATION ESSAYS

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Like definition essays, a classification essay sorts or organizes things into various groups or categories and explains each group or category in detail.

Classification essays focus on:

  • Sorting things into functional categories
  • Ensuring each category follows a common organizing principle
  • Provides examples that illustrate each category.

Example Expository Classification Essay:

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One of the best ways to understand the different features of expository essays is to see them in action. The sample essay below is a definition essay but shares many features with other expository essays.

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EXPOSITORY WRITING PROMPTS

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Examples of Expository Essay Titles

 Expository essay prompts are usually pretty easy to spot.

 They typically contain keywords that ask the student to explain something, such as “define,” “outline,” “describe,” or, most directly of all, “explain.”

 This article will examine the purpose of an expository essay and its structure. It will also examine the primary language and stylistic features of this vital text type.

 After this, we’ll explore five distinct tips for helping your students get the most out of writing their expository essays.

Expository Essays vs Argumentative Essays

 Expository essays are often confused with their close cousin, the argumentative essay. Still, it’s easy to help students distinguish between the two by quickly examining their similarities and differences.

 In an expository essay, students will attempt to write about a thing or a concept neutrally and objectively, unlike an argumentative essay where the writer’s opinions permeate the text throughout. Simple as it sounds, this may take some doing for some students as it requires the writer to refine their personal voice almost out of existence!

 Luckily, choosing the correct viewpoint from which to write the essay can go a long way to helping students achieve the desired objectivity. Generally, students should write their expository essays from the third-person perspective.

Contrastingly, argumentative essays are subjective in nature and will usually be written from the first-person perspective as a result.

 In an expository essay, the text’s prime focus is the topic rather than the writer’s feelings on that topic. For the writer, disassociating their personal feelings on a topic is much easier when they’re a step removed from the narration by using the third-person POV rather than the first-person POV.

Expository Essay Tips

Follow these top tips from the experts to craft an amazing expository essay.

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 Tip #1: Choose the Right Tool for the Job

writing-tools

Surprising as it may seem, not all expository essays are created equal.

 In fact, there are several different types of expository essays, and our students must learn to recognize each and choose the correct one for their specific needs when producing their own expository essays.

 To do this, students will need to know the 5 types of expository essays:

  • The Cause and Effect Essay : This type of essay requires that the writer explain why something happened and what occurred due to that event and subsequent events. It explores the relationship between people, ideas, events, or things and other people, ideas, events, or things.
  • The Compare and Contrast Essay: In a compare and contrast essay, the writer examines the similarities and differences between two subjects or ideas throughout the body of the piece and usually brings things together in an analysis at the end .
  • The Descriptive Essay: This is a very straightforward expository essay with a detailed description or explanation of a topic. The topic may be an event, place, person, object, or experience. This essay’s direct style is balanced with the freedom of the writer can inject some of their creativity into the description.
  • The Problem and Solution Essay : In this expository essay, the student will work to find valid solutions to a specific problem or problem.
  • The Process Essay : Also called a how-to essay, this essay type is similar to instruction writing, except in essay form. It provides a step-by-step procedure breakdown to teach the reader how to do something.

 When choosing a specific topic to write about, students should consider several factors:

 ●      Do they know the topic well enough to explain the ins and outs of the subject to an unfamiliar audience?

 ●      Do they have enough interest in this topic to sustain thorough research and writing about it?

 ●      Is enough relevant information and credible sources available to fuel the student’s writing on this topic?

Tip # 2: Research the Topic Thoroughly

Regardless of which type of expository essay your students are working on, they must approach the research stage of the writing process with diligence and focus. The more thorough they are at the research stage, the smoother the remainder of the writing process will be.

A common problem for students while researching is that sometimes they don’t have a clear understanding of the objective of their research. They lack a clear focus on their efforts.

Research is not mindlessly scanning documents and scrawling occasional notes. As with any part of the writing process, it begins with determining clear objectives.

Often, students will start the research process with a broad focus, and as they continue researching, they will naturally narrow their focus as they learn more about the topic.

Take the time to help students understand that writing isn’t only about expressing what we think; it’s also about discovering what we think.

When researching, students should direct their efforts to the following:

REad our complete guide to researching here

  • Gather Supporting Evidence : The research process is not only for uncovering the points to be made within the essay but also the evidence to support those points. The aim here is to provide an objective description or analysis of the topic; therefore, the student will need to gather relevant supporting evidence, such as facts and statistics, to bolster their writing. Usually, each paragraph will open with a topic sentence, and subsequent sentences in the paragraph will focus on providing a factual, statistical, and logical analysis of the paragraph’s main point.
  • Cite Sources : It’s an essential academic skill to be able to cite sources accurately. There are several accepted methods of doing this, and you must choose a citation style appropriate to your student’s age, abilities, and context. However, whatever style you choose, students should get used to citing any sources they use in their essays, either in the form of embedded quotations, endnotes, or bibliography – or all three!
  • Use Credible Sources: The Internet has profoundly impacted knowledge sharing as the Gutenberg Press did almost 600 years ago. It has provided unparalleled access to the sum total of human knowledge as never before, with each student having a dizzying number of sources available at their fingertips. However, we must ensure our students understand that not all sources are created equal. Encourage students to seek credible sources in their research and filter out the more dubious sources. Some questions students can ask themselves to help determine a source’s credibility include:

●      Have I searched thoroughly enough to find the most relevant sources for my topic?

●      Has this source been published recently? Is it still relevant?

●      Has the source been peer-reviewed? Have other sources confirmed this source?

●      What is the publication’s reputation?

●      Is the author an expert in their field?

●      Is the source fact-based or opinion-based?

Tip #3: Sketch an Outline

Every kid knows you can’t find the pirate treasure without a map, which is true of essay writing. Using their knowledge of the essay’s structure, students start whipping their research notes into shape by creating an outline for their essay.

The 5-paragraph essay or ‘Hamburger’ essay provides a perfect template for this.

Students start by mapping out an appealing introduction built around the main idea of their essay. Then, from their mound of research, they’ll extract their most vital ideas to assign to the various body paragraphs of their text.

Finally, they’ll sketch out their conclusion, summarize their essay’s main points, and, where appropriate, make their final statement on the topic.

Tip #4: Write a Draft

Title chosen? Check! Topic researched? Check! Outline sketched? Check!

Well, then, it’s time for the student to begin writing in earnest by completing the first draft of their essay.

They’ll already have a clear idea of the shape their essay will take from their research and outlining processes, but ensure your students allow themselves some leeway to adapt as the writing process throws up new ideas and problems.

That said, students will find it helpful to refer back to their thesis statement and outline to help ensure they stay on track as they work their way through the writing process towards their conclusions.

As students work through their drafts, encourage them to use transition words and phrases to help them move smoothly through the different sections of their essays.

Sometimes, students work directly from an outline as if on a checklist. This can sometimes be seen as the finished essay resembling Frankenstein. That is an incongruous series of disparate body parts crudely stitched together.

Learning to use transitions effectively will help students create an essay that is all of a whole, with all the joins and seams sanded and smoothed from view.

Tip #5: Edit with a Fresh Pair of Eyes

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Once the draft is complete, students enter the final crucial editing stage.

But, not so hasty! Students must pencil in some time to let their drafts ‘rest’. If the editing process occurs immediately after the student finishes writing their draft, they’ll likely overlook much.

Editing is best done when students have time to gain a fresh perspective on their work. Ideally, this means leaving the essay overnight or over a few nights. However, practically, this isn’t always possible. Usually, though, it will be possible for students to put aside their writing for a few hours.

With the perspective that only time gives, when returning to their work, students can identify areas for improvement that they may have missed. Some important areas for students to look at in the editing process include:

  • Bias : Students need to remember the purpose of this essay is to present a balanced and objective description of the topic. They need to ensure they haven’t let their own personal bias slip through during the writing process – an all too easy thing to do!
  • Clarity : Clarity is as much a function of structure as language. Students must ensure their paragraphs are well organized and express their ideas clearly. Where necessary, some restructuring and rewriting may be required.
  • Proofread: With stylistic and structural matters taken care of, it’s now time for the student to shift their focus onto matters of spelling , vocabulary choice, grammar, and punctuation. This final proofread represents the last run-through of the editing process. It’s the students’ final chance to catch mistakes and errors that may bias the assessor (aka You! ) against the effectiveness of the piece of writing. Where the text has been word-processed, the student can enlist inbuilt spelling and grammar checkers to help. Still, they should also take the time to go through each line word by word. Automatic checkers are a helpful tool, but they are a long way from infallible, and the final judgement on a text should employ the writer’s own judgement.

Expository essays are relatively straightforward pieces of writing. By following the guidelines mentioned above and practising them regularly, students can learn to produce well-written expository essays quickly and competently.

Explaining and describing events and processes objectively and clearly is a useful skill that students can add to their repertoire. Although it may seem challenging at first, with practice, it will become natural.

To write a good expository essay, students need a good understanding of its basic features and a firm grasp of the hamburger essay structure. As with any writing genre, prewriting is essential, particularly for expository writing.

Since expository writing is designed primarily to inform the reader, sound research and note-taking are essential for students to produce a well-written text. Developing these critical skills is an excellent opportunity for students through expository writing, which will be helpful to them as they continue their education.

Redrafting and editing are also crucial for producing a well-written expository essay. Students should double-check facts and statistics, and the language should be edited tightly for concision.

And, while grading their efforts, we might even learn a thing or two ourselves!

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expository essay

What is expository essay definition, usage, and literary examples, expository essay definition.

An  expository essay  [ik-SPOZ-ih-tohr-ee ess-ay] is an essay in which the writer researches a topic and uses evidence to inform their readers or clarify the topic. They can take many forms, including a how-to essay, an essay that defines something, or an essay that studies a problem and offers a solution.

The Five-Paragraph Model

Most expository essays follow the five-paragraph essay model:

  • Introduction:  The introduction contains the thesis statement or main point of the essay. Here, the writer describes the subject and gives necessary  context .
  • Body:  This section is usually three or more paragraphs and offers supporting evidence for the thesis.
  • Conclusion:  The conclusion revisits the thesis and summarizes the writer’s main points.

Types of Expository Essays

There are several types of expository essays that can be written.

  • Cause and Effect:  These essays question why something happened and the outcome of that occurrence. For example, an essay of this type might question why there’s a large homeless population in Seattle and what effects it has on the city and its citizens.
  • Classification:  These break a broad subject down into several, in-depth subcategories. A classification essay might study the various kinds of movies, define genres, and break the most common genres down by subgenre (for example, action thriller and action adventure as subgenres of the action genre).
  • Compare and Contrast:  These essays lay out the similarities and differences of at least two subjects. One such essay might compare two different novels by the same author. These essays can explore the pros and cons of different choices as well, like living in the city versus living in the country.
  • Definition:  As indicated, a definition essay describes or defines something. For example, it might define the internet and provide a detailed explanation of how it works.
  • How-To:  Also called a process essay, a how-to essay gives the reader steps for creating or doing something. For example, a process essay might walk its reader through setting a table, step by step.
  • Problem and Solution:  This type of essay explores a problem and, using evidential support, offers potential solutions. For example, a writer might consider the example of Seattle’s homeless population, cite a solution that other cities have used successfully, and propose that same solution for Seattle.

Other Forms of Expository Writing

In addition to the aforementioned, there are other uses for expository writing. Most commonly:

  • Newspaper articles
  • Encyclopedic entries
  • Manuals/assembly instructions

Expository vs. Argumentative Essays

Expository essays are like argumentative essays in that they both require research. Unlike argumentative essays, expository essays are meant to inform their audience rather than persuade it.

Argumentative essays are often controversial and contain the writer’s personal opinions, whereas expository essays give factual information and explore a topic from many  perspectives . Educational spheres often use expository essays to test writing ability, reading comprehension, and/or the writer’s understanding of a topic.

Examples of Expository Essays

1. Susan Sontag, “Notes on ‘Camp’”

This is a definition essay that explores the meaning and usage of the slang word  camp . When she wrote the essay in 1964, people used the word to describe a person or thing as exaggerated, effeminate, or theatrical. Sontag suggests that camp isn’t a solid concept but rather a sensibility, and she acknowledges its connection to contemporary gay culture. Her definition of camp is given in the following passage:

[Camp] is not a natural mode of sensibility, if there be any such. Indeed the essence of Camp is its love of the unnatural: of artifice and exaggeration. And Camp is esoteric–something of a private code, a badge of identity even, among small urban cliques.

2. David Foster Wallace, “Consider the Lobster”

Herein, Wallace reviews the 2003 Main Lobster Festival and questions the morality of boiling lobsters alive. He examines the problem from all facets, including whether a lobster feels pain, without directly asserting his opinion. After descriptions of the festival, physical properties of lobsters, and the common use of the crustaceans, Wallace poses the main question of the essay:

So then here is a question that’s all but unavoidable at the World’s Largest Lobster Cooker, and may arise in the kitchens across the U.S. Is it all right to boil a sentient creature alive just for our gustatory pleasure? A related set of concerns: Is the previous question irksomely PC or sentimental? What does “all right” even mean in this context? Is it all just a matter of individual choice?

3. Rebecca Solnit, “The Longest War”

From Solnit’s 2014 book of essays,  Men Explain Things to Me , “The Longest War” explores issues of male violence against women. Solnit uses both statistical and  anecdotal  evidence to inform her audience of the issue, which supports some of her argumentative essays that appear later in the book:

[T]hough a rape is reported only every 6.2 minutes in this country, the estimated total is perhaps five times as high. Which means that there may be very nearly a rape a minute in the United States. It all adds up to tens of millions of rape victims. A significant portion of the women you know are survivors.

Further Resources on Expository Essays

You can find more examples of expository essays on  LiteraryDevices.net .

Bibme.org  offers guidance for writing expository essays.

Essaytigers.com  provides step-by-step writing instructions and an additional argumentative essay and expository essay comparison.

Related Terms

  • Argumentative Essay
  • Expository Writing

point of view expository essay

Essay Papers Writing Online

Get the ultimate guide on writing an expository essay – step-by-step tips and examples.

How to write expository essay

Are you grappling with the challenge of composing a compelling expository essay? Look no further, as this comprehensive guide will provide you with all the essential tools and techniques to effectively convey your ideas and captivate your readers. By employing powerful writing strategies and supplementing your work with concrete examples and real-life anecdotes, you will unlock the true potential of your explanatory essay.

Begin your writing journey by harnessing the power of clarity and conciseness. Structuring your essay with a logical flow will allow your readers to effortlessly follow your thought process and grasp your central ideas. Employing strong transitions between paragraphs and employing cohesive language will ensure a seamless reading experience. Additionally, honing your analytical skills and supporting your claims with factual evidence will lend credibility to your work while fostering a deep understanding of the topic.

Furthermore, incorporating vivid examples and engaging anecdotes will breathe life into your expository essay, making your content relatable and memorable. By utilizing descriptive language and the art of storytelling, you will create a lasting impact in the minds of your readers. Whether it is a personal experience, a historical event, or a scientific study, weaving in these narratives will amplify the effectiveness and persuasiveness of your essay, leaving a lasting imprint on your audience.

Mastering the Art of Crafting a Compelling Expository Composition: Pointers and Illustrations

Mastering the Art of Crafting a Compelling Expository Composition: Pointers and Illustrations

An in-depth exploration of the fundamentals behind composing an impactful expository essay can serve as an invaluable tool in your academic and professional endeavors. By harnessing the power of language, analysis, and evidence, you can construct a persuasive and enlightening piece of writing that will captivate your readers. Let us embark on a journey to unravel the secrets of crafting an exquisite expository essay.

1. Avoid monotony: Deliver your ideas in a fresh, stimulating manner to enthrall your audience. Strive to maintain a captivating narrative flow by skillfully employing synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and metaphors. This will invigorate your writing and make it truly memorable.

2. Be concise yet comprehensive: Accomplish the delicate balance of being succinct without sacrificing the clarity and depth of your exposition. Remember to select your words wisely, presenting each idea concisely while ensuring it is thorough and complete.

3. Provide evidence: Back up your statements with solid evidence and well-researched examples. Citing credible sources, such as reputable studies, expert opinions, and statistical data, will add credibility and weight to your arguments, making them more persuasive and powerful.

4. Organize your thoughts: Structure your essay in a logical and coherent manner, ensuring that each idea flows seamlessly into the next. Utilize transitional words and phrases to guide your readers through the different sections of your essay, enabling them to follow your line of reasoning effortlessly.

5. Cater to your audience: Tailor your language, tone, and examples to suit the preferences and background of your intended audience. Use relatable and engaging references to convey your message effectively and establish a connection with your readers.

6. Emphasize clarity: Clarity is key when it comes to expository writing. Avoid excessive jargon, convoluted sentences, and ambiguous expressions. Instead, strive for lucidity and precision, ensuring that your readers can easily grasp the main points of your essay.

7. Show don’t tell: Instead of merely stating information, aim to vividly illustrate your ideas through anecdotes, case studies, and real-life examples. This will make your essay more relatable and memorable, enabling your readers to form a deeper understanding of the subject matter.

8. Revise and refine: Do not underestimate the importance of the revision process. Review your essay meticulously, focusing on grammar, clarity, and coherence. Eliminate redundancies, enhance sentence structure, and refine your vocabulary to elevate the quality and impact of your writing.

By equipping yourself with these essential guidelines and examples, you are well-prepared to embark on your expository essay writing journey. Remember, mastering the art of crafting a compelling expository composition requires practice and perseverance. Let your ideas flow, embrace creativity, and allow your words to inspire, educate, and leave an indelible mark in the minds of your readers.

The Significance of an Expository Article

When it pertains to written compositions, the significance of an expository article cannot be underestimated. This type of writing piece serves a crucial purpose in communicating information, presenting facts, and explaining ideas in a clear and concise manner. By utilizing objective analysis, evidence-based reasoning, and logical arguments, an expository essay provides readers with a deeper understanding of a subject matter.

Unlike other forms of writing, an expository essay focuses on informing rather than persuading or entertaining. It acts as a reliable source of knowledge, offering readers an opportunity to broaden their horizons and gain new insights. Whether used in academic, professional, or personal settings, the expository essay serves as a valuable tool for conveying information accurately and objectively.

Furthermore, an expository essay aids in building critical thinking and analytical skills. Through the process of researching and organizing information, the writer develops the ability to evaluate sources, discern facts from opinions, and present arguments based on logical reasoning. This type of writing encourages readers to question assumptions, analyze evidence, and draw their own conclusions.

Moreover, mastering the art of composing an expository essay equips individuals with essential communication skills that are applicable in various aspects of life. By learning how to present complex ideas in a clear and coherent manner, one becomes an effective communicator across different fields and disciplines. Whether it be writing research papers, reports, or even delivering presentations, the skills acquired from writing an expository essay are invaluable in expressing ideas persuasively and engaging an audience.

In conclusion, the importance of an expository essay lies in its ability to provide a comprehensive and objective understanding of a subject matter. By offering factual information, logical arguments, and clear explanations, this type of writing contributes to the development of critical thinking skills and effective communication. Whether in academic, professional, or personal settings, the expository essay plays a vital role in disseminating knowledge and fostering intellectual growth.

Understanding the Purpose and Audience

In order to create a compelling and impactful expository essay, it is important to have a clear understanding of the purpose and audience of your writing.

The purpose of an expository essay is to explain or inform the reader about a specific topic or idea. Unlike other types of essays, the main goal is to provide a balanced analysis and present factual information in a clear and concise manner. The purpose may vary depending on the specific assignment or context, but it is important to always keep the purpose in mind when writing an expository essay.

Equally important is knowing your audience. Understanding who will be reading your essay will help you tailor your writing style, tone, and level of complexity to effectively communicate your ideas. Consider the background knowledge, interests, and beliefs of your audience to ensure that your essay is accessible and engaging.

  • Start by identifying the demographic characteristics of your audience, such as age, education level, and background.
  • Consider their prior knowledge on the topic. Are they familiar with the subject matter, or do you need to provide additional context?
  • Think about their potential biases or preconceived notions. Are there any potential challenges or objections you need to address?

By understanding the purpose and audience of your expository essay, you can craft a well-written and relevant piece that effectively communicates your ideas and engages your readers.

Choosing the Right Topic and Gathering Information

One of the crucial steps in writing an outstanding expository essay is selecting a compelling topic and gathering relevant information. The topic should be interesting, relevant, and align with the purpose of your essay. It’s important to choose a topic that you are passionate about and have a good understanding of, as it will make the research and writing process more enjoyable and easier.

Start by brainstorming different ideas and concepts that you find intriguing. Consider your personal experiences, hobbies, or areas of expertise that you would like to explore further. You can also look for inspiration from current events, popular trends, or societal issues that grab your attention. Once you have a list of potential topics, narrow it down to the one that has enough depth and scope for exploration.

Once you have chosen a topic, it’s time to gather information to support your thesis statement and provide evidence for your claims. Start by conducting thorough research using various sources such as books, scholarly articles, reputable websites, and interviews with experts in the field. Take notes and keep track of the sources you use for referencing purposes.

By choosing the right topic and gathering relevant information, you lay the foundation for a well-researched and compelling expository essay. Take the time to explore different ideas, conduct thorough research, and organize your findings effectively. Remember, a well-chosen topic and solid information will make your essay engaging and informative for your readers.

Structuring Your Expository Essay

Structuring Your Expository Essay

When it comes to composing an expository essay, the way you structure your piece is crucial. Organizing your thoughts and ideas in a clear and logical manner will not only make your writing more coherent and easy to follow, but it will also help you effectively convey your message to the readers.

One effective way to structure your expository essay is to use the traditional five-paragraph format. This format consists of an introduction paragraph, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion paragraph. Each paragraph serves a specific purpose and contributes to the overall development of your essay.

The introduction paragraph is where you grab the attention of your readers and provide them with a brief overview of what your essay will be about. It should include a strong thesis statement that clearly states your main argument or point of view.

The body paragraphs are where you present your evidence, provide supporting details, and analyze your topic. Each body paragraph should focus on one main idea or aspect of your topic. Start each paragraph with a topic sentence that introduces the main point, and then provide examples, facts, or explanations to support your argument.

In the conclusion paragraph, you should summarize your main points and restate your thesis statement. Avoid introducing new information or arguments in this section. Instead, focus on leaving a lasting impression on your readers and reinforcing the main ideas discussed throughout your essay.

Remember to use appropriate transition words and phrases to ensure a smooth flow between paragraphs and ideas. Examples of transitional phrases include “firstly,” “in addition, “finally,” and “on the other hand,” among others.

By following a well-structured approach, you can effectively organize your expository essay and make it engaging and informative for your readers. Take the time to plan your essay, identify your main points, and arrange them in a logical order. With a clear structure, your expository essay will be a powerful piece of writing that effectively conveys your ideas.

Enhancing Clarity and Coherence

Creating a clear and coherent expository essay requires skillful use of language and organization. By carefully selecting words and arranging ideas logically, you can ensure that your essay is easy to understand and follow.

Word Choice: One of the most effective ways to enhance clarity is through thoughtful word choice. Consider using precise and specific language to convey your ideas. Instead of using general terms, opt for more descriptive words that accurately depict the information you are presenting.

Logical Organization: Coherence in your essay can be achieved through proper organization. Present your ideas in a logical progression, ensuring that each paragraph flows smoothly into the next. Use transitional words and phrases to connect your thoughts and guide the reader through your essay.

Consistent Structure: To enhance clarity and coherence, maintain a consistent structure throughout your essay. Use a clear introduction to outline your main points and a strong conclusion to summarize your findings. Each body paragraph should focus on a single topic and provide sufficient evidence and examples to support your claims.

Effective Transitions: Transitions are essential in ensuring a cohesive flow between ideas and paragraphs. Use transitional words and phrases such as “however,” “in addition,” and “furthermore” to link your ideas and create a smooth transition between different sections of your essay.

Eliminating Ambiguity: To enhance clarity, it is crucial to eliminate any ambiguity or confusion from your writing. Be precise in your language and avoid using vague terms or jargon. Make sure your ideas are clearly articulated and leave no room for misinterpretation.

Proofreading: Finally, closely edit and proofread your essay for clarity and coherence. Look for any unclear sentences or confusing phrases and revise them for greater clarity. Ensure that your ideas are presented in a logical and coherent manner, leaving no room for confusion.

By enhancing clarity and coherence in your expository essay, you can effectively communicate your ideas and engage your readers. Thoughtful word choice, logical organization, consistent structure, effective transitions, and careful proofreading all play important roles in creating a clear and coherent essay that will leave a lasting impact.

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Learning Objectives

  • Understand the function and use of expository essays
  • Identify eight types of expository essays
  • Apply expository essay structure

What Is an Expository Essay?

An essay that explains a writer’s ideas by defining, explaining, informing, or elaborating on points to allow the reader to clearly understand the concept.

Many of your future academic workplace writing assignments will be expository–explaining your ideas or the significance of a concept or action. An expository essay allows the writer the opportunity to explain his or her ideas about a topic and to provide clarity for the reader by using:

  • Explanations
  • Definitions

It may also include the writer outlining steps of a procedure in a way that is straightforward for the reader to follow. It is purely informative and often contains elements of summary.

Imagine you need to verbally explain a concept to your classmates, maybe a behavioural theory. What are the key elements on which you would focus? How would you organize the information? You could explain who came up with the theory, the specific area of study to which it is related, its purpose, and the significant details to explain the theory. Telling these four elements to your classmates would give them a complete, yet summarized, picture of the theory, so they could apply the theory in future discussions.

Although you did this verbally, you were still fulfilling the elements of an expository essay by providing definition, details, explanations, and maybe even facts if you have a really good memory. This is the same process that you would use when you write an expository essay. You may actually be doing this all the time; for example, when you are giving someone directions to a place or explaining how to cook something. In the following sections of the chapter, you will practise doing this more in different expository written forms.

The Structure of an Expository Essay

Sections versus paragraphs.

Before looking at the general structure of an expository essay, you first need to know that in your post-secondary education, you should not consider your essay as writing being constructed with five paragraphs as you might have been used to in high school. You should instead think of your essay in terms of sections (there may be five), and each section may have multiple paragraphs.

To understand further why you need to think beyond the five-paragraph essay, imagine you have been asked to submit a six-page paper (approximately 1,500 words). You already know that each paragraph should be roughly 75 to 200 words long. If you divide the required word count by five paragraphs (1,500 by 5), you end with 300 words per paragraph, way above the number you should have in a paragraph. If your paragraphs are too long, they likely have too many ideas and your reader may become confused. Your paragraphs should be two-third of a page at most, and never longer than a page.

Instead, if you think of your essays being divided into sections (with possibly more than one paragraph per section), your writing will likely be more organized and allow your reader to follow your presentation of ideas without creating too much distance between your paragraph’s supporting points and its topic sentence.

As you will see in Section 4.5, some essay forms may require even more than five paragraphs or sections because of how many points are necessary to address. For the rest of this chapter, the term paragraph will also imply section.

Sections of an Expository Essay

An expository essay, regardless of its purpose, should have at least five sections, which are:

  • Introduction
  • First body section/paragraph
  • Second body section/paragraph
  • Third body section/paragraph
  • Conclusion.

The introduction should state the topic of your paper: your thesis statement as well as brief signposts of what information the rest of the paper will include. That is, you only want to mention the content of the body paragraphs; you do not want to go in to a lot of detail and repeat what will be in the rest of the essay.

The first body section or paragraph should focus on one of your main points and provide evidence to support that point. There should be two to three supporting points: reasons, facts, statistics, quotations, examples, or a mix of these. Both the second and third body sections should follow the same pattern. Providing three body sections with one point each that supports the thesis should provide the reader with enough detail to be convinced of your argument or fully understand the concept you are explaining. However, remember that some sections will require more explanation, and you may need to separate this information into multiple paragraphs.

You can order your sections in the most logical way to explain your ideas. For example, if you are describing a process, you may use chronological order to show the definite time order in which the steps need to happen. You will learn about the different ways to organize your body paragraphs in the next chapter.

The concluding paragraph , or conclusion, can be a little tricky to compose because you need to make sure you give a concise summary of the body paragraphs, but you must be careful not to simply repeat what you have already written. Look back at the main idea of each section/paragraph, and try to summarize the point using words different from those you have already used. Do not include any new points in your concluding paragraph.

Consider Your Audience: How Much Do They Know?

Later in this chapter, you will work on determining and adapting to your audience when writing, but with an expository essay, since you are defining or informing your audience on a certain topic, you need to evaluate how much your audience knows about that topic (aside from having general common knowledge). You want to make sure you are giving thorough, comprehensive, and clear explanations on the topic. Never assume the reader knows everything about your topic (even if it is covered in the reader’s field of study). For example, even though some of your instructors may teach criminology, they may have specialized in different areas from the one about which you are writing; they most likely have a strong understanding of the concepts but may not recall all the small details on the topic. If your instructor specialized in crime mapping and data analysis for example, he or she may not have a strong recollection of specific criminological theories related to other areas of study. Providing enough background information without being too detailed is a fine balance, but you always want to ensure you have no gaps in the information, so your reader will not have to guess your intention. Again, we will practise this more in Section 4.9.

What Comes Next?

In the next eight sections (4.2 through 4.9), we will look at different expository modes, or rhetorical modes, you will often be assigned. These are:

  • Illustration
  • Description
  • Classification
  • Process analysis
  • Compare and contrast
  • Cause and effect

Rhetorical modes refers simply to the ways to communicate effectively through language. As you read about these modes, keep in mind that the rhetorical mode a writer chooses depends on his or her purpose for writing. Sometimes writers incorporate a variety of modes in any one essay. In this chapter, we also emphasize the rhetorical modes as a set of tools that will allow you greater flexibility and effectiveness in communicating with your audience and expressing your ideas.

In a few weeks, you will need to submit your first essay–an expository sample–and you will be given the choice of topic: one from each of the modes. Think about which types of expository essays are easier and which are more challenging for you. As mentioned, as you progress through your studies, you will be exposed to each of these types. You may want to explore a mode you find more challenging than the others in order to ensure you have a full grasp on developing each type. However, it is up to you. As you work through the sections, think about possible topics you may like to cover in your expository essay and start brainstorming as you work through the self-practice exercises.

After we explore each of the individual modes in the eight sections that follow, we will look at outlining and drafting; it is at this point you will want to fine tune and narrow the topic you will write about, so you can focus on that when doing the exercises.

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point of view expository essay

What is an Expository Essay? Ultimate Guide

expository-essay

source: Unsplash

So, it happens again: a teacher assigns an expository essay to you.

Nothing special, right? After all, who doesn’t know anything about expository writing?

*sarcasm here*

Types of essays are so many, and the differences between them are so tiny, that it’s less than simple for a student to get lost in those writing jungles. That’s why Bid4Papers craft the detailed guides for you to find a way out: persuasive essays , narrative essays , SAT essays – they aren’t that terrible if you follow the right path of writing them.

Today, the time is for how to write an expository essay. Take a cup of coffee or tea, sit back, and learn about what is an expository essay and its aspects.

Table of Contents:

  • Expository essay topics
  • Types of expository essays
  • Expository essay structure
  • The purpose of expository essay
  • Expository essay outline (+ POET method)
  • How to start an expository essay
  • How to end an expository essay
  • Benefits of expository writing
  • Writing tips to follow
  • Additional resources to check

What is an Expository Essay?

When asked to define expository essay, it’s significant to understand the characteristics of this essay type and its difference from argumentative and reflective papers.

Here goes a standard expository essay definition:

So, as you see, the expository definition is not that tricky to remember. The characteristics of your expository essay are as follows:

  • You write it to teach readers about the topic.
  • You describe and explain facts on the topic to inform readers.
  • You provide the exhaustive information on the topic.
  • You write it in the 3rd person, with a formal language, and in a precise, logical manner.

To write an A-worthy expository essay, you’ll need to do deep research to provide readers with insights on the topic. As an author, you can’t take any side or develop any arguments here: your goal is to inform and explain .

Expository Essay Topics

Expository essay topics can come from different spheres. As a rule, teachers assign a definite topic and give further requirements on writing about it; but if not, students are free to choose from topics of their interest.

You can write about education, health, law, movies, science, politics, social media, wars, history, etc. Just make sure you choose something you know about (it’s easier to research) and can explain it to readers.

Think of topics that might attract your audience and meet the requirements of your teacher. Avoid too general topics; narrow your research sphere, be specific, and make your expository essay clear and concise.

Here go some topic ideas for your inspiration. Feel free to choose any of them if they fit your assignment or ask Bid4Papers writers to assist you .

Expository Essay Topics for Beginners

point of view expository essay

Intermediate

Expository Essay Topics for Intermediates

Types of Expository Essays

Yes, it’s about types of essays within an expository essay. They are five:

  • Definition (descriptive) essays : they give information by explaining the meaning of a word or a concept. Here you tell readers about places, situations, or experience concerning the concept.
  • Classification essays: they break down a broad topic into categories. Here you start an writing expository essays with the general subject and then define and give examples of each subgroup within it.
  • Cause/effect essays: they explain the cause of something and how things affect each other within the concept. Here you identify the relations between two subjects, focus on what happened between them, and tell about the effect of that interaction.
  • Compare/contrast essays: they describe the similarities and differences between two or more concepts, places, people, etc.
  • Process essays: they explain a step-by-step process of something, its procedure, or how to do it. Your goal here is to give instructions to readers. Sometimes, this type of expository essays is called a problem/solution essay: you describe a problem and then tell readers how to solve it.

So, you can describe, explain, compare, tell about the process, or solve a problem in your essay. But before you choose, make sure you understand what is expository writing and what differs it from persuasive (argumentative) essays.

For many students, these essay types are the same. But it’s not so: while argumentative essays convince readers of your position or point of view, expository essays just tell about the issue and share the facts and evidence about it.

Let’s compare:

The difference between persuasive and expository essays

Expository Essay Structure

Once you’ve decided on the topic and type, it’s time to think of expository essay structure.

As well as all common types of essays, expository ones consist of an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. Usually, there are three paragraphs in an essay body, but you are welcome to change this number according to your topic and teacher requirements.

An expository essay structure includes:

  • A clear thesis statement in the first paragraph.
  • Logical transitions between all paragraphs.
  • Factual and logical evidence in body paragraphs.
  • A conclusion that restates a thesis and readdresses it in the list of provided evidence.
  • A pinch of creativity to impress readers.

point of view expository essay

So, what to write in each part of your expository essay writing:

  • Introduction: start it with a general statement about the topic, but do your best to hook the audience so they would like to continue reading; provide the context for the audience to understand your topic; and state a thesis for the audience to understand what you are going to expose in the essay.
  • Body paragraphs: start with the main idea of the paragraph; include the evidence (facts, statistics, quotes, interviews, etc.) to support the idea; analyze the evidence: explain why you choose this particular information to support your thesis; complete each paragraph with a logical transition to the next one.
  • Conclusion: overview the ideas you discussed in your essay and highlight the progression of your thoughts on it; restate your thesis and leave readers with food for thought.

How to Write an Expository Essay

An expository essay is about research and informing a reader about an issue, a point of view, or a fact. To get the idea on how to write an expository essay, you need to understand its purpose and follow the steps of academic writing.

The Purpose of Expository Essay

What is the purpose of expository essay?

In plain English, an expository essay explains a topic. You are just stating facts, no matter if you write a “how-to” paper or tell about the history of China or the cost of essays for students .

Such essays are not about what you think about a topic. You inform readers, explaining it through investigation and argumentation in a logical manner.

Use the POET method to organize your expository essay like a boss:

point of view expository essay

Expository Essay Outline

Before you sit and start an expository essay, write its plan. It’s a kinda map that allows you to specify core elements of your essay and make sure you don’t miss any fact or evidence while writing.

Just write a sentence for each element of your essay to save time and ease the writing process. Feel free to use this expository essay outline template from Bid4Papers:

point of view expository essay

[Download this template]

Fill it in – and you are ready to start writing your expository writing!

How to Start an Expository Essay

It’s the most common question among students. Frankly speaking, it can lead to a writer’s block and procrastination: you sit, staring at a blank page, and can’t find any words to start a sentence. It frustrates. It upsets. And it disappoints: you give up, postpone, and lose interest in writing…

We wrote about how to start a persuasive essay already. As for how to start an expository essay, the elements of introduction will be the same but with the only difference: you won’t argue about anything. Instead, you’ll be objective about the topic.

And now, for the structure of your introductory paragraph . It consists of:

  • An attention-grabbing hook: one sentence.
  • Information about your topic, to give the context to your readers: 2-3 sentences.
  • A thesis statement: one sentence about what you are going to write about.

Expository Essay Introduction: Structure

point of view expository essay

TIP: Try writing an introduction after you’ve finished the draft of the essay body. Thus you’ll have all the points and evidence fresh in your mind, and you’ll be able to extract the thesis and decide on the best hook to start an expository essay.

How to End an Expository Essay

Together with an introduction, a strong conclusion is critical for expository essays to have. It ties up the entire essay, wrapping up its thesis for readers and leaving them with thoughts on its topic.

source: Giphy

Think about a minimum of three sentences to write in your conclusion. And remember that you shouldn’t simply restate your thesis here: don’t repeat your thesis statement from the introduction but explain how the information from the essay body helped to come up to this conclusion.

Your essay conclusion is the answer to what you discussed in the essay body. Don’t introduce any new points to readers, and end your expository essay on a positive: give the audience something to remember your essay, and leave them with something to think about.

Points to remember when writing an essay conclusion:

  • Stay clear.
  • Conclude the thoughts, not present new ideas.
  • Restate the thesis and explain how your essay exposes it.
  • Be objective, use straightforward language.
  • Make sure it consists of three sentences minimum: sum up (1), answer the questions from your thesis (1-3), give readers the food for thought (1).

Benefits of Expository Writing

That’s all well and good, but…

Why the heck you need to spend time and energy on expository writing?

Nope, it’s not because teachers hate you and want you to get buried in tons of homework. It’s because expository essays help you develop some valuable skills you’ll need in the years since school is over. Below are the benefits you gain:

  • Research and evaluating the information: In the Internet era, when tons of information is online, and it’s hard to understand what’s true or false, this skill is more than crucial to have. Expository essays are about research, so the more you do it, the more skillful you become. You learn to evaluate the information, check if it’s relevant and trustful, and understand what’s fake online.
  • Critical thinking: In expository essays, you often need to evaluate the issue and approach to it from different angles. It develops your critical thinking, a must-have skill for each representative of Gen Z to have today.
  • Ability to express your thoughts briefly and clearly: You need to gather tons of information for your expository essay but stay coherent when describing it. Thus you learn to express yourself and share your thoughts with others.
  • Time management and organizational skills: Expository writing teaches you to organize thoughts and express them logically. It’s all about organizational skills we all need to develop and improve in adult life. Practice makes perfect, so you’ll learn how to manage time and organize your tasks. Not bad, huh?

The Process of Expository Writing

When writing an expository essay, you’ll follow at least four steps: prewriting (brainstorming, research, outlining), drafting (writing an introduction, a body, and a conclusion of your essay), revising (checking all factual and grammar/spelling mistakes), and editing.

Yes, the process seems energy-sapping. But nothing is as bad as it looks.

point of view expository essay

Here it goes, the process of your expository writing:

Step 1 – Prewriting

This phase is when you brainstorm a topic (if a teacher didn’t assign it beforehand), state a thesis, and do research to outline an expository essay before writing it.

How to choose the best topic for your expository essay?

Think of niches you already know something about. Make a list of topics that might be interesting for you, and you feel you might tell about to readers. Then, narrow it down to one that would be easiest for you to find research.

When choosing, answer these questions:

  • Is it interesting to you?
  • Do you have any previous knowledge about this topic?
  • Is it easy to find credible references for it?
  • Can you explain this topic (issue) to the reader?

Once the topic is ready, it’s time for research. Don’t skip this step, even if you think you know a lot about the topic of your expository essay: you’ll need references anyway; plus, you’ll learn more details and discover new things about your topic to include to your writing.

You need research to find examples for your essay, know what you will write in every paragraph, and state a thesis .

What’s a thesis?

It’s the heart of your essay, and no teacher will grade your paper high if it doesn’t have any thesis statement inside. In short, it’s a sentence in the introduction of your essay that identifies the main idea or a central purpose of your text .

For most students, a thesis is the most challenging part of an essay to write. That’s why so many free essay generators are online now, and that’s why thesis statement generators are so popular. Feel free to try ours :

NB! A thesis is not a mere fact or statement. It’s a claim, an idea, or an interpretation one can dispute. Your job as an essay writer is to give readers something they could think about.

Example: Bad thesis: British indifference caused the American Revolution.

Good thesis: By treating their U.S. colonies as little more than a source of revenue and limiting colonists’ political rights, British indifference contributed to the start of the American Revolution. ( Source )

Write down a thesis statement to the outline, with the researched info and examples. Now you are ready to start drafting.

Step 2 – Drafting

When the thesis and outline are ready, start writing your essay. Drafting each paragraph, refer to the thesis statement so you wouldn’t miss any points. Use transition words in every paragraph to reinforce the message, support facts, and make it easier for readers to follow your train of thoughts.

Start each body paragraph with a topic sentence to introduce what it will be about. Develop the idea and present the evidence in every paragraph

Tips for writing body paragraphs of your expository essay:

  • Provide facts that will help readers get to the point.
  • Avoid biased information, use straightforward language: short and clear words, active verbs, and appropriate adverbs.
  • Choose evidence that would be the most telling example for your thesis.

Step 3 – Revising

This is a phase when you review your draft and reorganize, if necessary, for it to look and sound better.

What to check when revising your expository essay:

Revising Your Expository Essay: Questions to Answer

Step 4 – Editing

The final step of writing an expository essay is its editing. Read it once again to check for grammar and spelling mistakes, improve its style and clarity, and make sure it’s engaging for readers to check.

  • You can ask a friend to read your essay and share advice on its editing.
  • You can read the essay out loud: this trick helps to identify phrases and grammar constructions that sound weird.
  • You can try some online tools to check the grammar and spelling of your expository essay: Hemingway App, Grammarly, After the Deadline, Ginger, and others.
  • You can ask a professional editor to check your essay and give feedback on what to improve there.

And only after you are 100% sure the essay looks great, submit it for a teacher’s review and wait for your A+.

Writing Tips to Follow

For expository essays, you need to investigate a topic inside out and report the facts, regardless of what you think about them. Follow these expository essay tips – and your paper will rock!

  • Think about an eye-catching headline for your essay, but make sure it has something to do with your thesis statement.
  • Research your topic, even if you think you know it well.
  • Use reputable resources for evidence and references: studies, academic journals, educational resources, official figures, etc.
  • Inform, share facts, but avoid writing about what you think about the topic.
  • Use clear and concise language, avoid biased information.
  • Organize facts logically, so it would be easier for readers to follow the information.
  • Write in the 3rd person. If describing a process or an activity, the 2nd person is okay to use too.
  • Avoid vague language, prioritize quality over quantity: introduce top facts and evidence only.
  • Write sentences of different length for better rhythm.
  • Use transition words to move between paragraphs.
  • Write your first draft a few days before the deadline, and wait a day or two before revising and editing it. Thus you’ll have a chance to look at your writing from a fresh perspective.
  • Read your expository essay out loud to notice its weak points or strange grammar constructions to revise.
  • Ask a friend to read your essay and tell if you need to edit something.

And last but not least:

Remember about the difference between argumentative and expository essays. Don’t persuade readers of your opinion. Tell about the topic, share facts and evidence, and let readers be the judge of that.

Expository Essay Examples

Are there any examples of what a great expository essay looks? Samples are many, and you’ll have no difficulty to find them in Google.

But remember:

All those expository essay examples are for assistance purposes only. You can’t take and copy them to use in own papers. After all, you know what happens to students who plagiarize in academia and infringe copyrights, don’t you?

Additional Resources to Check

  • Develop Expository Writing Skills
  • Expository Essay, Step by Step
  • 100 Expository Essay Topic Ideas
  • How to Plan & Write an Expository Essay (Video)
  • Expository Essays: Types, Characteristics & Examples

Related posts

  • What Is the Difference between Primary and Secondary Sources
  • Common Types of Plagiarism with Examples
  • Exemplification Essay – Ideas and Tips

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Expository Essay vs. Argumentative Essay: Similarities and Differences

Expository and argumentative essays involve research, strong thesis statements, factual body paragraphs, and well-thought-out conclusions. And when asked to write an expository essay, the key is to thoroughly understand the topic and research to inform the readers of new information.

But while the two writing pieces are similar in the work that creates them, they differ extensively in many other aspects. Their differences are diverse, and without proper scrutiny, it is possible not to tell these essays apart.

Conversely, expository essays provide coherent information and explanations about a specific issue. On the other hand, argumentative essays aim to convince readers the writer’s point of view is correct and for them to agree with you.

The definitions provide a clear path for their distinction such that you can easily tell them apart. But overall, the main difference can be seen in their names. One exposes an issue, while the other provides for an adoption of a specific position.

Let us now look at the expository essay vs. argumentative essay analysis to help you understand them better.

What Is an Expository Essay?

An expository essay is a type of writing that explains, describes, or illustrates something. It is not a persuasive essay and does not have a specific purpose other than to explain something in detail. It’s not a research paper, although it requires some research, and the information generated gives the reader information on a particular topic.

These essays can be written about anything from the history of your town to how to bake bread. They are used in many academic disciplines, including science, business, and social sciences. Their purpose is to inform the reader about something rather than persuade them to do something.

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In addition, an expository essay provides facts and evidence rather than opinion or conjecture. It should also be objective and neutral rather than subjective in its approach. Despite these essays aiming to educate readers, they also offer an opportunity for a writer to show their subject mastery. However, as mentioned, you should not show bias in the information you portray.

Expository essays classification

Compare and contrast.

These essays entail analyzing similarities and differences between a topic or issue

This essay type involves defining a concept through facts and figures.

They describe a step-by-step guide on how to do something or a particular procedure.

Classification essays

are those describing things in a category.

Cause and effect

These essays show how and why something occurs due to a previous action.

What Is an Argumentative Essay?

An argumentative essay is a kind of academic writing that requires an author to develop a position on a specific topic. This type of paper aims to convince the reader that your point of view is correct based on your provided evidence.

Ideally, you take a side and defend it by presenting evidence. The most important thing about an argumentative essay is that it is not just a story or narrative but an explanation of why you believe certain things. It is also not merely stating your opinion but proving your point with facts and evidence.

Also see: How Do You Write a Toulmin Argumentative Essay

Additionally, an argumentative essay should be clear and concise. It should also be organized logically and clearly with an introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion. The introduction states the main idea of the essay as well as gives some background information related to the topic being discussed.

The body paragraphs explain why you believe your thesis statement to be accurate, using evidence from your research sources. Each paragraph should have its topic sentence that clearly states what you are trying to prove with each paragraph.

Similarly, the final paragraph should summarize your points and restate your thesis statement to leave your reader with a lasting impression of what you have said throughout the essay.

These essays have three main ways to write them;

  • You can argue in favor of something (pro)
  • You can argue against something (con)
  • You can argue for two sides at once (both pro and con)

What is the Difference Between Expository and Argumentative Essays?

An expository essay is a writing piece that explains some idea or concept. It is not an opinion piece but rather a piece that presents information clearly and concisely. For example, if you were to write about the history of Western culture, your goal would be to give information about this topic without bias or prejudice.

On the other hand, an argumentative essay presents its point of view on a particular topic. It does not present facts but offers opinions on how things should be done by giving evidence supporting their position.

For instance, if asked to write about whether or not children should be allowed to play football, you would write about why it is good for them or bad for them based on your beliefs and research.

Both essays vastly differ in purpose. The primary purpose of an expository essay is to explain something, such as a concept or theory. You can also use an expository essay to describe a situation or event in detail. In either case, the purpose of an expository essay is not to persuade people to agree with you. It’s simply to inform them about something they don’t know much about.

In contrast, the purpose of an argumentative essay is to prove why you’re right. For example, if there is an article describing cats as better pets than dogs, you could write an argumentative essay about why dogs are better than cats. Your goal would be to convince your reader that dogs are better than cats as pets by using evidence from personal experience and research findings.

Thesis Statement

Thesis statements are the backbone of an essay and offer a clear direction for the rest of your paper. It also helps you to organize your thoughts and decide what points to include in the body paragraphs.

An expository essay’s thesis statement introduces the topic broadly and generally but specifically to serve as a starting point for further research. For example, an expository essay on the history of the automobile industry could begin with a broad statement like “The automobile industry has changed significantly over time.” This statement allows you to explore many aspects of car manufacturing, including technological changes, manufacturing processes, and marketing strategies.

On the other hand, an argumentative essay’s thesis statement comes in the form of stating your argument. It gives your readers a clear idea about which side of an issue you will take and how you will argue for that position. For example, if you are writing about whether or not gun control laws should be stricter, your thesis might look like this, “Gun control laws should be stricter because they help prevent crime.”

Point of View

In an expository essay, a writer explains a concept or idea in detail, providing evidence and examples to support the position taken. An argumentative essay, on the other hand, presents an opinion or position on a topic and supports it with evidence and reasoning.

With these different purposes, their viewpoints are also different. Expository essays typically use a third-person point of view (he/she) because they are factual and objective rather than personal. Argumentative essays often use the first-person point of view (I) because they are personal interpretations of events or issues rather than objective descriptions.

Further, expository essays are usually non-biased because the writer neutrally provides information without any emotional attachment aiming to inform or explain.

On the other hand, argumentative essays try to persuade the readers about their point of view by using facts and logical reasoning. Thus they are biased and subjective.

The Opening Line

The opening line of an expository essay is a general statement about your topic and presents your case. For example, if you’re writing about the history of baseball, you might write: “Baseball has been played in America since the nineteenth century.”

On the other hand, the opening line in an argumentative essay introduces your topic. For example, if you’re writing about whether or not schools should have dress codes for male students who wear athletic shorts and tank tops, your first sentence might be, “Dress codes are necessary to ensure school safety.”

An argumentative essay also uses logical, emotional, and ethical appeals. These appeal to logic, emotion, and ethics to persuade readers that your position is correct. On the other hand, an expository is devoid of such appeals.

Judgment/ Wayforward

The two essays differ in judgment emanating from their purposes. An expository essay does not give any decision because it aims to inform. But an argumentative ends by challenging or asking readers to agree with the writer’s position based on the reasons given.

In a nutshell, an expository essay summarizes the information provided by a factual source or source material. An argumentative essay, on the other hand, bases its claims on evidence and asserts the truth value of that position. It is worth noting here, though, that both essays rely on facts to prove the point the writer wants to make.

And with that, we know you can now clearly differentiate between the two essays.

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IMAGES

  1. Expository Essay Samples: Just The Facts

    point of view expository essay

  2. How To Write Expository Essay

    point of view expository essay

  3. Expert Tips to Write A Compelling Expository Essay!

    point of view expository essay

  4. How To Write an Excellent Expository Essay: Expert Tips and Examples

    point of view expository essay

  5. How to write Excellent Expository Essays

    point of view expository essay

  6. Emily's Enrichment Corner: Exploring Author's Point of View in

    point of view expository essay

VIDEO

  1. Expository Essay Conventions

  2. Essay 18: THE EXPOSITORY ESSAY

  3. EXPOSITORY ESSAY FC

  4. Expository Essay Brainstorming Video

  5. Expository Essay

  6. Expository Writing #developing an #argument #essaywriting #structure of an Expository Essay

COMMENTS

  1. 5 Expository Essay Examples (Full Text with Citations)

    Unlike argumentative or persuasive essays, expository essays do not aim to convince the reader of a particular point of view. Instead, they focus on providing a balanced and thorough explanation of a subject. Key characteristics of an expository essay include: Clarity and Conciseness; Structured Organization (Introduction, Body, Conclusion)

  2. How to Write an Expository Essay

    An expository essay provides a clear, focused explanation of a particular topic, process, or set of ideas. It doesn't set out to prove a point, just to give a balanced view of its subject matter. Expository essays are usually short assignments intended to test your composition skills or your understanding of a subject.

  3. Expository Essays

    2. Body paragraph. After understanding how to start an expository essay the next step is to construct substantial body paragraphs. Each body paragraph in an expository essay consists of a topic sentence, its explanation, and a transition statement. A single idea should be introduced in each paragraph.

  4. Expository Writing: The Guide to Writing an Expository Essay

    An expository essay requires you to investigate an idea, gather supporting evidence, and present your point of view on a topic. You may be wondering how this differs from a persuasive essay. While both essay types require you to provide evidence to support a claim, persuasive essays are more argumentative.

  5. How to Write an Expository Essay

    An expository essay requires the writer to take a balanced approach to the subject matter rather than justifying a particular point of view. Expository essays are assigned to students to evaluate their subject knowledge and composition skills. When compared with argumentative essays, they involve a lot less research. Definition of Expository Essay

  6. Expository Essay: 3 Building Blocks to Propose an Idea and Defend It

    The expository essay is a genre of essay that requires the student to investigate an idea, evaluate evidence, expound on the idea, and set forth an argument concerning that idea in a clear and concise manner. Keep in mind that your expository writing centers on giving your reader information about a given topic or process.

  7. How to Write an Expository Essay (Updated for 2021)

    When you write an expository essay, you are exposing the main ideas of the subject, expounding on a topic in detail, or explaining the meaning of a topic, idea, or phenomenon. You will typically be expected to have an introduction, body, and conclusion, plus a strong thesis statement to keep your ideas focused.

  8. How to Write an Expository Essay

    1. Read Your Essay Prompt. Most expository essay prompts will ask you to do one of the following: Define and explain a concept or theory. Compare and contrast two ideas. Examine a problem and propose a solution. Describe a cause and effect relationship. Explain a step-by-step process.

  9. How to Write an Expository Essay

    These are actually fairly simple essays to write, but they do require some serious research skills. Like most academic essays, the expository essay requires formal writing with an introduction, body, and conclusion. Guide Overview. Tips for writing a kick-butt essay. Focus on the thesis; Listen to the assignment; Pre-write; Explain, don't argue

  10. How to Write an Expository Essay: Types, Tips, and Topics

    The body of your essay can be anywhere from 2-3 paragraphs to several paragraphs long. As you compose your outline, write down the different headings for your paragraphs so you can see exactly how each one transitions into the next. 4. Write your first draft. Start with an introduction, where you include your thesis statement.

  11. How to Write an Expository Essay Step by Step

    Moreover, an expository essay is an informational, conceptual essay that has a single point of view to support it. This type of essay usually involves illustration and explanation to make the main idea clear while also providing useful facts for readers with little knowledge on the topic. Expository Essay Vs. Argumentative Essay

  12. Expository Essays

    The expository essay is a genre of essay that requires the student to investigate an idea, evaluate evidence, expound on the idea, and set forth an argument concerning that idea in a clear and concise manner. This can be accomplished through comparison and contrast, definition, example, the analysis of cause and effect, etc.

  13. How to Write an Expository Essay

    An expository essay is a type of write-up that is focused on explaining, clarifying, illustrating, or explicating an idea in a way that is clear to the readers. Its purpose is to make the reader aware of something ... that distinguishes it from others is the provision of all relative information without the author taking any specific point of view.

  14. How to write Excellent Expository Essays

    Tip # 2: Research the Topic Thoroughly. Regardless of which type of expository essay your students are working on, they must approach the research stage of the writing process with diligence and focus. The more thorough they are at the research stage, the smoother the remainder of the writing process will be.

  15. Expository Essay in Literature: Definition & Examples

    The Five-Paragraph Model. Most expository essays follow the five-paragraph essay model: Introduction: The introduction contains the thesis statement or main point of the essay.Here, the writer describes the subject and gives necessary context.; Body: This section is usually three or more paragraphs and offers supporting evidence for the thesis. ...

  16. Guide to Writing an Effective Expository Essay

    The purpose of an expository essay is to explain or inform the reader about a specific topic or idea. Unlike other types of essays, the main goal is to provide a balanced analysis and present factual information in a clear and concise manner. ... It should include a strong thesis statement that clearly states your main argument or point of view ...

  17. 4.1: Expository Essays

    An expository essay allows the writer the opportunity to explain his or her ideas about a topic and to provide clarity for the reader by using: Facts; ... Providing three body sections with one point each that supports the thesis should provide the reader with enough detail to be convinced of your argument or fully understand the concept you ...

  18. PDF Writing an Expository Essay

    Section 1 Essay structure An essay is a piece of writing made up of a number of paragraphs. Each paragraph has a specifi c role in an essay. In a fi ve-paragraph essay, the fi rst paragraph is an introduction; the second, third, and fourth paragraphs form the body of the essay; and the fi fth paragraph is a conclusion (see diagram on page 4).

  19. The Four Main Types of Essay

    An essay is a focused piece of writing designed to inform or persuade. There are many different types of essay, but they are often defined in four categories: argumentative, expository, narrative, and descriptive essays. Argumentative and expository essays are focused on conveying information and making clear points, while narrative and ...

  20. What is an Expository Essay? Ultimate Guide

    An expository essay is a type of academic writing where you investigate the topic to describe, explain, and provide the information to a reader. ... while argumentative essays convince readers of your position or point of view, expository essays just tell about the issue and share the facts and evidence about it. Let's compare: The difference ...

  21. Expository Essay vs. Argumentative Essay: Similarities and ...

    Point of View. In an expository essay, a writer explains a concept or idea in detail, providing evidence and examples to support the position taken. An argumentative essay, on the other hand, presents an opinion or position on a topic and supports it with evidence and reasoning.

  22. Welcome to the Purdue Online Writing Lab

    Learn how to write effectively for academic, professional, and personal purposes at the Purdue Online Writing Lab, a free resource for writers of all levels.