Letter Templates & Example

Cover Letter for Returning to Previous Employer: Free Template and Tips

Cover Letter for Returning to Previous Employer: Free Template and Tips

Hey there fellow job seekers, have you ever considered returning to a previous employer? It can be a great option if you’re looking for a new opportunity but still want to work for a company you’re familiar with. However, it’s important to make a good impression when reaching out to them about a potential position. That’s where a cover letter for returning to previous employer template can come in handy. With this template, you can find examples and edit them as needed to create a personalized cover letter that highlights your strengths and why you’re the perfect fit for the job. So why not give it a shot and see where it takes you? Let’s dive into the world of cover letters for returning to previous employers!

The Best Structure for a Cover Letter for Returning to a Previous Employer

Welcome back! So, you’ve decided to return to your previous employer, and now you’re wondering how to craft the perfect cover letter. Fear not, we’re here to help! A cover letter is your chance to showcase your skills and express your interest in the position. Here’s the best structure to follow:

Paragraph 1: Introduction Start by mentioning your previous position and briefly explaining why you left. Then, express your excitement to be applying for a position with the company again. Be enthusiastic and show that you’re genuinely interested in returning to work with the organization.

Paragraph 2: Highlight Your Achievements In this paragraph, you should highlight your previous accomplishments and how they align with the company’s goals. Use specific examples of projects you led or milestones you achieved. By doing this, you’re demonstrating that you understand the company’s needs and can contribute positively to the team’s efforts.

Paragraph 3: Explain What You’ve Been Doing Since Leaving In this paragraph, explain any additional experience or qualifications you have gained since leaving. Highlight any relevant training or skills you have acquired since leaving the company. You want to demonstrate that you have been active in your career and stayed current in your field.

Paragraph 4: Express Your Interest In the Position Here, you want to convey your excitement for the position and why you feel you would be the best fit for it. Explain how your skills and experience make you the ideal candidate for the job. Make sure you tailor your language to fit the job description and the company’s culture.

Paragraph 5: Wrap Up and Thank Them In your final paragraph, thank the company for their time and consideration. Reiterate your enthusiasm for the position and express your desire to speak with them further about the opportunity. Provide your contact information and express your willingness to help with any additional questions.

And that’s it! Follow this structure, and you’ll have a well-crafted cover letter that will impress your previous employer and land you the job. Good luck!

7 Sample Cover Letters for Returning to Previous Employer

Sample 1: returning after personal leave.

Dear [Manager’s Name],

I hope this letter finds you well. I recently took a brief personal leave from my position at [Company Name] due to a family matter that needed my full attention. Although it was a difficult decision to make, I knew it was important to prioritize my family.

During my absence, I realized how much I enjoyed working with the team at [Company Name] and how much I valued the relationships I have built with everyone. I am excited to return to work and continue contributing to the success of the company.

Thank you for your understanding during this time. I look forward to hearing from you and hope to return to my position as soon as possible.

Best Regards,

[Your Name]

Sample 2: Returning After Pursuing Higher Education

I hope this letter finds you in good health and high spirits. It gives me great pleasure to express my interest in returning to [Company Name] after completing my higher education.

The knowledge I have gained during my time away has equipped me with new skills that will undoubtedly benefit the company. My experience has also deepened my appreciation for the company’s culture, mission, and people, as well as highlighted the strengths that make [Company Name] a fantastic place to work.

I am thrilled to take what I’ve learned and apply it as I return to [Department Name] as a [Job Title]. I greatly appreciate your consideration and the opportunity to rejoin the team at [Company Name].

Thank you once again for your time and consideration. I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Sample 3: Returning After Being Laid Off

I hope all is well with you and the team at [Company Name]. I am writing to express my interest in returning to my previous role as [Job Title] after being laid off due to the pandemic.

My time at [Company Name] was immensely gratifying, and I have always admired the company’s values and commitment to excellence. Since my departure, I have continually followed the company’s growth journey and have become even more enthusiastic about the exciting initiatives undertaken by the company.

As an experienced and skilled [Job Title] professional, I am confident I can make a valuable contribution to the [Department Name] team. I am eager to be part of the organization’s progress and growth as we navigate the post-pandemic world.

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to discussing how I can support [Company Name] using my skills and expertise.

Sample 4: Returning After a Career Break

I hope this letter finds you well. I am writing to express my interest in returning to [Company Name]. I had previously worked as [Job Title] before taking a career break to focus on personal issues.

The time away from work has reminded me of my passion for my field and the many contributions I can make to [Company Name]. My experience and skills will undoubtedly assist me in assuming the responsibilities of my previous role.

Working with [Company Name] was a great experience, and I cherish the relationships I developed with my colleagues. It would be a pleasure and an honor to return to the organization.

I appreciate your time and consideration. I look forward to the opportunity to come in for a meeting and discuss my application.

Sample 5: Returning After Relocation

I hope this letter finds you in good health and spirits. Since my move to [Location], I have reflected on my career and what I want for my future. One thing that has become clear to me is that I miss the team at [Company Name].

I enjoyed working as [Job Title] in [Department Name] and have found myself recalling the camaraderie and fulfillment it brought me. Therefore, I would like to express my interest in rejoining [Company Name] as a [Job Title].

In particular, my familiarity with the organization will be a significant asset in my transition back to the team. I am eager to bring my experience and skills to [Company Name] and look forward to making a positive contribution to the organization’s future.

Thank you for your support and consideration; I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Sample 6: Returning After Maternity Leave

I hope this letter finds you in good health and spirits. I am writing to express my interest in returning to work as [Job Title] at [Company Name] after an extended maternity leave.

While taking care of my newborn has been the greatest joy of my life, I also miss my professional life and the joy and satisfaction it brings me. I miss being a part of the team at [Company Name] and engaging in our collective pursuit of excellence.

I am excited to return to work and apply the skills and knowledge gained during my leave to contribute to the company’s growth and success into the future. I am confident that my renewed enthusiasm and dedication will enable me to perform my duties as a [Job Title] to the highest standard.

Thank you for considering my request. I look forward to hearing back from you and resuming my work as part of the team at [Company Name].

Sample 7: Returning After Health Issues

I hope this letter finds you in excellent health. I am writing to express my interest in returning to work as [Job Title] at [Company Name] after recovering from my health issues.

I am immensely grateful for the support and understanding shown by the company during my health-related absences. My experience with [Company Name] has always been positive and enjoyable, and my colleagues are among the best I have had the pleasure of working with.

Returning to work with the company would be a dream come true. I miss the company’s daily routines, the challenges it posed, and the achievements we celebrated. As a [Job Title], I promise to work diligently and contribute my knowledge and skills to the best of my ability to achieve our collective goals.

Thank you so much for your consideration, and I am eagerly looking forward to hearing back from you soon.

Tips for Writing a Cover Letter to a Previous Employer

Returning to a previous employer may seem like a bit of a daunting task. However, it is not impossible. Writing a cover letter is a crucial step in the process of reaching out to your previous employer. The cover letter is your chance to express your interest in the job and explain why you are the right fit. Here are some in-depth tips to make writing the cover letter to your previous employer a success

  • Avoid being presumptuous: When writing a cover letter, avoid assuming that the job is yours automatically. It is essential to communicate your skills and achievements to show what value you bring to the organization you are applying to. Be confident but not presumptuous.
  • Highlight what has changed since you left: Whether you left to pursue other career opportunities or to take a break from work, you must acknowledge what has changed in your life. This way, the hiring manager can understand why you are applying again. Your time away from the organization might have equipped you with new skill sets and experience, which would make you an ideal candidate for the job.
  • Address why you left: If you left the company on good terms, it is essential to highlight that. If you left for a negative reason, such as a family emergency or a health issue, it is essential to address that in your cover letter. This helps the employer to understand why you left and why you are applying again.
  • Show your enthusiasm: When applying for a job, it is crucial to show your enthusiasm and passion for the position. Employers are more likely to hire someone who is excited about the job and the organization. Be sure to express your enthusiasm in your cover letter.
  • Customize your cover letter: Even if you are returning to your previous employer, it is important to customize your cover letter. Do not use the same cover letter you used when you applied years ago. Take the time to update your cover letter and make it specific to the job.

In conclusion, writing a cover letter to a previous employer is all about being authentic and transparent. Addressing why you are applying and why you left is essential. Highlighting your achievements and skills and showing your enthusiasm will also help you to increase your chances of securing the job. Remember to take your time to craft a customized cover letter that will show the hiring manager that you are the perfect candidate for the job.

FAQs related to Cover Letter for Returning to Previous Employer Template

1. What is a cover letter for returning to a previous employer?

A cover letter for returning to a previous employer is a document that you send to the company you previously worked with to express your interest in returning to work with them.

2. Why is it important to write a cover letter when returning to a previous employer?

Writing a cover letter when returning to a previous employer is important because it shows that you are serious about wanting to come back and work for the company. It also allows you to remind the employer of your professional skills and experience.

3. What should I include in my cover letter for returning to a previous employer?

In your cover letter for returning to a previous employer, you should include your reasons for leaving the company, your reasons for wanting to come back, and any updates on your professional experience and achievements since you left the company. You should also express your enthusiasm for rejoining the company.

4. How should I address my cover letter when returning to a previous employer?

When addressing your cover letter for returning to a previous employer, you should include the name and job title of the person who will be reading your letter. You can address the letter to them personally, or to the human resources department.

5. How should I format my cover letter for returning to a previous employer?

Your cover letter for returning to a previous employer should follow a standard business letter format, including your name and contact information, the date, the employer’s name and contact information, and a formal greeting and closing. You should also use a professional font and format the letter in a way that is easy to read.

6. What tone should I use in my cover letter for returning to a previous employer?

You should use a polite and professional tone in your cover letter for returning to a previous employer. Express gratitude for the opportunity to work with the company in the past, and express your sincere interest and enthusiasm for returning to work with them.

7. How can I personalize my cover letter for returning to a previous employer?

To personalize your cover letter for returning to a previous employer, you can mention specific projects or accomplishments from your previous tenure with the company that showcase your skills and experience. You can also reference any personal connections or relationships you have with current employees or management.

Thanks for stopping by!

We hope this template helps you as you consider returning to work for a previous employer. Remember, a cover letter is a great way to showcase your skills and enthusiasm for a job opportunity. Make sure to tailor your letter to the specific job and company, and don’t forget to proofread before sending it off. Good luck in your job search! And be sure to come back soon for more career and job search advice.

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How to Write a Cover Letter to Reapply for a Job at a Company That You Have Already Worked For

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How to Respond to the Interview Question: Why Did You Resign?

How to cancel a job offer you've accepted, how to accept a job politely.

  • How to Leave a Long-Term Job
  • Good Examples of Why You Would Like to Work for an Employer

It can be a small world, and at some point in your career, you may find yourself trying to go back to a company you previously worked for. As long as you weren’t terminated for misconduct or poor performance, you likely have an “in” with the company that you can capitalize on in a re-introductory cover letter.

Why Did You Leave?

It’s important to take stock of why you left before you try to write a cover letter to reapply for a job with a company you’ve already worked for. You may have left because of a toxic corporate culture, because there was no room for advancement, you didn’t like the compensation package or you disagreed with management decisions. It's important to consider if anything may have changed that would make the second go-around a worthwhile pursuit. If you still have contacts inside the company, consider them as valuable resources, both for getting an inside scoop and possibly even pushing your resume into the right hands.

If You Were Downsized

If you were downsized for no reason other than corporate restructuring, you theoretically left on better-than-average terms. In your letter, discuss what you liked about working for the company and why you would like to return.

W__hile it was difficult to be let go last year when the company restructured, the organization remains one of the best I’ve ever worked for. In the past several months, I’ve been doing consulting work, and when I noticed you have a new position open in sales, I thought I’d reach out to see if you still consider me a good fit for the organization.

If You Left for Another Job

If you moved on from the company to pursue another opportunity, particularly a job that was a step up, there shouldn’t be any hard feelings with your previous employer. Be honest about why you would like to come back in a new or similar capacity.

As you know, I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to run my own team when I was offered a job at ABC Co. While I learned a great deal there, I must admit, I miss the cohesive team environment of XYZ Co. I understand you’re looking for someone to run the new community relations division, and I would love the opportunity to be considered for the role.

If You Left for School

If you left a job to further your education, you have a lot of advantages for a rehire request. Emphasize what you liked about working there, what you have learned and how you anticipate utilizing your education if you’re invited to return.

It was such a pleasure working with ABC Co. back in 2016. While I opted to take the last two years away from work to complete my MBA, now that it’s completed, I’d love to be able to utilize my newfound skills in the accounting department. I understand you are hiring right now, and I would be most appreciative of an interview.

If You Left for Personal Reasons

If you left your old job to raise a family, tend to an elderly relative or even travel or explore self-employment, it’s perfectly acceptable to reference that time in your cover letter.

As you are aware, I decided it was important to be home with my girls when they were toddlers. Now that they are in preschool, I’m incredibly excited about re-entering the workforce, and I can think of no place I’d rather be than back at ABC Co. Could I make arrangements to visit HR sometime in the near future?

Capitalize on Your History

When communicating with your previous employer in your cover letter, stress the value of your knowledge of the company, your existing in-house networks and highlight any new skills you bring to the table.

I believe I can be an asset to the organization because I have a solid understanding of strategic objectives, I'm familiar with the board of directors and I know all of the internal routing systems and best practices.

Conclude your cover letter by making a request for a meeting or for re-hire consideration. As with any professional correspondence, note any attachments, such as resume or references and include all relevant contact information.

  • Forbes: 8 Tips For Getting Rehired By A Former Employer
  • Fast Company: Five Steps to Getting Rehired by a Former Employer

Lisa McQuerrey has been an award-winning writer and author for more than 25 years. She specializes in business, finance, workplace/career and education. Publications she’s written for include Southwest Exchange and InBusiness Las Vegas.

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Letter Draft

Cover Letter to Previous Employer

Cover Letter to Previous Employer

A Cover Letter to a Previous Employer is a letter written by a former employee to their former employer. Its purpose is to express interest in returning to the company or inquiring about potential job opportunities.

In this article, we will provide you with templates and examples of Cover Letters to Previous Employers. These samples will serve as a guide to help you craft your own letter, whether you are seeking reemployment or simply exploring options.

With our samples, you can easily customize the letter to suit your specific needs and convey your interest and qualifications effectively.

Cover Letter to Previous Employer

Sample of a Cover Letter to Previous Employer

[Your Name]

[Your Address]

[City, State, Zip Code]

[Email Address]

[Phone Number]

[Previous Employer’s Name]

[Company Name]

[Company Address]

Dear [Previous Employer’s Name],

I hope this letter finds you well. I am writing to express my interest in the possibility of returning to [Company Name] in a [mention the type of position] capacity.

During my time at [Company Name], I greatly valued the opportunities for growth and development that were afforded to me. I believe that my skills and experiences align well with the needs of [Company Name], and I am eager to contribute to the continued success of the team.

Thank you for considering my application. I am looking forward to the possibility of rejoining the [Company Name] family and contributing to its ongoing success. Please feel free to contact me at [Your Phone Number] or [Your Email Address] to discuss this opportunity further.

How to Write a Cover Letter to Previous Employer

Writing a cover letter to a previous employer can be a strategic way to express your interest in returning to the company or inquire about potential job opportunities. Here’s how to write a compelling cover letter:

1. Start with a Strong Opening:

Begin your cover letter by addressing the previous employer by name and expressing your interest in returning to the company. Mention the position you are interested in and briefly explain why you are a good fit.

Cover Letter to Previous Employer

2. Highlight Your Achievements:

In the body of your cover letter, highlight your key achievements and experiences from your previous tenure at the company. Provide specific examples of projects you worked on and contributions you made.

3. Express Your Continued Interest:

Clearly state why you are interested in returning to the company. Mention any positive experiences you had while working there and explain how you believe you can contribute to the company’s success in the future.

4. Address Any Changes:

If there have been any changes since you left the company, such as acquiring new skills or experiences, mention them in your cover letter. Explain how these changes make you an even stronger candidate than before.

5. Request an Interview:

Close your cover letter by expressing your desire for an interview to discuss your application further. Provide your contact information and indicate your availability for an interview.

6. Proofread Carefully:

Before sending your cover letter, proofread it carefully to ensure there are no grammatical or spelling errors. A well-written cover letter enhances your professionalism and credibility.

7. Follow Up:

After sending your cover letter, consider following up with the employer to ensure they received it and to express your continued interest in the position.

Tips and Tricks

Here are some tips and tricks to keep in mind while writing a cover letter to a previous employer:

1. Personalize Your Letter:

Address the cover letter directly to your previous employer by name to show that you have taken the time to tailor your application.

Emphasize any key accomplishments or successes from your previous tenure at the company to demonstrate your value as a candidate.

3. Express you’re Enthusiasm:

Clearly express your enthusiasm for the opportunity to return to the company and explain why you are eager to rejoin the team.

If there have been any changes since you left the company, such as acquiring new skills or experiences, mention them in your cover letter to show your growth.

5. Focus on the Future:

Instead of dwelling on the past, focus on how you can contribute to the company’s future success and growth.

6. Be Concise:

Keep your cover letter concise and to the point, focusing on the most relevant information and avoiding unnecessary details.

7. Proofread Carefully:

Before sending your cover letter, proofread it carefully to ensure there are no grammatical or spelling errors, which can detract from your professionalism.

FAQs about a Cover Letter to Previous Employer

When writing a cover letter to a previous employer, it’s important to address key questions that job seekers often have. Here are some frequently asked questions about this topic:

1. How do I address a cover letter to a previous employer?

– When addressing a cover letter to a previous employer, use the employer’s name and position title, if known, followed by the company’s name and address. For example, “Dear [Employer’s Name], [Company Name].”

2. What should I include in a cover letter to a previous employer?

In a cover letter to a previous employer, include a brief introduction expressing your interest in returning to the company, highlight relevant skills and experiences, and explain why you are a good fit for the position.

3. How do I mention my previous tenure at the company in the cover letter?

Mention your previous tenure at the company in the cover letter by briefly summarizing your past role and contributions, and explaining how your experience makes you a valuable asset to the company.

4. How can I show enthusiasm for returning to the company in the cover letter?

Show enthusiasm for returning to the company in the cover letter by expressing your excitement about the opportunity to rejoin the team and contribute to the company’s success.

5. Should I follow up after sending a cover letter to a previous employer?

Yes, it’s a good idea to follow up after sending a cover letter to a previous employer to ensure they received it and to express your continued interest in the position.

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How to write a great cover letter in 2024: tips and structure

young-woman-checking-her-cover-lette

A cover letter is a personalized letter that introduces you to a potential employer, highlights your qualifications, and explains why you're a strong fit for a specific job.

Hate or love them, these brief documents allow job seekers to make an impression and stand out from the pile of other applications. Penning a thoughtful cover letter shows the hiring team you care about earning the position.

Here’s everything you need to know about how to write a cover letter — and a great one, at that.

What is a cover letter and why does it matter?

A professional cover letter is a one-page document you submit alongside your CV or resume as part of a job application. Typically, they’re about half a page or around 150–300 words.

An effective cover letter doesn’t just rehash your CV; it’s your chance to highlight your proudest moments, explain why you want the job, and state plainly what you bring to the table.

Show the reviewer you’re likable, talented, and will add to the company’s culture . You can refer to previous jobs and other information from your CV, but only if it helps tell a story about you and your career choices .

What 3 things should you include in a cover letter?

A well-crafted cover letter can help you stand out to potential employers. To make your cover letter shine, here are three key elements to include:

1. Personalization

Address the hiring manager or recruiter by name whenever possible. If the job posting doesn't include a name, research to find out who will be reviewing applications. Personalizing your cover letter shows that you've taken the time to tailor your application to the specific company and role.

2. Highlight relevant achievements and skills

Emphasize your most relevant skills , experiences, and accomplishments that directly relate to the job you're applying for. Provide specific examples of how your skills have benefited previous employers and how they can contribute to the prospective employer's success. Use quantifiable achievements , such as improved efficiency, cost savings, or project success, to demonstrate your impact.

3. Show enthusiasm and fit

Express your enthusiasm for the company and the position you're applying for. Explain why you are interested in this role and believe you are a good fit for the organization. Mention how your values, goals, and skills align with the company's mission and culture. Demonstrating that you've done your research can make a significant impression.

What do hiring managers look for in a cover letter?

Employers look for several key elements in a cover letter. These include:

Employers want to see that your cover letter is specifically tailored to the position you are applying for. It should demonstrate how your skills, experiences, and qualifications align with the job requirements.

Clear and concise writing

A well-written cover letter is concise, easy to read, and error-free. Employers appreciate clear and effective communication skills , so make sure your cover letter showcases your ability to express yourself effectively.

Demonstrated knowledge of the company

Employers want to see that you are genuinely interested in their organization. Mention specific details about the company, such as recent achievements or projects, to show that you are enthusiastic about joining their team.

Achievements and accomplishments

Highlight your relevant achievements and accomplishments that demonstrate your qualifications for the position. Use specific examples to showcase your skills and show how they can benefit the employer.

Enthusiasm and motivation

Employers want to hire candidates who are excited about the opportunity and motivated to contribute to the company's success. Express your enthusiasm and passion for the role and explain why you are interested in working for the company.

Professionalism

A cover letter should be professional in tone and presentation. Use formal language, address the hiring manager appropriately, and follow standard business letter formatting.

excited-woman-in-her-office-how-to-write-a-cover-letter

How do you structure a cover letter?

A well-structured cover letter follows a specific format that makes it easy for the reader to understand your qualifications and enthusiasm for the position. Here's a typical structure for a cover letter:

Contact information

Include your name, address, phone number, and email address at the top of the letter. Place your contact information at the beginning so that it's easy for the employer to reach you.

Employer's contact information

Opening paragraph, middle paragraph(s), closing paragraph, complimentary close, additional contact information.

Repeat your contact information (name, phone number, and email) at the end of the letter, just in case the employer needs it for quick reference.

Remember to keep your cover letter concise and focused. It should typically be no more than one page in length. Proofread your letter carefully to ensure it is free from spelling and grammatical errors. Tailor each cover letter to the specific job application to make it as relevant and impactful as possible.

How to write a good cover letter (with examples)

The best letters are unique, tailored to the job description, and written in your voice — but that doesn’t mean you can’t use a job cover letter template.

Great cover letters contain the same basic elements and flow a certain way. Take a look at this cover letter structure for ref erence while you construct your own.

1. Add a header and contact information

While reading your cover letter, the recruiter shouldn’t have to look far to find who wrote it. Your document should include a basic heading with the following information:

  • Pronouns (optional)
  • Location (optional)
  • Email address
  • Phone number (optional)
  • Relevant links, such as your LinkedIn profile , portfolio, or personal website (optional)

You can pull this information directly from your CV. Put it together, and it will look something like this:

Christopher Pike

San Francisco, California

[email protected]

Alternatively, if the posting asks you to submit your cover letter in the body of an email, you can include this information in your signature. For example:

Warm regards,

Catherine Janeway

Bloomington, Indiana

[email protected]

(555) 999 - 2222

man-using-his-laptop-while-smiling-how-to-write-a-cover-letter

2. Include a personal greeting

Always begin your cover letter by addressing the hiring manager — preferably by name. You can use the person’s first and last name. Make sure to include a relevant title, like Dr., Mr., or Ms. For example, “Dear Mr. John Doe.”

Avoid generic openings like “To whom it may concern,” “Dear sir or madam,” or “Dear hiring manager.” These introductions sound impersonal — like you’re copy-pasting cover letters — and can work against you in the hiring process.

Be careful, though. When using someone’s name, you don’t want to use the wrong title or accidentally misgender someone. If in doubt, using only their name is enough. You could also opt for a gender-neutral title, like Mx.

Make sure you’re addressing the right person in your letter — ideally, the person who’s making the final hiring decision. This isn’t always specified in the job posting, so you may have to do some research to learn the name of the hiring manager.

3. Draw them in with an opening story

The opening paragraph of your cover letter should hook the reader. You want it to be memorable, conversational, and extremely relevant to the job you’re pursuing. 

There’s no need for a personal introduction — you’ve already included your name in the heading. But you should make reference to the job you’re applying for. A simple “Thank you for considering my application for the role of [job title] at [company],” will suffice.

Then you can get into the “Why” of your job application. Drive home what makes this specific job and this company so appealing to you. Perhaps you’re a fan of their products, you’re passionate about their mission, or you love their brand voice. Whatever the case, this section is where you share your enthusiasm for the role.

Here’s an example opening paragraph. In this scenario, you’re applying for a digital marketing role at a bicycle company:

“Dear Mr. John Doe,

Thank you for considering my application for the role of Marketing Coordinator at Bits n’ Bikes.

My parents bought my first bike at one of your stores. I’ll never forget the freedom I felt when I learned to ride it. My father removed my training wheels, and my mom sent me barrelling down the street. You provide joy to families across the country — and I want to be part of that.”

4. Emphasize why you’re best for the job

Your next paragraphs should be focused on the role you’re applying to. Highlight your skill set and why you’re a good fit for the needs and expectations associated with the position. Hiring managers want to know what you’ll bring to the job, not just any role.

Start by studying the job description for hints. What problem are they trying to solve with this hire? What skills and qualifications do they mention first or more than once? These are indicators of what’s important to the hiring manager.

Search for details that match your experience and interests. For example, if you’re excited about a fast-paced job in public relations, you might look for these elements in a posting:

  • They want someone who can write social media posts and blog content on tight deadlines
  • They value collaboration and input from every team member
  • They need a planner who can come up with strong PR strategies

Highlight how you fulfill these requirements:

“I’ve always been a strong writer. From blog posts to social media, my content pulls in readers and drives traffic to product pages. For example, when I worked at Bits n’ Bikes, I developed a strategic blog series about bike maintenance that increased our sales of spare parts and tools by 50% — we could see it in our web metrics.

Thanks to the input of all of our team members, including our bike mechanics, my content delivered results.”

5. End with a strong closing paragraph and sign off gracefully

Your closing paragraph is your final chance to hammer home your enthusiasm about the role and your unique ability to fill it. Reiterate the main points you explained in the body paragraphs and remind the reader of what you bring to the table.

You can also use the end of your letter to relay other important details, like whether you’re willing to relocate for the job.

When choosing a sign-off, opt for a phrase that sounds professional and genuine. Reliable options include “Sincerely” and “Kind regards.”

Here’s a strong closing statement for you to consider:

“I believe my enthusiasm, skills, and work experience as a PR professional will serve Bits n’ Bikes very well. I would love to meet to further discuss my value-add as your next Director of Public Relations. Thank you for your consideration. I hope we speak soon.

man-reading-carefully-how-to-write-a-cover-letter

Tips to write a great cover letter that compliments your resume

When writing your own letter, try not to copy the example excerpts word-for-word. Instead, use this cover letter structure as a baseline to organize your ideas. Then, as you’re writing, use these extra cover letter tips to add your personal touch:

  • Keep your cover letter different from your resume : Your cover letter should not duplicate the information on your resume. Instead, it should provide context and explanations for key points in your resume, emphasizing how your qualifications match the specific job you're applying for.
  • Customize your cover letter . Tailor your cover letter for each job application. Address the specific needs of the company and the job posting, demonstrating that you've done your homework and understand their requirements.
  • Show enthusiasm and fit . Express your enthusiasm for the company and position in the cover letter. Explain why you are interested in working for this company and how your values, goals, and skills align with their mission and culture.
  • Use keywords . Incorporate keywords from the job description and industry terms in your cover letter. This can help your application pass through applicant tracking systems (ATS) and demonstrate that you're well-versed in the field.
  • Keep it concise . Your cover letter should be succinct and to the point, typically no more than one page. Focus on the most compelling qualifications and experiences that directly support your application.
  • Be professional . Maintain a professional tone and structure in your cover letter. Proofread it carefully to ensure there are no errors.
  • Address any gaps or concerns . If there are gaps or concerns in your resume, such as employment gaps or a change in career direction, briefly address them in your cover letter. Explain any relevant circumstances and how they have shaped your qualifications and determination.
  • Provide a call to action . Conclude your cover letter with a call to action, inviting the employer to contact you for further discussion. Mention that you've attached your resume for their reference.
  • Follow the correct format . Use a standard cover letter format like the one above, including your contact information, a formal salutation, introductory and closing paragraphs, and your signature. Ensure that it complements your resume without redundancy.
  • Pick the right voice and tone . Try to write like yourself, but adapt to the tone and voice of the company. Look at the job listing, company website, and social media posts. Do they sound fun and quirky, stoic and professional, or somewhere in-between? This guides your writing style.
  • Tell your story . You’re an individual with unique expertise, motivators, and years of experience. Tie the pieces together with a great story. Introduce how you arrived at this point in your career, where you hope to go , and how this prospective company fits in your journey. You can also explain any career changes in your resume.
  • Show, don’t tell . Anyone can say they’re a problem solver. Why should a recruiter take their word for it if they don’t back it up with examples? Instead of naming your skills, show them in action. Describe situations where you rose to the task, and quantify your success when you can.
  • Be honest . Avoid highlighting skills you don’t have. This will backfire if they ask you about them in an interview. Instead, shift focus to the ways in which you stand out.
  • Avoid clichés and bullet points . These are signs of lazy writing. Do your best to be original from the first paragraph to the final one. This highlights your individuality and demonstrates the care you put into the letter.
  • Proofread . Always spellcheck your cover letter. Look for typos, grammatical errors, and proper flow. We suggest reading it out loud. If it sounds natural rolling off the tongue, it will read naturally as well.

woman-writing-on-her-notebook-how-to-write-a-cover-letter

Common cover letter writing FAQs

How long should a cover letter be.

A cover letter should generally be concise and to the point. It is recommended to keep it to one page or less, focusing on the most relevant information that highlights your qualifications and fits the job requirements.

Should I include personal information in a cover letter?

While it's important to introduce yourself and provide your contact information, avoid including personal details such as your age, marital status, or unrelated hobbies. Instead, focus on presenting your professional qualifications and aligning them with the job requirements.

Can I use the same cover letter for multiple job applications?

While it may be tempting to reuse a cover letter, it is best to tailor each cover letter to the specific job you are applying for. This allows you to highlight why you are a good fit for that particular role and show genuine interest in the company.

Do I need to address my cover letter to a specific person?

Whenever possible, it is advisable to address your cover letter to a specific person, such as the hiring manager or recruiter. If the job posting does not provide this information, try to research and find the appropriate contact. If all else fails, you can use a generic salutation such as "Dear Hiring Manager."

Should I include references in my cover letter?

It is generally not necessary to include references in your cover letter. Save this information for when the employer explicitly requests it. Instead, focus on showcasing your qualifications and achievements that make you a strong candidate for the position.

It’s time to start writing your stand-out cover letter

The hardest part of writing is getting started. 

Hopefully, our tips gave you some jumping-off points and confidence . But if you’re really stuck, looking at cover letter examples and resume templates will help you decide where to get started. 

There are numerous sample cover letters available online. Just remember that you’re a unique, well-rounded person, and your cover letter should reflect that. Using our structure, you can tell your story while highlighting your passion for the role. 

Doing your research, including strong examples of your skills, and being courteous is how to write a strong cover letter. Take a breath , flex your fingers, and get typing. Before you know it, your job search will lead to a job interview.

If you want more personalized guidance, a specialized career coach can help review, edit, and guide you through creating a great cover letter that sticks.

Ace your job search

Explore effective job search techniques, interview strategies, and ways to overcome job-related challenges. Our coaches specialize in helping you land your dream job.

Elizabeth Perry, ACC

Elizabeth Perry is a Coach Community Manager at BetterUp. She uses strategic engagement strategies to cultivate a learning community across a global network of Coaches through in-person and virtual experiences, technology-enabled platforms, and strategic coaching industry partnerships. With over 3 years of coaching experience and a certification in transformative leadership and life coaching from Sofia University, Elizabeth leverages transpersonal psychology expertise to help coaches and clients gain awareness of their behavioral and thought patterns, discover their purpose and passions, and elevate their potential. She is a lifelong student of psychology, personal growth, and human potential as well as an ICF-certified ACC transpersonal life and leadership Coach.

3 cover letter examples to help you catch a hiring manager’s attention

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Sample Letter Hub

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Cover Letter To Previous Employer

Cover Letter To Previous Employer

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By Sikandar Ali

May 19, 2024

A cover letter to a previous employer is a letter that you write to your former employer when you are applying for a new job.

The purpose of this letter is to express your interest in returning to work for the company and to highlight your skills and experience that make you a good fit for the position. It is a great way to show your professionalism and dedication to the company.

In this article, we will provide you with templates, examples, and samples of cover letters to previous employers. These samples will help you to write a letter that is tailored to your specific situation and will make it easy for you to express your interest in returning to work for the company.

Whether you are looking to return to your previous job or to a different position within the company, these samples will provide you with the guidance you need to write a compelling cover letter.

By using these samples, you can save time and effort in writing your own cover letter. You can also ensure that your letter is professional, well-written, and tailored to your specific situation.

 So, if you are considering returning to work for a previous employer, read on to learn more about how to write a cover letter that will help you stand out from the competition.

Dear [Employer’s Name],

I trust this letter finds you well. It is with great enthusiasm that I am reaching out to express my interest in rejoining the [Company Name] team. Having previously been a part of your esteemed organization, I am excited about the possibility of contributing once again to the success and growth of the company.

During my previous tenure at [Company Name], I gained valuable experience and honed my skills in [mention relevant skills or responsibilities]. The positive and collaborative work environment at [Company Name] significantly contributed to my professional development, and I am eager to bring the knowledge and insights I gained back to the team.

Since leaving [Company Name], I have continued to refine my skills and stay updated on industry trends. I believe that my [mention specific skills or achievements] make me a strong fit for the [position name] role. I am confident in my ability to make meaningful contributions to the team and help achieve the company’s objectives.

Moreover, I deeply appreciate the values and vision of [Company Name], and I am excited about the prospect of contributing to its ongoing success. The camaraderie and sense of purpose within the team were instrumental in my past accomplishments, and I am eager to be a part of that once again.

I am attaching my updated resume for your reference, which outlines my experience and qualifications in detail. I would be grateful for the opportunity to discuss how my skills align with the current needs of [Company Name] in a face-to-face meeting.

Thank you for considering my application. I am genuinely excited about the possibility of rejoining the [Company Name] family and contributing to its continued success.

Cover Letter For Returning To Previous Employer

I trust this letter finds you in good health and high spirits. It is with a genuine sense of eagerness that I am reaching out to express my interest in rejoining the [Company Name] team.

My previous experience with [Company Name] has been nothing short of fulfilling and professionally enriching. The time spent with your organization has left a lasting impression on me, and I am drawn to the prospect of contributing once again to the dynamic and collaborative environment that defines [Company Name].

During my tenure, I had the privilege of working on projects that not only enhanced my skills but also deepened my appreciation for the company’s commitment to excellence. The values and vision of [Company Name] align seamlessly with my own professional ethos, making it a natural choice for me to consider returning.

Since departing, I have continued to refine and expand my skill set in [mention relevant skills or areas]. I am confident that the experiences I’ve gained during my time away will bring added value to the team and contribute to the continued success of [Company Name].

I am genuinely excited about the possibility of rejoining the team and contributing to the growth and success of [Company Name]. I believe that my skills and experiences make me a strong fit for [specific role or department], and I am eager to discuss how I can contribute to the goals of the organization.

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the opportunity to discuss my potential return to [Company Name] and how I can make meaningful contributions to the team.

Letter Of Reapplication

Dear [Recipient’s Name],

I hope this letter finds you well. I am writing to express my continued interest in a position at [Company Name] and to formally reapply for the [specific role] that was advertised recently.

Having previously applied for this position, I have taken the time to reflect on the valuable feedback provided during the initial application process. I have since invested in additional training and professional development to further enhance my skills in [mention relevant skills or areas].

I remain deeply enthusiastic about the prospect of contributing to [Company Name]. The innovative projects, commitment to excellence, and the dynamic work environment make [Company Name] an ideal place for me to apply my skills and continue my professional growth.

During my time away, I have had the opportunity to work on projects that allowed me to refine my abilities and gain a deeper understanding of industry trends. I am confident that these experiences, combined with my passion for [industry or field], make me an even stronger candidate for the [specific role] at [Company Name].

I appreciate the time and consideration given to my previous application and hope that my renewed application reflects my genuine commitment to contributing to the success of [Company Name]. I am eager to bring my skills and enthusiasm to your team.

Thank you for considering my reapplication. I am looking forward to the opportunity to discuss how my skills align with the needs of [Company Name] and how I can contribute to the continued success of your organization.

Cover Letter To Previous Employer With No Experience

I hope this letter finds you well. I am writing to express my sincere interest in returning to the [Company Name] team, despite my current lack of direct experience in the field.

While my professional journey has taken me in different directions, the foundation I built during my time at [Company Name] has remained a guiding influence. Although I may not possess specific experience in [mention the field or role], I am enthusiastic about the opportunity to leverage my transferable skills and bring a fresh perspective to the team.

During my absence, I have actively engaged in self-directed learning and skill development in areas relevant to the current needs of [Company Name]. My passion for [industry or field] has only intensified, and I am eager to contribute to the innovative and collaborative environment that has always defined [Company Name].

While I may not have direct experience, I believe my [mention relevant skills, qualities, or educational background] make me a valuable candidate for the [specific role]. I am a quick learner and am confident that my dedication and eagerness to contribute will quickly bridge any experience gap.

Thank you for considering my application. I am excited about the prospect of returning to [Company Name] and contributing to its continued success. I am open to discussing how my unique blend of skills and passion aligns with the needs of the team.

Cover Letter To Reapply For A Job

Dear [Hiring Manager’s Name],

I trust this letter finds you well. I am writing to express my continued interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name] and to formally reapply for the role. I remain enthusiastic about the prospect of contributing to the success of your team.

Since my last application, I have taken proactive steps to address the feedback provided. I have engaged in additional professional development, honing my skills in [mention relevant skills or areas] to better align with the requirements of the position.

The experience gained in my recent endeavors has reinforced my commitment to pursuing a career at [Company Name]. I am eager to leverage my strengthened skill set and contribute to the innovative and collaborative work environment that defines your company.

I appreciate the opportunities for growth and development that [Company Name] offers its employees. My previous application, though not successful, served as a valuable learning experience, and I am confident that my renewed application reflects my genuine dedication to the goals and values of your organization.

Thank you for considering my reapplication. I am excited about the possibility of joining the [Company Name] team and contributing to its continued success. I look forward to the opportunity to discuss how my skills and experiences align with the needs of the team.

Cover Letter To Previous Employer

How to Write a Cover Letter to Your Previous Employer

Writing a cover letter to your previous employer can be a daunting task, especially if you left on less than ideal terms. However, it can also be an opportunity to showcase your growth and professionalism. Here are seven steps to help you write a compelling cover letter that will impress your former employer.

1. Start with a Professional Greeting

Begin your cover letter with a professional greeting, such as “”Dear [Employer’s Name],”” or “”To Whom It May Concern.”” Avoid using informal greetings like “”Hey”” or “”Hi,”” as they can come across as unprofessional.

2. Remind Them of Your Previous Employment

In the opening paragraph, remind your former employer of your previous employment with their company. Mention the position you held, the dates you worked there, and any notable achievements or contributions you made during your time there.

3. Explain Why You’re Writing

In the second paragraph, explain why you’re writing the cover letter. Are you interested in returning to the company? Are you applying for a different position? Be clear and concise in your explanation.

4. Highlight Your Skills and Experience

In the third paragraph, highlight your skills and experience that make you a strong candidate for the position. Use specific examples from your previous employment to demonstrate your abilities and accomplishments.

5. Address Any Concerns

If there were any issues or concerns that led to your departure from the company, address them in a professional and respectful manner. Explain how you’ve grown and learned from the experience, and how you would handle similar situations differently in the future.

6. Express Your Enthusiasm

In the closing paragraph, express your enthusiasm for the opportunity to work with the company again. Thank your former employer for considering your application and express your willingness to discuss the position further.

7. Close with a Professional Sign-Off

End your cover letter with a professional sign-off, such as “”Sincerely,”” or “”Best regards.”” Include your full name and contact information, including your phone number and email address.

Cover Letter To Previous Employer

FAQs About Cover Letter To A Previous Employer

1. what is a cover letter to a previous employer.

A cover letter to a previous employer is a formal letter that is sent to a former employer when applying for a job. It is used to express interest in a job opening and to highlight the skills and experiences that make the applicant a good fit for the position.

2. Why would someone write a cover letter to a previous employer?

There are several reasons why someone might write a cover letter to a previous employer. For example, they may have left the company on good terms and want to return, or they may have gained new skills and experiences that make them a better fit for a different position within the company.

3. What should be included in a cover letter to a previous employer?

A cover letter to a previous employer should include a brief introduction, a statement of interest in the job opening, a summary of the applicant’s skills and experiences, and a closing statement expressing gratitude for the opportunity to apply.

4. How should a cover letter to a previous employer be formatted?

A cover letter to a previous employer should be formatted like any other professional letter, with a clear and concise introduction, body, and conclusion. It should be written in a professional tone and should be free of errors and typos.

5. What are some tips for writing a successful cover letter to a previous employer?

Some tips for writing a successful cover letter to a previous employer include researching the company and the job opening, tailoring the letter to the specific position, highlighting relevant skills and experiences, and expressing enthusiasm for the opportunity to return to the company.

6. Should a cover letter to a previous employer be sent via email or mail?

The method of sending a cover letter to a previous employer will depend on the company’s preferences and the job opening. Some companies may prefer to receive applications via email, while others may prefer traditional mail. It is important to follow the company’s instructions for submitting applications.

7. What are some common mistakes to avoid when writing a cover letter to a previous employer?

Some common mistakes to avoid when writing a cover letter to a previous employer include using a generic template, failing to tailor the letter to the specific job opening, including irrelevant information, and failing to proofread for errors and typos.

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Just Cover Letters

Cover Letter for Returning to Previous Employer

When returning to an old employer, it is important to ensure that your cover letter reflects the changes in your career and the skill set you possess. In addition, be sure to highlight any accomplishments or developments since leaving the company. Finally, focus on why you believe you would be a valuable asset to the company.

Cover Letter for Returning to Previous Employer

There are a few reasons why you might want to write a cover letter when returning to your previous employer. First, it can help you establish credibility with your new employer.

Second, it can show that you’re keen to return and contribute to the team. Finally, a well-written cover letter can help you stand out from other candidates and increase your chances of being offered the job.

Dear Sir or Madam,

I am writing to apply for the open position of Research Assistant at [company name]. I was an instrumental part of the research team at [company name] and enjoyed working closely with the other members of the team. I have since moved on to other endeavors, but am confident that I would be a valuable asset to your organization once again.

I would be more than happy to provide additional information, such as my resume and a list of references, if needed. In addition, I am available for an interview should you wish to discuss my qualifications further.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

[Your Name]

If you’re looking to return to your previous employer, there are a few things you should keep in mind. First, make sure your resume is updated to reflect your new position and company.

Second, be prepared to answer any questions your interviewer might have. Finally, be honest and respectful when discussing your departure from the company – it will show that you took the necessary steps to ensure a smooth transition.

If you’re returning to a previous employer, there are a few things to keep in mind when writing your cover letter. First, be sure to express your excitement about coming back and emphasize how your previous experience with the company will be an asset in your new role.

It’s also important to be honest about why you left in the first place and to reassure your potential employer that the same situation won’t happen again. Finally, be sure to highlight your skills and experience that have been gained since you were last with the company and how they will benefit the organization in your new role.

By following these tips, you can write a cover letter that will help you get the job you want with your previous employer.

In conclusion, if you have left your previous employer and are considering returning, it is important to have a well-written cover letter that highlights your skills, why returning would be advantageous to the company, and how you would contribute to the team. Make sure to include your resume and contact information so that the employer can contact you for an interview.

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RequestLetters

Email To Previous Employer For Rejoining: How To Draft It Right!

Reconnecting with a former employer hinges on a professional, sincere email with a hint of personal flair. I’ll provide a detailed guide and template to facilitate this process.

Key Takeaways

  • Purpose : Crafting a compelling and professional email to a previous employer expressing interest in rejoining the company.
  • Personal Touch : Sharing personal growth and experiences since leaving the company enhances the email’s effectiveness.
  • Customization : Tailor the email to reflect the specific context of your previous employment and the current opportunity.
  • Free Template :  Utilize the provided template to simplify the process.
  • Follow-up : Suggest a meeting or call for further discussion.

Understanding the Context

Before you begin writing, understand why you want to return and what has changed since you left. This reflection will help tailor your message effectively.

Step-by-Step Guide

  • Subject Line : Start with a clear and engaging subject line. Example: “Exploring Opportunities to Rejoin [Company Name] Team”.
  • Greeting : Address the recipient by name. A personal touch goes a long way.
  • Introduction : Reintroduce yourself and briefly mention your previous role in the company.
  • Expression of Interest : Clearly state your intention to rejoin the company. Mention specific reasons why you are interested in returning.
  • Highlighting Growth : Share any new skills, experiences, or perspectives you’ve gained since leaving that would add value to the team.
  • Acknowledging the Past : If you left on less than ideal terms, acknowledge it briefly and focus on the positive aspects of your previous tenure.
  • Call to Action : Propose a meeting or a phone call to discuss potential opportunities.
  • Closing : End with a professional sign-off and your contact information.
  • Proofread : Ensure your email is free of typos and grammatical errors.

Email Template

Subject: Exploring Opportunities to Rejoin [Company Name] Team

Dear [Recipient’s Name],

I hope this email finds you well. As a former [Your Previous Position] at [Company Name], I have always valued the experiences and the learning opportunities I had during my time with the team.

Trending Now: Find Out Why!

After leaving [Company Name], I [mention any relevant experience, growth, additional education]. These experiences have not only enriched me professionally but also personally, and I believe they can significantly contribute to the [specific department/project] at [Company Name].

I am particularly excited about [mention any new company initiatives, projects, or changes]. I would love the opportunity to discuss how my current skill set and experiences align with the needs of the team.

Would it be possible to arrange a meeting or a call at your convenience to explore potential opportunities for rejoining the team?

Thank you for considering my request. I look forward to the possibility of working together again.

Best regards,

[Your Name] [Your Contact Information]

Personal Experience

In my case, reaching out to my previous employer was nerve-wracking, but I focused on the positive experiences and the new skills I had acquired. This approach helped open the door to a conversation.

Writing to a previous employer can be a delicate balance between professionalism and personal connection. Remember, the goal is to open a dialogue, so keep it cordial, concise, and clear.

Comment Request

Have you tried reaching out to a former employer? Share your experiences and tips in the comments below!

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

cover letter to a previous employer

Q: How Do I Approach a Previous Employer About Rejoining the Company?

Answer: I found the best approach to be direct and professional. I drafted an email, starting with a brief update about my current situation and the valuable experiences I have gained since leaving. 

Then, I clearly expressed my interest in rejoining and how I believe my enhanced skills can contribute to the company’s current goals. It’s important to acknowledge the positive aspects of my previous tenure there, which helps establish a good starting point for the conversation.

Q: What Should I Include in My Email to a Former Boss for a Rehire?

Answer: In my experience, it’s crucial to personalize the email. I mentioned specific projects or achievements from my time there and related them to the current position I was interested in. 

This shows that I’m not just looking for any job; I’m specifically interested in contributing to their team again. I also made sure to express gratitude for the past opportunity and how it helped me grow professionally.

Q: How Can I Express My Interest in Rejoining Without Sounding Desperate?

Answer: The key for me was to maintain a professional tone and focus on mutual benefits. I highlighted what I can offer the company now compared to when I left, and how rehiring me could be advantageous for them. 

It’s important to avoid phrases that sound too pleading and instead maintain the tone of a professional offering valuable skills and experience.

Q: Is It Appropriate to Mention My Reasons for Leaving in the Rehire Email?

Answer: In my email, I briefly mentioned my reasons for leaving, especially if they were positive, like pursuing further education or a unique opportunity. 

However, I focused more on the present and the future, explaining why rejoining now is a good decision for both me and the company. It’s important to frame the past in a positive light and not dwell on any negative aspects.

Q: How Should I Close the Email to a Previous Employer for Rejoining?

Answer: I always end such emails on a positive note, expressing eagerness to discuss potential opportunities. I make it clear that I’m open to discussing various roles or projects where my skills can be most useful. 

It’s also good to thank them for considering your interest and providing your contact information for easy follow-up. This shows professionalism and makes it easy for them to respond.

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Is it a good idea to return to a former employer?

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Sure, going back to a former employer can be a solid move, but it’s all about the why and the how. If you left on good terms and the place still vibes with your career goals, why not?

It’s like jumping back into a familiar pool—you already know the people, the culture, and how things work, which can make sliding back in pretty smooth.

Plus, if the new gig offers better opportunities or perks than before, it’s a no-brainer. Just make sure you’re not stepping back into the same old stuff you left behind and that the company hasn’t flipped a 180 on what made it great for you in the first place.

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How do I approach a former boss or co-worker for a job reference? Ask HR

When preparing for a job search, it's essential to approach the right people and make your request thoughtful and professional.

Johnny C. Taylor Jr. tackles your human resources questions as part of a series for USA TODAY. Taylor is president and CEO of the Society for Human Resource Management, the world's largest HR professional society and author of "Reset: A Leader’s Guide to Work in an Age of Upheaval.”

Have a question? Submit it here .

Question: I've been asked for a professional reference in my recent job search. My old references are outdated and don’t relate to my recent roles. How should I ask for a recommendation from a former boss or co-worker? – Naomi

Answer: When asked to provide professional references during your job search, it's essential to approach the right people and make your request thoughtfully and professionally. Here’s how you can effectively ask a former boss or co-worker for a recommendation:

◾ Identify suitable references : Choose individuals who can provide a positive endorsement and speak specifically to your recent roles, skills, work ethic and achievements. This could be a former boss, co-worker, senior leader, or mentor.

◾ Reach out professionally : You can make your request verbally, via email, or through LinkedIn. Use a professional tone and make your request clear and concise.

◾ Craft your request : Be specific about the job you applied for, including the company name and key skills or qualifications the employer seeks. This helps your reference tailor their recommendation to highlight the most relevant aspects of your background.

◾ Express gratitude : Always thank the person for their time, thoughtful consideration and willingness to help. Show appreciation regardless of their response.

◾ Be prepared for other options : Not everyone may be able to provide a reference due to availability or company policies. Have a few different professionals in mind as backups. They could include other former colleagues, mentors, or people you’ve volunteered with.

◾ Provide context : If they agree, give them more details about the role and the types of skills or achievements you’d like them to emphasize. This will help make their reference more relevant and impactful.

◾ Check for errors: Before sending your request, proofread it for any spelling or grammar mistakes to ensure it’s polished and professional.

Following these steps will make it easier for your former boss or co-worker to provide a strong, relevant reference to support your job search. Best of luck in securing your new role!

Employer moving? What recourse do I have if my employer relocates my job? Ask HR

I manage a small team of health and safety inspectors and analysts from varied backgrounds. They sometimes have misunderstandings stemming from their different life experiences. Can I help them get along better and minimize flare-ups at work? – Cyril

Absolutely! While fostering friendships may not be within your control, you can certainly create an environment where your team works together effectively and minimizes conflicts. Here are some strategies to help your diverse team of health and safety inspectors and analysts get along better:

◾ Promote a culture of acceptance and respect: Model and encourage a workplace culture that values acceptance, inclusion and respect. Regularly communicate the importance of these values in team meetings and one-on-one interactions. Acknowledge and celebrate the diversity within your team. This could include recognizing various cultural holidays and events, which can help build mutual respect and understanding.

◾ Provide diversity and inclusion training: Offer training sessions to highlight the benefits of diversity and inclusion. These sessions should focus on understanding and appreciating differences, as well as recognizing unconscious biases. Emphasize commonalities such as shared goals, love for family and mutual professional aspirations, to help team members see beyond their differences.

◾ Encourage active listening : Teach and model active listening skills. Encourage team members to pay full attention when someone is speaking, refrain from interrupting and ask clarifying questions, to ensure they fully understand the speaker’s point of view. Consider workshops or training sessions on effective communication and active listening to reinforce these skills.

◾ Address conflicts promptly and respectfully : When misunderstandings or disputes arise, address them quickly and with respect. Create a safe space for team members to express their concerns, and work together to find solutions. Focus on the issue at hand rather than personalizing disagreements. Encourage a problem-solving mindset that seeks to understand the root cause of conflicts.

◾ Lead by example : Demonstrate the behaviors you want to see in your team. Show respect, actively listen and appreciate each team member's unique perspective. Provide consistent feedback and recognition for positive interactions and collaborative efforts within the team.

◾ Facilitate team-building activities : Organize team-building exercises to promote collaboration and understanding. These activities can help break down barriers and build trust among team members. Consider activities that highlight each team member’s strengths and unique contributions, fostering appreciation and teamwork.

Any team of people brought together is bound to have differences based on their backgrounds and preferences. The key to bringing them together is understanding and respecting those differences and acknowledging common perspectives and identities. We can’t assume people will always get along. Instead, we must facilitate civility among one another and create pathways to prevent and resolve disputes.

By implementing these strategies, you can help team members from varied backgrounds work together more harmoniously and effectively. Creating an inclusive and respectful work environment will minimize conflicts and enhance overall team productivity and job satisfaction.

Full disclosure: Should I tell my current employer I am looking for a new job? Ask HR

cover letter to a previous employer

What does a cover letter really show a prospective employer?

My phone rang.  “Ms. Blackwood?” the person asked. 

“This is she.” 

“Hi!  This is Shelly.  I’ve just read the most incredible cover letter, submitted by you, for our marketing position.  Did you actually write it yourself?”

My mind whirled.  Most beautiful cover letter?  Why was she asking if I wrote it?  Of course I did!  I had spent the last 4 years earning my degree in marketing, spending countless hours writing, rewriting and tweaking individual sentences and picking the perfect words to convey the messages I wanted to portray.

“Yes, I did.”

“Wonderful!  I’d love to have you come in for an interview and talk with us about our job.  And while you’re here, I’d like you to do a writing sample to see if you really can write.”

This was just over 20 years ago, but I remember the phone call.  It was a high compliment on my cover letter and followed by a bit of a blow by asking me to “prove myself”.  The impact of that is a conversation for another day (especially when tools like ChatGPT weren’t around).  For now, let’s focus on the highlight!

There will forever be a hot debate on whether cover letters are needed, important, wanted or warranted.  My answer:  it depends.  There are some positions where I can get behind the idea that they aren’t worth it.  For the vast majority, however, even if a letter isn’t required, I argue that it’s your chance to really show and tell the screener why you’d be the best candidate for the position.

To dig deeper into this answer:  cover letters show initiative.  A well written letter takes some effort, even when writing may be a honed skill already.  There’s some research involved, so you’d need to see what you can learn about the position.  Yes, the job ad and job description are primary sources of that and can allow you to write about your qualities which match criteria; but there’s also a chance for you to explain why you’re so interested in the position.  There may be some additional info you can glean into the open job through the company’s social media; talking to someone you may know who has that position (maybe within that company even); or doing a search on the web for videos of what the job entails.  When you have this understanding, you can better explain why you’re so interested and how it fits your wants as well as your skills. Trust me, the extra effort in writing a cover letter does not go unnoticed by HR and hiring managers.

Cover letters also allow you to get personal, in a professional way.  In your resume, where space is tight, aspects of your skills and experience are very sterile, showing facts and data.  The cover letter is an opportunity to put some context around what you’ve done to get you to this place now.  You’re able to share, through your writing style and the words chosen, a little bit of your personality and the way you approached various occasions. Demonstrate positive qualities about yourself, like leadership or self-motivation, among others.  Elaborate on previous roles, where you have had successes and challenges, and reasons for seeking new challenges.

In a time where many employers are willing to teach skill, and therefore hire for “soft skill,” writing a cover letter shows that you can be effective in communicating.  And we know communication is one of the top soft skills sought after! Regardless of the position you seek, employers value the ability to articulate thoughts and ideas, collectively pull them together in proper flow, and make them easy to understand in writing.

A solid cover letter accompanying your resume becomes a first step in building a relationship with HR and the hiring manager reviewing your submission. When providing context for the data in your resume, reviewers begin to see you as a whole and gain insight into your accomplishments and motivations. Reviewers see how your career goals align with the role to fill, and even more, with the company’s interests. Reading about your experiences and what you choose to highlight about your journey provides character to the information, helping to visualize you as part of the team early on. 

Ready to write? Here are some quick tips on things to include in your letter:

  • Make it personal – this time not about you, but about the reviewer. If you know who the hiring manager is, address the letter specifically to that person, or to the team! It shows that you took that extra little step to know a bit more about the job than what was posted on the job board.
  • Grab attention! Open the letter with a powerful sentence that will have the reader wanting to know more.  Immediately emphasize your best-selling points and the traits which make you the best fit as an example of what can catch their eye quickly.
  • Concise is key. You’ll have a lot you want to say, but keeping things straightforward and brief is important. The letter is intended to put a little bit of color into the information on your resume, but make sure to save some content for your interview!
  • Incorporate proper lingo. Use job specific language, such as key words from the job description. This will be helpful should the company be using an ATS system on the front end of their screening and shows that you understand a bit about the position.
  • Use action verbs where you can. Instead of writing about your responsibility for a task, tell what you did to accomplish it. An example: “I was responsible for the marketing department” could be “I spearheaded a team of three highly creative team members in the marketing department.”
  • Close with a promise. Make sure to tell them you are looking forward to talking with them throughout this process to help them understand how your experience and knowledge can further the company’s goals as a team member.
  • Keep the closing salutation formal, but you can be creative. I personally try to avoid using “sincerely” (although there’s nothing wrong with using it) and choose to use words or phrases like “kindly” or “best regards” before I sign off.
  • Most importantly, don’t forget your contact information!

Whether you love writing or despise it, making the effort to craft a cover letter is a step worth taking, regardless of the position for which you’re applying. It can, really, be the deciding factor between you and another applicant at any point in the hiring process.

Monica Blackwood is CEO of Westsound Workforce, a staffing agency with offices in Gig Harbor and Poulsbo. She writes a regular column for the Kitsap Sun on human resource issues in the workplace.

This article originally appeared on Kitsap Sun: What does a cover letter really show a prospective employer?

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  2. Cover Letter to Previous Employer

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  3. How to Write a Cover Letter in 2021

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  6. 2018 Cover Letter Examples [+Writing Tips]

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COMMENTS

  1. How to Write a Cover Letter to a Previous Employer

    Verify Previous Employment. Call the human resources department for the name of the senior recruiter, HR manager or the hiring manager for the job for which you're applying. Also, confirm that you have rehire eligibility. Verify your dates of employment. You don't necessarily need to include the precise dates in your cover letter; however, you ...

  2. Cover Letter for Returning to Previous Employer: Free Template and Tips

    In your cover letter for returning to a previous employer, you should include your reasons for leaving the company, your reasons for wanting to come back, and any updates on your professional experience and achievements since you left the company. You should also express your enthusiasm for rejoining the company. 4.

  3. How to Write a Cover Letter to Reapply for a Job at a Company ...

    When writing a cover letter to a previous employer, highlight the reason you want to return, and note your experience and knowledge of the company. Social Justice; Home; News; Food & Drink; Sports; ... It's important to take stock of why you left before you try to write a cover letter to reapply for a job with a company you've already ...

  4. Cover Letter to Previous Employer

    A Cover Letter to a Previous Employer is a letter written by a former employee to their former employer. Its purpose is to express interest in returning to the company or inquiring about potential job opportunities. In this article, we will provide you with templates and examples of Cover Letters to Previous Employers. These samples will serve ...

  5. How to Write a Cover Letter to a Previous Employer

    Create a heading for the cover letter consisting of your name, address, phone number and email address. Drop down four lines, then type the date on the left side. Leave two more lines and enter your employer's name, company and address. Begin your letter with "Dear Mr. Jones," using the employer's real name.

  6. How to Write a Reapplication Letter in 6 Steps (With Tips)

    How to write a convincing reapplication letter in 6 steps. The following are six easy steps for writing a cover letter to reapply for a position: 1. Determine why you want to reapply. If you worked for the company previously and quit, it's often helpful to ask yourself why you left. This could be especially important if it was for reasons ...

  7. How To Write a Cover Letter to an Employer (With Template)

    Follow these steps to write an effective cover letter to an employer: 1. Review the job description. Reference the job description and review the duties and tasks sections to see what qualifications you have that best align with this position. Then, make a two-column list. On one side, write the job duty from the job description, and in the ...

  8. How to Write a Great Cover Letter in 2024 (+ Examples)

    1. Personalization. Address the hiring manager or recruiter by name whenever possible. If the job posting doesn't include a name, research to find out who will be reviewing applications. Personalizing your cover letter shows that you've taken the time to tailor your application to the specific company and role. 2.

  9. Cover Letter To Previous Employer

    A cover letter to a previous employer should be formatted like any other professional letter, with a clear and concise introduction, body, and conclusion. It should be written in a professional tone and should be free of errors and typos. 5. What are some tips for writing a successful cover letter to a previous employer?

  10. How To Write a Cover Letter (With Examples and Tips)

    Middle paragraph (s) Closing paragraph. Letter ending and signature. Your cover letter should be one page long and use a simple, professional font, such as Arial or Helvetica, 10 to 12 points in size. Your letter should be left-aligned with single spacing and one-inch margins. Show Transcript.

  11. How To Write the Perfect Cover Letter (With Template and Example)

    Include the name of the person to whom you are writing as well as the company name and address just above the salutation. In the salutation, greet the hiring manager by name. If you don't know the name of the person, consider greeting the hiring department or the department with which you would be working if hired. 3.

  12. How to Write a Cover Letter to a Previous Employer

    Step 1. Address the letter to the manager with whom you will be working, or the person mentioned in the job application as the person dealing with the hiring for this position. Avoid using any personal nicknames or pet names; even if you know the person well, you don't know whether other people will be reading the cover letter and may be put ...

  13. How to Write a Cover Letter for a Job in 2024

    Respectfully, Kind regards, Best regards, Yours truly, Then, make two spaces below the salutation, and type your full name. For some professional (but optional) flair, sign your cover letter either with a scan of your signature or by using software like DocuSign. 8. Check your cover letter's content and formatting.

  14. Cover Letter for Returning to Previous Employer

    Sincerely, [Your Name] If you're looking to return to your previous employer, there are a few things you should keep in mind. First, make sure your resume is updated to reflect your new position and company. Second, be prepared to answer any questions your interviewer might have. Finally, be honest and respectful when discussing your ...

  15. Tips for Writing a Cover Letter After You've Been Laid Off

    Here are five tips for writing a cover letter after you've been laid off. 1. Don't Waste a Word. A cover letter should never be a summary of your entire work history, skills, or life story. That's what the resume and interview are for. Your cover letter should be a brief summary of why you're interested in the job and why you think the ...

  16. How to Write a Cover Letter to a Hiring Manager (With Templates)

    1. Choose the right salutation. We are well past the days when "To Whom It May Concern" or "Dear Sir or Madam" were considered gold standard business salutations. Unless you're hoping to look like a nonagenarian on paper, plan to address your cover letter directly to the hiring manager or recruiter involved with the search.

  17. How To Write a Career Change Cover Letter (With Examples)

    To write a career change cover letter, start with the following steps: 1. Introduce yourself. Start your cover letter by stating who you are, what you want and why you'd be a good fit for the job. Highlight your most impressive, valuable and relevant achievements without oversharing your lack of experience.

  18. The Short Cover Letter: What to Include & Why (with Examples)

    Hanna says that all cover letters—whether long or short—should be written using a professional tone and must contain the following elements: A header that contains your name and contact information. This information should match that on your resume. The date. A salutation, ideally with the hiring manager's name.

  19. Sample Cover Letter for a Previous Employer

    September 6, 2007. Mr. Steve Probation. Chief Probation Officer. Dauphin County Juvenile Office. 100 Chestnut Street. Harrisburg, Pa 17101. Dear Mr. Probation: I am writing to apply for a Juvenile Probation officer position in your office. My internship with your office in the summer of 2004 prompts my interest.

  20. Email To Previous Employer For Rejoining: How To Draft It Right!

    Example: "Exploring Opportunities to Rejoin [Company Name] Team". Greeting: Address the recipient by name. A personal touch goes a long way. Introduction: Reintroduce yourself and briefly mention your previous role in the company. Expression of Interest: Clearly state your intention to rejoin the company.

  21. How to Ask For Your Old Job Back Using Email (2024 Sample)

    Here are the steps you can take to create a professional email to ask about your previous position: 1. Create a subject line. The subject line provides the recipient with an idea of the email's content. When creating your subject line, consider including your full name and state your purpose for the email.

  22. Writing a Letter to Previous Employer for Rejoining (with Sample)

    Here is a sample letter to previous employer for rejoining. Sample Letter to Previous Employer for Rejoining. Re: Job Application from YOUR NAME. Dear NAME OF EMPLOYER: I hope you and your family are well. You may remember I was employed at NAME OF BUSINESS as a data processor for 10 years.

  23. How To Ask for Your Old Job Back via Email (With Sample)

    Here are eight steps you can take to ask for your old job back via email: 1. Address your former employer. To start your email, address your former employer by adding a greeting. You can write "Dear Mr./Ms." and their last name, or write their first name if you were close.

  24. How to ask a former boss or co-worker for a job reference

    This could be a former boss, co-worker, senior leader, or mentor. Reach out professionally: You can make your request verbally, via email, or through LinkedIn. Use a professional tone and make ...

  25. How To Write a General Worker Cover Letter (With Examples)

    To help you learn more about cover letters, here is a sample cover letter for a general worker: Chuck Ferris. Chicago, Illinois. 304-555-0192. [email protected] March 14, 2024 Mr. Bob Richardson. ABC Company Dear Mr. Richardson, I am writing to express my keen interest in the general worker position at ABC Company as advertised.

  26. What does a cover letter really show a prospective employer?

    Cover letters also allow you to get personal, in a professional way. In your resume, where space is tight, aspects of your skills and experience are very sterile, showing facts and data.

  27. Writing a Cover Letter After a Layoff: How-To and Tips

    If a previous employer laid you off and you want to address it in your cover letter, here are some steps you can use: 1. Frame it positively. The most important thing you can do when addressing a layoff in your cover letter is to keep it positive. Layoffs are challenging, and employers want to know that their prospective hires can take a ...