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The Ultimate Guide to Writing a Successful Financial Aid Appeal Letter (With Free Templates)

How to Write a Successful Financial Aid Appeal Letter

  • By Debbie Schwartz

Published on November 15, 2023

If you’ve recently received your college financial aid offer and it’s less than what you need, you’re not alone. Many students find themselves in this position, but there’s a proactive step you can take: writing a financial aid appeal letter.

While the prospect might seem daunting, it’s a well-established and often successful part of navigating college finances.

In this guide, we’ll explore the ins and outs of financial aid appeal letters. You’ll learn when it’s appropriate to submit an appeal, and how to effectively articulate your needs in a way that resonates with financial aid offices. 

Remember, your situation is unique, and if there have been changes in your financial circumstances or if you have reasons to believe the initial offer falls short, an appeal might be the right course of action. Our goal is to provide you with a clear roadmap for crafting a financial aid appeal letter that is both professional and persuasive.

When Should You Submit a Financial Aid Appeal?

Appealing a financial aid package is appropriate when there’s a significant change in a family’s financial circumstances, like job loss, or when the initial offer is insufficient to cover educational expenses. Appeals should be made as soon as possible after receiving the award letter.

This will give you the best chance of getting attention, and it’s possible more money will be available earlier than later. Students who are offered aid and decide not to attend may free up money, and that money can be eaten up fast by those in need.

Do not contact the school and ask to appeal for more money before you receive your initial award from financial aid. The college won’t even review it. If you haven’t received their award yet, and you think you have completed all necessary paperwork, reach out to the school to get an estimated time frame of when the award will be sent.

Contact the School to Find Out the Financial Aid Appeal Process

Experts recommend writing an email to the financial aid office in order to find out what the appeal process is. Trying to call, especially during a busy time, can result in endless voicemails.

Instead, have your student write to financial aid and ask about the appeals process. While the email does not need to be as detailed or formal as the eventual appeal letter, it should explain that there are additional circumstances and your child wishes to appeal.

During busy times, it can also be helpful to reach out to the student’s admissions counselor for information about the financial aid appeal process. Some schools manage appeals for merit aid through admissions and appeals for need-based aid through the financial aid office.

Every school will have its own process. Some will be more open to reconsideration than others. Be sure to pay attention to the details the school sends you and follow the steps closely.

> RELATED: Filling Out a Special Circumstances Form to Appeal Financial Aid

Students, Not Parents, Should Write All Communication

This recommendation is rather controversial among parents, but we believe that the best thing you can do with the appeal is to have it come from your child.

They are the one who will be attending, and they are the one that the aid package directly affects. The school wants to hear from them.

If there are reasons your student can’t write the letter, for instance they don’t understand all the financial details, then you, as the parent, can write a supporting letter explaining the financial details in more depth. This way, your student is still getting involved in the process and writing their initial letter, but you are providing more details to show the full picture.

How to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter

The student should write a respectful personal appeal explaining why the appeal is warranted and reiterating why they want to attend the college. The letter may be accompanied by a financial aid appeal form and documentation of any financial changes you’ve experienced. 

To get a feel for your approach, read these two sample financial aid appeal letters . You can use the samples as a guide to create your own appeal letter that is specific to your family’s situation.

> FREE DOWNLOAD: FINANCIAL AID LETTER TEMPLATES

How to Structure Your Appeal Letter 

  • Open with thanks: The first thing to do is acknowledge the award already received and express gratitude for it. Explain how excited you are to attend the school, and how glad you are that the school offers help so that students can afford to attend.
  • Explain the shortfall: Next, the letter should express regret because the current financial aid package doesn’t allow you to attend the school.

Express the financial considerations that make attending the school difficult or impossible with the current aid package. Of course, these should be strong reasons.

Paying for a second home or a parent’s desire to retire are not considered strong reasons to appeal. Illness, death, job loss or an additional child in school, however, can be very strong reasons.

Also, if your GPA or test scores have increased significantly since your initial application to the school, mention that in the letter. 

  • Use careful, respectful language: Never refer to the situation as a “negotiation,” because financial aid offices don’t negotiate. Instead, be clear that you that you understand the decision but feel there are additional circumstances to consider.

Be extremely respectful, and use the name of the financial aid officer if at all possible. Never use the appeal letter to vent frustration or insult the school, process, or officer. That won’t help you win anything.

  • Include documentation: Include any forms required by the school, such as a special circumstances form , along with documentation of any extra expenses. Perhaps the FAFSA didn’t reflect costs your family has from helping ailing grandparents, for instance. If competing offers are in play, you can also include those as documentation for your financial aid appeal.
  • Follow up with a thank-note: Remember that financial aid officers are working their tail off during this time. They are hearing from so many families and considering so many situations, it’s exhausting. So you can stand out by sending a thank-you note after you get the appeal information. Tthis will mean a lot to the financial aid office, even if they can’t grant your appeal.Even if you get a “no,” you never know when you might need an ally in financial aid in the future. If additional funds become available, the financial aid office may be more likely to remember your student if they were respectful and responsive during the appeal process.

Tips From Parents Who Have Completed a Financial Aid Appeal 

Here are a collection of suggestions and testimonials that were shared in our Paying for College 101 Facebook group by parents who completed the financial aid appeal process.

  • “The appeal needs to come from the student, not the parent. Also, if you have a higher offer that you want them to match, show it. No guarantees at all.”
  • “Appeal before paying any deposits.”
  • “Appealed before depositing and got $3,000 more in financial aid and in addition also appealed the merit aid through admissions because my daughters gpa went up so we sent updated third quarter grades and her merit scholarship went up $3,000 also.”
  •  “We appealed and received an additional $1,000 in aid. Be honest, explain why you need the additional help, note any changes.”
  • “My daughter called financial aid and they directed her to the website and the specific form she needed. Her appeal was not based on a change in our financial situation. She just wrote about why she wanted to go there, what she loved about the program and the university in general.”
  • “We successfully appealed for an increase in financial aid at UNC last year. They doubled an out-of-state student grant and gave a laptop grant. We used a very similar letter rubric: ecstatic to get an offer of admission. Mentioned new awards and continues to excel in classroom. Thanks for the package they put together. Described new circumstances that couldn’t be reflected on FASFA, more aid would help our decision, comparable school scholarship offers. Offered to meet face to face but via phone preferred.”

>> RELATED: Tips on Appealing Financial Aid Decisions

You Can Also Appeal Merit Scholarship Decisions

As with need-based aid, you must provide a good reason for appealing a scholarship decision. A college may sweeten its merit offer if you can show offers from other colleges, improvements in your test score or GPA, or a noteworthy award. A lot depends on how much the school wants you as a student.

Colleges are concerned about competitors, and if you are at the top of their applicant pool and the college wants you to accept their offer, they will be more inclined to offer more money.

Be sure to explain that this is your top school and more money will guarantee you accept their offer of admission.

> RELATED: Appealing Merit Scholarships

Comparing Financial Aid Offers

Wouldn’t it be nice if you could compare your student’s financial aid offer against what other students were offered at the same school?

To help families do just this, Road2College crowdsources financial aid and merit scholarship offers in our Compare College Offers tool.

Families can submit all their students offers and compare the net cost of each school.  Then, families can see offers from other students at the same school.

By comparing student profiles with similar characteristics, like GPA, test scores, and family EFC range, families can decide whether the offer they received is fair or not.

>> Compare College Offers

Nothing Is Guaranteed

Obviously no appeal is guaranteed to work, but you may be surprised how much extra aid your student ends up with, so it’s good to try! If you have a great reason for reconsideration, don’t hesitate to reach out for an appeal.

Use  R2C Insights  to help find merit aid and schools that fit the criteria most important to your student. You’ll not only save precious time, but your student will avoid the heartache of applying to schools they aren’t likely to get into or can’t afford to attend.  

Other Articles You Might Like:

Navigating College with a 0 EFC: A Unique Journey

Financial Aid and More: How to Pay for College with No Money

Don’t Be Overly Optimistic About Financial Aid

JOIN ONE OF OUR FACEBOOK GROUPS & CONNECT WITH OTHER PARENTS: 

PAYING FOR COLLEGE 101

HOW TO FIND MERIT SCHOLARSHIPS

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college essay guy financial aid appeal

The College Essay Guy Podcast: A Practical Guide to College Admissions

103: how to appeal a financial aid award letter.

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Mar 29, 2017

Ever wonder what you should include in an appeal letter? This week, Jodi and I cover:

  • Who should make the call to a financial aid office: the student or parent?
  • What to literally say to a financial aid officer when you call them to appeal
  • Why you maybe shouldn’t start off the conversation by mentioning a financial aid offer from another school
  • Jodi’s five points to cover in an appeal letter
  • What tone to take and how long the letter should be
  • The one thing students and parents should do but don’t

About the Podcast

Practical, up-to-date interviews with experts in college admissions, financial aid, personal statements, test prep and more. Ethan Sawyer (aka College Essay Guy), interviews deans of admission, financial aid experts, and veterans of the admissions field to extract, then distill their advice into practical steps for students and those guiding them through the process. From creating an awesome college list to appealing a financial aid letter, Ethan skips the general advice and gets right to the action items, all in an effort to bring more ease, joy and purpose into the college admissions process.

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How to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter (With Example)

college essay guy financial aid appeal

Will Geiger is the co-founder of Scholarships360 and has a decade of experience in college admissions and financial aid. He is a former Senior Assistant Director of Admissions at Kenyon College where he personally reviewed 10,000 admissions applications and essays. Will also managed the Kenyon College merit scholarship program and served on the financial aid appeals committee. He has also worked as an Associate Director of College Counseling at a high school in New Haven, Connecticut. Will earned his master’s in education from the University of Pennsylvania and received his undergraduate degree in history from Wake Forest University.

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college essay guy financial aid appeal

Bill Jack has over a decade of experience in college admissions and financial aid. Since 2008, he has worked at Colby College, Wesleyan University, University of Maine at Farmington, and Bates College.

college essay guy financial aid appeal

Maria Geiger is Director of Content at Scholarships360. She is a former online educational technology instructor and adjunct writing instructor. In addition to education reform, Maria’s interests include viewpoint diversity, blended/flipped learning, digital communication, and integrating media/web tools into the curriculum to better facilitate student engagement. Maria earned both a B.A. and an M.A. in English Literature from Monmouth University, an M. Ed. in Education from Monmouth University, and a Virtual Online Teaching Certificate (VOLT) from the University of Pennsylvania.

How to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter (With Example)

Let’s say you get accepted to college, but the financial aid package does not work for you and your family. Did you know that many colleges will allow you to submit a financial aid appeal letter to be considered for more financial aid and scholarships?

When I worked in college admissions, I was a part of our college’s “scholarship appeal committee” where I helped evaluate various appeals for more financial aid and merit scholarships.

Related:  Scholarships360’s free scholarship search tool

Jump ahead to:

Starting the merit scholarship appeal process

How to write your merit appeal letter, how to appeal for need-based financial aid.

  • Financial Aid Appeal Example

Can you ask for more money from private scholarships?

  • What can you do the college turns down your appeal?

Feel free to jump ahead to any of the above sections or keep on reading to learn more about the appeals process. Students should also thoroughly review their financial aid award letter to understand what types of aid the college offered them.

Recommended: How to read a financial aid award letter (with examples)

Before you begin thinking about the merit scholarship appeal process, you should make sure that the college or university actually offers merit scholarships. If the institution does not offer merit scholarships, this is a nonstarter (a quick review of their admissions and financial aid website should tell you whether they do).

Once you know that the college does offer merit scholarships, you can inquire about the merit scholarship appeal process and whether they offer it. You can either call the admissions office or email the admissions officer responsible for your region. If they say that there is a process, you can start working on your appeal letter.

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First things first, let’s talk about how you can write a successful merit appeal letter. A successful letter is all about making your case to the admissions officer.

Here is our step-by-step process for writing a merit appeal letter:

  • Begin your letter by introducing yourself, where you are from, and your high school.
  • You should also reiterate how grateful you are to be admitted to the college and how excited you are to potentially attend.
  • Next explain the reasons why you are appealing for money in scholarships–did you receive need-based financial aid? Perhaps you did not receive  enough  need-based financial aid? Or maybe there was a life circumstance that’s making paying for college difficult for your family? If so, provide a brief explanation.
  • Have you accomplished anything significant academically/extracurricularly since you applied? This would be a good time to mention that. Same goes for any new grades/test scores.
  • Do you have more generous merit scholarship offers from other schools? Include the offer letters along with your note. While this may seem a bit crass, it helps give the admissions office context of where you are coming from.
  • Finally, you should conclude the letter by thanking the admissions officer for their time and consideration. You can also restate your interest in the college and why you hope to attend.

Related:  Why didn’t I receive financial aid?

Need-based financial aid is a completely different type of financial aid than merit aid. Colleges award need-based scholarships according to a formula dictated by your family’s financial situation. This means that there is very little (if any) wiggle room for how colleges award need-based financial aid.

With this said, there are two ways that you may be able to receive a reevaluated need-based financial aid package:

  • There was an error on your FAFSA or other financial aid form (like the CSS Profile )
  • Your family’s financial aid situation has changed since you submitted your financial aid forms. Two of the most common reasons that this can happen include dramatically increased medical expenses or a parent loses their job. However, there may be other situations that could impact a family’s financial situation.

In these situations it is absolutely worth contacting the college’s financial aid office to ask if there is any possibility of an adjusted aid package. Generally, the office of financial aid will ask you for a letter explaining your change in circumstances, with context and possible documentation.

Is there any harm to appealing for more financial aid?

When a need-based financial aid appeal is filed, the financial aid officers will examine the entire financial aid application again. In this second, careful review, it is possible that the financial aid officers might see something that could cause the award letter to change for the worse. While this is rare, it is important to know that financial aid appeals can impact your financial aid positively and negatively.

Advice from an admissions professional

Christina Labella | Director of Undergraduate Admissions, Manhattanville University

Financial aid appeal letter sample

Below you will find a financial aid appeal letter sample that you can use as an outline when writing your own appeal letter.

Dear [Ms. Gomez],

My name is [Will Geiger] and I am a senior at [Manasquan High School] in [Manasquan, NJ]. I was so excited to be accepted to [Wake Forest University] as a member of the class of [2024]. 

However, as I weigh my college options, affordability is an important factor for me. [Wake Forest University] is a top choice college for me. [Include 2-3 reasons why the college is a good fit].

I am writing to ask to be considered for any merit scholarship opportunities. [Include 2-3 academic or extracurricular updates from this year]. 

I have been lucky enough to receive the following scholarships from some other colleges:

[Specific colleges and award amounts]

Additionally, I have attached the actual award amounts.

Nonetheless, I want to attend [Wake Forest University] to study [insert major] and can’t wait to study [insert details about specific classes, programs, or professors that you hope to experience at the college]. With my [insert major] degree, I want to go into [insert job or ambition].

Thank you for the opportunity to be reconsidered for additional merit scholarship opportunities. I am honored to be accepted at [Wake Forest University] and hope to be a member of the freshman class.

Please let me know if you have any other questions!

Will Geiger

Private scholarships are almost always awarding a very fixed amount of money so it is unlikely that they are going to be considering appeals. This is unlikely to be a winning strategy for students. Of course, with billions of dollars in scholarship money available each year, nothing should stop you from finding and winning more scholarships!

What can you do if your appeal is turned down?

Once you have exhausted the appeals process and have determined that your financial aid forms accurately represent your family’s financial situation your next best move is to apply for more scholarships and consider more affordable options on your list.

There are still many scholarships available for current high school seniors . Additionally, you should continue to apply for scholarships once you are in college (there are a number of scholarships available for college freshmen ).

In addition to scholarships, you may also qualify for federal work study , which is essentially a part time job to help pay for educational expenses.

If your financial situation simply won’t permit you to accept the college’s offer, there are many other options available . Coding bootcamps , certificate programs , and community college can all help you land a higher-paying job. These alternatives typically take a fraction of the time and cost of traditional college.

Finally, student loans or Income Share Agreements can be a last resort for paying for college. Students should consider all of their federal student loan options before considering any private student loans.

Recommended: How to apply for student loans

Key Takeaways

  • Being accepted by a college means they want you to join their institution
  • As a result, they may be open to considering you for additional merit scholarships
  • Taking an hour to negotiate merit scholarship aid could result in thousands of dollars in scholarships down the line
  • Financial aid appeals will not result in your admission being rescinded

Frequently asked questions about financial aid appeal letters

Will a college rescind my admission if i ask for more financial aid, could i lose my financial aid if i file a financial aid appeal, how do i ask for more financial aid from a college, what if i can't afford my financial aid package, what are some valid reasons for a financial aid appeal.

  • A significant change in your family’s financial situation
  • Recent unemployment
  • High medical related expenses
  • Changes in family size or dependency status
  • Other extenuating circumstances

How long does it take to receive a response to a financial aid appeal letter?

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  • How to Write the Perfect Financial Aid Suspension Appeal Letter (and a Sample)
  • Financial Aid

Your financial aid can be suspended while you attend school for several reasons: You switch schools or change majors; your family makes too much money, which changes the information on your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA); or you do not make satisfactory academic progress (SAP) as determined by your school.

If your school suspends your financial aid, and private student loans are not an option, it makes sense to worry about completing your degree. Depending on the reasons your aid was suspended , you can likely file an appeal.

If you do not meet the minimum course or hour requirements, you may lose financial aid with no ability to appeal. However, if you have personal reasons for struggling academically during the school year, you can file an appeal.

As part of your financial aid suspension appeal, include a letter explaining what happened. This letter can help the committee determine whether to reinstate this help.

  • How to Understand the Appeals Process During Financial Aid Suspension

college essay guy financial aid appeal

Filing a financial aid suspension appeal starts when you go to your school’s student financial services office. Ask them about the appeals process and what forms you need. Be diligent about gathering correct information and file your appeal by the deadline. Schools generally only allow you to file an appeal when your financial aid is suspended due to an SAP problem. To have financial aid reinstated, you must: 

  • Understand your school’s SAP auditing process and the specific causes for your financial aid’s suspension.
  • Show that you have corrected the SAP problem.
  • Submit the appeal.
  • Have your appeal accepted by the SAP committee.

When your appeal is accepted, you will be placed on financial aid probation. This provides you another semester, trimester, or quarter of financial aid. The committee will then reconvene to determine whether you addressed your SAP problem in a satisfactory way. A successful SAP appeal will include information about why your academic status changed, you dropped courses or failed to sign up for enough courses, or otherwise did not meet your school’s standards. There are many reasons students struggle, but some common causes include:

  • Personal struggles with physical or mental health
  • Family struggles, including illness or death
  • Financial catastrophe, making your living situation unstable

As you complete your SAP appeal , gather information like health records, financial records, family statements, and correspondence with professors, employers, and peers that may be relevant. You should also write a personal letter to the SAP committee, which acknowledges that you did not meet SAP standards, that you understand what happened, and that you will take steps to correct this problem. Components of a successful SAP appeal letter are : 

  • Formal heading, including your name, student identification, the date, and the committee’s information
  • Formal address, including names of committee members you have corresponded with
  • Introductory and concluding paragraphs
  • One or two paragraphs explaining events that caused your academic struggles
  • Information in these middle paragraphs about how you will improve your performance in the coming semester, trimester, quarter, or year
  • Formal signoff
  • Information about relevant attachments, like doctors’ notes or personal statements from family members

You may also be required to create a plan, in a separate document, to improve your academic performance. If you have a good academic record from previous years, you can show that this is a temporary problem and you understand how to solve it. If you are a newer student, you may need to provide references from other school years or classes that show you are able to improve your performance.

college essay guy financial aid appeal

  • Financial Aid Suspension Appeal Letter Sample

To understand how all the components of a financial aid suspension appeal letter work together, here is a sample: Dear Dr. Smythe and Esteemed Members of the Committee, My name is Joan Doe, and I am writing this letter as part of my appeal to reinstate my financial aid. Because I struggled to complete classes during this past semester, it was determined that I did not make satisfactory academic progress per the institution’s guidelines. Consequently, my financial aid was revoked. While I respect the school’s decision regarding my grades, I need this financial support to continue completing my bachelor’s degree. My poor academic progress occurred because of struggles within my family this year. My father was diagnosed with colorectal cancer. While his prognosis is good and we now know that treatment is going well, it was a devastating emotional blow. I spent more time with my family, helping to take care of the household and my two younger siblings while my mother was with my father during his treatment. This included a hospital stay of about one week, during which time I was unable to return to class. I worked hard on my studies during this time, but because my time was much more limited, I was unable to focus on writing papers, studying for midterms and finals, and meeting some deadlines. My professors, including my adviser Dr. Smythe, have been as understanding as possible. I did not communicate as clearly as I should have, and I understand that my negligence has translated into lower grades. I even failed some courses, which is a first for me, if you look at my previous years at this college. I regret such poor performance, and I want to improve in the coming academic year. The school has accepted me as a student again for the upcoming semester, but without the financial aid provided through the Pell Grant and student loan programs, I cannot afford to attend. My academic record prior to this has been exceptional, and I believe I can return to this level of scholastic performance. Please consider reinstating my financial aid with my regret, my apologies, and my history as a good student in mind. Thank you for your consideration. I appreciate attending this school and look forward to graduation. Respectfully, Joan Doe

  • Other Sources of Funding if Your Financial Aid Is Suspended

The SAP committee may not accept your appeal or your financial aid suspension could stem from other causes, like changing majors and no longer meeting scholarship requirements. Other sources of financial aid, like private student loans, can help you complete your semester or year if you are unable to get your financial aid reinstated.

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How to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter

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What’s Covered:

The 2 main reasons to appeal financial aid.

  • Steps to Write Your Appeal Letter

Financial Aid Appeal Letter Examples

  • Final Recap

Did you get accepted into your dream school, but the financial aid wasn’t sufficient?

Luckily, many colleges allow you to file an appeal to your financial aid award, where you ask for a new assessment of your financial situation or offers from other schools. There are many variables that are considered, so a better offer isn’t guaranteed, but filing an appeal may be worth a try.

If you’re interested in appealing or negotiating your financial aid award, it’s essential that you act quickly, follow the correct procedures, and provide all the right information, often in the form of a letter stating your case. Here are the steps you’ll need to take to put together a professional and persuasive financial aid appeal letter.

First of all, you’ll need to decide whether it’s worthwhile for you to file an appeal, as it will take some time and work on your part. Colleges will be most responsive if you have a change in financial situation or better offers from other schools.

If neither of these two situations apply to you, it is unlikely that the college will be willing to negotiate. You need to present a compelling reason for the college to give you more aid.

Change in Financial Situation

Colleges are willing to offer additional aid due to changing financial circumstances. The following situations qualify:

  • Investment losses
  • Losing a job
  • Losing income at a job due to a pay cut or reduced hours
  • Divorce or separation
  • Change in out of pocket expenses (healthcare, childcare, family support, or natural disasters)

If any of these circumstances apply, you will need to show supporting documentation. Colleges will let you know which documents they might need after you contact them.

Better offers

Another powerful tool to appeal your existing offer is with your other acceptances and financial aid letters. Colleges are responsive to two types of offers:

  • A better financial aid offer or price at a school with comparable ranking
  • Acceptance to a university with a higher ranking 

Steps to Write Your Financial Aid Appeal Letter

1. understand the college’s appeal process..

Check the school’s financial aid page to find official information about appealing your aid. Some schools have a specific online form to use. Others request that you submit the form in writing.

Figure out what exactly you’ll need to do and who you’ll need to contact. Your request is more likely to be successful if you follow the correct procedures!

2. Gather Information

Whatever the issue with your financial aid award, you’ll need to back up the statements in your appeal letter with documented facts. Take a moment to collect the documents you’ll need so that you can refer to them while you’re writing. 

This includes the FAFSA and CSS profile (if applicable). What else you’ll need depends on the specifics of your situation, but could include proof of major expenses (like medical bills), documentation of a parent’s job loss, financial statements, legal documents, or competing award letters from other colleges.

You’ll need to submit copies of these documents along with your letter so that you can show why your award should be reconsidered. Some schools may even be able to accept certain documents as scans via email, but you should always check first—sometimes this is not possible for security reasons.

3. Structure Your Argument

First of all, remind the college that you want to attend! There’s a reason why this school chose you and you chose this school; it’s a mutually beneficial arrangement. Explain that despite this desire, unless your financial aid is increased, you won’t likely be able to enroll.

Then, cover why you need more aid. If the current expected family contribution would represent an extreme hardship for your family, say so, and explain the situation. If you have a better offer from another similarly-ranked college, ask if this college can adjust your award. If anything about your financial status has changed your family’s ability to pay, include this as well.

Refer to your supporting documents to bolster your argument with specifics. Sometimes people are reluctant to share these personal financial details, but if you’re arguing that your financial need is higher than it seems, you’ll need to demonstrate it with documentation.

Be direct and stick to the facts. Don’t try to compare yourself to what you may have heard about other students and their awards, and be realistic about your family’s financial status. Focus on the numbers: the amount of aid you’ve initially been awarded, and the amount you’ll need to make that school a feasible option.

If you have any major achievements since your application, feel free to mention those as well. Things like becoming valedictorian or winning a state tournament are highly-impressive and increase your desirability as a potential student.

4. Get Help Reviewing Your Letter

Just as with application essays, someone reliable should review your letter before you submit it. Paying attention to grammar, spelling, and typos helps to show that you take the situation seriously.

Tone is also deeply important here, so ask your reviewer to consider it. In requesting that your financial aid be reevaluated, you’re asking for a big favor from the college and its financial aid staff, and you don’t want to appear entitled or unreasonable. As always, be polite, mature, and professional, and thank the financial aid office for their time and help.

Since this letter concerns your family and your collective financial situation, have your parents or other interested parties check it for accuracy. If your financial situation is particularly complex, it might make sense to have your family’s financial or legal advisor read over it as well, just to make sure you don’t misrepresent the facts.

5. Send Your Letter to the Right Place

For physical mail, double-check the address you’re sending it to; call the financial aid office to check again if you’re unsure. Use clear handwriting or printed labels. For extra reassurance, you might choose to use Priority Mail or another service with features like tracking and receipt confirmation.

As we’ve mentioned, your school may accept some documents via email, but ask them before you do so. Double-check the email address you’re sending them to, of course, and make sure any scanned documents you’re sending are legible.

For any appeal letter, be very clear about who you are, so that your letter and documents are filed to the correct account. Include your full name and applicant or student ID number on everything you send in. If your school has special requirements about which identifying information to include, follow those directions exactly. (Be aware that if any of your documents are in languages other than English, you’ll need to have them translated first.)

It’s a good idea to follow up within a week or so to make sure your information made it to the right place and ask how long you’ll need to wait for a response. Just don’t overdo it; appeals take time, and bugging your financial aid officer excessively for updates will only take away from the time they have to work on your case.

6. Maintain a Backup Plan

A financial aid appeal is simply a request to have your financial aid application reconsidered, often in the light of new information; it’s not a guarantee of a favorable outcome. The college may decide not to increase your financial aid, or to increase it as much as you would like. You need to be prepared for this possibility, especially with the May 1st decision deadline looming.

You’ll need to have some serious discussions with your family about your options. Maybe you’ll need to attend another college. Or, you or your parents will take out a loan. Only you can weigh all the factors and make a final decision.

Now you know the steps to filing a financial aid appeal, here are some appeal letter examples.

Appealing based on a change in financial situation

Dear Dean Rora,

When I learned I was accepted into Redwood University, I was ecstatic—I am a first-generation Filipino student and this school has been one of my top choices for years, due to its world-renowned aerospace engineering program. I would love to be able to attend; however, the current aid package makes it financially unfeasible for my family. As such, I’m writing to request a re-evaluation of my financial aid award. 

Since applying, my single mother has lost her job as a garment worker in Los Angeles, due to the impact of canceled orders during COVID-19. She did not receive a severance package. While I have tried to make up for the lost income by working two part-time jobs, I’m unable to cover that $25,000 gap as a full-time student, and I will be unable to work as much once in college. As it is, I currently earn only enough to cover our rent ($800/month), let alone daily expenses like food. I wish I could ask my other relatives for help, but it is just me and my mother in the United States.

Because of this significant change, I was hoping that your office could readjust my financial aid award. I am currently expected to pay $2,000 per semester, which is unfeasible given our situation. I am attaching documentation regarding these changes. 

Thank you in advance for your consideration, and please let me know if you need more info. I truly hope I will be able to attend Redwood and realize my dreams of becoming an aerospace engineer.

Althea Reyes

This letter is a good example because it:

  • Thanks the college for the chance to attend and reiterates the student’s interest in the school
  • Provides specific numbers about the family’s situation
  • Gives upfront documentation to streamline the process
  • Is polite while conveying a sense of urgency

Appealing based on better offers

Dear Dean Edhouse,

My name is Milo and I’m a student from Chicago who is planning to study International Relations. I am beyond grateful to have the opportunity to study at Applewood University, especially because of the many opportunities for fieldwork in the U.S. and abroad.

Over the next few weeks, however, I have to make a difficult decision: Applewood University or Magnolia College. Applewood is my top choice, but Magnolia has offered me more scholarship money. As such, I’m writing to request a re-evaluation of my financial aid award. I understand that your office does not match offers and am not requesting a match. I’d simply like to ask that you consider my other offer when reviewing my award holistically.

To attend Applewood, my family must pay $21,000 per year. For Magnolia, we need to pay $16,000. This is a significant difference for my family, especially since my sister will also be in college at the same time (she is a junior at Englewood University). For your convenience, I am attaching documentation of this offer from Magnolia.

Since applying, I have also placed 3 rd in the track and field state championships for the 3200m. After the track season, I ran a half marathon and raised $3,000 for the International Rescue Committee. I know Redwood has a road race team that frequently participates in charity runs, and would love to continue running for social causes in college.

Please let me know if you need any more information, and thank you for your consideration. I hope I will be able to join the Redwood community this fall.

This letter is strong for the same reasons as the previous, but here’s what it does differently:

  • Highlights an understanding of the school’s financial aid policies (“I understand that your office doesn’t match offers”) and requests a holistic review
  •   Updates the finaid officer/dean on major accomplishments that increase their desirability as a student
  • Emphasizes fit with the school through their unique resources

College affordability matters a great deal; the best college application in the world won’t be of much use if attending that college is not financially feasible. Thankfully, widespread financial aid and scholarship opportunities exist, and make exceptional colleges into reasonable options for a much greater range of talented students.

If you aren’t happy with your financial aid award, it doesn’t hurt to try and appeal. Just as with applying to college in the first place, you may not end up getting the outcome you want, but if you don’t ask for what you need, you definitely won’t have the opportunity to get it. With a strong, well-researched, professional appeal letter, you’ll put yourself in the best possible position to work out an arrangement that meets your needs.

For more information about the financial aid process and getting the aid you need to make your college dreams real, check out these posts from the CollegeVine blog.

  • Understanding College Costs: FAQs About Financial Aid in Practice
  • Understanding Your Financial Aid Award Letters
  • Can I Appeal My Financial Aid Award?
  • How to Evaluate, Compare, and Leverage Financial Aid

To get more college finance advice, join our free CollegeVine community forum about paying for college . You can ask other students in the same boat about their experiences and request help from our team of admissions experts.

Related CollegeVine Blog Posts

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How to Appeal a Financial Aid Award Letter The College Essay Guy Podcast: A Practical Guide to College Admissions

Ever wonder what you should include in an appeal letter? This week, Jodi and I cover: Who should make the call to a financial aid office: the student or parent? What to literally say to a financial aid officer when you call them to appeal Why you maybe shouldn’t start off the conversation by mentioning a financial aid offer from another school Jodi’s five points to cover in an appeal letter What tone to take and how long the letter should be The one thing students and parents should do but don’t

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How to Write a Successful Financial Aid Appeal Letter

Did you receive less financial aid than you needed secure more with a financial aid appeal letter., circumstances that warrant financial aid appeal, how to write a college financial aid appeal letter.

Gather Evidence: Your word is only as powerful as your ability to prove it. Gather any evidence — past FAFSA applications, letters from other schools, correspondence — and include it with your letter before you submit. 

Match Request: Sometimes, people write financial aid appeal letters when they receive more aid from one school than another. If this is the case, clearly document that and include a dollar amount that you’d like them to match. 

Sample Financial Aid Appeal Letter

5801 S Ellis Ave

Dear Mr. Jenkins,

If you’re able, I’d appreciate a review of my FAFSA with this change of circumstance. I’m hoping that you’d be able to award a revised financial aid amount of (New financial aid amount).

What Can You Do If Your Financial Aid Appeal Letter is Unsuccessful?

Tips to improve your chance for acceptance of your appeal letter for college financial aid, frequently asked questions (faqs),     1. what should i write in my financial aid appeal letter ,     2. how do i appeal my financial aid award,     3. what is the 150 rule for financial aid,     4. can you appeal losing financial aid,     5. will i lose financial aid if i fail a semester.

The Dos and Don’ts of Writing a Letter of Appeal for Financial Aid

college essay guy financial aid appeal

If you’re a high school senior who is worried about paying for college, financial aid can be a true lifesaver. Once you’ve received your acceptance letter, financial aid packages should arrive in the following weeks. However, if you still haven’t received your package by then, don’t hesitate to contact the financial aid office for assistance. Once your award letter arrives, it’s important to sit down with your family to determine if the college is truly affordable for you.  Unfortunately, sometimes the financial aid package you receive may not cover all of your expenses. In these cases, writing a letter of appeal for additional financial aid can be a helpful option. 

In this blog post, we’ll provide some tips to ensure that you learn how to write a letter of appeal for financial aid and make your appeal as effective as possible.

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How to write a letter of appeal for financial aid

Here are the do’s and don’ts to make your letter of appeal for financial aid as effectives as possible.

Do express gratitude and appreciation for any assistance received.

When writing a letter of appeal for financial aid, it’s important to express gratitude and appreciation for any assistance you have already received. This shows that you are not taking the aid for granted and that you understand the value of the support you have been given. It also helps to build a positive relationship with the financial aid office, which can be beneficial in the future if you need to appeal again. Be sincere in your expression of gratitude, and avoid using overly formal or generic language.

Here’s what the beginning of your letter may say:

“I hope this letter finds you well. I am writing to express my gratitude for the financial aid package awarded by the University of Tampa.”
“I am deeply appreciative of the financial support I have been granted thus far, as it has allowed me to pursue my educational goals at Miami University of Ohio.”
“I am profoundly grateful for the $20,000 financial aid package I have received thus far, as it has enabled me to pursue my educational aspirations at the University of Chicago.”

Do provide specific reasons for your appeal.

In your appeal letter, kindly ask the financial aid office to take another look at your financial aid package, considering your current situation. Explain that extra help, like grants, scholarships, or work-study programs, would make a big difference in helping you continue your education at the school. When explaining why you need more support, mention specific reasons such as sudden costs, changes in your money situation, or other special circumstances.  Providing this new information can help the financial aid office better understand your current situation and may increase your chances of receiving additional aid. Give plenty of details and be sure to provide documentation to support any claims you make.

Highlight commitment to your education

Make sure to highlight how committed you are to doing well in school and being a positive part of the college community. Talk about your dreams and what you hope to achieve in the future. By sharing these things, you show that giving you more financial help would be a great investment because you’re going to make the most of it and have a successful future.

Here are examples that may be helpful as you draft your letter:

"I am wholeheartedly committed to my academic journey and eager to make a positive impact on the college community through my involvement in clubs, volunteering, and supporting my fellow students."
"As I strive towards my goal of becoming a [desired profession], I am determined to excel academically and take full advantage of the educational opportunities provided at the University of Michigan to prepare for a successful career."
"I am deeply grateful for the financial assistance I have received thus far, and with your continued support, I am confident that I will be able to achieve my educational goals and contribute meaningfully to both the college community and society as a whole."

Provide supporting documentation

Attach any relevant documentation that supports your appeal, such as proof of income, medical bills, or a detailed explanation of your family’s financial situation. This will help the financial aid office make an informed decision about your request for additional support. Here’s a list of common types of supporting documentation you may need to include in your appeal:

  • Letter of explanation : A written statement that outlines your family’s financial situation, any recent changes, and the reasons for requesting additional financial aid.
  • Proof of income : Documents that verify your family’s income, such as recent pay stubs, W-2 forms, or tax returns.
  • Proof of unemployment or job loss : If applicable, provide documentation such as an unemployment benefits statement or a termination letter from your former employer.
  • Medical bills : Copies of medical bills or invoices for any significant medical expenses not covered by insurance, especially if these expenses have affected your family’s ability to contribute to your education.
  • Death certificate or obituary : If your family has experienced a recent loss that has impacted your financial situation, provide a copy of the death certificate or obituary as evidence.
  • Proof of reduced income : If your family’s income has decreased due to factors such as reduced work hours or a pay cut, provide documentation that demonstrates this change.
  • Divorce or separation documents : If your parents are divorced or separated, provide legal documentation that outlines the financial arrangements and any changes in support that may affect your ability to pay for college.
  • Proof of one-time or unexpected expenses : If your family has incurred a significant one-time expense, such as a natural disaster or a major home repair, provide documentation that verifies these costs.
  • Letters of support: Letters from teachers, guidance counselors, or community leaders that attest to your academic achievements, character, and commitment to your education can strengthen your appeal.
  • Financial aid award letters from other institutions: If you’ve received financial aid offers from other colleges or universities, include copies of these award letters to demonstrate your financial need and to show that other institutions have recognized your merit.

Be courteous and professional

Throughout your appeal letter, maintain a respectful and professional tone. Remember that the financial aid office is working to support students, and your request is one of many they will be considering. Being polite and understanding can go a long way in making a positive impression.

college essay guy financial aid appeal

Don't be confrontational

Avoid using a confrontational tone, and don’ t threaten or give ultimatums. Avoid saying things like, “If I don’t get more aid, I can’t attend this school,” or “I’ll have to drop out if you don’t help me.” This kind of language can sound confrontational and may not work in your favor. Instead, offer solutions, such as suggesting other ways the school can help you, like offering a work-study program or connecting you with scholarships you might qualify for.

Don't make excuses or blame others

When writing a letter of appeal for financial aid, it’s important to take responsibility for your own financial situation. Avoid making excuses or blaming others for your financial struggles. Instead, focus on the specific circumstances that have led to your need for additional assistance and provide evidence to support your claims. Taking ownership of your situation will show the financial aid office that you are serious about finding a solution and willing to work hard to achieve your goals.

Don't provide irrelevant information

Stick to the facts and only provide information that is relevant to your appeal.

Don't exaggerate or lie about your situation

It may be tempting to exaggerate or even lie about your financial situation in hopes of receiving more aid, but this is not a good idea. Financial aid offices have processes in place to verify the information you provide, and if they discover that you have been dishonest, it could result in serious consequences, including the loss of all financial aid. Stick to the facts and provide documentation to support your claims. Honesty is always the best policy when it comes to appealing for financial aid.

Don't wait too long

Submit your appeal letter as soon as possible, as financial aid funds may be limited and awarded on a first-come, first-served basis.

college essay guy financial aid appeal

Financial Aid Letter Appeal FAQs

When it comes to financial aid letter appeals, students and their families may have many questions about the process. Here are some frequently asked questions (FAQs) and their answers to help you better understand the appeal process.

What is a financial aid appeal letter?

A financial aid appeal letter is a written request to a college or university’s financial aid office, asking for a reevaluation of your financial aid package. This usually happens when the initial aid offer doesn’t cover your educational expenses or there’s been a significant change in your financial situation.

When should I submit a financial aid appeal letter?

Ideally, you should submit your appeal letter as soon as possible after receiving your financial aid offer or experiencing a change in your financial circumstances. The sooner you submit your appeal, the better your chances of receiving additional aid, as some funding sources may be limited.

What should I include in my financial aid appeal letter?

Your appeal letter should include the following:

  • A clear expression of gratitude for the financial aid you have already received
  • A detailed explanation of your family’s financial situation, including any changes or special circumstances that affect your ability to pay for college
  • A polite request for a reevaluation of your financial aid package
  • An emphasis on your dedication to your education and your desire to contribute positively to the college community
  • Supporting documentation that verifies your financial situation and any special circumstances

What are some examples of special circumstances?

Special circumstances can include job loss, reduced work hours, medical expenses, divorce or separation, death of a parent or guardian, natural disasters, one-time expenses, caring for an elderly family member, or having multiple children in college at the same time.

What tone should I use in my appeal letter?

Use a respectful, friendly, and professional tone in your appeal letter. Avoid sounding confrontational or demanding. Focus on expressing gratitude for the aid you’ve received, explaining your situation, and requesting a reevaluation of your financial aid package.

How long should my financial aid appeal letter be?

Your appeal letter should be concise and to the point, usually no longer than one page. Make sure to provide sufficient details about your financial situation and special circumstances, but keep your explanations clear and straightforward.

When can I expect a response to my appeal?

The response time for a financial aid appeal varies depending on the institution and their workload. Generally, it may take anywhere from a few weeks to a couple of months. Be patient and follow up with the financial aid office if you haven’t heard back within a reasonable amount of time.

What are my options if my appeal is denied?

If your appeal is denied, you can consider applying for additional scholarships, seeking out work-study opportunities, taking out student loans, or exploring other funding sources, such as community organizations or employers that offer educational assistance programs.

Conclusion + Next Steps

A financial aid appeal letter is an important way to get extra help to make your college dreams come true. Now that you know how to write an appeal letter for financial aid, use these tips and tricks to boost your chances of getting more financial aid offers. If you need more help with writing your letter, don’t forget to check out our appeal letter writing service .

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Your Guide to Writing A Financial Aid Appeal Letter

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Updated: Sep 4, 2020, 10:44am

Your Guide to Writing A Financial Aid Appeal Letter

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While 86% of first-time, full-time undergraduate students receive financial aid at four-year universities, the financial aid package you receive from your dream school may not be enough to cover all of your education costs. Particularly with the coronavirus pandemic, you and your family may have experienced job losses or lost income, so you may need more help to pay for school than you expected.

You don’t have to take your school’s first word on its financial aid offer. If the school’s awards of scholarships, grants and student loans are insufficient for your needs, here’s how to write a financial aid appeal letter and ask for additional help.

Know When to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter

In general, schools will only review a financial aid appeal if there has been a substantial change in your circumstances since you submitted your school application and the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)  that would make you eligible for more need-based aid . For example:

  • You or your parents lost their jobs
  • A parent or spouse passed away
  • You or a family member had major medical expenses

Given the economic impact the coronavirus pandemic has caused, many people may qualify for additional reviews. The 2020-2021 FAFSA required applicants to submit their 2018 tax returns. But in 2020, tens of millions of people have filed for unemployment, so many families may have seen their financial situations significantly change since they filed their 2018 tax returns.

When it comes to appealing financial aid decisions, timing is everything. Financial aid is often limited, so submit your appeal as soon as possible. Universities may only have a small amount of institutional aid available, such as grants or scholarships. Once that money is distributed, they can’t issue more, so your only option may be to take out additional student loans.

Steps to Appeal Your Financial Aid

Every school has its own appeal process, but in general, here’s how to appeal financial aid decisions:

  • Contact the school financial aid office. You’ll want to ask what the process is for filing an appeal. While some schools list this information on their websites, it may be out of date, so it’s always a good idea to speak to a representative directly, so you have the latest information.
  • Fill out the necessary forms. The financial aid representative will tell you what forms to complete. At some schools, there are formal financial aid appeal documents that will ask about your situation and special circumstances.
  • Gather supporting documentation. You will typically have to submit documentation that supports your request for additional aid. For example, if you’re asking for more aid because of recent medical expenses, you should send in copies of your medical bills and signed letters from healthcare providers. If you or your parents were laid off from work, include termination notices or a copy of your unemployment compensation.
  • Craft your financial aid appeal letter. If the school requests a letter, keep it to one page. Be as specific as possible, and focus on concrete incidents that affected your family’s finances.

What to Include in Your Financial Aid Appeal Letter

In your appeal letter for financial aid, explain to the university that you were accepted to the school and are eager to attend. But because of changes to your family’s circumstances, the current financial aid package isn’t enough to cover your total cost of attendance .

Next, detail exactly what occurred that negatively impacted your financial situation. Include dates, if possible. For example, if you lost your job this year, write, “I was laid off in March 2020, and our household income was reduced by 50%.”

Don’t request a specific amount of money; just explain your situation, and that additional aid is needed. The school will review your circumstances and adjust your financial aid accordingly.

Be polite and courteous in the letter. There is no appeals process beyond this, and the financial aid officer’s decision is final, so you want to make as good of an impression as possible.

Financial Aid Appeal Letter Sample

Below is a sample of what a financial aid appeal letter should look like:

Dear Financial Aid Administrator:

I was so excited to receive my acceptance letter and financial aid offer to University of ABC. The school is my top choice for my bachelor’s degree.

Unfortunately, my financial situation has changed since I applied and submitted my FAFSA in November, and the financial aid package right now doesn’t cover a large portion of my education costs. Because my needs have changed, I’m requesting a review to determine if my financial aid can be adjusted to reflect my current situation.

Like many households, my family was affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, and it had an impact on our finances:

  • My mother was laid off from her job in April, causing our household income to decrease by 50%
  • My father was in the hospital in May, and we had $5,000 in hospital bills that insurance didn’t cover
  • With my younger brother in virtual school, there have been increased child care costs

I’ve attached copies of my mother’s termination notice and unemployment benefits, my father’s medical bills and pay stubs for my brother’s care.

I appreciate your help. If you need any other information, please let me know.

Phone Number

Email Address

Mailing Address

How to Submit Your Appeal Letter

When it comes to submitting your financial aid appeal letter, make sure you follow the school’s processes exactly. Some schools will accept appeals electronically, while others will insist that you send it through the postal service.

If the school requested the letter via email, call a few days after you sent it to confirm they received it.

If they asked you to mail it, send it via certified mail, so you know it arrived safely. You can call a week after it was scheduled to arrive to follow up and ask about any next steps.

Some schools will review your appeal and issue a decision right away, while others can take weeks. The financial aid office should be able to give you an idea of the expected timeline.

Your Financial Aid Appeal Was Rejected: What’s Next?

Unfortunately, not all financial aid appeals are successful. In some cases, the university may deny your appeal for additional aid. If that happens, consider the following options:

  • Apply for outside aid. Even if you’re ineligible for institutional aid or federal loans, you may qualify for other scholarships and grants. You can search for scholarships and grants offered by nonprofit organizations, companies and private foundations on FastWeb , Niche  and Scholarships.com .
  • Take out private student loans. While you may not be able to take out additional federal loans, you may qualify for private student loans . Unlike most federal loans, private loans require a credit check, and interest rates and terms vary by lender. Check out the best private student loan lenders .
  • Look for a part-time job. If you’re willing to work while in school, you can use your earnings to offset your education expenses. SnagAJob  and Indeed  can be good resources for part-time work opportunities.
  • Attend a less expensive school.  If your selected university or college is too expensive with the current financial aid package, you may want to consider attending a less expensive school. If you have your heart set on earning a degree from that university, you could go to a state school or community college for two years, then transfer to your dream school to cut down on your education costs.
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A Guide to Writing the Perfect Financial Aid Appeal Letter

You’ve received your college acceptance letters – but your financial aid award wasn’t enough. Maybe that’s because your top-choice school has offered you less aid than other schools, or because your financial circumstances have recently changed. Don’t worry – your aid offer is not necessarily final. You can write a financial aid appeal letter to request a revised financial aid package. Here’s how.

Writing a financial aid appeal letter? Do it on Going Merry.

Heads up! If you’ve begun receiving financial aid offers from your colleges and it’s not quite enough to cover your financial gap, use the Financial Aid Appeal Generator from Going Merry . It takes just a few minutes and can help you write the perfect letter for your financial situation, getting you even more financial aid 1 .

Click here to start your letter

What is a financial aid appeal letter?

A financial aid appeal letter is a formal request asking your school to reconsider its decision on your financial aid. The letter is your chance to explain your special circumstances, financial situation, and anything else that has changed since you submitted your FAFSA® ( Free Application for Federal Student Aid ). Your letter should be honest and concise and should focus on why you need more financial aid.

You’ll submit your financial aid appeal letter alongside any documents that might support your case. If your appeal is approved, the school will generate a new financial aid package and send you their new offer. If your appeal letter is rejected, you’ll have to decide whether or not you can make your original financial aid offer work. If not, it may be time to consider another strategy to afford your degree . 

Why would I write a financial aid appeal letter ?

There are five common scenarios for why you might want to appeal your original financial aid offer and request more aid:

1) You got admitted, but it’s just not enough. You were thrilled when you received an acceptance letter to your top school but disappointed when you got your financial aid award letter. Now, you can’t afford to attend without more aid. 

2) You received a better offer at another school. Your top choice school has offered you less financial aid than another school on your list. You want to see if you can use your other offer as a bargaining chip to negotiate for more aid at your top school. 

3) Your FAFSA® didn’t reflect some nuanced financial situation. Maybe your parents are predicted to earn significantly less this year because they’re freelancers and have lost their biggest client. Maybe your family has debt outside the United States or informal debt to other family members. Finances can be complex. Sometimes the FAFSA® doesn’t take those details into consideration, but your top school might.  

4) Your financial circumstances have changed. Your family no longer has the same ability to contribute to your college expenses. Common reasons for this include a family member losing their job, a birth or death in the family, separation or divorce that affects household income or expenses, and medical bills. This change might have occurred between when you filed your FAFSA® and when you received your original financial aid offer. Big life changes can also occur in the middle of a school year. In the latter case, you can appeal to have your next semester’s aid raised. 

5) You made a mistake (or multiple) on your FAFSA®. The financial aid appeal process is a great way to remedy any errors you may have made on your FAFSA. Be sure to submit an appeal letter to your school’s financial aid office as soon as you realize your mistake.

Note: If you have multiple reasons for appealing , you’ll need to decide how to strategize what to include vs. exclude. (Avoid an overly long letter — it should be one page, max.)

How to write a financial aid appeal letter  

Research your school’s requirements.

Most schools accept financial aid appeals, but each institution has different processes and document requirements. Don’t miss out on extra financial aid just because you forgot a deadline or sent your letter by mail when an online submission was required. Before starting the appeal process, check your school’s website for the most up-to-date information.

Call the financial aid office and get a contact

One of the best ways to get immediate help is to call your school’s financial aid office. Tell them you’d like to write an appeal letter and ask them who you should address it to. They’ll be able to provide you with the appropriate person’s name (usually the school’s director of financial aid). When you write your letter, address it to that person rather than using a generic greeting such as “to whom it may concern.” Pro tip: include the recipient’s name at least twice throughout the appeal to give your letter a more personal touch.

Do the math

Before you write your letter, compare your original financial aid package against your school’s current cost of attendance. Then, calculate exactly how much extra financial aid you’ll need to make college affordable for you. 

To make that calculation, first talk with your family about whether or not the student aid index (SAI) listed on your award letter feels reasonable. How much is your family comfortable contributing? If they can’t contribute as much as you need, can you try to win extra cash through scholarships instead? Are you comfortable taking out student loans to cover part of your college tuition? Think through various scenarios and then determine exactly how much additional financial aid you want to request from your school.

Express your passion

If you’re a high school senior applying for your freshman year of college, begin your letter by acknowledging how thrilled you are to be accepted at the college. These folks read a lot of letters, and it never hurts to underscore your appreciation for their university. If this school is your first choice, express that. Be clear about why you want to go to this school, as well as why you are a student they should want to keep (You’re hardworking, you’re high-achieving, etc.).

If you’re already enrolled and are appealing your financial aid package for another semester or year, focus more on the importance of your continuing attendance. What have you achieved since you’ve been on campus? How have you contributed to the community? Emphasize how additional financial aid will allow you to improve your academic record and complete your degree at the same pace as your peers. 

Your letter should clearly state the facts of your family’s financial situation and your financial need. It should explain why you need additional aid, even if the reason is something you find difficult or even embarrassing to talk about. Be candid and honest about your family finances. Don’t hesitate to restate any relevant information from your original application. And if you have extenuating circumstances not captured by the FAFSA® — like medical expenses or impending job changes — discuss them here. 

Be specific

After you’ve argued your case, tell your financial aid administrator just how much more money you require. Clearly state the amount of aid it would take for you to be able to attend their school. If there are other details that might help make your attendance possible — like a work-study job or a scholarship to cover the cost of books and supplies — mention that, too. The financial aid office might not be able to give you every dollar you ask for, but it never hurts to try. 

Mention other financial aid offers

If you’ve received a more lucrative financial aid package from another school, be sure to mention that. You can even ask one school to match another school’s offer. Just remember: you’re not trying to play hardball here. Instead, maintain a tone of respect and appreciation whenever you’re negotiating financial aid.

Gather supporting documentation

Your school’s office of financial aid will likely require some documentation to back up the statements you make in your letter. Pay stubs, medical bills, proof of eviction, or job termination paperwork can all help prove financial need. Most college financial aid offices will request documentation after they receive your letter, but sending it all upfront can help speed up the process. If you’re not sure what documents your school requires, either call the financial aid office or look online.

Be respectful

Recognize that the financial aid administrator reading your letter is likely pretty busy, so keep your letter to one page and make sure your writing is clear. Ask a trusted friend or family member to proofread your letter for errors or typos; sending in a well-formatted, grammatically correct letter is an easy way to project respect and show that this process matters to you. 

At the end of the letter, express your sincere gratitude for the recipient’s time, consideration, and support. Check the language of your letter and make sure it’s appropriate. The key to a successful financial aid appeal is a balance of gratitude, humility, and persuasiveness. 

Make it look professional

If your school requires a printed and mailed copy of your letter, sign your name to the bottom before you send it. You can also use a template in your text-editing software of choice to create a letterhead and make your letter look professional. If you’re using Google Docs, explore their template gallery . And if you’re submitting a digital copy of your appeal, add your digital signature in a PDF to give your letter a personal touch. 

Sample financial aid appeal letter  

Here’s a sample letter to get your creative juices flowing. The below was written by a student whose family recently lost their primary source of income. Use this as a template and add your own details to customize it for your needs. 

Dear Mr. Smith, 

Thank you so much for taking the time to review my financial aid application to The University of America. I couldn’t be more thrilled by the prospect of continuing my education at such a fantastic school. It is, without a doubt, my first choice. 

While I am grateful for the detailed and generous financial aid package you provided, I’m writing to appeal my financial aid decision. After I submitted my original application, my family’s financial situation changed. Unfortunately, my mother, who is the primary earner in our family, lost her job. As a result, my family is no longer able to contribute to my college education at the amount originally established as our EFC. Over the past two months, my mother has earnestly sought new employment but hasn’t yet found any options. We’re hopeful that she will find steady work soon, but her unemployment has placed a significant financial strain on our family. I’ve attached supporting documentation, including the notice of termination from my mother’s previous employer. 

In spite of these unfortunate circumstances, pursuing higher education continues to be a priority for my family and me. I plan to study computer science at the University of America. Throughout high school, I maintained a 3.5 GPA and recently received an award for my contribution to my school’s robotics team. I am confident that I will make an excellent addition to the student body at The University of America.

Due to my increased financial need, I would like to appeal your decision and request an additional $8,500 of aid to put toward my college tuition. I am already planning to take on federal student loans. This additional financial aid of $8,500 would increase my ability to focus on my education without taking on more debt. 

In any case, I appreciate your time and thoughtful consideration, Mr. Smith. It would be an honor to join the next class of students at The University of America, and this increased financial aid would make my attendance possible.

Student Name

Financial aid appeal letter template

You can use Going Merry’s Financial Aid Appeal Generator to write your personalized appeal letter easily. It takes just a few minutes, and includes tips to address common questions, concerns, and misconceptions regarding financial aid appeals. If you feel a bit stuck, it has prompts to help you think of what you want to say. It also sends you an email reminder to send your letter before Decision Day.

college essay guy financial aid appeal

You can also get your own financial aid appeal letter template here , which you can customize to your specific financial situation, or find a number of templates online . Remember that these are just templates; you’ll have to update them to include the details of your own needs and special circumstances before you send them in.

How do I submit the financial aid appeal letter ?

Check the college’s website for more information on how to appeal the award package, as they may have a specific procedure they’d like you to follow.

If no process is indicated, contact the college’s financial aid office. Many colleges will have a specific individual assigned to people with last names starting with certain letters. Email that person instead of the generic financial aid office email.

Note that most colleges will ask you for documentation to confirm any claims you make in your letter. Attaching the documentation from the beginning can speed up the process and improve your chances of a successful appeal because it shows you are proactive and truthful. If you choose not to attach documentation from the start, be sure to at least have this documentation ready. 

When should I submit the financial aid appeal letter ?

Submit the appeal as soon as possible to give the college ample time to review your request and provide you with a decision. Make sure you consider when your deposit/decision deadline is–and send in your appeal letter at least two weeks before this date. 

If your deadline has already passed (and you’ve made your deposit), it’s still possible to appeal on the basis of changed financial circumstances, but of course, you will have less leverage.

How long will it take for me to receive an appeal decision?

The timing will depend on the college, their review process, and how close you are to the deposit deadline. But generally, it should take one to four weeks. If you’re worried about the timing, you can contact the college’s financial aid office to confirm how long the process should take. However, note that the financial aid office is likely pretty busy, so try to give them two weeks from when you submitted your appeal before you check in. 

What if they still don’t give me enough financial aid money?

If your financial aid appeal doesn’t result in sufficient additional aid, it might be time to consider some other options — like applying for scholarships or attending a more affordable school. Offers won through financial aid appeals can vary greatly, usually between $1,000 and $10,000 in extra funding. If you’re looking for more than that, though, a financial aid appeal likely won’t be enough. You may have to explore some of the below options to cover your college costs. 

Outside scholarships

External scholarships might be able to fill in some of your financial gaps. You can apply for scholarships based on your location , community service , extracurriculars, merit, and other factors. Make sure you keep an eye on scholarship deadlines and follow all instructions to apply. Scholarships are considered to be free money because you just need to qualify, apply, and wait patiently to see if you win. This is not money you need to pay back.

You can also check out other options to pay for college , such as finding a work-study job on campus to fund your education.

Or, if you just want help understanding your college budget, check out our free College Cost Insights & Appeal product .

Student loans

Today, a majority of college students in the U.S. take on student loans. If your financial aid package isn’t enough to cover your college tuition, it may be time to research loan options. For most students, federal student loans are the better bet. Provided by the U.S. Department of Education, federal loans generally carry lower, fixed interest rates and more flexible repayment options than private loans do. When you complete the FAFSA®, you’ll automatically receive information about which federal loans are available to you. 

After you’ve exhausted your federal loan options, explore private student loans. Private loans have higher financial caps, so you can usually borrow as much as you need to pay your college tuition. Before you sign on the dotted line, though, be sure to research different private student loans and lenders. Take the time to compare interest rates, repayment options, and fees. Earnest, a trusted partner of Going Merry, never charges origination fees or prepayment fees and allows qualifying borrowers to skip one payment per year. You can explore their loans  online and find one that suits your needs.

Want more financial aid resources?

Check out these blog posts for more information on funding your education:

  • How to understand your financial aid award letter
  • How to apply for scholarships
  • How student loans work
  • The ultimate financial aid guide

If you’re ready to apply for scholarships and increase your funds for college, get started with Going Merry. Sign up for your free profile . We’ll match you with scholarships based on your profile, and you can easily apply with the click of a button.

Disclaimer: This blog post provides personal finance educational information, and it is not intended to provide legal, financial, or tax advice.

1 Submitting your appeal letter does not guarantee an adjustment of your financial aid award. Please consult with the relevant university’s financial aid office for additional questions.

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How to Appeal a Financial Aid Award

Suzanne shaffer.

college essay guy financial aid appeal

This was my story: A teenage daughter with her heart set on attending an expensive private college. A mother who knew the financial aid award would need to be substantial for it to work. Waiting for an offer of admission only to find out that, though she was accepted, the aid package was insufficient and the college was simply not affordable.

We were headed for a tough conversation.

This same scene may be playing out in your home today. As a parent, you know the financial realities of paying for college. Your student, on the other hand, is thinking with their heart.

If you aren’t happy about your financial aid award package, what can you do? Fortunately, you do have options. Your student may choose to accept an offer from another college with suitable financial aid — as we did. Or you can ask the college for more financial aid.

If you choose the second option, here’s what you need to know and do before you proceed.

Compare Award Offers

You can compare your student’s financial aid offer with other student offers at the same school. To help families do this, Road2College has crowdsourced financial aid and merit scholarship offers using their Compare College Offers tool .

Families submit all their student offers and compare the net cost of each school. Then, you can see offers from other students at the same school and compare your student with other students who share similar characteristics like GPA, test scores, and family EFC range. This can help you determine if the offer your student received is comparable to the offers to other students.

Another option is to look at the percentage of admitted students receiving financial aid at a particular college and the amount of the average award using a college data source like College Data or College Navigator .

What is a Financial Aid Appeal?

Just like any other large consumer purchase, college tuition prices are negotiable. The sticker price you see is very rarely the price you pay . Data collected by the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) revealed that colleges discounted tuition for the 2018–19 school year by over 50 percent.   This year, because of the pandemic, you can anticipate that many (but not all) colleges will be even more flexible in order to lure students due to low application numbers based on the fact that families are struggling financially.

When you appeal your financial aid award, you are simply asking for more money. Don’t be afraid to do this; the college will not be offended or react by rescinding their offer of admission. They may say no, but it does not hurt to ask. You have nothing to lose and everything to gain by appealing your award.

What Should You Appeal?

There are two types of financial aid awards you can appeal: need-based aid and merit-based aid. You must, however, have a good reason to appeal.

You might appeal need-based aid if your financial situation has changed since completing the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) or if there is something you need to clarify beyond what the school saw on the FAFSA.

To appeal merit-based aid, your student should have a reason to increase the aid such as other higher award offers from other schools or an improved academic performance.

Merit-Based Aid

There are some reasons to appeal merit-based aid. If the college is keen to attract your student, they may sweeten the deal by providing more aid if you ask. Depending on how their freshmen deposits are looking (fewer students than expected accepting admission offers), the college may be inclined to increase merit aid to attract more students. Make this appeal through the admissions office.

If your student decides to appeal merit aid, you should provide the college with information to support the request:

  • Other colleges have offered you more money and are more affordable. Use these offers for leverage by asking your first-choice college to at least match the award, thus assuring you will accept their offer of admission.
  • Your student's test scores have significantly improved since they applied, making them eligible for more merit aid.
  • Your student's GPA has improved since applying and might give the college a reason to increase their aid.

“At many schools, it’s a buyer’s market,” explains Lynn O’Shaughnessy , author of The College Solution , a book aimed at helping students find the right school at the right price. “You’re going to be more likely to succeed [in getting more financial aid] if you’re looking at a private school than at a public school. They’re more eager to fill their spots.”

Need-Based Aid

Based on the information you provided on the FAFSA, the college has evaluated your ability to pay. Appeal your student's need-based award if there has been a change in your family circumstances or your family’s finances. The financial aid office will evaluate your situation and make a determination based on the information you provide.

Some reasons to appeal may include these changes in a family’s ability to pay for college:

  • Loss of income due to job loss or another factor
  • A one-time infusion of income such as a salary bonus or inheritance inflated your income in a prior year
  • Long-term care of a family member
  • Natural disaster
  • Illness or disability
  • Increase in childcare expenses due to parent returning to work
  • Family education costs such as private elementary or secondary school tuition or a parent returning to college
  • Death or incarceration of a parent causing a loss of income

Examine your student’s academic situation as it relates to merit aid and your family’s financial situation as it relates to need-based aid. Determine whether an appeal might increase your financial aid award amount.

How Should You Appeal?

Write a financial aid appeal letter either to the admissions office or the financial aid office. Since every family’s circumstances are different, every letter will be different and should be personally crafted. You can, however, follow these simple guidelines:

  • Gather all documentation necessary to make your case.
  • Use proper grammar and mechanics.
  • Do not make demands and remain humble.
  • State your reason for appeal clearly.
  • Be specific including dates, figures and amounts.
  • Provide documentation along with the letter to substantiate your appeal.
  • Open and close with gratitude.

Some colleges use a Special Circumstances Form for financial aid appeals. The form asks questions to add to the financial picture derived from the FAFSA. You simply list your reason in a few sentences or even just fill in bubbles and submit it to the financial aid office. Based on the information provided on this form, the college may adjust your student's award.

The College Essay Guy provides examples of financial aid appeal letters in "How to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter" >

When Should You Appeal?

Once you compare your student's financial aid awards and determine you are eligible to appeal, craft your letter to the college or colleges. Just remember that May 1 is the decision deadline and once you accept admission, positive appeal decision will be less likely.

How Can You Win an Appeal?

If you presented a clear reason for requesting more need-based aid, the odds are in your favor that the college will find some money to supplement your award. If you are requesting more merit aid, don’t expect an avalanche of money. A few thousand dollars, however, can make the difference between having to take out substantial student loans or being able to attend with minimal debt.

The more selective a college is, the less likely they will be to offer more merit aid. If your student is at the top of the applicant pool and a stellar student, the college may be more likely to offer additional aid.

Will the Pandemic Impact Financial Aid Appeals?

Due to the pandemic, many colleges and universities are facing enrollment uncertainty and a risk to their revenue streams. They will be more likely to grant appeals to attract more students. For parents, financial circumstances may have changed due to job loss or national shutdowns and warrant additional aid based on financial need.

The U.S. Department of Education issued  guidance to college financial aid administrators, allowing them to use professional judgement “when students and/or their families have been affected by COVID-19.” The coronavirus will not change financial aid appeal procedures, however.

Mark Kantrowitz, Publisher and VP of Research for Savingforcollege.com, in an article for Forbes outlined some examples of special circumstances related to COVID-19 that might justify an adjustment:

  • The student or parent’s employer closes for a period of time, laying off or furloughing staff
  • Death or illness of a parent or other wage-earner
  • Lost wages due to illness, a quarantine period or shelter-in-place order
  • Inability to work because of illness (e.g., impaired lung function prevents a parent from engaging in substantial gainful activity)

Current college students are also eligible to appeal their financial aid. Due to the financial impact of the pandemic, they may need additional financial aid to attend college.

If you need more money in your financial aid package and you meet the criteria, initiate an appeal and ask. But ask properly and politely.

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How to Write a Letter of Appeal for Financial Aid

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Was your expected family contribution (EFC) too high and now you’re left with a too-little financial aid package? Did your child retake the ACT/SAT to get a significantly higher score? You can amend your financial aid package based on your student’s application or a change in your family’s situation. How? Through the appeal process. 

A financial aid appeal is a request for additional aid , a more lucrative offer, or a higher grant amount often spurred by a change in family circumstances. 

Colleges and universities are inundated with appeals from students whose families have fallen on hard economic times due to the coronavirus pandemic or any other hardship that does not necessarily get reflected on the financial aid applications like the FAFSA and CSS Profile . Many families’ ability to pay for college has changed, and their aid package should change with it.  

If you feel that something needs to be altered, start the financial aid appeal process. Below is a simple guide on how to write a letter of appeal for financial aid . 

Should you appeal your financial aid offer?

In general, two broad categories could warrant an appeal:

  • Exceptional merit/multiple offers
  • Special or unusual circumstances

You can appeal for more aid if you received better offers from other schools or if your student has exceptionally high test scores . Most appeal letters, however, fall under the second category, especially as families continue to come out of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Special circumstances include job loss, salary reduction/loss of income, death of a parent, unreimbursed medical expenses, divorce/separation of student’s parents, serious illness, natural disaster, and more.

Learn more about two-household ( divorced/separated ) families: What Divorced, Separated, and Two Household Families Need to Know About the FAFSA and CSS Profile

When is a letter of appeal due?

You can submit an appeal at any time. There is no particular due date, but it’s often best to start the process as soon as you experience a change in circumstances. If, for example, you were furloughed earlier this year, start the process as soon as you receive the formal letter or notice. 

It doesn’t matter if it’s the middle of a semester or if school is out of session—the earlier you file, the better.

How do you submit an appeal?

Each university has its own appeals process, making it critical to follow the specific system. You will almost always be writing a letter of appeal, but some schools require additional information or forms. Contact the school’s financial aid office to discover whom to contact about the appeal, how to get in touch with them, and the requirements you must meet.

Best practices for writing a letter of appeal for financial aid

Once you understand how the appeal process works at a specific school, you will need to make your case in an appeal letter. It’s important to get this letter right, so here are some best practices to keep in mind as they start writing.

  • Have your student submit the appeal. It is important for you to remember that it is the student appealing for additional financial aid, not the parents. Of course, parents need to provide much of the supporting documentation in many cases, but the best results come when the student is presenting their case.
  • Keep it short and sweet. A one-page letter is ideal.
  • Be honest and authentic. It’s critical to express your circumstances using direct and persuasive language. You shouldn’t smudge or veil your situation, instead clearly express how your ability to pay for school has changed. Avoid vague language or overarching statements. 
  • Provide adequate supporting documentation. When it comes to your appeal letter: document, document, document. Your specific circumstances need to be properly documented whether it’s a termination notice, tax documents, test scores , or other merit-based requests. Be sure to attach this documentation to the letter.
  • Ensure the writing is clear, concise, and grammatically correct. Now isn’t the time to push the envelope on writing style. Stick to traditional grammar rules and proofread the document so it’s free of errors. The last thing you want to do is misspell the school’s name when you’re appealing for more money. 

Why should you appeal for more financial aid?

The price of college isn’t set in stone and neither is the financial aid that your family received in the mail. You will likely be overwhelmed by the process, so break it into small, manageable, and actionable steps.

Financial aid is a crucial component of college affordability . By being proactive about your student’s aid package, you can help save your child thousands of dollars, and may even allow them to take on one less student loan . 

Worried appealing might impact your child’s admission to a particular college? Learn more in Does Appealing for More Financial Aid Affect Admissions .

Need help writing a letter of appeal?

We know that this can be confusing. Having someone who knows what colleges are looking for to review your letter of appeal would be so helpful. Well, we can do that. 

With a MyCAP account you get access to several of our expert’s compiled knowledge, all at your fingertips. And with our Valedictorian package, you get all that PLUS a 1 on 1 session with a CAP pro. This can be to discuss how to write a letter of appeal for financial aid , review net price of various college options on your child’s “to apply” list, or even help you try to ask for more free scholarship money from a particular university. 

Get the answers to all this and more. Sign up for a MyCAP Valedictorian account today to learn and get access to our team of experts and our college search tools to make this process easier! Get 1 on 1 expert help for less than $300 here .

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How to Write a Good Financial Aid Appeal Letter (13 PDF Sample Examples)

Published: 26 Apr 2021 Scholarship Application 53,273 views

How to Write a Good Financial Aid Appeal Letter (13 PDF Sample  Examples)

Do you wish to write an appeal letter for financial assistance to your school? Do you want to secure more funding to cover your educational costs? How can you overcome this challenge? It's quite difficult to meet up with the cost of higher education, especially since the outbreak of Covid-19 pandemic.

But worry no more! This article will give you insights on how to write a scholarship appeal letter. There are also great supporting examples that will prepare you to write an effective financial aid appeal letter.

Here is what you will learn...

  • What is a financial aid appeal letter?
  • 10 Good Reasons for submitting a financial aid appeal letter
  • A Step by Step Guide on how to write a good financial aid appeal letter?
  • Parts of a financial aid appeal letter
  • How to structure and format a financial aid appeal letter
  • Tips: What to DO when writing a financial aid appeal letter
  • Tips: What NOT to do when writing a financial aid appeal letter
  • Financial Aid Letter example
  • Sample Example of a financial aid appeal letter PDF
  • Other Sample examples of financial aid appeal letter PDF
  • What to do if your financial aid appeal is denied (Conclusion)

What is a Financial Aid Appeal Letter?

A financial aid appeal letter is a written polite request where you appeal to the school authorities to increase the financial support. Please note that this kind of letter is composed after receiving a monetary award. You may be taken aback when you receive the letter and realize that the aid will not suffice for your educational expenses. In your letter of appeal for financial support, you appeal to the institution to kindly reconsider their initial financial offer. Not all institutions grant the opportunity to appeal for more funding, but with ScholarshipTab, you can definitely compose a convincing financial aid appeal letter. Follow the next step by step guide religiously. But before then, let's see why you would want to write a financial aid appeal letter.

Read: How To Apply For Scholarships - And Get Taken

10 Good Reasons why you should Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter

Here are some valid yet solid reasons that could make your financial appeal letter convincing enough to incite a positive response.

  • Better School offers : You may have received better scholarship offers from there schools or have been accepted to more affordable schools.
  • Unemployment : Your financial sponsor (parent, older sibling or relative) may have been laid off from work or have his business shut down.
  • Your parents are still paying his educational loan : Your parent might be currently enrolled in an institution or still paying back his student loans.
  • Family Change : Your guardian or parent could be getting a divorce, fighting for alimony or you may be experiencing the loss of a family member.
  • Natural Disaster : You may have been a victim of a serious earthquake other natural distaster and still have to cover up the cost of home repairs.
  • Loss of a Job : You may have been laid off from your part - time gigs, thus have no income to support yourself in school.
  • Offering Family Financial Support : You may be extending financial support to aging parents or family members who livw overseas.
  • Medical Emergency : Your family may have experienced an unexpected medical emergency and have bills to pay.
  • Tuition Fees of Siblings : Your parents may be consumed with paying the high tuition fees oda private school for your siblings.
  • Temporaries Inflated Income : Your guardian may have enjoyed a huge tax benefit or a large compensation but would not be repeated in your next academic year.

Is any of the above circumstances above your case? If yes, then let's get down to business. How do you write a financial aid appeal letter?

Step by Step Guide to Writing a Good Financial Aid Appeal Letter

You may be at the state of delirium. But don't get too upset. You can convince the school authorities to help you out. You really can! Don't give up on your dream school. With an example financial aid appeal letter due to low GPA, you can always write a college financial aid appeal letter and secure the monetary support you deserve. Simply follow the 5 steps below.

STEP 1: Be sure that you want to appeal for more funding

Your reasons for appealing must be solid and most importantly - valid. In writing a financial aid appeal letter, there are three cases in which you may be able to compose a financial aid. For instance, you might have a serious family case of unemployment, financial loss or medical emergency. Or you might want to appeal to increase their financial aid and meet up with the offers you received from other schools. Perhaps you might have a committed an error while filling out your FAFSA application.

STEP 2: The Earlier You Submit Your Financial Aid Appeal Letter, the Better

Write the student financial aid appeal letter sample as soon as possible as possible. If you can, you could have a financial aid appeal letter ready, just in case the initial offer turns out to be insufficient. Do you know why? Because they will definitely be a number of students that have the same concern with you. By the time, you wait for too long, the school might have exhausted their pool of financial resources. So the earlier you complete your scholarship appeal letter example, the better.

STEP 3: Make a research on what to include in your financial aid appeal letter

Before writing an appeal for financial aid, reach out the school and learn if there is a particular procedure for composing a financial aid appeal letter. Also, find out who is the letter supposed to address.

STEP 4: Compose your Financial Aid Appeal Letter

Now, this is the stage where you construct your example of letter for financial assistance. Here is what it should include

  • The address to the designated person in the financial and office.
  • Go straight to the point. State that you are appealing for a financial aid and give concrete reasons why you need the aid. Also, share your specific circumstances.
  • Attach any document that could solidify the reasons you mentioned earlier.

STEP 5: Patiently wait for a response

Usually, you can expect a response within few weeks to a month. But that depends on the school. Keep in mind that they may be dealing hundreds of submissions. If you don't hear from them, follow up. If you do hear from them and the response is positive, hurray! If you hear from them and the response in negative, don't panic. You can opt out for scholarships or colleges with affordable tuition fees.

Find out: Top 40 Scholarship Interview Questions And Answers Example (PDF for Download)

Parts of a Financial Aid Appeal Letter

As earlier mentioned, you might view it demoralizing to find it out that the initial financial aid is below your expectations. Nevertheless, you can compose your example of letter for financial assistance in a way that the content will flow and your audience will sympathize and get into action. Here is how you write your letter!

Address and Salutation:

That should include a date and the name of the designated person, the address of the financial aid office and a salutation.

Introductory Paragraph:

In writing a letter for financial assistance, you are expected to heartwarmingly appreciate the committee’s gesture in supporting you financially. Explain that you don't take the offer for granted. Then, state that you want to appeal for additional financial aid. Lastly, introduce the reasons why you are requesting for that.

Body Paragraphs:

From the next two paragraphs of the following financial aid appeal sample, you learn that you can expatiate your circumstances and prove how the challenges you face would affect you financially in school. Also, explain why you deserve the extra financial support.

Concluding Paragraph:

Once again, indicate your appreciation for granting your FAFSA application. Reiterate how important this additional support is to you and state that you attach all the necessary documents that prove your story. Then, end your letter asking for financial aid with your email address and cell phone number.

Financial Aid Appeal Letter Formatting

The structure and layout of financial aid appeal letter essays is as important as its content. This means that you have to pay undiluted attention to ways of making the financial aid appeal letter eye - catching and edible. Only a good financial aid appeal format can give you that. So here are the following tips:

  • Maximum number of pages will be 1 and ½.
  • Set one inch margin on all sides
  • The content should be left align
  • Line spacing is 1 or 1. 5 inch
  • Double spacing between the paragraphs
  • Send your financial aid appeal letter in a PDF file
  • Fonts like Calibri, Arial and Times New Roman are welcome.
  • Don't be tempted to use justification. Left side alignment is easy on the eye.

Click: How To Write A Good Scholarship CV/Resume - Sample Scholarship CV/Resume Template

TIPS: What to DO when writing a financial aid appeal letter

  • Be polite and honest . Simply explain your family circumstances in a polite and clear manner.
  • Attach the necessary documents to the financial aid letter of support that prove the validity of your challenges and makes your story convincing.
  • Indicate appreciation and show how thankful you are for having your initial application for financial support granted.
  • Keep your letter concise and involve more facts yet less emotions.
  • Submit your letter as soon as possible to give your college ample time to review your request.
  • Stick to the college's procedure on how to appeal the initial financial award package.

TIPS: What NOT TO do when writing a financial aid appeal letter

  • Don't fail to include details about how hardworking you are and your success record.
  • Don't sound rude or demanding . You are the one that needs the cash.
  • Don't just address the financial aid office. Address the designated person at the financial aid office .
  • Don't submit your letter without proofreading for possible grammatical errors.
  • Don't be ashamed. Be confident yet not overly assertive.
  • Don't complain too much or demand more sympathy.

Check out : How To Write A Good Recommendation Letter For Scholarship Application (8 Sample Examples PDF)

Sample Example of a Financial Aid Appeal Letter

To thoroughly demonstrate how to write a thought - provoking financial aid appeal letter, here is an attractive financial aid appeal letter template. Here, Mauricio Gael is a prospective student of the Fairwell Business School and has just received a financial aid offer. But his family has been a victim of a natural disaster in southern Italy. In the next college financial aid appeal letter sample, this makes the initial offer insufficient so Mauricio Gael appeals for more funding.

22 - 04 - 2021

Devon Macbeth,

Financial Aid Office,

University of Fairwell,

Fairwell Business School,

Dublin Ireland.

Dear Mr. Macbeth,

My name is Mauricio Gael. I recently gained admission to study International Finance at the Fairwell Business School. I was also granted a decent financial aid. I am deeply grateful for this opportunity to realise my goals. I happen to be emotionally attached to the college because it is the only school that would secure a stable future in the finance world. This is a kind gesture that I will hardly forget. However, I humbly appeal for more funding as my family and I have been victims of a harrowing earthquake.

As you must have heard from the news, Southern Italy has been plagued by a devastating earthquake that has devoured lives and properties. Thankfully, no life was lost in my family. However, the cost of this unforeseen tragedy has drastically reduced our savings for education. Our house has been repeatedly destroyed and the treatment of my elder brother who has sustained injuries is expensive.

I understand funding can be challenging to provide but I assure that your investment in me will yield fruits. My past academic success and leadership experience can testify to how responsible, dependable, studious and hardworking I am. I have been awarded number times for my academic excellence and industriousness. I don't intend to stop working hard for my education.

An increase in the financial aid would help in lifting my academic expenses off the shoulders of my family sponsors. And I would devote my full attention to my studies. Attached here are the bills of the home repairs, the re - installation of electrical appliances, the current receipts of medical bills and the pictures of our wrecked home. Thank you for sympathizing, indicating understanding and considering my application.

Mauricio Gael,

[email protected]

+3456892391572

Sample Example of Financial Aid Appeal Letter PDF

In the above financial appeal letter sample, Mauricio faced a family emergency that was unplanned. He appreciated the school for granting the financial aid but politely explained why the support was insufficient at that time. What's your situation? Download the financial aid sample letter PDF and be fully guided on composing your own content.

Other Sample Examples of a Financial Aid Appeal Letter

You know there are different circumstances that demand a tailored financial aid appeal example. It could be extenuating circumstances, suspension, FAFSA. You might also be needing a financial aid reconsideration letter or perhaps financial aid petition letter example. You name it! So here are some sample examples that would fit such circumstances.

Sample Letter for Extenuating Circumstances for Financial Aid

Do you face circumstances that seem tolerable but still need a financial helping hand? Or could just a financial aid appeal letter for bad grades be enough?

Download this sample letter for extenuating circumstances for financial aid.

Fafsa Appeal Letter

Has there been an error in your FAFSA application and want to rectify it?

Download this fafsa appeal reasons examples of special circumstances letter.

Asking for More Financial Aid Sample Letter

Have you gotten your initial financial offer but doesn't seem to be enough? Would you like to ask for more?

Download the asking for financial assistance letter.

Read: 100 Study Abroad Frequently Asked Questions

Merit Scholarship Appeal Letter Sample

Do you madly want to get the Merit Scholarship award?

Download this application for financial aid sample letter and win the merit scholarship.

Appeal for Financial Help for Treatment

Has your family been facing medical challenges? Is money at the lowest ebb?

See how you can appeal for financial help for treatment with this sample letter of appeal for financial support .

Financial Aid Suspension Appeal Letter

Have you been suspended? Has your financial aid been affected by this development? Do you think you can write a financial aid reinstatement appeal letter example?

Gain the attention of the school committee by downloading and editing this financial aid suspension appeal letter sample.

Reconsideration Letter for Scholarship

Did your grades in the scholarship process not meet the standards of the school? Do you badly want to get a letter of appeal for reconsideration of scholarship sample?

Download this reconsideration letter for scholarship and get a second chance.

Examples of SAP Appeal Letters

Are you finding difficult to get examples of sap appeal letters on the Internet? Do you badly need an example sap appeal letter for financial aid?

Here is one the top examples of sap appeal letters you can get from Scholarship Tab.

Letter to Financial Aid Office Sample

Would you like to write a financial aid appeal letter and send it to the financial aid office right away? Nothing should stop you form composing an appeal letter for financial assistance.

Download this letter to the financial aid office sample and submit straight to the financial aid office.

Special Circumstances Financial Aid Letter Example

Are you facing difficult circumstances that are quite unique in nature? Have they affected your finances? What if you get a special circumstances letter sample?

Download and edit this special circumstances letter example.

Student Loan Appeal Letter Sample

Do you want to secure a loan for yourself while in school? Do you think a good tuition appeal letter sample would do the trick?

See how you can get a student loan with this student loan appeal letter sample .

Find out: 20 Best Scholarship Websites For International Students

Grant Appeal Letter Sample

Do you want to receive a grant but don't know how to get it? Have you received one that doesn't seem to be enough?

Download this captivating grant appeal letter sample so that you get the money you desire.

What to Do if Your Financial Aid Appeal is Denied?

Don't lose hope. Some schools offer the option to submit a secondary appeal to your school's financial aid office. If your school allows that, then you have to present more documents that prove your story.

Suppose this doesn't turn out to be successful. Still, don't give up. You can get a student loan, or get a part - time job that could cover your expenses. In any case, know this: when there is a will, there will always be a way!

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How to Appeal a College Financial Aid Award

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More on navigating student aid:

Find a loan:   Apply for student loans

Select a loan:  Pick the right student loan

Not enough aid:   Get more financial aid

Free money:   Find college grants and scholarships

When you get a college acceptance, you'll also receive a financial aid award letter — and it might not be what you were expecting.

It might be less generous than another school's offer was. It might have too many loans and not enough free aid like grants and scholarships . Or the information you gave on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, might no longer reflect your family's current financial situation and now you need more money.

That's when you know it's time to file an appeal.

» MORE: How to read a financial aid award letter

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3.99-17.99% College Ave Student Loans products are made available through Firstrust Bank, member FDIC, First Citizens Community Bank, member FDIC, or M.Y. Safra Bank, FSB, member FDIC.. All loans are subject to individual approval and adherence to underwriting guidelines. Program restrictions, other terms, and conditions apply. As certified by your school and less any other financial aid you might receive. Minimum $1,000. Rates shown include autopay discount. The 0.25% auto-pay interest rate reduction applies as long as a valid bank account is designated for required monthly payments. If a payment is returned, you will lose this benefit. Variable rates may increase after consummation. This informational repayment example uses typical loan terms for a freshman borrower who selects the Flat Repayment Option with an 8-year repayment term, has a $10,000 loan that is disbursed in one disbursement and a 7.78% fixed Annual Percentage Rate (“APR”): 54 monthly payments of $25 while in school, followed by 96 monthly payments of $176.21 while in the repayment period, for a total amount of payments of $18,266.38. Loans will never have a full principal and interest monthly payment of less than $50. Your actual rates and repayment terms may vary. This informational repayment example uses typical loan terms for a freshman borrower who selects the Deferred Repayment Option with a 10-year repayment term, has a $10,000 loan that is disbursed in one disbursement and a 8.35% fixed Annual Percentage Rate (“APR”): 120 monthly payments of $179.18 while in the repayment period, for a total amount of payments of $21,501.54. Loans will never have a full principal and interest monthly payment of less than $50. Your actual rates and repayment terms may vary. Information advertised valid as of 7/10/2024. Variable interest rates may increase after consummation. Approved interest rate will depend on the creditworthiness of the applicant(s), lowest advertised rates only available to the most creditworthy applicants and require selection of full principal and interest payments with the shortest available loan term.

Variable APR

5.59-17.99% College Ave Student Loans products are made available through Firstrust Bank, member FDIC, First Citizens Community Bank, member FDIC, or M.Y. Safra Bank, FSB, member FDIC.. All loans are subject to individual approval and adherence to underwriting guidelines. Program restrictions, other terms, and conditions apply. As certified by your school and less any other financial aid you might receive. Minimum $1,000. Rates shown include autopay discount. The 0.25% auto-pay interest rate reduction applies as long as a valid bank account is designated for required monthly payments. If a payment is returned, you will lose this benefit. Variable rates may increase after consummation. This informational repayment example uses typical loan terms for a freshman borrower who selects the Flat Repayment Option with an 8-year repayment term, has a $10,000 loan that is disbursed in one disbursement and a 7.78% fixed Annual Percentage Rate (“APR”): 54 monthly payments of $25 while in school, followed by 96 monthly payments of $176.21 while in the repayment period, for a total amount of payments of $18,266.38. Loans will never have a full principal and interest monthly payment of less than $50. Your actual rates and repayment terms may vary. This informational repayment example uses typical loan terms for a freshman borrower who selects the Deferred Repayment Option with a 10-year repayment term, has a $10,000 loan that is disbursed in one disbursement and a 8.35% fixed Annual Percentage Rate (“APR”): 120 monthly payments of $179.18 while in the repayment period, for a total amount of payments of $21,501.54. Loans will never have a full principal and interest monthly payment of less than $50. Your actual rates and repayment terms may vary. Information advertised valid as of 7/10/2024. Variable interest rates may increase after consummation. Approved interest rate will depend on the creditworthiness of the applicant(s), lowest advertised rates only available to the most creditworthy applicants and require selection of full principal and interest payments with the shortest available loan term.

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Sallie Mae Undergraduate Student Loan

4.15-15.49% Lowest rates shown include the auto debit. Advertised APRs for undergraduate students assume a $10,000 loan to a student who attends school for 4 years and has no prior Sallie Mae-serviced loans. Interest rates for variable rate loans may increase or decrease over the life of the loan based on changes to the 30-day Average Secured Overnight Financing Rate (SOFR) rounded up to the nearest one-eighth of one percent. Advertised variable rates are the starting range of rates and may vary outside of that range over the life of the loan. Interest is charged starting when funds are sent to the school. With the Fixed and Deferred Repayment Options, the interest rate is higher than with the Interest Repayment Option and Unpaid Interest is added to the loan’s Current Principal at the end of the grace/separation period. To receive a 0.25 percentage point interest rate discount, the borrower or cosigner must enroll in auto debit through Sallie Mae. The discount applies only during active repayment for as long as the Current Amount Due or Designated Amount is successfully withdrawn from the authorized bank account each month. It may be suspended during forbearance or deferment. Advertised APRs are valid as of 7/12/2024. Loan amounts: For applications submitted directly to Sallie Mae, loan amount cannot exceed the cost of attendance less financial aid received, as certified by the school. Applications submitted to Sallie Mae through a partner website will be subject to a lower maximum loan request amount. Miscellaneous personal expenses (such as a laptop) may be included in the cost of attendance for students enrolled at least half-time. Examples of typical costs for a $10,000 Smart Option Student Loan with the most common fixed rate, fixed repayment option, 6-month separation period, and two disbursements: For a borrower with no prior loans and a 4-year in-school period, it works out to a 10.28% fixed APR, 51 payments of $25.00, 119 payments of $182.67 and one payment of $121.71, for a Total Loan Cost of $23,134.44. For a borrower with $20,000 in prior loans and a 2-year in-school period, it works out to a 10.78% fixed APR, 27 payments of $25.00, 179 payments of $132.53 and one payment of $40.35 for a total loan cost of $24,438.22. Loans that are subject to a $50 minimum principal and interest payment amount may receive a loan term that is less than 10 years. A variable APR may increase over the life of the loan. A fixed APR will not.

5.37-15.70% Lowest rates shown include the auto debit. Advertised APRs for undergraduate students assume a $10,000 loan to a student who attends school for 4 years and has no prior Sallie Mae-serviced loans. Interest rates for variable rate loans may increase or decrease over the life of the loan based on changes to the 30-day Average Secured Overnight Financing Rate (SOFR) rounded up to the nearest one-eighth of one percent. Advertised variable rates are the starting range of rates and may vary outside of that range over the life of the loan. Interest is charged starting when funds are sent to the school. With the Fixed and Deferred Repayment Options, the interest rate is higher than with the Interest Repayment Option and Unpaid Interest is added to the loan’s Current Principal at the end of the grace/separation period. To receive a 0.25 percentage point interest rate discount, the borrower or cosigner must enroll in auto debit through Sallie Mae. The discount applies only during active repayment for as long as the Current Amount Due or Designated Amount is successfully withdrawn from the authorized bank account each month. It may be suspended during forbearance or deferment. Advertised APRs are valid as of 7/12/2024. Loan amounts: For applications submitted directly to Sallie Mae, loan amount cannot exceed the cost of attendance less financial aid received, as certified by the school. Applications submitted to Sallie Mae through a partner website will be subject to a lower maximum loan request amount. Miscellaneous personal expenses (such as a laptop) may be included in the cost of attendance for students enrolled at least half-time. Examples of typical costs for a $10,000 Smart Option Student Loan with the most common fixed rate, fixed repayment option, 6-month separation period, and two disbursements: For a borrower with no prior loans and a 4-year in-school period, it works out to a 10.28% fixed APR, 51 payments of $25.00, 119 payments of $182.67 and one payment of $121.71, for a Total Loan Cost of $23,134.44. For a borrower with $20,000 in prior loans and a 2-year in-school period, it works out to a 10.78% fixed APR, 27 payments of $25.00, 179 payments of $132.53 and one payment of $40.35 for a total loan cost of $24,438.22. Loans that are subject to a $50 minimum principal and interest payment amount may receive a loan term that is less than 10 years. A variable APR may increase over the life of the loan. A fixed APR will not.

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When to appeal college financial aid

The financial aid appeal process varies from school to school. There’s no guarantee that your appeal will be approved, but there are steps you can take to improve your chances.

There are two situations when you should appeal your financial aid award:

Your financial circumstances have changed

If your family has experienced a life event that impacts its finances and isn’t reflected on your FAFSA, you’re probably a good candidate for an appeal. These changes can include a birth or death, unemployment, disability, divorce, lowered income, moving, selling a house or having another child enter college.

Most colleges will help you find additional need-based aid — but you have to back up your claims. Supplying supporting documents, such as medical bills, helps. You should also update the FAFSA to get more aid and let your school know you've done this step.

Your top school offered less aid than another

Some schools will work with you to match or beat another school’s offer if it means locking in your acceptance — especially if you're an exceptional candidate.

“At many schools, it’s a buyer’s market,” explains Lynn O’Shaughnessy, author of “The College Solution,” a book aimed at helping students find the right school at the right price. “You're going to be more likely to succeed [in getting more financial aid] if you're looking at a private school than at a public school. They're more eager to fill their spots.”

Stephanie Goldberg-Mauro, founder of consulting company College Planning 101, suggests researching the SAT and ACT score ranges of the college's previous freshman class using the National Center for Education Statistics' College Navigator tool. If your scores are in the 75th percentile or higher, you may be able to leverage them to secure more merit-based aid.

You can also use the College Board’s search tool to learn about the average financial aid package awarded by each school you're considering. This will help you decide if appealing is the right move.

How to appeal your financial aid award

Email — don't call — the school’s financial aid office to find out its appeals guidelines.

“Have you tried calling a college lately?” Goldberg-Mauro asks. “You can’t get through. You can call and call and call; they are so slammed with requests — but they’re going to check their email.”

The response you receive should tell you whom to contact, how to get in touch with him or her and any special requirements you must meet.

Once you have this information, figure out exactly how much you want, why you want it and how to put it in writing. The more specific you are, the more likely it is that the school will approve your appeal.

» MORE: How to write a financial aid appeal letter

Another useful tip: Speak their language.

“I wouldn’t use the word ‘negotiate'; they don’t like that. And don’t just appeal to a school emotionally. They’re not going to relate to that,” O’Shaughnessy says.

If you document your situation, ask for a specific sum, show that you’re willing to work for the extra aid and sprinkle in a bit of flattery, you'll have a good shot at approval. But it’s important to go in with realistic expectations, Goldberg-Mauro says. She advises students to expect nothing, but hope for the best.

“We might get another $500, or we’ve had one offer go from $8,000 into a $30,000 award. So there’s a huge range,” she says.

What to do if your financial aid appeal is rejected

If your appeal isn't successful, you might still be able to close the gap. For example, you can ask to have the cost of attendance adjusted for your circumstances, covering your commuting costs, for example, or the costs of required items, such as a laptop or textbooks. This might qualify you for more aid. If that doesn’t work, it might be time to consider a less expensive alternative.

“Don’t go to a school that costs too much money,” O’Shaughnessy says. “Do not go into huge debt because you think this degree is going to be magical.”

An affordable school is one that won't put your in debt you can't handle. A manageable debt is one with a monthly payment of less than 10% of your projected after-tax monthly income in your first year of school. Use a debt affordability calculator to get an idea of how much debt would be worthwhile.

On a similar note...

college essay guy financial aid appeal

IMAGES

  1. How to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter

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  2. How to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter

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  3. 8+ Financial Aid Appeal Letters

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  4. 103: How to Appeal a Financial Aid Award Letter

    college essay guy financial aid appeal

  5. How To Write A Financial Aid Appeal Letter Sample Pdf

    college essay guy financial aid appeal

  6. How To Write A Financial Aid Appeal Letter with Samples

    college essay guy financial aid appeal

VIDEO

  1. It's Time How to Negotiate Your Financial Aid Award

  2. How to Decide on a Topic (Montage)

  3. 5 Ways to End Your College Essay (And Stand Out to Admissions Officers)

  4. Top 4 Things to Know for a Successful Financial Aid Appeal

  5. Essay for Financial Aid Application on Coursera

  6. College Destinations: How To Appeal Your Financial Aid Decision

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter

    In Episode 103 of the College Essay Guy podcast I spoke with Jodi Okun, financial aid guru and author of the Amazon bestseller Secrets of a Financial Aid Pro. We talked about everything from whether or not to include house and retirement when reporting assets on the FAFSA to how decisions are sometimes made in a financial aid office.

  2. 103: How to Appeal a Financial Aid Award Letter

    What to literally say to a financial aid officer when you call them to appeal. Why you maybe shouldn't start off the conversation by mentioning a financial aid offer from another school. Jodi's five points to cover in an appeal letter. What tone to take and how long the letter should be. The one thing students and parents should do but don't.

  3. How to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter (With Free Templates)

    Contact the School to Find Out the Financial Aid Appeal Process. Experts recommend writing an email to the financial aid office in order to find out what the appeal process is. Trying to call, especially during a busy time, can result in endless voicemails. Instead, have your student write to financial aid and ask about the appeals process.

  4. How to Understand Your Financial Aid Award Letter

    Step #2: Fill out Amanda Miller's Award Letter Analyzer. Almost every award letter looks different, which can make it difficult to compare across schools or even understand what the letter is actually saying. This is why a tool like the Analyzer is super helpful.

  5. The College Essay Guy Podcast: A Practical Guide to College Admissions

    What to literally say to a financial aid officer when you call them to appeal Why you maybe shouldn't start off the conversation by mentioning a financial aid offer from another school Jodi's five points to cover in an appeal letter What tone to take and how long the letter should be The one thing students and parents should do but don't ...

  6. How to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter (With Example)

    Below you will find a financial aid appeal letter sample that you can use as an outline when writing your own appeal letter. Dear [Ms. Gomez], My name is [Will Geiger] and I am a senior at [Manasquan High School] in [Manasquan, NJ]. I was so excited to be accepted to [Wake Forest University] as a member of the class of [2024].

  7. How to Write the Perfect Financial Aid Suspension Appeal Letter (and a

    My name is Joan Doe, and I am writing this letter as part of my appeal to reinstate my financial aid. Because I struggled to complete classes during this past semester, it was determined that I did not make satisfactory academic progress per the institution's guidelines. Consequently, my financial aid was revoked.

  8. How to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter

    2. Gather Information. Whatever the issue with your financial aid award, you'll need to back up the statements in your appeal letter with documented facts. Take a moment to collect the documents you'll need so that you can refer to them while you're writing. This includes the FAFSA and CSS profile (if applicable).

  9. How to Appeal a Financial Aid Award Letter

    What to literally say to a financial aid officer when you call them to appeal Why you maybe shouldn't start off the conversation by menti… ‎Show The College Essay Guy Podcast: A Practical Guide to College Admissions, Ep How to Appeal a Financial Aid Award Letter - Mar 29, 2017

  10. How to Write a Successful Financial Aid Appeal Letter

    Office of Financial Aid. University of Chicago. 5801 S Ellis Ave. Chicago, Illinois. 60637. Dear Mr. Jenkins, I'm (Your first and last name), about to enroll in undergraduate education. I'm very much interested in attending (Name of University/College) this fall. I'm grateful for your detailed financial aid package.

  11. The Dos and Don'ts of Writing a Letter of Appeal for Financial Aid

    Be courteous and professional. Throughout your appeal letter, maintain a respectful and professional tone. Remember that the financial aid office is working to support students, and your request is one of many they will be considering. Being polite and understanding can go a long way in making a positive impression.

  12. Your Guide to Writing A Financial Aid Appeal Letter

    In your appeal letter for financial aid, explain to the university that you were accepted to the school and are eager to attend. But because of changes to your family's circumstances, the ...

  13. How to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter

    Step 4. Gather documents to support your request. Step 5. Write a financial aid appeal letter that is no more than one page and includes details of why you need more money. Step 6. Submit your ...

  14. Financial Aid Appeal Letter: How to Request More Money For College

    There are five common scenarios for why you might want to appeal your original financial aid offer and request more aid: 1) You got admitted, but it's just not enough. You were thrilled when you received an acceptance letter to your top school but disappointed when you got your financial aid award letter. Now, you can't afford to attend ...

  15. How to Appeal a Financial Aid Award

    The College Essay Guy provides examples of financial aid appeal letters in "How to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter" > When Should You Appeal? Once you compare your student's financial aid awards and determine you are eligible to appeal, craft your letter to the college or colleges. Just remember that May 1 is the decision deadline and once ...

  16. How to Write a Financial Aid Appeal Letter for College

    Write any type of letter with the goal of completing these five components: Introduction: Keep it short with your name. Include any details about your contact with the financial aid office. Then, make a clear statement that circumstances have changed, and you are hoping to find additional financial support. State why.

  17. College Essay Guy

    College Essay Guy believes that every student should have access to the tools and guidance necessary to create the best application possible. That's why we're a one-for-one company, which means that for every student who pays for support, we provide free support to a low-income student. Learn more.

  18. How to Write a Letter of Appeal for Financial Aid

    When it comes to your appeal letter: document, document, document. Your specific circumstances need to be properly documented whether it's a termination notice, tax documents, test scores, or other merit-based requests. Be sure to attach this documentation to the letter. Ensure the writing is clear, concise, and grammatically correct.

  19. How to Write a Good Financial Aid Appeal Letter (13 ...

    Financial Aid Appeal Letter Formatting. The structure and layout of financial aid appeal letter essays is as important as its content. This means that you have to pay undiluted attention to ways of making the financial aid appeal letter eye - catching and edible. Only a good financial aid appeal format can give you that. So here are the ...

  20. When and How to Appeal a Financial Aid Award

    When to appeal college financial aid. The financial aid appeal process varies from school to school. There's no guarantee that your appeal will be approved, but there are steps you can take to ...

  21. 7 Strategies for Appealing a College Financial Aid Package

    Getty Images. Colleges' financial aid and admissions offices are typically swamped with decisions and appeals around May 1. So if for any reason you want additional funding, don't wait until right ...

  22. Discussing Finances + Financial Aid

    Discussing Finances + Financial Aid. Parents and guardians: When you're 17, it can be hard to understand that going $100k into debt for a degree from an art school… may not be a sound long-term financial decision. As your student builds a college list, we highly recommend taking family finances into account, and this is a key area where you ...

  23. Step-by-Step Financial Aid Guide for International Students

    The ISFAA is a financial-aid application used to determine the need for institutional financial aid. Colleges use this application to: Understand the family's financial need. Help award aid to students. This is a free, paper-based application available for download on the respective school's website.

  24. A guide to Stanford's summer programs

    The Stanford Summer Session is an opportunity for high school students to experience college life by taking courses for college credit and receiving an official transcript from Stanford. You get to live on campus, attend lectures alongside current Stanford students, and engage in various social and academic activities with other visiting students from all over the world.